John Henry Newman.

Addresses to Cardinal Newman with his replies, etc., 1879-81 online

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the necessity of a reply which such
official demonstrations seem to demand,
we cannot individually omit the oppor-
tunity of testifying our gratitude to one
from whom so many of us have directly
or indirectly received, under God, so
much benefit.

You may be sure, dear Rev. Father
while we may still so familiarly address
you that there are many among us who
do not cease and will not cease to make
you the only return that is possible in
their prayers and sacrifices, and who
hope that they are not altogether without
a share in yours.

I remain, in the name of them all,
Ever yours very faithfully in Christ,
JOHN GERARD, S.J.

* [St. Philip Ncri, St. Ignatius Loyola, St. Francis

Xavicr, St. Isidore Agricola, and St. Teresa were canonised

by Pope Gregory XV. on the same day, March 12, 1622.

fcnf St. I'hilip, by Card. Capecelatro ; translated

by Fr. Thomas Pope.]



22

To Fr. Gerard, S.J., St. Francis
Xavier's College, Liverpool.

THE ORATORY, BIRMINGHAM, Mar. 12, 1879.

MY DEAR FR. GERARD,

How very kind your letter
is ! I thank you and the other mem-
bers of your Community and College
with all my heart for so welcome a
message. Of course my first gratifi-
cation, on receiving the great honour
which is the occasion of your writing
to me, is the approbation of me
which it implies on the part of the
Holy Father. But the next and my
keen source of enjoyment is to receive
the congratulations of friends. And I
have been quite startled at receiving
so many, and so warm and not the
least of these in affectionateness from
the Houses of your Society.

Of course I can't expect to live
long but it is a wonderful termina-
tion, in God's good Providence, of my
life. I have lived long enough to see
a great marvel. I shall not forget
that I have your prayers many
thanks for them.

Most sincerely yours in Christ,
JOHN H. NEWMAN.



23

From Fr. Purbrick, S.jf., Stonyhurst.

STONYHURST COLLEGE, March 14, 1879.
VERY REV. AND DEAR DR. NEWMAN,

By passenger train to-day I
am sending you an address from all the
inmates of Stonyhurst.

A formal address always reads to me
cold and stiff, but I am sure you will
believe that there was not any want of
warmth in the feelings that prompted it.

Indeed our joy has been and is en-
thusiastic, especially amongst our own
Communities. No words could exaggerate
the veneration, love, and gratitude we all
feel towards you. Some of us know that
under God we owe our very souls to you
and all the blessings of admission into
the Church.

What can we do but unite our humble
prayers on your behalf most fervently for
every choicest grace and blessing now
and for ever.

Believe me,

Very Rev. and dear Dr. Newman,
Your devoted, humble servant in Christ,
E. J. PURBRICK, S.J.

From Stonyhurst College.

March 14, 1879.
VERY REV. AND DEAR FR. NEWMAN,

We, the Rector, Fathers,
Brothers, Philosophers and Scholars of
Stonyhurst College, seize the earliest oc-
casion, after certain assurance of the fact,
to offer your Reverence our united



24

heartfelt congratulations on your coming
enrolment among the College of Car-
dinals. We not only rejoice in common
with so many English Catholics at the
personal mark of high esteem which His
Holiness has thus shown you, but it is
to us a great cause of thankful joy, that
your theological labours and unremitting
efforts for the cause of Christ and His
Church, more particularly in this country,
have implicitly received a sanction that
must for ever in future stop the mouths
of gainsayers.

We only hope that an event so joyous
may not deprive us of the continuance of
your dear presence among us, for so long
as God in His mercy may spare you to
aid us by your wisdom and sustain us by
your bright example.

EDWARD J. PURBRICK, S.J.

STONYHURST COMMUNITY.

Thomas Murphy, S.J.; John New, S.J.; Clement W.
Barraud, S.J.; Thomas Kay, S.J.; James Pinnington,
S.J.; Sebastian Sircom, S.J. ; Frederick Myers, S.J. ;
Reginald Colley, S.J. ; Charles Widdowson, S.J. ; Herbert
W. Lucas, S.J.; Alfred Yates, S.J.; Ralph Swift, S.J.;
Frederick Jerrard, S.J. ; Herman Walmesley, S.J. ; G. R.
Kingdon, S.J.; W. H. Eyre, S.J.; Thomas Harper, S.J. ;
John O'Reilly, S.J. ; H. Mahon, S.J. ; C. Kaelin, S.J. ; John
Farmer, S.J.; Joseph Hawett, S.J.; Richard Sykes, S.J. ;
James Robinson, S.J. ; Ignatius Gartlan, S.J. ; Thomas
McMullin, S.J.; Jno. D. Whitney, S.J.; Vincent Horny-
old, S.J.; William Taylor, S.J.

PHILOSOPHERS.

Geo. Barren, Louis Benoist, Edward Nelson, B. L.
O'Donnell, T. J. Lynch, T. V. Filose, Art. Heber, Eug.
Gizard, Ignatius Rhodes, Fernand Guyot, M. de Men-
dizabai, Edward Macdonald, R. Andrew, Chas. Barry,
D. Murphy, T. E. O'Gorman, M. Pycke, F. Francia,
Theo. Benoist, W. Moylan, Jos. Scully.



STONYHURST SCHOLARS.

Francis Vincent Keating, Thomas Francis Griffin,
Ignatius Ward, Charles Redman, Francis Walsh,
George Pye, Joachim Palomo, George John, Henry John,
Arthur Bliss, Christopher O'Conor, Aloysius Guibara,
Ronald J. Macdonell, Destours P. Larue, George East-
wood, Adolphe de Rudder, H. Scrope, J. Stanton, E.
Field, H. Bliss, P. Forde, A. Codrington, W. O'Conor,
Charles Newdigate, P. McNulty, Philip Langdale,
George Pfaehler, Donald Prestage, Ignatius O'Gor-
man, Henry Marsden, Walter Clifford, Edward Cullen,
Charles Roche, Henry Roche, Alban Ellison, Paul
Keens, Alexander Morrogh, M. Kenna, W. Johnson, J.
Sybrandt, E. Kernan, L. de Romana, G. Keating. J.
Payne, E. de Alberti, John Brinkmann, Albert Swan,
Francis Seymour, Antony Povell, James Morrogh, John
Waters, Thomas Carroll, Thomas Unsworth, Eugene de
Romana, Evodio de la Pena, Jose Taraves Bastos,
Lancelot Scott, Francis Green, Henry Corrigan, Thomas
Waters, Alfred Wyse, Carlos Escovar, George Grene,
Benjain L. de Romana, Joseph Keating, J. Harris,
Joaquin Escovar, Edward Roche, Ignatius Sandoval,
Joseph Robinson, John Ellison, Charles Lambert
James Grene, Richard Miranda, Charles Rushbrooke,
Walter McCann, Valentine Blake, Joseph A. Oliver, J.
Lalor, E. O. Bryen, R. Robinson, G. Taaffe, A. Loper,
Brendan MacCarthy, Francis Butler, Charles Miller, S.
J. Considine, Camilo Palomo, Daniel Powell, James
Corrigan, Joaquin Amor, Walter Whitty, John M'Neil,
P. Considine, Henry Weld, Richard Ratcliffe, George
Murray, Bertram Garnett, John J. White, Charles E.
Scanlan, R. Hickie, Charles Lonergan, Raleigh Chi-
chester, Charles Norton, Thomas Jones, Hugh Cullen,
J. Higginson, F. Goold, Charles Waterton, Thomas
Hughes, Bernard O' Flaherty, Henry Sparrow, Albert
Morrogh, Charles McCann, John Whyte, Frederick
Garnett, Edwin Pearce, Herbert Mason, Mirza AH
Ackbar, Reginald Gibb, Albert M. Smith, W. Grimshaw,
W. Barron, L. Caiman, F. Belton, J. Urruela, W.
Wilkinson, Alfred E. Lonergan, John F. O'Connor,
John White, Robert Hawkins, John Weld, Felix Larue,
Gerald McClement, Charles Ryan, J. Perry, Robert de
Romana, Edward Reynolds, Paul Chastanet, T. Fitz-
patrick, John Ratcliffe, William McEvoy, P. Hallinan,
G. Kernan, J. Hallinan, J. Dewhurst, S. Murphy, A.
Kelly, T. Clery, F. Reynolds, George Gruggen, Ed.
Kelly, Ed. Blanchfieid, Jas. Gaynor, Jas. Feely, Jn.
Feely, Jose Renshaw, Juan Tuason, M. Sandoval, C.
Banon, M. Pena, M. Renshaw, T. Cochran, John Shiel,
Eugene Fogarty, Frederick Marsden.



26



SEMINARY COMMUNITY.

Fathers Stephen Joseph Perry, SJ. ; Henry Thie-
man, SJ. ; J. E. Moore, SJ.; Sidney F. Smith, S J. ;
Bernard Bodder, SJ.; Frederick Gower, SJ.; Ewan
Macpherson, SJ.; John George Gretton, SJ.; William
J. Thomson, SJ.; Louis Payne, S J. ; Philip Bernard,
S.J.; Francis Chew, SJ. ; Raymund Delebecque, S J. ;
E. J. Romana, SJ.; Herbert H. E. Thurstan, S J. ;
Chas. J. Nicholson, SJ.; Thomas Slater, SJ. ; Denis
Manning, SJ. ; Lawrence Lynch, SJ.; Bart. Cooney,
SJ.; Michael O'Reilly, S J. ; Wm. Carlisle, S.J.; Geo.
Eastham, SJ.; Michael Maloney, SJ.; Henry Starkey,
SJ.; Wm. McKeon, SJ. ; Donald C. V. Campbell,
S J. ; J. Redman, S J. ; Francis O'Donnell, S J. ; Wm.
L. D. Young, SJ.; Joseph Browne, SJ.; John E.
Darby, S J. ; M. A. Power, SJ.; Edw. Etherington,
SJ. ; Isaac Lee, SJ. ; C. H. Chandler, SJ. ; Compton
T. Gallon, S J. ; J. F. Dobson, S.J.; H. J. Garcia, SJ.;
Chas. Drakes, SJ. ; John Robertson, S.J.; Wm.
Knowles, SJ.; Richard Aloysius Luse, S.J.; James
Colgan, SJ.: Robert Ross, SJ.; Thos. Meynell, SJ.;
Alfred F. Allen, SJ.; Richard Bolton, SJ. ; Thos.
Horton, SJ.; Edw. F. Barraud, SJ. ; Austin Barrow,
SJ.

HODDER COMMUNITY AND SCHOLARS.

William H. Kerr, SJ. ; John Proctor, SJ.; John
Reynolds, John Lalor, W. Bodkin, Paul Amor, Henry
Brighan, Frederic Whyte, Edmund Belton, Bernard
Newdigate, Vincent Johnson, Alfred H. Harrison, Ed-
mund Perry, Thomas Mundy, Bertie Kelly, Bernard E.
Goodrick, Hugh Mason, Patrick McEvoy, Patrick Con-
sidine, Charles Blake, Gerald Jackson, Carteret Maule,
John Noble, Hubert L. Harrison, Frank Irwin, Edward
Duff, Paul Monselle ; John McCormack, SJ. ; George
Dover, S J. ; Arthur Cooper, Charles Whyte, Thomas
Gallaher, Richard Keogh, Robert Parry, Alexander
Amor, Charles Chichester, Frederic McClement, Ray-
mond Oliveros, Alfred Duff, Arthur Irwin, Francis
Kennedy, Herbert Harrison, Charles Spencer, Bernard
Mason, Charles Eastwood, Frederick Chadwick, Percy
Lalor, Henry Caiman, G. Maxwell Stuart, George
Whyte, Harry Irwin, J. Latham, Thomas Stevens,
Reginald Harrison.

March 14, 1879.



Reply to the Address from Stonyhurst
College.

THE ORATORY, BIRMINGHAM, Mar. 17, 1879.

MY DEAR FR. RECTOR,

MY DEAR FATHERS, BROTHERS, AND

OTHERS OF THE COLLEGE AT

STONYHURST,

The special honour which at
this time has been conferred on me
by the Sovereign Pontiff has been
made still more grateful to me by the
pleasure which it has given to my
fellow Catholics, and still more and
singularly so by the gracious message
which has accompanied it from the
Holy Father, that it was his express
purpose, in raising me to the Sacred
College, to do an act acceptable to the
Catholic body and to my countrymen.
To this intention of the Holy
Father you have, without knowing of
it, responded in an address to me, as
artistically beautiful in its appearance
as in its wording it is affectionate,
and which comes to me with an ad-
ditional charm as uniting such various
signatures, of young and old, of
masters and scholars, of friends and
strangers, of ecclesiastics and laymen,
in one act of kindness and sympathy.



28

I thank you for it with all my
heart, and shall take care to place it
on our walls as a document for pos-
terity. Some fifty or a hundred years
hence it will, beyond dispute, have a
fresh and distinct interest for Catho-
lics, as being then found to con-
tain names, which by that time will
belong to history, as belonging to
men, who in their day, in various
lines of work, have done good services
either to Holy Church or to their
own country and people.

Believe me to be, with much grati-
tude, my dear Fr. Rector, Fathers
and others,

Most truly yours,

JOHN H. NEWMAN.



From Abbot Burchall, President-General
of the English Benedictines.

WOOLTON, LIVERPOOL, March 14, 1879.

VERY REV. AND DEAR FATHER,

On my return home yesterday
evening I read in the Tablet a confirma-
tion of the report that His Holiness has
intimated his desire of raising your
Paternity to the dignity of one of the
Princes of the Church.

Permit me, Very Rev. and dear Father,



2 9

in my own name and in the name of the
English Benedictine Congregation to ten-
der to you our united and heartfelt con-
gratulations on your having been selected
by the Head of the Church for this
dignity. It is a pleasure to us to unite
our congratulations with those of un-
numbered friends and admirers of Dr.
Newman.

That it may please God to bless you
with health to wear the Purple for many
long years to come and to continue your
labours in the good cause is and shall be
the prayer of

Very Rev. and dear Father,

Your faithful servant in Christ,

R. BURCHALL,

President-General of the English
Benedictine Congregation.



To Abbot Burchall, President-General,

O.S.B.
THE ORATORY, BIRMINGHAM, March 17, 1879.

MY DEAR FR. BURCHALL,

I feel the extreme kindness
of your letter written in your own
name and in that of the English
Benedictine Congregation.

It is wonderful to me that I should
have lived long enough to have these
great marks of kindness, and such
great honours, both from the Sove-
reign Pontiff and my brethren, and I



30

thank you and yours for the part you
have taken in them with all my
heart.

Say this to the good Fathers whom
you represent, and tell them that I
take their present charity to me as a
pledge that, when my time is up and
I am called away, they will not for-
get me in their good prayers.

Most truly yours in Jesus Christ,
JOHN H. NEWMAN.

[See p. 208.]



From St. Edmund's College, Douai.
March 12, 1879.

EMINENCE,

Be good enough to accept the
warm and sincere congratulations of the
Prior and Community of St. Edmund's
on the occasion of your being raised to
the Cardinalate.

To one so thoroughly acquainted with
whatever is peculiar to the Benedictine
spirit, it is unnecessary to say much.
You will guess our sentiments much
better than we could express them. One
thing, however, we must say. Since the
memorable year 1845 our minds and
hearts have ever followed you in your
wonderful career, and no tongue could
well describe the respect, affection, (and
at times the sympathy), we have all felt
for you.



We have nothing amongst us which
could engage you to visit us ; but we
think that the very ground we tread on,
this holy place whence so many went
forth to keep up Catholicity in England
even at the cost of life, might possibly
induce your Eminence to take Douai as
a resting-place on your journey to Rome.
A visit from you would make us all so
happy, and we should endeavour to pro-
cure an extra supply of Benedictine sim-
plicity for the occasion.

I remain, Eminence,
Your dutiful servant in Christ,

E. A. O'GORMAN (PRIOR).



To Prior Gorman, O.S.B., of St.
Edmund's, Douai.

THE ORATORY, BIRMINGHAM, March 17, 1879.

MY DEAR PRIOR GORMAN,

The kindness of your letter
embodying the congratulations of your-
self and your Community on the Holy
Father's goodness to me cannot be
duly answered in a formal letter.
Considering the place the College at
Douai holds in English Catholic His-
tory, it is wonderful that I should
have received such a letter as yours,
and should have lived long enough to
receive such honour.

I wish I could promise myself the



32

pleasure of availing myself of the
invitation you give me, but I am not
very strong and know nothing of the
future.

Meanwhile I feel sure you will not
forget me in your good prayers,
My dear Fr. Prior,

Yours very sincerely,
JOHN H. NEWMAN.



From Fr. Keogh, Superior of The
Oratory, London.

THE ORATORY, LONDON, Feb. 24, 1879.

MY DEAR FATHER,

I hope you will let me say, for
myself and in the name of all our
Fathers, how much we feel for you and
all your Fathers in the trying circum-
stances of the moment, and how con-
stantly we shall pray for you ; and at the
same time with what affectionate rejoic-
ing we have heard of so great a mark of
honour and love on the part of the Sove-
reign Pontiff towards you.

Whatever happens this at least will
remain.

Believe me, My dear Father,
Always yours with great affection in
St. Philip.

EDWARD S. KEOGH,
Cong. Orat.



33



From Fr. Keogh, Superior of The

Oratory, London.
THE ORATORY, LONDON, March 20, 1879.

MY DEAR FATHER,

I write on behalf of our Fathers
to beg your acceptance of a little present
(which I have just forwarded to Edgbas-
ton) in the hope that you will sometimes
use it in the functions of your dignity as
Cardinal.

With it they beg me also to send you
in their name the vote of our Congrega-
tion of which a copy is enclosed.

With all our kindest wishes, I am,
My dear Father,

Affectionately Yours,
EDWARD S. KEOOH,
Cong. Orat.

From the Fathers of The Oratory,
London.
(Sent) March 20, 1879.

Extract from the Minutes of a General Congrega-
tion held March 6, 1879.

The Fathers of the London Oratory,
assembled in General Congregation, desire
to offer to Fr. Newman the expression of
their affectionate congratulations on the
announcement of the honour to be con-
ferred on him by the Vicar of Christ in
creating him a Cardinal of the Holy
Roman Church.

Whilst sharing with so many others
the general rejoicing at so high a recog-
3



34

nition of his great services to the Church
and to souls, the Fathers of this Congre-
gation feel a singular and special joy,
inasmuch as they venerate in Father
Newman him to whom, under God, they
owe the happiness of wearing St. Philip's
habit and of being St. Philip's Sons.

EDWARD S. KEOGH,
Praepos.

The Cardinal answered the above informally, and, as
in the case of Oscott, the Diocesan Seminary, and else-
where, a visit and a discourse took the place of a formal
reply. While staying in London with the Duke of Nor-
folk, in May of the following year, he assisted in Cappa
Magna at Vespers in the Oratory, and afterwards gave a
discourse in the Little Oratory to the Brothers.* Before
leaving London he held a reception of clergy in the Oratory
house. See p. 321.



From the Chapter of Westminster.
WESTMINSTER, March 18, 1879.

VERY REV. AND DEAR FATHER,

The Provost and Canons of the
Metropolitan Chapter of Westminster de-
sire to express to you the heartfelt grati-
fication with which they have learnt that
His Holiness Pope Leo XIII. has intimated
his intention of raising you to the rank of
a Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church.
They rejoice in this recognition of the
eminent services you have rendered to
the cause of religion and morality, both
before and since your submission to the
Catholic Church, and in so conspicuous a
testimony to the virtues of a life charac^

* See pp. 256-60.






35

terised throughout by the most sensitive
obedience to the dictates of conscience
and the voice of authority.

The almost unexampled unanimity with
which the announcement of your approach-
ing elevation has been welcomed by the
principal organs of public opinion, and in
every class of society throughout the
kingdom, is a manifest proof of the cor-
rectness with which the Holy Father has
interpreted the feelings and anticipated
the wishes of the people of these is-
lands, by conferring this signal mark of
favour and confidence on one so univer-
sally revered and beloved.

The Provost and Canons feel the sin-
cerest pleasure in uniting their congratu-
lations with those which you are receiving
on every side, and they earnestly pray
that you may still live many years to
adorn a dignity so richly merited and so
gracefully bestowed.

Signed in behalf of the Chapter,
WILLIAM PROVOST HUNT,
GEORGE CANON LAST, Sec.

To the Provost and Canons of West-
minister.

THE ORATORY, BIRMINGHAM, March 22, 1879.
VERY REV. AND DEAR PROVOST OF

WESTMINSTER,
I have delayed my reply to
the most welcome congratulations ad-
dressed to me by yourself and the



36

Canons of Westminster, on occasion
of the singular honour which the
Holy Father graciously intends for
me, simply because I have been con-
fused at receiving words so very kind
and so very earnest. How can I re-
fuse a praise which is so pleasant ?
How can I accept what, according to
my knowledge of myself, is so beyond
what I can justly claim ?

However, such words at least are
signs of your affectionate good-will
towards me, and no misgiving about
myself can deprive me of a right to
them. As such I thank you for them
with all my heart, and shall treasure
them.

It is indeed a happiness as great
as it is rare that those special feel-
ings which are commonly elicited in
a man's friends after his death should
in my own case find expression in
my behalf while I am yet alive.

With deep gratitude to those who
have been so good to me,

I am, my dear Very Rev. Provost,

Sincerely yours in Christ,

JOHN H. NEWMAN.



37

From the Provost and Canons of Hex-
ham and Newcastle.

OLD ELVET, DURHAM,
St. Cuthberfs Day, March 20, 1879.

VERY REV. AND DEAR DR. NEWMAN,

Our Chapter meeting was on
Tuesday the i8th, and the Canons com-
missioned me to offer you our united,
unanimous, and warmest congratulations
on the high dignity to which you are
about to be raised by the Holy Father.
You have not more loyal or devoted
friends than the clergy of this diocese, and
I am sure it will please you to know that
many of us are indebted to your writings
for a deeper appreciation of the beauty
and truth of our holy Faith.

We rejoice, therefore, exceedingly that
your most valuable services to the Clergy
and the Church have met with their fit-
ting recognition and recompense. It is a
special subject of congratulation to us
that you, whom we have always looked
upon as our champion and defender,
should be the first amongst the second
order of the English Clergy to be made
a Prince of the Church.

We pray that your life may yet be pro-
longed to add lustre to the Purple, and to edify
the Church by your writings and virtues.

I have the honour to be,
Very Rev. and dear Dr. Newman,

With much respect,
Your obedient servant in Christ,

EDWARD CONSITT,
Provost of Hexham and Newcastle.



38

To the Provost and Canons of Hex-
ham and Newcastle.

THE ORATORY, BIRMINGHAM, March 22, 1880.

MY DEAR RT. REV. PROVOST OF
HEXHAM,

I do not know how ade-
quately to express the great pleasure
with which I have received the con-
gratulations of yourself and your
Chapter on occasion of the singular
honour which the Holy Father pro-
poses to confer on me.

That honour is the highest that I
could receive at his hands. I should
be utterly heartless if it did not
touch and gratify me deeply. But it
is no want of due appreciation of it
or ingratitude to the giver if I say
how greatly it adds to my happiness
to find his condescension on my be-
half so warmly welcomed, nay hailed
with so generous an impulse, by my
brethren in the priesthood and by
ecclesiastics so highly placed as your-
selves.

I have no fear lest, so speaking,
I should be mistaken by him who
has been so good to me ; for I have
reason to know that, with an affec-
tionate thought not only of me, but
of his children in these parts gene-



39

rally, and as realising my antecedents
and my present circumstances in my
own country, it has been his express
intention, in bestowing on me this
high dignity, to do an act which will
be grateful to the Catholic body, and
even to England itself.

You will understand how proud I
am that what in you has been a
spontaneous kindness towards me
should have been in the Holy Father
a sure anticipation of it.

I take for granted that those who
have been so considerate towards me
in other ways do not forget how old
I am and the needs of old men.

I am, my dear Provost of Hexham,
Sincerely yours in Christ,
JOHN H. NEWMAN,

Of the Oratory.



Letter from Fr. Robinson, Superior of

the Oblates of St. Charles.
BAYSWATER, LONDON, March 23, 1879.
VERY REV. AND DEAR FATHER,

I have the great pleasure of
forwarding to you a little address of con-
gratulation from our Fathers on the
honour you are about to receive from
our Holy Father.

As two of our Fathers are unfortu-
nately away at present, their names do



40

not appear, and they will regret very
much not to have been able to join the
others in this token of sincere esteem
and affection.

Although I am myself a perfect stranger
to you, you are not so to me. For many
years I have learnt to know you and to
love you in your works in a way that I
can only describe as being akin to the
love which you yourself have somewhere
expressed towards the " Ancient Saints,"
known only to you in their words and
works.

I hope you will kindly forgive me for
thus expressing my feelings, and believe
me,

Very Rev. and dear Father,

Yours very respectfully and sincerely
in Christ,

CUTHBERT ROBINSON,
Sup. Ob. St. C.

From the Oblates of St. Charles at
Bayswater, London.

ST. MARY OF THE ANGELS,
BAYSWATER, LONDON, March 22, 1879.

VERY REV. AND DEAR FATHER,

We, the Priests of the Con-
gregation of the Oblates of St. Charles,
in the diocese of Westminster, desire to
offer you our sincere and heartfelt con-
gratulations on the honour which is
about to be conferred upon you by his
Holiness Leo XIII.



41

\Ye are conscious that we are only
uttering the common sentiments of all
Catholics, whether clergy or laity and
indeed of all classes of our countrymen,


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