John G. (John Gaylord) Wells.

Wells' illustrated national campaign hand-book for 1860 online

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upon an estimate to be made by the secretary of the treasury of
the United States, to defray the expenses of the Legislative Assembly,
the printing of the laws, and other incidental expenses ; and the Governor
and secretary of the territory shall, in the disbursement of all moneys
intrusted to them, be governed solely by the instructions of the secre-
tary of the treasury of the United States, and shall, semi-annually,
account to the said secretary for the manner in which the aforesaid
moneys shall have been expended ; and no expenditure shall be made
by said Legislative Assembly for objects not specially authorized by
the Acts of Congress making the appropriations, nor beyond the suma
thus appropriated for such objects.

Sec. j 3. That the Legislative Assembly of the territory of Nebraska
shall hold its first session at such time and place in said territory
as the Governor thereof shall appoint and direct ; and at said first
session, or as soon thereafter as they shall deem expedient, the Gover-
nor and Legislative Assembly shall proceed to locate and establish
the seat of government for said territory at such place as they may
deem eligible ; which place, however, shall thereafter be subject to be
changed by the said Governor and Legislative Assembly.

Sec. 14. That a delegate to the House of Representatives of the
United States, to serve for the term of two years, who shall be a citizen
of the United States, may be elected by the voters qualified to elect
members of the Legislative Assembly, who shall be entitled to the
same rights and privileges as are exercised and enjoyed by the
delegates from the several other territories of the United States to the
said House of Representatives, but the delegate first elected shall hold
his seat only during the term of the Congress to which he shall be
elected. The first election shall be held at such time and places, and
be conducted in such manner, as the Governor shall appoint and
direct ; and at all subsequent elections the times, places, and manner
of holding the elections shall be prescribed by law. The person
having the greatest number of votes shall be declared by the "Governor
to be duly elected, and a certificate thereof shall be given accordingly.
That the Constitution, and all the laws of the United States which
are not locally inapplicable, shall have the same force and efifect mthin
the said territory of Nebraska as elsewhere within the United Stat«B.
axcopt the eighth section of the Act p-eparatory to the adrnis?ioti f/



68 KANSAS AND NEBRASKA A JT.

Miss(5uri inlo the Union, approved March sixth, eighteen hundred and
twenty, which, being inconsistent with the->principle of non-interven-
tion by Congress with slavery in the states and territories, as recog-
nized by the legislation of eighteen hundred and fifty, commonly called
the Compromise Measures, is hereby declared inoperative and void ; it
being the true intent and meaning of this Act not to legislate slavery
into any territory or state, nor to exclude it therefrom, but to leave
the people thereof perfectly free to form and regulate their domestic
institutions in their own way, subject only to the Constitution of the
United States : Provided, That notking herein contained shall be con-
strued to revive or put in force any law or regulation which may have
existed prior to the Act of sixth March, eighteen hundred and twenty,
either protecting, establishing, prohibiting, or abolishing slavery.

Sec. 15. That there shall hereafter be appropriated, as has been
customary for the territorial governments, a sufficient amount, to be
expended under the direction of the said Governor of the territory of
Nebraska, not exceeding the sums heretofore appropriated for similar
objects, for the erection of suitable public buildings at the seat of gov-
ernment, and for the purchase of a library, to be kept at the seat of
government for the use of the Governor, Legislative Assembly, Judges
of the Supreme Court, secretary, marshal, and attorney of said terri-
tory, and such other persons, and under such regulations as shall be
prescribed by law.

Sec. 16. That when the lands in the said territory shall be surveyed
under the direction of the government ol the United States, preparatory
to bringing the same into market, sections numbered sixteen and thirty-
six, in each township in said territory, shall be, and the same are hereby
reserved for the purpose of being applied to schools in said territory,
and in the states and territories hereafter to be erected out of the same.

Sec. 17. That, until otherwise provided by law, the Governor of
said territory may define the judicial districts of said territory, and
assign the judges who may be appointed for said territory to the
several districts ; and also appoint the times and places for holding
courts in the several counties or subdivisions in each of said judicial
districts by proclamation, to be issued by him ; but the Legislative
Assembly, at their first or any subsequent session, may organize, alter,
or modify such judicial districts, and assign the judges, and alter tho
times and places of holding the courts, as to thebi shall seem proper
and convenient.

Sec. 18. That all officers to be appointed by the President, by and
with the advice and consent of the Senate, for the territory of Ne-
biaska, who, by virtue of the provisions of any law now existing, or
■which may be enacted during the present Congress, are required t&
give security for moneys that may l:)e intrusted with them for disburse
iiionis, shall give such security, at such time and place, and in such
manner as the secretary of the treasury may prescribe.

Sec. 19. That all that part of the territory of the United States
included within the following limits, except such portions thel'eof as
are hereinsfter expressly exempted from the operations of this act, to



KANSAS AND NEBRASKA AuT. 69'

wit : beginning at a point on the western boundary of tlit- state nf
Missouri, where the thirty-seventh parallel of north latitude crosas
the same ; thence west on said parallel to the eastern boundary of
New Mexico ; thence north on said boundary to latitude thirty-eight ;
thence following said boundary westward to the east boundary of the
territory of Utah, on the summit of the Rocky Mountains ; thence
northward on said summit to the fortieth parallel of latitude ; thence
east on said parallel to the western boundary of ths state of Missouri ;
thence south with the western boundary of said state to the place of
beginning, be, and the same is hereby, created into a temporary
government by the name of the Territory of Kansas; and when admit-
ted as a state or states, the said territory, or any portion of the same,
shall be received into the Union with or without slavery, as their con-
stitution may prescribe at the time of their admission : Provided,
That nothing in this act contained shall be construed to inhibit the
government of the United States from dividing said territory into
two or more territories, in such manner and at such times as Congress
shall deem convenient and proper, or from attaching any portion of
said territory to any other state or territory of the United States :
Provided, further. That nothing in this act contained shall be so con-
strued as to impair the rights of persons or property now pertaining
to the Indians in said territory, so long as such rights shall remain
unextinguished by treaty between the United States and such Indians,
or to include any territory which, by treaty with any Indian tribe, is
not, without the consent of said tribe, to be included within the terri-
torial limits or jurisdiction of any state or territory ; but all such
territory shall be excepted out of the boundaries, and constitute no
part of the territory of Kansas, until said tribe shall signify their
assent to the President of the United States to be included within the
said territory of Kansas, or to affect the authority of the government
of the United States to make any regulation respecting such Indians,
their lands, property, or other rights, by treaty, law, or otherwise,
which it would have been competent to the government to make if this
act had never passed.

[With the single exception of the location of the seat of govern-
ment for Kansas at Fort Leavenworth, provided for in section CI,
the ensuing sixteen sections, relative to the organization and govern-
ment of the territory, are precisely similar to the sections already
recited, providing for the government of Nebraska territory. The
final section of the act, which has a general reference to both terri-
ries. is as follows :]

Sec. 37. And be it further enacted, That all treaties, laws, and other
engagements made by the Government of the United States with the In-
dian tribes inhabiting the territories embraced within this act, shall be
faithfully and rigidly observed, notwithstanding anything contained in
ihis act ; and that the existing agencies and superintendeiicies of said
Indians be continued, with the same pirwers and duties which are now
prescribed by law, except tliat the President of the United States may
at his discretion change the locatio' of the office of superintendent



70



ELECTORAL VOTES.



ELECTORAL VOTES



PRESIDENT AND YICE-PEESIDENI OF THE UNITED STATES.

ELECTION FOR THf FIRST TERM.
COiBIENCING lURCH 4, 1789, AND •r\''RMI>TATING ILiRCH 3, 1793.



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New Hampshire

ilassachusetts

Connec'icut

New .Jersey

Pennsylvania... ....


6

10

7

6

10

3

6

10

7

5


5
10
5

1
8

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6
10
3


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3












7
5


Souili Carolina

Georfjia


6
5










2
2


1


1


1


69


Whole No. Electors.
.Majority 35


69


3i


•2.


4


6


1


1


1



The first Congress under the »1onstitution was c^rvpood at the
' Federal Hall," situated at the lead of Broad, froiiting o^^ Waii
itreet, (where the Custom- House now stands.) in the citv of New
York, on the first Wednesday, beiu": March 4, 1789 — Senator' and
liepresentatives having been elected from the elevea states which
lia(l ratified the Constitution ; but, owiiig to the absence of a quorum,
the House was not organized till the Ut of April, and, for a like rea-
son, the Senate was not organized till ilie 6th ; when the latter boi' r
'proceeded by ballot to the choice of a President, for the sole purpose
of opening and counting the [electoral] votes for President of the
United States." John Langdon, of New Hampshire, was chosen
President pro tern, of the Senate, and Sawfel Alyne Otis, of Massar
elmsetts, Secretary; after which, proper measm-es were taken to uotity
the successful individuals of their election.

(xcorge Washington took the oath of office, as Pi'csident, find entered
apon his duties April 30, 1 789. (For his Inaagural Address, see p. 24.)

John Adams, A^ice-Presideut, entered upon his duties in the Seuaw
A-pril 21, 1789. and took the oath of ofTice June 3, 1789



ELECTOKAL VOTK.-.



71



ELECTION FOR THE SECOND 1 ERM,
COMMENCmO MARCH 4, 1793, AND TERMINATING ilARCH 3, 1797.



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New Hampshire


6

16
4
9
3

12
7

15
3
8

21
4

12
8
4


6
16
4
9
3

7
14
3
8

"7"








ir,


JIaasaohusetts




4










9










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New York


12






7






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1






R






8










?1




21

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4






1?






8




1


4












r.?




132


77


50


4


1




Majority 67





George AVashington, re-elected President, took the oath of office for
a second term, and entered upon his duties, March 4, 1793.

John Adams, re-elected Vice-President, took the oath of office, and
entered upon his duties in the Senate, December 2, 1793.

After the expiration of his second Presidential term, Washington
retired to the tranquil shades of Mount Vernon, fondly indulging the
hope that the remainder of his days would be peacefully enjoyed iu
his much-cherished home ; but these pleasing anticipations were not
allowed to remain long undisturbed. In 1798 the conduct of the
French Directory and its emissaries led to frequent difficulties with
this country, which were calculated to provoke a war ; and the opinion
was universally entertained that he who had formerly so well acquitted
himself, must be again called to the command of our armies. Accord-
ingly, early in July, the rank and title of " Lieutenant-General and
Commander-in-Chief of all the armies raised, or to be raised, in the
United States," was conferred upon him ; and the Secretary of Wax*,
Mr. McHcnry, immediately waited upon him to tender the commission.
In a letter to President Adams, accepting ''this new proof of public
conBdence," he makes a reservation that he shall not be called into the
field until the army is in a situation to require his presence, and adds :
" I take the liberty also to mention, that I must decline having my
acceptance considered as drawing after it any immediate charge upon
the public, and that I cannot receive any emoluments annexed to the
appoiatmeut, before entering into a situation to incur expense."



72



ELECTORAL V0TE8.



ELECTION FOR THE THIRD TERM,
COMMENCING MAKCH 4, 1797, AND TERSHNATING MARCH S, 1801.



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New Hampshire
Massachusetts.
Rhode Island. . .
Connecticut . . .

Vermont

New York

New Jersey

Pennsylvania..

I»elaw"are

Maryland

Virginia


6
16
4
9
4
12
7
1
3










6
1

4
















16




13










2










4










9


"ii"
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20
4

11
8
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7
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12










:::: :;.










7
15






















13




















3




















11


3
1

4
6




















21
4


15












1






12


North Carolina.
South Carolina.














3


1






8














4










4












3


Tenneftsee






3






































139


No. of Electors.
Majority ... 70


71


68


50


SO


15


11


5


7


2


3


2


1


2



John Adams, elected President, took the oath of office, and entered
upon his duties, March 4, 1797.

Thomas Jefferson, elected A^iee-President, took the oath of office,
and entered upon his duties in the Senate, March 4, 1797.

The administration of Mr. Adams encountered the most virulent
opposition, both domestic and foreign. France, still in the confusion
following her revolution, made improper demands on our country, which
not being complied with, she commenced seizing American property
on the high seas. Our people, taking different sides, were about equally
divided — some approving and others deprecating the course pursued by
France. Letters of marque and reprisal were issued by our govern-
ment, and a navy was raised with surprising promptitude. This had
the desired effect, peace being thereby secured ; and the aggressor was
taught that the Americans were friends in peace, but were not fearful
of war when it could not bo honorably averted.

The Indians on our western frontiers also caused much trouble; but
at length, being severely chastised by General Wayne, they E'ued for
peace, v.'hich was granted in 1795.

In 1800 the seat of government was removed from Philadelphia to
Washington City, which had been designated by Washington, under
% law of Congress, as the most central situation.



ELECTORAL VOTES.



73



ELECTION FOR THE FOURTH TERM.
COMMENCING MAR OH 4, 1801, AND TERMINATING iURCH 3, ISOo.



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STATES.


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6
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6
16
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4




16










4








1


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Ne w Yo rk


12


12








7
7
3
5


7
7
3
6




\i




8


8




8






10




5
21
4
8
3
8
4


5

21
4
8
3
8
4




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4










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4


4




3






8










4



















138




73


73


65 ! 64 1 1




Majority 70









The electoral vote for Thos. Jefferson and Aaron Burr being equal
no choice was made by the people, and on the 11th of February, 1801
^he House of Representatives proceeded to the choice of President iii
the manner prescribed by the Constitution. On the first ballot eight
states voted for Thomas Jefferson, sis for Aaron Burr, and the votes
»f two states were divided. The balloting continued till the 17th of
February, when the thirty-fifth ballot, as had all previously, resulted the
tame as the first. After the thirty-sixth ballot, the Speaker declared
that the votes of ten states had been given for Thomas Jefferson, the
Fotes of four states for Aaron Burr, and the votes of two states in
blank ; and that, consequently, Thomas Jefferson had been elected for
the term of four years.

Thomas Jefferson, thus elected President, took the oath of ofiSce,
ind entered upon his duties, March 4, 1801.

In his inaugural address, Mr. Jefferson used the following memorable
/xpression : " We have called by different names brethren of the same
principle. "We are all republicans : we are all federalists. If there be
any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union, or to change ita
republican form, let them stand, undisturbed, as monuments of the
safety with which ereor of opinion may be tolerated, where rea-
son IS left free to combat it."

Aaron Burr, elected Vice-President, took tne oath of office, and
altered upon his duties in the Senate, March 4, 1801.



74



KLKCTORAL VOTES.



ELECTION FOB THE FIFTH TERM,
OOMMENONG MARCH 4, 1805, AND TERMINATING MARCH 3, 18W



X 9



STATES,



PRKSID'T. V.PKBS'T.



6"s .|



20

3

11

24

14

10

6

5

8

3

m



New Hampshire.
Massachusetts. ..
Rhode Island., . .

Connecticut

Vermont

New York

New Jersey

Pennsylvania.. . ,

Delaware

Maryland. ,

Virginia

North Carolina..,
South Carolina. . ,

Georgia

Tennessee

Kentucky

Oliio



Whole No. of Electors

Majority 89




14



Thomas Jefferson, elected President, took the oath of ofiBce for a
second term, and entered upon his duties, March 4, 1805.

George Clinton, elected Vice-President, took the oath of office, and
entered upon his duties in the Senate, March 4, 1805.

Among the most important acts of Mr. Jefferson's administration
was the purchase of Louisiana from France for S15, 000,000, which
territory was surrendered to our government in December, 1803.

In November, 1808, the celebrated "Orders in Council" were
issued by the British government, which prohibited all trade with
France and her allies ; and, as a retaliatory measure, in December fol-
lowing Bonaparte issued his " Milan Decree," interdicting all trade
with England and her colonies — thus subjecting almost every Americaa
yessel on the ocean to capture. In requital for these tyrannous pro-
ceedings, and that England and France might both feel their injustice,
Congress decreed an embargo ; but as this failed to obtain from either
power an acknowledgment of our rights, and was also ruinous to our
commerce with other nations, it was repealed in March, 1809.



t'LECTOBAL VOTES.



lb



ELECTION FOR THE SIXTH TERM,

COMilENCING MARCH 4, 1S09, AND TERMINATING ilARCH 3, 1813.







PKESIDE.VT. j


VICE-I'RESIDEXT.


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4

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7
19

4
9


19
















4


Rhode Ipland














9

















fi




6
13

8










6


19




6




13

8


3


3




8






on




20




"3


20
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R








3


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9




.... 2




Virginia


24
11
10

6

7




'3


24
11
10
6








14








3


in










6










7










•y




5
3






5










R


Ohio






3


















175


Whole No. of Electors

ilajority 88


122


6


47


113


■'


3


9


47



James Madison took the oath of office, as President, and entered
upon his duties March 4, 1809.

George Clinton, elected Vice-President, took the oath of office, and
attended in the Senate, March 4, 1809.

Our national position, especially in regard to England and France,
was certainly a very perplexing one when Mr. Madison came to the
Presidency. We were not only threatened by enemies abroad, but
were harassed by a savage foe on our western frontier, probably urged
on by British influence, and led by the famous chief Tecumseh and his
brother the Prophet. These last were finally subdued in 1811 ; but
our European foes were more troublesome. After all peaceful means
had failed to check the aggressions of England, and when at length
" patience had ceased to be a virtue," war was declared against that
country, June 19, 1812. The events of that war it is not wiihiii our
province to record ; and it is sufficient to say, that they greatly ele-
vated the American character in the estimation of both friends and



76



ELECTORAL VOTES.



ELECTIIN FOR THE SEVENTH TERM.
OOIIMKNCING lUECH 4, 1813, AND TERfflNATING lUECH 3, 1817.



i

11

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STATES. *


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4

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8

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"e'

25

15

11

8

12

8

7

3


7


9.9.






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4








9






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8'


Vermont


8




9.9




<■/«


8






ri


25




25




4




4


11




6
25
15
11
8
12
8
7
3


5


VS






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11






S






^9






8






7


Ohio




3












nil 7


Whole No. of Electors


128


89


131


86




Majority 109











James Madison, elected President for a second term. [There is no
notice on the Jom-nals of Congress of his having taken the oath.j

Elbridge Gerry, elected Vice-President, attended in the Senate ou
the 24th of May, 1813, and exhibited a certificate of bis having takt-r^
the oath of office prescribed by law, which was read.

The war into which the country had been forced was brought to a
close by the treaty of Ghent, which was signed December 24, 1814;
but this treaty had scarcely been ratified, when it became necessary to
commence another war for the protection of American commerce and
seamen against Algerine piracies. In May, 1815, a squadron under
Commodore Decatur sailed for the Mediterranean, where the navai
force of Algiers was cruising for American vessels. After capturing
two of the enemy's best frigates in that sea, Decatur proceeded to the
Bay of Algiers, and there dictated a treaty which secured the United
States from any further molestation from that quarter. Similar trear
ties were also concluded with the other Barbary powers.



EMCCTOnAi, VOTKS.



ELECTION FOR THE EIGHTH TERM,
COMilENONG MARCH 4, 1817, AND TEIIMINATIXG MARCH 3, 1821.



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12

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22








4




4








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4




8




8
29

8
25




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8












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3


8




8

25

15

11

8

12

8

8

3

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11






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Ohio ,










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', 7




183


34


183


22


5




3




Majority 100







James Monroe took the oath of office, as President, and enteretl
Uj-oa his duties March 4, 1817.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Online LibraryJohn G. (John Gaylord) WellsWells' illustrated national campaign hand-book for 1860 → online text (page 19 of 27)