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THE CRUISE OF THE "LIVELY BEE"***


E-text prepared by David Edwards, Demian Katz, and the Online Distributed
Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net) from page images generously made
available by Villanova University Digital Library
(http://digital.library.villanova.edu)



Note:
Transcriber's note:

Text enclosed by underscores is in italics (_italics_).





THE CRUISE OF THE "LIVELY BEE"


* * * * * *

BOYS OF LIBERTY LIBRARY.

12mo. Cloth, handsomely bound. Price, each, postpaid, 50 cents.


PAUL REVERE and the Boys of Liberty. By John De Morgan.

THE FIRST SHOT FOR LIBERTY or The Minute Men of Massachusetts. By
John De Morgan.

FOOLING THE ENEMY. A Story of the Siege of Boston. By John De Morgan.

INTO THE JAWS OF DEATH or The Boys of Liberty at the Battle of Long
Island. By John De Morgan.

THE HERO OF TICONDEROGA or Ethan Allen and His Green Mountain Boys.
By John De Morgan.

ON TO QUEBEC or With Montgomery in Canada. By John De Morgan.

FIGHTING HAL or From Fort Necessity to Quebec. By John De Morgan.

MARION AND HIS MEN or The Swamp Fox of Carolina. By John De Morgan.

THE YOUNG AMBASSADOR or Washington's First Triumph. By John De Morgan.

THE YOUNG GUARDSMAN or With Washington in the Ohio Valley. By John De
Morgan.

THE CRUISE OF THE LIVELY BEE or A Boy's Adventure in the War of 1812.
By John De Morgan.

THE TORY PLOT or Saving Washington's Life. By T. C. Harbaugh.

IN BUFF AND BLUE or Serving under Old Put. By T. C. Harbaugh.

WASHINGTON'S YOUNG SPY or Outwitting General Howe. By T. C. Harbaugh.

UNDER GREENE'S BANNER or The Boy Heroes of 1781. By T. C. Harbaugh.

FOR FREEDOM'S CAUSE or On to Saratoga. By T. C. Harbaugh.

CAPTAIN OF THE MINUTE MEN or The Concord Boys of 1775. By Harrie
Irving Hancock.

THE TRADER'S CAPTIVE or The Young Guardsman and The French Spies. By
Lieut. Lounsberry.

THE QUAKER SPY, A Tale of the Revolutionary War. By Lieut. Lounsberry.

FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM or The Birth of the Stars and Stripes. By Lieut.
Lounsberry.

BY ORDER OF THE COLONEL or The Captain of the Young Guardsmen. By
Lieut. Lounsberry.

A CALL TO DUTY or The Young Guardsman. By Lieut. Lounsberry.

IN GLORY'S VAN or The Young Guardsman at Louisbourg. By Lieut.
Lounsberry.

THE YOUNG PATRIOT or The Young Guardsmen at Fort William Henry. By
Lieut. Lounsberry.

"OLD PUT" THE PATRIOT or Fighting for Home and Country. By Frederick
A. Ober.

THE LEAGUE OF FIVE or Washington's Boy Scouts. By Commander Post.

THE KING'S MESSENGER or The Fall of Ticonderoga. By Capt. Frank Ralph.

DASHING PAUL JONES, The Hero of the Colonial Navy. By Frank Sheridan.

FROM MIDSHIPMAN TO COMMODORE or The Glories of Our Infant Navy. By
Frank Sheridan.

THE CRUISE OF THE ESSEX or Making the Stars and Stripes Respected. By
Frank Sheridan.

* * * * * *


THE CRUISE OF THE "LIVELY BEE"

Or

A Boy's Adventure in the War of 1812

by

JOHN DE MORGAN

Author of
"Paul Revere," "The Young Ambassador," "The First
Shot for Liberty," "The Young Guardsman," etc.







[Illustration: BOYS OF LIBERTY LIBRARY]

Philadelphia
David McKay, Publisher
610 South Washington Square

Copyright, 1892
By Norman L. Munro

The Cruise of the "Lively Bee"




THE CRUISE OF THE "LIVELY BEE."




CONTENTS


CHAPTER I. DECLARATION OF WAR.
CHAPTER II. THE DEPARTURE.
CHAPTER III. THE LIEUTENANT'S STORY.
CHAPTER IV. THE CHALLENGE.
CHAPTER V. THE CHASE.
CHAPTER VI. STORM AT SEA.
CHAPTER VII. THE ESSEX.
CHAPTER VIII. SCENTING MUTINY.
CHAPTER IX. A BRUSH WITH THE ENEMY.
CHAPTER X. PREPARING FOR ACTION.
CHAPTER XI. THE FIGHT AT SEA
CHAPTER XII. ON THE VERGE OF SUCCESS.
CHAPTER XIII. THE RETURN OF THE CONQUEROR.
CHAPTER XIV. THE LIVELY BEE'S PLUCK.
CHAPTER XV. THE WASP'S STING.
CHAPTER XVI. THE MERCHANT CAPTAIN'S CARGO.
CHAPTER XVII. A RICH PRIZE.
CHAPTER XVIII. A STRANGE SAIL.
CHAPTER XIX. BOB, THE POWDER-MONKEY.
CHAPTER XX. THE MONARCH'S DOOM.
CHAPTER XXI. HOMEWARD BOUND.
CHAPTER XXII. JACK'S REQUEST.
CHAPTER XXIII. THE STORY OF THE FIGHT.
CHAPTER XXIV. MARRIAGE AT SEA.
CHAPTER XXV. THE BALL AT THE WHITE HOUSE.
CHAPTER XXVI. THE MARRIAGE AT THE WHITE HOUSE.
CHAPTER XXVII. AN UNEXPECTED PLEASURE.
CHAPTER XXVIII. THE CONSTITUTION'S GREAT VICTORY.
CHAPTER XXIX. A LESSON IN MILITARY LAW.
CHAPTER XXX. BOB'S GOOD ANGEL.
CHAPTER XXXI. THE REGINA, OF TORQUAY.
CHAPTER XXXII. HOW BOB KEPT HIS OATH.
CHAPTER XXXIII. THE MUTINY QUELLED.
CHAPTER XXXIV. VERNON'S SUCCESS.
CHAPTER XXXV. THE END OF THE LIVELY BEE.




CHAPTER I.

DECLARATION OF WAR.


There was a large crowd on the Battery in New York City one hot day in
June in the year eighteen-hundred-and-twelve.

Every one was talking and every one was looking out across the waters
of the harbor.

There were pale, anxious faces in that crowd, and side by side with
them were the flushed cheeks of men and boys whose hearts were fired
with patriotic zeal.

Women were looking at their husbands, and young girls' hearts were
throbbing with painful excitement as they saw the enthusiasm of their
sweethearts.

"War, did you say?"

"Ay, ay, the President has aroused at last, and old England shall be
taught another and a final lesson."

It was true.

President James Madison had signed the Declaration of War against Great
Britain.

War!

There were many in that crowd who remembered 1783; there stood the man
who, in his boyhood's days, had climbed the flagpole and torn down the
Union Jack of England, and in its place had hoisted the Star Spangled
Banner.

Many whose hair was now turning gray had shouldered the musket and had
marched with Washington from victory to victory.

The war had ended when the British evacuated the city, but America was
not free and independent.

England held the supremacy of the seas.

English vessels entered American ports, and men were impressed as
seamen on the technical ground that they had never abjured allegiance.

American vessels were boarded on the high seas, and some of the best
men taken away and forced to serve under the English flag.

There is a limit to forbearance, and the young nation, whose infancy
had scarcely been passed, resolved that it would be better to die than
endure such insults.

War was declared.

It looked like madness.

It was so, if judged by the ordinary rules of national conduct.

Great Britain was the mistress of the seas.

On the roll of her navy were over a thousand ships, and eighty-five of
the largest were actually in American ports.

President Madison and his Cabinet did not, however, intend that the war
should be waged on the high seas.

The American ships-of-war were to remain in the harbors as so many
floating batteries for defensive purposes.

In New York Harbor was a small squadron under the command of Commodore
Rodgers.

He heard the rumor that he was not to go out to sea, and dispatched
Captains Bainbridge and Stewart to Washington to confer with the
Secretary of the Navy.

Secretary Paul Hamilton listened attentively to the two captains,
and they thought they had won their case; but with great courtesy he
thanked them, and said that the President had, with the consent of his
Cabinet, decided to order the ships to remain in the harbors.

Captain Stewart stamped his foot, and with almost anger, exclaimed:

"Sir, you are going to ruin the country; I'll have you impeached!"

Paul Hamilton smiled.

Off went Stewart to the White House and argued his case so well that
the President put the unsigned order in his desk, and told the captain
he would consider the matter.

War was declared a few days after that consultation.

Commodore Rodgers was ready to sail, and only awaited official
knowledge of the declaration.

The crowd at the Battery held divergent sentiments.

"It's all very well for Rodgers to take his ships out, but kin he bring
'em back," asked an old sailor whose face was tanned by many a summer
sun and winter wind; "kin he bring 'em back? That's what I want to
know!"

"You're afraid, Sam Buller, that's what's the matter."

"Durn it! I afraid, younker? I hate John Bull like pizen, and but
that's no reason why I should go an' get killed and do no good."

"Take no notice of the old grumbler, men. Our commodore will not only
come back, but will bring lots of British ships as prizes."

The speaker was a boy - a mere child - for he had only just passed his
eleventh birthday; but he was dressed in the full uniform of the United
States navy, and ranked as a midshipman.

"Hark to the baby!"

"Baby! I'd have you know I got my commission two years ago, and if you
doubt it, I ask these gallant men to attest it. I'm proud of my ship.
I'm proud of her captain, and I'm an officer there. Is it not so?"

The boy appealed to the crew of a boat which had just reached the
wooden dock.

"Ay, ay, sir, and as brave an officer as ever carried a sword."

The midshipman stepped into the boat, the men dipped their oars, and
the crowd watched the boat glide over the water until the _Essex_, a
thirty-two gun frigate, was reached.

"What did I tell you?" asked the old salt who was known as Sam Buller,
"what did I tell you? Going to war with chits of boys, not old enough
to be a cook's slavey, as officers."

"Say what you like, that boy may not be as strong, but he is as brave
as any man in the service."

"Perhaps you know him, sir?"

"I do. That boy's name is David Glasgow Farragut, and he has been on
the _Essex_ for four years. He is the adopted son of Captain Porter,
and whoever says one word against that young midshipman will have to
answer to me."

"And who may you be, my hearty?" asked Sam Buller

"I am Captain Stewart of the United States navy; who are you?"

Captain Stewart did not wait for a reply, but entered the boat which
awaited him and was soon rowed across to his ship.

Every one knew Charles Stewart's character for bravery, for in the year
1800, when in command of the schooner _Experiment_, he captured the
French privateers _Deux Amis_ and the _Diana_. In 1804 he commanded
the _Siren_, and went with the American squadron against Tripoli, and
achieved several victories.

"I only wish I could get on board the _Essex_. I'd be pleased to call
Farragut my superior," said a young man, whose build and manner were
those of an educated sailor.

"Why don't you?" asked one of the crowd.

"I have tried, but they told me they were full."

"Do you want to fight?"

The inquirer was one whose appearance invited confidence. He was well
dressed, and had a good honest face.

"Fight? Yes, sir; if it be the British I fight against."

"Why are you anxious to fight the British?"

"My grandfather, sir, was with Washington, and was killed fighting for
his country; my father was wounded, and my elder brother killed. I have
been told of those days, and I have a debt to pay."

"But you do not remember that time."

"No, sir. I am only nineteen years old, and the British evacuated New
York twelve years before I was born."

"Then it is only as you have been educated? You blush! You need not
make me your confidant unless you like - - "

"I will tell you, sir, for I know you can feel for me."

The two young men had separated from the crowd, and had walked along
the water's edge until they came to where the Barge Office now stands.

They were alone, or nearly so, as the crowds were watching the war
vessels.

"I had a dear friend who was taken from his home and impressed."

"Ah! never mind the story now. What say you to shipping with me?"

"I - I would like to be on a man-of-war."

"I see; and you think I cannot ship you on a war vessel. But if it is
fighting you want, I can promise you as much as you desire. If it is
prize money you seek, my boy, don't go on a warship, but ship with me."

"And, sir, what may be your ship's name?"

The elder man led his companion a little farther up the dock and
pointed out a schooner.

"See! there is the ship for you, my boy; look at her! Isn't she a
model?"

She was certainly a beautiful sight as she hoisted her mainsail and
jib and glided off under a breeze so light that the large ships hardly
stirred, with all their sails set.

"She has started."

"Ay, ay; but we can catch her at the Narrows. I like you, and I want
you to ship with me. Will you do so?"

"I - don't know - I - - "

"Come along; you shall have a warm welcome on board the _Lively Bee_."

"Is that schooner the famed privateer?"

"Yes; I have a _lettre de marque_ from the government. We shall fight,
but if we are taken prisoners we shall be hanged. On the one hand I
promise you plenty of fighting and lots of prize money, on the other
there is the risk of being hanged."

"I will go with you."

"I knew you would. I came ashore purposely to meet you."

"To meet me? You do not know me."

"Don't I? Then perhaps I have made a mistake. I thought you were John
Tempest - - "

"That is my name; but how did you know me, and why did you want me?"

"You will ship with me?"

"I will."

"Give me your hand. We shall be comrades in many a fight. I am Captain
Harry Vernon of the _Lively Bee_."




CHAPTER II.

THE DEPARTURE.


Out in the bay the American fleet was preparing to depart.

Commodore Rodgers had just heard of the declaration of war, and he was
afraid that the order to detain him in the harbor would be signed and
delivered to him before he could start.

He called Captains Bainbridge and Stewart and Porter to the flagship
and asked abruptly:

"How long before you can sail?"

"Ready now, sir," was Stewart's answer.

Rodgers was blunt and always spared himself words.

"Do you want to fight on the high seas or skulk like old hulks in the
harbor?" he asked, and added quickly: "You need not answer. I know
you well. Go back, get ready; we will start within an hour, and once
outside the Narrows, no President's order can reach us."

The captains swung themselves over the side and were rowed back to
their vessels.

It was a pretty sight. Those "wooden walls" of Columbia, in all the
bravery of trimly taut rigging, yards crossed in mathematically precise
order, hulls newly painted, ports open to reveal the lines of frowning
guns, presented a sight which was enough to rouse the enthusiasm of
every patriot on land.

The fleet under the command of Commodore Rodgers consisted of
the flagship _President_, carrying forty-four guns; the _Essex_,
thirty-two, and the _Hornet_, eighteen.

These three vessels were anchored off the Battery, but they did not
comprise the entire fleet, for over against what is now Liberty Island
were three more, the _United States_, mounting forty-four guns, a
sister-ship to the _President_; the _Congress_, thirty-eight, and the
_Argus_, sixteen.

Fifty minutes only elapsed after the conference on the flagship before
the entire fleet was under sail.

"Come, my boys," said Captain Vernon, "we have to overtake the _Lively
Bee_ before she reaches the Narrows, and it is a long pull."

Vernon took the helm, young Tempest the bow oar, and a tough old salt
the oar next him.

It was not until they were seated that Tempest saw the face of the
sailor next him, and at once took a fancy to him.

Captain Vernon gave the command in a loud, ringing voice:

"Oars down! Give way!"

The oars fell into the water with splendid precision, and the boat made
a spurt forward.

"You will find, Mr. Tempest, that on board the _Lively Bee_ we have
such discipline that we move like machines."

All the rowers bent to their work, and the captain cheered them with
words of praise.

At times he would pretend to be angry.

"You lazy lubbers, are you asleep? Come, rouse up, or we'll never reach
the _Lively Bee_."

The men did pull with more spirit after every outburst of grumbling or
reprimand.

Governor's Island was passed, the little boat was saluted by the
captain of the _Essex_, and Vernon felt proud.

"Tom Mullen, start us a good rousing chorus - that one you sang when we
chased the French."

Tempest was surprised, for he had not known that the new sailor was
known to the captain, or had sailed with him against the French.

The rough old salt, in a voice which had more of the nature of a fog
horn than a human being, started singing:

"Americans, then fly to arms,
And learn the way to use 'em;
If each man fights to 'fend his rights,
The English can't abuse 'em.
Yankee Doodle - mind the tune -
Yankee Doodle Dandy;
For Britons there's trouble brewin' -
We'll spank 'em, hard and handy."

All joined in the chorus, and Tempest looked surprised, for he had all
the prejudices of the navy against the lax discipline of a privateer or
merchantman.

"I changed my gaff a little, cap'n, for we ain't a-fightin' Johnny
Crapaud any more, but the redcoats," said Mullen, well pleased with
himself for having inserted the word English for French in the doggerel.

"You did right, Tom, and if we all fight as well as you sing we'll come
back with our pockets full of chinks and a lot of British prizes in
tow."

The _Lively Bee_ was still a long way ahead, and Captain Vernon shouted
to the rowers:

"Now my hearties, don't get stiff-backed. Crack the oars! Now, then,
bend away!"

The day was hot. Those on shore were bathed in perspiration.

Had thermometers been so plentiful in the streets then as they are now
they would have told the sweating crowd that ninety degrees in the
shade had been reached.

But if standing still, watching the great war vessels sail lazily out
of the harbor, was hot work, what must those sailors in the captain's
boat have experienced as they rowed through the waters of the bay at
racing speed.

"You lazy lubbers, I guess you think you're in church with your wives,
and can go to sleep. Rouse up, will you, and land me on the _Lively
Bee_."

Tempest thought he had never been so hot before. He was not afraid of
work, he expected it.

He had entered as a man before the mast, and he knew a dog's life was
one to be envied when compared with that of a common seaman.

The most barbarous cruelties were practiced on sailors; they were
not treated to any consideration, and therefore John Tempest was not
surprised at the hard work he had to endure.

He was ready to drop with the heat and fatigue, but he would not allow
the captain to see he was tired.

The Narrows were reached before the boat overtook the _Lively Bee_, and
the waters of the Lower Bay were entered before the captain and his men
stood on the deck of the famous schooner.

The crew saluted the captain, who responded warmly, and then bade
Tempest follow him to the cabin.




CHAPTER III.

THE LIEUTENANT'S STORY.


"I know you, John Tempest, better than you know me," commenced Captain
Vernon, "and before you sign the ship's log I want to have a talk with
you."

Tempest followed, wondering much at the manner and deference shown to
him by the captain of the privateer.

"Sit down, and place yourself outside a stiff glass of that brandy,"
said Vernon, helping himself at the same time to a similar dose.

"You possess a time-honored name, young man, and have spunk to maintain
it. Have you forgotten that you were on the _Essex_ when the British
boarded her and demanded the surrender of a deserter?

"Your captain ordered the alleged deserter to prove his citizenship,
and he couldn't!"

"But he gave his word," said Tempest.

"Yes, but who believes a man's word in such a case?"

"How do you know all this? Who are you?"

"Captain Vernon, of the good privateer _Lively Bee_."

"Yes, but how did you know - - "

"Let me finish. Your captain agreed to give up the sailor, whose name
was - - "

Vernon hesitated as though he would have liked Tempest to have finished
the sentence.

Tempest remained silent, and his captain continued:

"His name was Vincent Decatur."

"You are right, captain, though that was not the name in the ship's
books."

"No, he was known on board as James Vincent. He had good reasons for
changing his name: Decatur went below to get his kit. The British
officer and squad of marines waited him on deck.

"Decatur saw an ax on the carpenter's bench as he passed. With only a
moment's hesitation he seized it in his right hand, and with one blow
cut off the left. It was then that you, John Tempest, junior officer on
board the U. S. frigate _Essex_, saw the deed, and congratulated the
man on his bravery.

"Decatur went on deck carrying the severed hand with him. He presented
himself before the British officer, maimed and useless as a sailor for
life.

"He showed his bleeding wrist to the officer, and, almost faint with
loss of blood, he managed to say:

"'Sir, I swore I would never serve under the English flag, or recognize
it except as the flag of an enemy. My own captain has deserted me. I
am an American born, and my severed hand will show how I have kept my
oath.' Then you, Ensign Tempest, called for three cheers for the brave
American sailor. The crew and marines on the _Essex_ responded to the
call, and the cheers ascended through the rigging. Captain Porter
intimated that your influence in the service would not be good, and - to
put it mildly - asked you to resign your commission. The men would have
stood by you, but you knew disobedience to the captain's will was
mutiny, and you offered your resignation, which was accepted. There was
one who did plead for you - Cadet Midshipman Farragut. But Porter was
inexorable, and you became a landsman."

"How do you know all this?"

"I have not yet finished; hear me through and we shall better
understand each other."

The _Lively Bee_ was skimming through the water at the rate of four
knots an hour, but so well proportioned was she that the motion was
almost imperceptible.

"Take another glass of brandy, Tempest."

"No, captain, I have sea legs, but a landsman's head, and cannot stand
much grog."

"You had not been on shore long before you again met Vincent Decatur.
He was crippled for life, but was happier than had he been compelled to
sail under the British flag.

"You visited him - ah, your face tells me that I am right - you felt
a strange desire to distinguish yourself, not because of patriotism
altogether, but the bright eyes of Bertha Decatur shone into your very
soul. She would marry none who deserted his country in the hour of
need. The man she would honor was one who fought for his country. You
heard this and - - "

"Shipped on a privateer," added Tempest, almost sarcastically.

"Yes, shipped on the neatest, trimmest, fastest schooner afloat, on the
_Lively Bee_, which shall sting so often and so deeply that all America
shall respect its crew."

"How did you learn all you have told me?"

Captain Vernon laughed merrily, and looked at the young ensign almost
quizzically.

"You would like to know?"

"I am burning with curiosity."

"Then I will tell you. I heard the story partly from Midshipman
Farragut - - "

"You know him?"

"Of course I do."

"And yet when Buller was reviling him at the Battery you did not defend
him."

"No! It would have been an impertinence for a privateer captain to
defend a naval officer."

"But young Farragut did not know - - "

"Bertha Decatur, no; but I do, and she sang your praises so often that
I wanted to find you. Farragut quietly pointed you out in the crowd at
the Battery, and - well, here you are."

"A man before the mast."

"No. You were ensign in the navy, where promotion is slow; you shall be
first officer on the _Lively Bee_. Will you accept?"

"How can I thank you?"

"By doing your duty. I am proud to have you, Tempest, and I don't think
you will ever rue the day you became first officer on the _Lively Bee_."

"I accept your generous offer."

"You have done well. I am a good skipper, I can steer a vessel as well
as any man, and I can fight, but sometimes a little science which you
naval fellows have is very useful. I shall expect you to be as ardent
an enemy of the British as I am. Show no quarter, have no mercy, send
every British ship to Davy Jones' locker if you can't take it captive.
Let your motto be, as mine is, eternal hatred to British rule."

"I will swear it if necessary."

"No, Tempest, the word of an honest man is all I need. Be watchful."

"I will make no boast, captain, but I think you will find I can do
without food or sleep as long as any man, and my vigilance shall never


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