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another age of Big Tree life. But not the unconquerable
Sequoia. Blood will tell! So long as a sound root re-
mained, and sap still flowed, this "King" would be no
less than kingly.

Mustering Its diminished resources, the stricken .„ .^ ,

^ 1 T • 1 o • '£ Mariposa IJly (Cal-

monarch held Its ground. It is the Sequoia way, it a tree ocimrtnN vennstufi).



Maul Oak (Qiiercus olirj.s<>lei»i>*». ou Wawona Road.
This familiar tree, also Icnown as "Canon Live Oals,"
"Gold-Cup Oak," etc., is common on hillsides and
canon walls In the lower half of the Park, and
covers the talus and rock ledges of Yosemite and
Hetch Hetchy with low-spreading evergreen foliage.




THE KING OF THE FOREST



141



be weakened by fire, to clutch
the soil more broadly than be-
fore. Thus, here, the few re-
maining roots were sent farther
out, and new stores of nour-
ishment drawn upon. But it
must do more than feed. It
is a tree's office to be beautiful.
It Is a king's right to wear a
crown. So now the surviving




'King of the Forest," a mere Nliell,
eft by lire, of ^vlijit ^vas onee the
nionaroli of tlie Tiioliiiiine Grove;
now niulvin}; an heroir effort to re-
build it.s crown, and set a ne>v .start
in life. Tlie tliree Itv^iireN at its bane
nIiow that ItM tlianieter Ava.s altout
thirty feet. The line tree in tlie
foreground below i.s a Mix-foot i{ed
ir (AI>ieH niagrnlHea).

branchlets are cheerily turning
upward, — also after the habit
of the species when, crushed by
lightning or storm, it quickly



142



YOSEMITE AND ITS HIGH SIERRA



rebuilds its top; and one of them has already taken shape there, far aloft,
as a symmetrical young tree, undaunted by adversity, and fighting for its
share of air and sunshine. Thus would the living skeleton hide its shame
by grace of new foliage. Here's wishing it luck ! Royal endurance merits
homage. Long may so kingly a forest "character" play a part in the tree
world ! An eminent expert, famous for his knowledge of mankind, once




Three Veterans. — the "Haverford" anil "Ohio" trees in the Mariposa Grove, and Galen
Clarlt at tlie age of !)."». Tliis is said to be the last picture of tlie celebrated "Guar-
dian of Yosemite," who died a year later, in 1910. The "Haverford." named for the
college in Pennsylvania, illustrates the Indian practice of using Big Trees as back-
logs for fires. Although its core v»as burnt away, leaving a cavern that is reputed to
have sheltered seventeen horses and their riders, its remaining roots have reached
out the more stoutly for nourislinient, and are supplying ample sap to stalk an«l crown.

declared: "Skin for skin, yea, all that a man hath will he give for his life."

This Sequoia King, more than human in its tenacity, is a veritable Job of

the forest. Its faith forbids death. Better to keep on growing against

odds, better to live even as a misshapen cripple, showing what humble

beauty it may, than to stand a black and rotting shell where once it reigned

Sovereign of the Woods! Truly, it is not alone in the Forest of Arden

that we

Find tongues in trees, books in the running brooks,
Sermons in stones.



NOTES

Transportation, Hotels, Camps, Guides, etc. — Yosemite Valley is about 150 miles due
east of San Francisco. It is reached by either the Southern Pacific or the Santa Fe Rail-
way to Merced, 145 miles by rail from San Francisco and 330 from Los Angeles; by the
Yosemite Valley Railroad from Merced, 78 miles, to El Portal, just outside the National
Park boundary, and by automobile stages from El Portal to Yosemite village, 12 miles.
Round-trip tickets from San Francisco to Yosemite, $22.35; from Los Angeles, $31.20.
Sleeping-car berths, $2.50 each way.

Del Portal, the Yosemite Valley Railroad's hotel at El Portal, is more than a stop-
ping place on the way to Yosemite, as it offers excellent accommodations for sportsmen
hunting or fishing in the near-by mountains, or tourists visiting the Merced and Tuolumne
Sequoia Groves. Hotel Rates, $4.00 per day, or $22.50 per week, upwards. Automobile
round trip to the Big Trees, made in one day, $7.50.

Tourist accommodations in Yosemite are provided at present by the Sentinel Hotel
and three large permanent camps. While a larger and modern hotel is promised by the
Park administration for the season of 1915, the Sentinel Hotel, opposite Yosemite Falls,
W. M. Sell, Jr., manager, gives good service at the prices charged, $3.50 to $5.00 a day,
or $23 to $30 a week; for two persons in a room, $3.00 to $4.00 a day, or $20 to $25 a
week. Camp Ahwahnee is situated at the foot of Sentinel Rock. It is well managed by
W. M. Sell, and offers an excellent table with clean, roomy floored tents at $3.00 to $3.75
a day, or $17.50 to $22.75 a week. Camp Lost Arrow, near the foot of Yosemite Falls,
W. M. Sell, Jr., manager, is a popular resort at $2.50 a day or $15 a week.

Camp Curry, D. A. Curry, proprietor, at the upper end of the valley, is the largest
and best known of the camps. Its structures include oflfices, dining rooms, steam
laundry, bakery, bath house, swimming pool, etc. Comfortable tents are provided for
1,000 guests. Rates, $2.50 a day, or $15 weekly. At Glacier Point, overlooking
Yosemite and Little Yosemite, W. M. Sell, Jr., conducts a hotel and camp. Rates, $2.50
to $4.00 a day.

Free sites are designated by the Superintendent in different parts of the valley for
parties wishing to establish temporary private camps. Cut firewood may be bought from
the Superintendent. Tents, camp outfits, groceries and other supplies, as well as outfits




Dfl I'orliil, the Yosemite Valley KaiUviiy I'oiiipniiy'M nttrat-tive lititol at I'A l'<>rt:il.



144



NOTES



for High Sierra trips, are obtainable from the well-stocked general store of W. D.
Thornton in Yosemite. Thornton's store is also the post office. A bakery and confec-
tioner's shop, meat market, laundry, telegraph and express office, with several photo-
graphic and art studios, will be found in the village.

Carriages from the hotel and camps to all parts of the valley, and horses and guides

for the trails, are supplied by
J. W. Coffman, under regula-
tion of the Superintendent, at
whose office the authorized
rates may be obtained. Ar-
rangements and prices should
be made in advance through
the hotel or camp management.




Camp Curry, deliglitfully situ-
ated among tlie pines at the
foot of Glacier Point one mile
from Happy Isles. This is the
largest of the tourist camps in
Voseniite Valley. The little
Douglas squirrels are common
throughout the Park.

Wawona and the Mariposa
Grove. — Transportation from
Yosemite to Wawona, 2 6 miles, and thence to the Mariposa Big Tree Grove, is by the
automobile stages of the Yosemite Stage and Turnpike Company. Rates, Yosemite to
Wawona, |6.50, round trip, $13; Yosemite to Mariposa Grove, $7.50, round trip, $15.
Transportation, Yosemite to Glacier Point by stage, via Inspiration Point and Chinquapin,
$6.50 each way. At Wawona, the Wawona Hotel is one of the best kept mountain inns in
America; rates from $3.50 to $4.50 a day.

Automobiles. — Automobiles are now admitted to the Park. Good roads from Stock-
ton, Modesto and Merced, in the San Joaquin Valley, lead to the west boundary of the
Park, connecting with the Coulterville and Big Oak Flat roads. Automobiles are per-
mitted to enter the Park over either of these roads, but east of the Merced Grove they
are limited to the Coulterville road as far as Big Meadows, whence they may either pro-
ceed directly to Yosemite, or take the new road via El Portal. A fee of $5.00 is charged
for permit. Garage and automobile-camp sites are provided in the valley. For regula-
tions apply to the Superintendent.

Literature. — The useful pamphlet, General Information Begarding Tosemite National
Pari-, may be had gratis at the office of the Superintendent in Yosemite Village, or by
mail from the Department of the Interior, Washington, D. C. It contains brief notes on
the Park and its administration; altitudes, distances, trails, etc.; size of Big Trees in
Mariposa Grove; rules and authorized rates of transportation; hotels, camps, and camp-



NOTES



^4S



ing outfits; automobile regulations; and a bibliography of books and important magazine
articles. Two other government pamphlets are for sale at the Superintendent's office:
Sketch of Yosemite National Park, a popular account of Yosemite geology by F. E. Matthes,
of the U. S. Geological Survey, price 10 cents; and The Secret of the Big Trees, by Ells-
vi'orth Huntington, price 5 cents. Foley's Yosemite Souvenir, a handy pocket guide, may be
purchased at J. D. Foley's studio in the village.

Of the earlier books, Dr. L. H. Bunnell's Discovery of Yosemite, 1880, 4th ed., 1911, is
the best account of the Indian war of 1851 and the visits of the Mariposa Battalion. The
last edition is handsomely illustrated from photographs by Boysen. In the Heart of the
Sierras, by J. M. Hutchings, 188 6, is a history of the valley by one of its earliest residents.
Prof. J. D. Whitney's The Yosemite Guide-Book, 18 71, despite its obsolete theory of the
valley's origin, is a very readable and informing essay. Mountaineering in the Sierra Nevada,
1871, by Clarence King, who was Whitney's associate in the geological survey of Cali-
fornia, is one of the best books inspired by the mountains of the West.

Three booklets, Indians of Yosemite Valley, 1904; The Big Trees of California, 1907;
and The Yosemite Valley, 1910, by Galen Clark, discoverer of the Mariposa Grove and
long the guardian of Yosemite under the state regime, contain much first-hand informa-
tion. The fullest and most valuable description of the Park, with its glaciers, past and
present; its forests, flowers, birds and animals, is of course, John Muir's Yosemite^ 1912.
Muir's other books. My First Summer in the Sierra, 1911; The Mountains of California, en-
larged ed., 1913; and Our National Parks, 1909, are also full of Yosemite. Naturalist and
geologist as he is, Mr. Muir, rather than Joaquin Miller, has been the real poet of the
Sierra, though he writes in prose. His books are after all not so much treatises on its
natural history as delightful interpretations of its spirit. Yosemite Trails, 1911, by J.
Smeaton Chase, is an enjoyable account of the Yosemite uplands, especially useful on
their trees and flowers. Mr. Chase's little manual, Cone-Bearing Trees of the California
Mountains, 1911, will also be found of service.

The standard handbook on the botany of the Park is A Yosemite Flora, 1912, by
Prof. Harvey M. Hall and Carlotta C. Hall. Untechnical in style and excellently illus-
trated, with keys for identifying the trees and flowers, this accurate manual is invaluable

for field work. Prof. Willis Linn Jepson's The Trees
of California, 1909, is well planned for laymen's use,
and capitally illustrated. It is not to be confused
with his monumental and technical Silva of California,
published by the University of California. Supple-
menting these popular handbooks, Sudworth's Forest
Trees of the Pacific Slope, 1908, published by the U. S.
Forest Service, covers the Sierra forests with the
same thoroughness given to the rest of its subject.
The nine volumes of the Sierra Club Bulletin con-
tain a store of papers by experts, covering not only
the Yosemite country, but also the great mountains
of the Kings and Kern River basins. These admirably
edited publications, with a considerable library of
other mountain literature, may be consulted at the
Sierra Club's headquarters, the LeConte Memorial
Lodge, near Camp Curry. In the general periodicals
of this country and Europe, Yosemite and Hetch
Hetchy Valleys have received more attention than
any other American scenic district, and many note-
„. . . , ., ^ . , „. worthy articles may be found through the periodical

WntchlUK <lie Siiui-inc at Mirror •' = i

, j,,-g indexes and magazine files at the public libraries.





FRODI YOSEMITE VALLEY TO VVAWONA AND THE MARIPOSA GROVE.



1.


Mt. Raymond (EL


8,548


ft.).


17.


u.


Signal Peak, or Devil


Peak (7,079).


18.


3.


Wawona Point.








19.


4.


Mariposa Grove.








20.


5.


Wawona.








21.


6.


Fish Hatchery.








22.


S.


Eight Mile.
Eleven Mile.








23.
24.


».


Chinquapin.








25.


lO.


Grouse Creek.








26.


It.


Fort Monroe.








27.


12.


Inspiration Point,








28.


13.


Artist Point.








29.


14.


Old Inspiration Po


int.






30.


15.


Stanford Point.








31.


16.


Crocker Point.








32.



DeTvey Point.

Cathedral Rocks.

Cathedral Spires.

Taft Point.

Sentinel Rock.

Sentinel Dome.

Union Point.

Glacier Point.

Sentinel Hotel, Yosemite Village.

Lost Arrow Camp.

Three Brothers.

Camp Ab^^ahnee.

EI Capltan.

Lookout Point.

Ostrander Lake.

Crescent Lake.



PRESS OF

THE BLAIR-MUROOCK COMPANY

SAN FRANCISCO



INDEX

Figures in light face type refer to the text, those in heavier type to illustrations.



"Ah-wali-ncc," 3 6

Asjicn I'orcst, S)2

Automobiles, 62. 1-14

l!;iiiner, Mt., Itli

l!(.-nson Lake, 111-

Itcusun Pass. lliO, 12 1, 110

I'.ergschruiul, lOil, 110. HI4

I'.ig Oak Flat Roail. 62, !i'.i

P.loocly Canon, 4,5, 44. 4.";, KM)

Uridal \'eil Fall, 66, 76, 20, ««

Bridal \'eil Meadow, ii'S

Hroderick, Mt., 86, «.S

Bunnell, Dr. L. II., 44, 54, 145

Buttercups, 33

Camps, Alnvahnee, Curry, and

Lost Arrow, 143, 144
Cascade Falls, (15
"Cataract of Diamonds," .S3
Cathedral Creek Falls. 11«
Cathedral Peak, 30, 107
Cathedral Rocks. 62. 9 0. 1!>, (i!)
Chase, J. Smeaton. 63, 14 5
Chilnualna Falls, 02
Cirques, 79. 109, 110, 4.">, 100,

114
Clark, Galen. 145, .10, 74, 142
Clark, Mt., 82, 7, 22, 31, 68, S3,

03, 1)5, JM>, US
Clouds Rest, 94, 7, 42, OS, S5
Colby :Mtn., .^5

Cold Canon Meadows. 12 4, 40
Colorado Canon. 25, 92
Conncss, John, 56
Conness, Mt.. 10<!
Dana, Mt., 117, 120, 33, 3!), ICT;

Glacier, 100
Domes, 2S. 30, !M)
Donohue Pass. !>«, 101
Eagle Peak. 27, OS
Echo Peak, 104
El Capitan, 36, 00. 92. 23, 47, 07,

OS; Moraine, 66-72
Eleanor Canon. 12.S, 134
Eleanor Lake, 131
Electra Peak, 102
Fairview Dome, 106. 116. 107, 110
"Fallen Monarch," SO
Firs. White, 138, 3S; Red, 126,

138, 13!>. 141
Fissures. The. 92
Five-Finger Falls, 131
Florence. Mt.. 31, 3S
Forests. 29, 32, 34, 131, 134, 137,

142, 01; see Sequoias
Gannett. Dr. Ilenrv. quoted, 110
Geikie, Sir Archibald, 110
Gibl.s. Mt., 117, 33, Ifl.l
Glaciers, 26-32. 67-92, 100, 104
Glacier Landscape. 22
Glacier National Park. 25
Glacier Point, 91, 93, J», 31, ."57,

7r>, 76, SS
Glen .\ulin. 117
"Governor Tod" Group. 32
"Grizzly Giant," 46, 136
Guides. 143
Half Dome, 92. 0, 2S, 42. 40, 51,

60, 61. <SS, 73, SO. S7. SS
Hall, II. M. an.l C. C. 145
Happy Isles, 34. 41, 7!)
Hcinlocks. Mountain, 09
Hetch TIetchv, 29. 3 2, 88, 117,

120 134. .36. .'.S. 11.-;, 12.->, 127,

12S. 131, 132, 1.13. IH5
Hoffman. Mt., 79, 88, 93, 17, 45,

1)0, 104
Illilouctte Fall, 82, 7S
Illilouette Watershed, 82, 22



Indians, Vosemite, 36, 38, 49, 52.

26. 43, .•".2, .-4
Inspiration Point, 63
lack Main Canon, 10
Jepson, Prof. W. L.. 14 5
Jeffcry Pine, 138, ,S.3, !l(l. 01
"Jointing," 72, 90,. 9 2, 72
Johnson, Willard, 110
Johnson Peak, 04
King. Clarence, 145
"King of the Forest," 139-14 2,

141
Kolana Rock, 115, 126, 12S
Kuna Crest, 35, 3S, 44, OS, 00,

114
Lakes, glacial, 29, 33. 70-72, 100
Lambert Dome, 33, 108, 116, lO.S,

116
Le Conte Memorial Lodge, SO
Leopard Lily, 72
Liberty Cap, 86, 31, 6.S, S3
Little Hetch Hetchy, 126
Little Yosemite, 85, 7, 20. 31, 6S,

S3, S5
Long Mtn., 34
Lookout Point, 52
Lost Arrow, 92, 70; Trail, 61
Lyell Fork of Tuolumne, .3S. OS
Lyell Glacier, 104
Lvell. Mt.. 116. 120, 7, 25. 3S. 06,

100, 101, 103, 113
Lvman. Prof. W. I)., 30
Madera, Cal., 4 8
Mammoth Mtn.. 33
Mariposa Battalion. 4 8
Mariposa Grove, 57, 137, 32, 37,

.56, 136, 137
Marijiosa Lilv, 140
Matterhorn Canon, 120. 124, 109
^latthes, Francois E.. 88, 110, 145
McClure. Mt., 14. 25, .SS
Merced Canon, 87. 7. 31, 76. .SO
Merced Lake, 85, 98, 103. .SO
Merced River, 25, 64-66. 70, 100,

52. 61, 64, 6,S, 69, 79, 138
Mirror Lake, 87, .5.3, 145
Mono Craters, 105; Lake. 117,44
Mono Pass, 43, 44. 45, 00
:\!uir Gorge, 3.5, 124, 125
Muir, John, 36, 58, 93, 113, 145,

46, .5S
Nevada Fall, 82-4, 31, 6S, .S2
North Dome. 2S, 34, 42, 51, 67,

6S, 90, 126
Oaks, black. 134. 70. Maul, 140
Parsons Peak. 38. 98
Parsons Memorial Lodge, 117
Passes, 109, 04, 95, 99. 102. 110
Phlox, .S7
Pine. Sugar, 138, 40; Tamarack.

138; Yellow, 137-8. 134
Piute Canon. 126; :Mtn.. 114
Pleasant Valley. 126
Poliono. see Bridal \'eil Fall
Polcmonium. 43
Portal, El. G4-5, 143
Potter Point. 3S, OS
Primrose, Evening, 73
Rancheria :Mtn. 124. 126. 127
Ranier National Park, 2 5, 29
Ritter, Mt.. 112
Roads. 98-9

Rodgers Lake. 126. 17, 123
Rodgers Peak, 102
Roosevelt, Theodore, 58, 46
Roval .\rches, 92, 128, S, 51, 5.5,

OS
Sardine Lake, 45



Savage, Maj. James D., 43, 48-52
Seavey Pass, 1 14
Sentinel Dome, 00, 91
Sentinel Hotel, 143
Sentinel Rock, 92. 21, 47
Sequoias. 3 4. 138, 113

Mariposa Grove, 137, 37, 56,
SO, 136, 137, 139, 141, 142
Merced Grove, 65, 2

Tuolumne Grove, 65, 139, 129
Sierra Club. 98, 109, 113-16, 145

7, II, 14, SO, 122, 123
Smedberg Lake, 124
Smith Peak, 11.5, 127, 131
-Snow Creek l'\ills, 2(t
Snow Plant, 110
Soda Springs, 98. 106. 1 13
Spermophiles, 117
Tenava Canon. 87, 88, 2S, 42,

49, 51, .53, 59, 68
Tenaya Glacier, 88
Tenaya, Indian Chief, 43, 45, 48,

49, 52-6
Tenaya Lake, 55, 87, 30, 4,8, 50,

108
Tenaya Peak, 4S
Three Brothers. 54, 92, 27, 67
Tilden Lake, 29
Tioga Lake, 39
Tioga Road, 79. 98, 106, 115,

116. 4.5, 10.S, 110
Triple Divide Peak. 93
Trout, 102, 104, 1.37
Trails. 93, 100, 106. 109, 144, SS
Transportation. 143
Tueeulala Falls. 128
Tuolumne Canon. 113. 121. 122,

125, 126. 22, .3.5, 110, 124
Tuolumne Falls, 122. US
Tuolumne Glacier, 87, 106
Tuolumne Meadows. 105. 115-120,

11, 107. 1(18. 114, 116
Tuolumne Pass, 04
Tuolumne River, 25, 2.5, 127,

131, 1.35
Twin Lake. 29
Tnicorn Peak. 104, 107
I'nion Point. 90. 47
\ernal Fall, 82-3, 31, 6.S, 77, SI,

82
\irginia Canon. 122
\'ogelsang Pass. 95, OS
Walker, Capt. Tos. R., 40, 4 6
Walker Lake. 44
^^'apama Falls, 12S
Washburn Lake, 86, 103, .34, 94
Washington Column, 92, 42, 51
Waterfalls. 29. 33. 76. 79
Waterwheel Falls. 122. 120, 121
Watkins. Mt., 87, .53, 68
Wawona, 61, 62. 143, 62. 63. 138.

146
White Cascade. 122, 25
Whitney. Josiah D., 67, 72, 145
Wilmer Lake, 10
Yellowstone National Park. 25
YoseiTiite, name, 48



-Creek. 79, 80
-Falls, 80, 81,



l.S. 24, OS. 71.



-Lake, 70, 74
-National Park,

58, 96
-Point, 90. 93,
Trail. 18. 46.
-Vallev. 29. 32. 61, 65,

16, 46, 47, «.S, 75



17.



OS
68



26, 56,



ftyso



nend




The following maps, at the prices given, may be obtained from the Director of the U. S. Geological Survey,
Washington, D. C, or at the office of the Superintendent of the Park in Yosemite Village:

Map of Yosemite National Park, 2834 x 27 inches, scale 2 miles to the inch. Price, 50 cents a copy flat; 55 cent»
a copy folded and bound between covers.

Map of Yosemite Valley, 35 x 15^ inches, scale 2,000 feet to the inch. Price, 20 cents.

Panoramic view of Yosemite National Park, i8j4 x 18 inches, scale 3 miles to the inch. Price, 25 cents.




DUAWM BY CUKIS JOKGENSEH



COPVUIGIIT, 1914. »» Jo"" *'■ W1U.I,



Key to Outline Map of Yosemite Valley and Adjacent Peaks, with Elevations of Principal Landmarks.

Note: The elevations given below are from the maps of the United StateUeological Survey. These maps do not always agree one with ^"^^f'^';' ^"^ J"^^" ^^
the same map sHght differences between the legend and bench-mark figures are sfi)metimes found. Such variations, however, are mconsideraDie, "^^^ /"""^
feet. Where they occur, the authority of the latest map, the "Panoramic View/of the Yosemite National Park," has as far as possible been lo'iowe . ^ ■ , „ t^

The figures indicate height above sea-level. For height above the floor c5f Yosemite Valley, deduct 3,960 feet, the elevation of the pier near
In the case of waterfalls, the height, or "drop," of each is given, as well as its elefvation above sea-level.



1. Artist Point, 4,701 feet.

2. Inspiration Point, 5,391.

3. Old Inspiration Point, 6,603.

4. Stiintoid Point. 6,659.

5. Crocker Point, 7,090.

6. Dewey Point, 7,316.

7. Bridal Veil Fall, top, 4,787; drop, 620.
S. Cathedral Rocks, 6,638.

9. Cathedral Spires, 6,114.

10. Tatt Point. 7,503.

11. The Fissures.

12. Sentinel Rock, 7,046.

13. Union Point, 6,314.

14. Glacier Point, 7.214.

15. Sentinel Dome. 8,117.

16. Olacler Point Hotel.



17. Vernal Fall, top, 5,049; drop, 317.

18. Panorama Cliff. 6,224.

19. Illllouette Fall, top, 5,816; drop, 370.

20. Nevada Fall, top, 6,910; drop, 594.

21. Mt. Broderick, 6,705.

22. Liberty Cap, 7,072.

28. Little Yosemite, 6.150.

24. Mt. Starr King, 9,181.

25. Mt. Clark, 11,500.

26. Foerster Peak, 12,062.

27. Electra Peak, 12,462.

28. Rodgers Peak, 13,006.

29. Mt. Lyell, 13,090.

30. Mt. McClure.

31. Mt. Florence, 12,507.

32. Half Dome. 8.852.



33. Clouds Rest, 9,924.

34. Parker Peak, 12,850.

35. Glbbs Mountain, 12,700.

36. Tenaya Peak, 10,200.

37. Mt. Watklns, 8,235.

38. Indian Rock. 8.526.

39. Basket Dome, V.602.

40. Leaning Tower. 5,863.

41. North Dome, 7,531.

42. Washington Column, 5,912.

43. Mirror Lake, 4,096.

44. Camp Curry.
46. Kennyville.

46. Royal Arches, 5,500.

47. Indian Camp.

48. Camp Lost Arrow.



49 Camp Yosemite (Military).

50. Yosemite Point, «,936.

51. Yosemite Falls: Top of Upper Fa .

6.525; drop, 1.430. Top of Lrfjwer Fall,
4,420; drop, 320.

li. ^rle^B^roTher.. 7.773 (Eagl. Peak)
64 EI Capltan: Brow, 7,042; summit, 7,B«4.
Se Ribbon Fall, top. 7,008; drop, 1.812 .
66. Sentinel Hotel. Yosemite Village, 8,984.

57. Camp Ahwahnee.

58. Garage.

59. Lake Tenaya, 8.1<o- r»
60 Dana Mountain, 13,060.





L



16. Glacier Point Hotel,





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