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John F. Addington Sarah Josepha Buell Hale.

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^ /<> :^^



A Complete Dictionary of
Poetical Quotations



iarah Joseoha Buell Hale, John F. Addinaton



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COMPLETE DICTIONARY



or




POETICAL QUOTATIONS:

COMPRIflVO

MOST EXCELLENT AND APPROPRIATE PASSAGES

IN THJB

OLD BRITISH POETS;

WITH

^CHOICE AND COPIOUS SELECTIONS

rROM THX BX8T

MODERN BRITISH AND AMERICAN POETS.

ZDITED BT

SARAH JOSEPHA HALE.



A9 BiftatinfalM do upon glow-wonnt Aed.
«o poets liv« upon the Uring light
or Natura and of B«aut/.



Stistifsllii dllsstiattli fflitli (0ograiiiiigs«



^''^^^,^*^->i^''>^*^li^»^^0S^*»fSi^^i^



PHILADELPHIA:
J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.

18 59.



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Entered aoeonUnf to the Act of Congress, in the )Bf r i849, bf

«BI«0, ELLIOT & OOn

in the Clerk's Ollice of the District Coort of the United States, for the JUsiero
District of PennsyWania.



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\



PREFACE.



PAJ
6o8a

H2



M^^*^^^^^^0^^



On presenting to tiie publio this Diotionaby oy Poetical Quotations, the onl^
COMPLETE work of tiie kind in tiie English langoage, the best pre£Eice will be its history.

About twenty years ago the plan was ori^nated by John F. Addington, an English-
man, then residing in this city; but he devoted his attention almost exclusively to the
old British Bards. His labours were valuable, still the work was incomplete; the
modem writers of poetry, both English and American, with a few exceptions in favour
of the former, were wholly omitted. Then his selections were not always in accordiiuce
with the present standard of public taste. The old dramatic poets wrote according to
their light, which was often reflected through a foul medium, and revealed much that is
now considered, and justly, too, as coarse and indelicate. The text of Mr. Addington's
selections required revision; still, he deserves much credit for his perseverance and
research, and the study he devoted '^ to rescue from the reckless tooth of time some of
the finest thoughts and most vivid images of t&e ancient fathers of English poetry."
His selections &om Shakspeare were copious ; and also from Byron, the only modem poet
Uiat he much favoured.

To the present Editor was committed the task of revising the origmal work, and adding
tiicreto selections from the modem Britbh and American poets. This required the
examination of a multitude of volumes, and much care and study, in order to exhibit, as
&r as possible, the characteristic excellence of each author. A difficult and delicate task
it is to select from living poets, — especially when there are so many I The index shows
an array of over four hundred autJiors ; thus, at a glance, may be seen how wide has
been the field of research.

Besides the new quotations introduced under every head, quite a number of new sub-
jects have been added, making the plan complete, and furnishing a Manual of Poetical
Extracts, dlphaheiicaUy arranged, which will serve to interpret every passion, emotion,
and feeling of the human soul. Here, also, every condition and pursuit of life may find
its motto or character, and the beauties of Nature and Art their tmest description. In
short, the book is a precious casket, where the most perfect gems of &enius the Anglo*
Saxon literature has preserved for the last three hundred years are garnered. The chro-
nological order of the quotations is preserved, and thus the curious reader may trace the
progressive improvements of the one language, forming now the bond of union between
two great nations, whose children of song are here, for the first time, united. In the
American portion, the striking characteristics of the poetry are devotion to nature,
patriotism, and deep religious sentiment. This sentiment it is which makes poetry so
popular in our country ; and while the work now submitted contains such treasures of
hdy and beautiful thoughts as no other collection of poetry can show, the Editor ant]
Publishers flatter themselves its merits will ensure it a welcome reception.



PmiADELPHiA, January, 1850.



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LIST OF AUTHORS QUOTED IN THIS WORK.



BRITISH.



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Jo
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Le,,

LewM, Muuliew Grumr
Ullo.G««»rg«
Ully, John
Ujrweiyii. Stan
Ludie. Dr. TlinniM
LovelMce. Rirlitnl
LvUleion. GMirRe. Lord
MacnulNy. 1*li<iinu Jkbiogtoa
Macklin, CliiiriM
MiuJii«it. Dr. Samoel
Mallei. HhtmI
Manners. Ladjr
Markluun. Oervaae
Marlow^. Clirmtophar
Mannytm. Slic^kerljr
Manlt. Narriatua
Manrton. JoUa
Martyn. Jolin
Marvel, Aiidniw

MuMMt, WllllMIQ

Mujwitiirnr. I'liilip

Mai arm. Chariot Robert

May, 1'himias

Meail. Rolwrt

Miiklletiin. 'llionuM

Miliwr, Janiw *

Milnian. Henry Hut

MiluM. Richanl If.

MilUHi. Joiin

Muniffuniary. Jamei

MuntKiHiiery, Ruljert

MrMira.l'hiimaa

Mfire, Mn Uanmh

MiHIterwell. William

MuiU«y, Juha

Murphy. Afthtff

Nubb. T

Nevil. Robert

Nurtmi. HiMi. Mn. CaroUna

ORilvie. I>r Joha

OtdiiHUi, Juhn

Uliiiiiixoa, John

OpM. Mm. Amelia

Orn-rr. Uinl

()Khiiriie. Fraiiois

(Hway, 1'hiMiias

Overbmy. Sir Thonai



ibeth



> Parnell,!

PattervoQ. Jamca

Pattjaon. WiUiea

Pot^r, WHIiam

Philipe, Ambrtiao

Philipe, John

Fbllock. Robert

Pi

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Ri

Ri
Ri

tu

Ri
Ki
Si
Si
Sc
Se
SI

Sh

SI

SI

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So

Sn

Sn

So

S(i

Sc

Sc

Souihweil, Robert

SpeiiMr, lulniand

Sterlinc. John

SiiUiufneet, BeiUemiB

SuckliuK, Sir John

Swin. I)r. Jotiathan

TBlfounl, TboouM Noon

Tate. Nail am

Taylor, Henir

Tennyson, Alfred

Thoniaon, James

ThiHiipaon, WilUm

Tickell. Thomaa

TiKiie. Mrv. Mary

Tnnna, Mm. Charlotte Elinbeth

Tmpp, Jneeph

Tapper, Murtm Farqahar

Vinrenl. Willmm

Wilier, ikiniand

N^altdu. IttNHO

Waikina. Roland

W atta, A lane A.

Wriwier. Jitlin

White. Henry Kirke

Wliilehentl. William

Wilkie. William

Wiikinn. Jolin

Wilmm. Anhar

Wolrot. Or John

Wonliiworth, William

Yuung, luiwanl

AMERICAN.

Adamt, Jolin Qoincy

Alilrich. Jiiniee

AllHion. Wiuiiiineton

Uurker, Jnmea N.

Bitrluw. JiNil

Bates. tkvKl

B<-nj:iniiii. Park

Bttihnne. Ge«»rK« Waahintfon

Binl. U.ilMfrt M

B<«art. MiKM tUzabetii

U<»ker. Charles

BmnianI, J U. C.

Bnntkx, James 6.

Bnmk», .Mrs. Maria

Bryant. Juhn H.

Br>iiiii, N^ iliiuui Cullen

Biirleieh. Willinm H.

Carey. Mnc* Aline

Curejr. Mm PhiHtw

Chuniller. Mni Cnroline R

Chundler. Wn Kliznlwlh M.

(lurk. WiliiK Gnylonl

Clarke, Muw Sara J.

Cue. Rjchanl, Jr. ^



El
El

El
El
El
El
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n

Fr

Pi

Fi

Ot

Gi

Of

Gi

Hi

Hi

Hi

; Hi

: Hi

< Hi

I Hi
Hi
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Hi
Hi
Hi
Ja
Ki
Lf
U
Lo
Lu
Ix
Lu



OoIt<m.WaKer

Cooke. Philip P

Ciixe. Arthur CiMvelaad

Craneh. C. P.

Dana, Richard H.

Daridson. Mim Lociecia IL

Daridson. Misa Margaiet M

Dawes, Rnftia

Dinnies, Mn. Amia Psyre

Dnane, Georn Washingtoa

Drake, J(«epli Rodmaa

Dvnnne. A. J. H.

Dr-^-^- •^- —



J.



la



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Dv



Ml

Ml
Ml

Ml
Ml
Ml

N.
Ni
Ni
Ni
Ni
Ni

S »•

Pi

Pm

Pa

P' L

Pe

P*

Pi(

Pi.

Pii

Prt

Prentioe. Geonte D.

Read. T. Bunhaium

Rockwell. J. O

Sands, Roliert C.

Sancent, Efiei

Sanrent, John O.

Sawyer. Mm. Camline II.

SiKoumev. Mm Lydm H.

Sinuns. Willuini Giiniure

Sntith, Mm Elizabeth Oajiso

Sprurue. Charles

Stoddard, Mm Lavmia

Siuddard. R. H.

Street, Alfhxl B

Taylor, J. Bavard

Thomas. K. W

ThonisiHi, Charles West

I'uckerniMD. Heuiy T.

Very. Junes

Walhce. William

Ware. Henry, Jr.

Wjinl, Thumas

W>Miy. Mrs. Aroelto B.

W'liiiniHn. Mm. Sarah Hflsit

Whiitier. Jo.in G.

Wrtcux, Cnrloe

W'ilde. Rirhard Henry

Wiiiiti. Naihantei Parker

V'mhI worth, Samuel

W oitluu(ton, Mra. Jana T



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TABLE OF CONTENTS.



^^*M»«M»^0^<»



IMMMMMM»*^MW»



A.

ibmce Page 7

AlMenceM... 9

ilbitinence 9

Accident

Acclammation 9

AccmnpliBtUDentfl JO

AceoMtJoa 10

Action 10

AetJTitj 10



Adrenitj •
Advice . . .
Adieu ...
Affection .

Ar

Africulture.



11
14
15
15
15
17
Alarm 17



Amszement
Ambition ..
America ...
Ancestrr . . .

Aifets

Anjter

Aniline....
AnimaM. ...

Antipathf S7

Antiquarj 87

Apparel 97



Booka 55

Bountf 56

Brevitj 56

Bribery 56

Boildinf 57

C.

Calamity 57

; Calm 58

; Candour 58

Care 59

Cause 60

' Caution 60

' Celibacy 60

'Ceremony 61

; Challenge 61

Change 61

Character €9

Charity 63

Chaitity 65

CheerTulneai 65

Childhood and Children 66

Choice 68

Church 69

Clergy and Churdmien 70

Church-yard 73

Circumvention 74

City and Citixena .... 74

Clouds 75

Comet 76

Comfort 76

Commonwealth 76

Company 76

Compassion 76

Complaint 76

Compliments 77

Concealments 77

Conceit • 77

Confidence 77

Conscience 77

Conppirary 80

Consideration 81

Constancy 81

Contemplation 8S

Contempt 82

Content 83

Conversation 84

Coquette 84

Corpulence 85

Corniption 86

Country 87

Country Ufe 88

Courage 93

Court 96

Courtesy 97

Courtier 97

_ -. , Courtship 100

Birth 51 j Cowardice 103

Birthday 52 ; Cowards 104

ttindness *. 53 ^ Coxcomb 104

Btantuess 53 ; Craft 105

Bhishing 54 > Creiluliiy lOtf

Boasting 54 < Critics and Criticism-. lOG



Appearances.
Applause ..
Architecture

Arbour

AigunwBt..
Arms.......

Army

Art

Artiflee 33

Aftonislmient 39

Atheist 33

Authors 33

Authority 34

Autumn 34

Avarice 35

AwkwardneM 37



Banishment 37

Bargain 38



Battle .
Branl...
Beaoty .
Bed...



38
43
43
48
48

Bepfar 48

Benefits 49

Bifotry.... 49

Binls 50



Crown 107

Cruelty 108

Curiosity 100

Curses 100

Custom Ill



Dancing 113

Dandy 113

Danger 113

Death 113

, Debts 134

: Decay 134

Deceit 135

Declaration 136

Defiance 196

; Deformity 189

* Deity 130

Delay 131

Delicacy 133

Deluge 133

Defendants 139

Deputy 139

Design 133

Desire 133

Despair 133

Despondency 138

Destiny 138

Destruction 138

Determination 138

Detraction 138

Dew 138

Pevotion 139

Dignity 139

Dinner 139

Disapimintment .... 139

Discontent 139

Discord 140

Discretion 140

Disease 140

Dishonesty 140 ]

iiisplcasure 140 '

Disposition 140

Doubt 141

Dreams 141

Drras 143

Drowning 143

Drums 143

Drunkenness 143 {

Duelling 145 [

Duty 145



Earth 146 \

Earthquake 146 >

Eating 146 '

Ecstacy 146 i

Education 146 >

Effotisra 147 \

El(*cance 147 i

Eloquence 147 i

Emiirration 149

Emulation 150 '



Enemy I3i

Engagemen 156

Enaland 150

Enjoyment 153

Ennui 153

Enthusiasm 153

Envy 153

Equality 155

Error 155

Etiquette 155

Evening 156

Evil 157

Example 157

Excellence 158

Execution 158

Exercise 158

Exile 158

Experience lUV

Expectation ItSO

ExtravaKanco Itil

Extremes 16:

Eyes 161

F.

Faction 163

Fairies 1G3

Faith 164

Fall 165

Falsehood 1U5

Fame 166

Fancy HJO

Farewell 170

Farmer 170

Father 170

Fashion 171

Fate 171

Favour 173

Fear 173

Feasting 174

Features 175

Feoline 175

Festivity 175

Fickleness 175

Fidelity 175

Fighting 179

Firmness 170

Fishing 179

Flag ITJ

Flattery and Flatterer IHO

Flowers 182

Flood ]f*>

Fool 1H3

ForgetfulncM 1H3

Forpi veness ;h

Fonnnlity |S5

Fortitude la^

Fortune 185

Fortune-Tellers 1H7

France !,*«

Freedom 1H8

Frpe-Will MH!»

Friendfeu.p '911

Funeral .- <^4



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TABLE OF CONTENXa



Pury 194 \

futurity IM



Sambling 105

Geiu'nwiiy l^

3oiiiii8 1U6

Geiitlemaa 11*6

Ghoet 1»7

Giflt ]»9

Glory 199

Gluttony SOO

God 900

Gold 801

GriodneM 203

Gossip 903

Government 903

Grace 904

Gratitude 904

Grave SOS

Greatneai 906

Grief 910

Guide 918

Guilt 918



Hair 919

Hand 919

Haii|;ing 920

Hapiiinen 9S0

Hurvtist 933

Hatred 944

Health 987

Hearins 927

Heart 227

Heavens 998

Hell 930

Hermit 930

Ut-roes 930

HiMury. . EHstorian. .. 233

Hume 933

Hoii(>fiiy 936

Honour 930

Hope 939

Horspmanship 249

Hospital 943

Hospitality 943

Humility 944

Huuting 945

Husbands 947

Hypocrisy 947



IdteneM SSO

Iffuorance 953

iflneu 953

Imagination 953

Immortality 954

Impatience 955

Imprisonment 255

Impudence 356

Inconstancy 357

Independence 257

li.iiustry 258

Inebriety 259

InOincy 960

Infidelity 260

Ingratitude 963

Injuries 964

Inn 364

Innocence 2()5

Instinct ^ .... 266

IniUruction 967

Intellect 267

Invention 967

Irresolution 267

luly 267



Jail 96R

Jealousy 268

Jest 273

Jt»y 272

Jud^ 274

Judgment 374

Justice 275



iCindntsM 277

llinn 278



Knaves 283

Knighthood ^83

Knowledge 984

L.

Labour 285

Law 987

Learning 988

Letters 990

Liberty 991

Life 293

Light 303

Uon 303

London 304

Love 304

Lovers 836

Lust 337

Luxury 338

Bf.

Madness 338

Man 339

Marriage 337

Meeting 343

Melancholy 343

Memory 344

Mercy 346

Merit 347

Messenger 348

Mind 348

Mirth feO

Mischief. 351

Miser 351

Misfortune 353

Mob 353

Modesty 353

Moon. Moonlight.... 354

Morning 357

Mother 361

Mountains 363

Mourning 364

Murder 365

Music 367

N.

Name 372

Nature 372

Necessity 375

News 376

Night 377

Ni}!htingale 381

Nobility 383

Novelty 383

Nun 383

O.

Oaths 384

Obituary 385

Oblivion 386

Obstinacy 386

Ocean 386

Offence 388

Office 388

Opinion 389

Opportunity 389

OppreMion 390

; Orator 390

P.

Pain 391

Parasite 391

Parents 391

\ Parting 393

\ Pansion 3!)5

) Patience 397

I Patriotism 398

< Peace 401

\ Peasant 403

\ Pen 403

Perfection 404

Perwverance 404

Philanthropy 404

Philosophy 405

Phrenology 407

Phvsic 407

Pity 408

Players 409

Pleasure 409

Poets 411

Politeness 416

PoUtict 416



Popularity 417

Portrait 419

Poverty 420

Praise 432

Prayer 433 >

Preferment 435

Press 426

Pride 436

Prison 428

Prodigality 438

Prodigies 439

Promises 430

Proposal 430

Prosperity 433

Providence 433

Prudence 434

Punishment 434

Purity 435



436



Rage 436

Rain 437

Rainbow 437

Reapers 437

Reason 438

Rebellion 438

Reciprocity 443

Rec<mciliation 443

Refinement 443

Reflection 442

; Reformation 443

Regicide 442

Religion 443

Remembrance ........ 445

Repentance 446

Reproof 448

Reputation 448

Resolution 449

Resurrection 450

Retirement 450

Revenge 454

Riches 457

Rivers 458

Ruins 459

Rumour 460



Sabbath 461

Safety 463

Sailor 463

Satan 463

Satiety 463

Satire 464

School 465

Scold 466

Scxirn 4ti6

Scotland 467

S»wre»y 467

Seduction 468

Sflflshness 469

Senses 470

SeuHibility t 470

Servants. Service.... 471

Sexton 471

Slinme 471

Shepherd 473

Ship 472

Shipwreck 473

SiKHiting 475

Silence 476

Sin 477

Sincerity 477

^ Single Lift 478

Skull 479

Slander 479

Slavery 483

Sleep 485

Society 487

Soldier 489

Solitude 493

Sorrow 496

Soul 498

Spleen 500

^ Splendour 500

Spring 500



Sport/' 502

Stars 509

BinV!tu4A 503

8toni< 503

Stuobomne^ 503

Study 503

Style 504

Submission 504

Succrrs 504

Suicide 504

Summer 500

Sun 507

Superiority 508

Supei^tit ion 508

SurprJie 509

Suspense.. 509

Suspicion 509

Swan 509

Swimming 509

Sycophant 509

Sympathy 500



Talking 511

Taute 513

Taxation 513

Teacher 513

Tears 5J3

Temper 515

Tempest 515

Temperance 518

Temptation 519

Thieves 520

Thought 520

Threatening 521

Thirst 522

Time 523

Timidity 525

Titles 525

Token 525

To-morrow 526

Torture 52^

Transport 52?

Traveller 527

Treason 528

Triumph 5.T0

Truth 530

Twilight 531

Tyranny 532

XI.

Unanimity 535

Unbelief. 535

Usurper 535



Vanity 535

Variety 536

Vice 5.'W

Vicissitude 537

Victory 537

Villain 538

Virtue 538

Voice 541

Volcano 542

W.

War 542

Water 548

Wealth 549

Widow .550

Wife 551

Winds 553

Wine 554

Winter 555

Wisdom 556

Wit 5.56

Witches 553

Woman 559

Wonder 560

Words 566

World 567



Yeoman ffTC

Yes 571

Yew-tree 571

Youth 571



Zeal.



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POETICAL QUOTATIONS



ABSENCE.

Lke as the culver on the bared bough,
8iti mooming for the abeence of her mate,
And in her songs sends many a wishfnl vow
For his return that seems to Imger late ;
80 I, ahme now left, disocmsolate.
Mourn to myself the absence of my love ;
And wandering here and there all desolate.
Seek, wiUi my plaints, to match that monminl dove.

Edmtmd Spenaer,
llioiigh absent, present in desires they be ;
Our sools much fbrther than our eyes can see.

Miehad Drayton,

Oar two souls, therefore, which are one,
Hiongh I most go, endnro not yet
A breach, bat an expansion;
Like gold to any thinness beat
If they be two, they are two so
As Mt twin compasses are two;
The sonl, the fixt foot, makes no show
To move, but doth, if th* other da
And though it in the centre sit,
Tet when the other fiir doth roam.
It leans and hearkens after it.
And grows erect, as that comes home.
Such wilt thou be to me, who must,
Like th' other foot, obliquely run ;
Tiij firmness makes my circle just.
And makes roe end where I begun.

Dr, John Dorme,

It is as if a night should shade noonday.
Or that the sun was here, but forced away ;
And we were left, under that hemisphere.
Where we must foel it dark for half a year.

Btn Jonooiu

Short absence hurt him more.
And made Lis wound fkr greater than before ;
Absence not long enough to root out quite
Al. *ove, increases krre at second sight

Thmuio May'o Hem^ IL



I do not doubt his love, but I could wish
His presence might confirm it : when I see
A fire well fed, shoot up its wanton flame,
And dart itself into the face of heaven ;
I grant that fire, without a fresh supply,
May for a while be still a fire ; but yet
How doth its lustre languish, and itself
Grrow dark, if it too long want the embrace
Of its loved pyle ! how straight it buried lies
In its own ruins!

Robert Mead^o Comfort of Love and Friendshif

If she be gone, the world, in my esteem.
Is all bare walls; nothing remains in it
But dust and feathers.

John Croum't AmbUiouo Stateottiom.

O thou that dost inhabit in my breast.
Leave not the mansion so long tenantless ;
Lest, growing ruinous, the building fall,
And leave no memory of what it was !
Repair me with thy presence, Sylvia ;
Thou gentle nymph, cherish thy forlorn swain.

ShaJapeareo Two Gent cf Verona
What! keep a week away 7 Seven days and

nights?
Eight sooie eight hours 7 and lovers* absent hours,
More tedious than the dial eight score times 7

O weary reckoning!

^ Shako, OthOo.

Without your sight my life b less secure ;
Those wounds you gave, your eyes can only cure •
No balm in absence will effectual prove.
Nature provides no weapon salve for love.

Sir Robert Howardo Vestal Virgm

Thus absence dies, and dying proves
No absence can subsist with loves
That do partake of fair perfection ;
Since, in the darkest night, they may.
By love's quick motion, find a way

To see eaco other in reflection.

Smhinfi
(7)



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8



ABSENCE.



Every mament
I*m from th7 night, the heart within my boeom
Moons like a tender infknt in its cradle,
Whoee nmve had lefl it

Otway't Venice Preeened.
Lovo reckons hours for months, and days fiur years ;
And eveiy little absence is an age.

Dryden'e AmphSdrian,
All flowers will droop in absence of the sun
That waked their sweets.

DrydetCe Aurenxthe,

CondemnM whole years in absence to deplore,
And image charms he must behold no more.

Pope'e Eloiea,
No hapfuer task these faded eyes porsue ;
To read and weep is ail they now can da

Pepe'9Eloi9a.

Of all affliction taught a lo?er yet,
*T is sure the hardest science to forget !

Pcp^MEMio.
Unequal task ! a passion to resign.
For hearts so touch'd, so pierced, so lost as mine !
Ere sach a soul regains its peaceful state.
How oflen must it love, how often hate.
How often hope, despair, resent, regret,
C>>nceal, disdain— do all things but forget !

Ptjpe'9 EUnea,
There *s not an hour
Of day or dreaming night but I am with thee :
There 's not a wind but whispers of thy name.
And not a flower that sleeps beneath the moon
But in its hues or fragrance tells a tale
Of thee.

ProcUn^i Maundola,

Methinks I see thee straying on the beach,
And asking of the surge that bathes thy &ot
If ever it has wash'd our distant shore.

Cmopei*9 Taek.
Not to understand a treasure's worth
Till time has stoPn away the slighted good.
Is cause of half the poverty we feel.
And makes the world the wilderness it is.

Cmoper'e Task,
Her fancy followed him through foaming waves
To distant shores, and she would sit and weep
At what a sailor suflbrs. Fancy, too,
JDcIusive most where warmest wishes are.
Would oft anticipate his glad return.
And dream of transports she was not to know.

Cwfper's Tatk.
Where'er I roam, whatever realms to see,
My heart, untravel'd, fondly turns to thee :
Still to my brother turns, with ceaseless pain.
And drafifs at ^ach remove a lengthening chain.
QoldemWCe Traveller.



O tell him I have sat these three long hours,



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