John Henry Newman.

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bright,
Aiming as emblems of their God to shine,
Christ in their heart, and on their brow His
Sign,—



266 APPENDIX.

Soft funeral lights in the world's twilight dim,
Loving their God, and ever loved by Him.

Ye countless multitudes, content to bow
To the soft thraldom of the marriage vow !
I mark your haughty step, your forward gaze,
Gems deck your hair, and silk your limbs

arrays ;
Come, tell the gain which wedlock has

conferr'd
On man ; and then the single shall be heard.

The married many thus might plead, I wean ;
Right glib their tongue, full confident their

mien : —
' ' Hear all who live ! to whom the nuptial

rite
Has brought the privilege of life and light.
We, who are wedded, but the law obey
Stamp'd at creation on our blood and clay,
What time the Demiurge our line began,
Oped Adam's side, and out of man drew man.
Thenceforth let children of a mortal sod
Honor the law of earth, the primal law of

God.



THE MARRIED AND THE SINGLE. 26^

' ' List, you shall hear the gifts of price that

lie
Gather'd and bound within the marriage-tie.
What taught the arts of life, the truths which

sleep
In earth, or highest heaven, or vasty deep?
What fill'd the mart, and urged the vessel

brave
To link in one fair countries o'er the wave ?
What raised the town ? what gave the type

and germ
Of social union, and of sceptre firm ?
What the first husbandman, the glebe to

plough.
And rear the garden, but the marriage vow ?



' ' Nay, list again ! Who seek its kindly

chain,
A second self, a double presence gain ;
Hands, eyes, and ears, to act or suffer here,
Till e'en the weak inspire both love and

fear, —
A comrade's sigh to soothe when cares annoy,
A comrade's smile, to elevate his joy.



268 APPENDIX.

* Nor say it weds us to a carnal life,

When want is urgent, fears and vows art

rife.
Light heart is his, who has no yoke at home.
Scant prayer for blessings, as the seasons come;
But wife, and offspring, goods which go or

stay,
Teach us our need, and make us trust and

pra}^
Take love away, and life would be defaced,
A ghastly vision on a howling waste.
Stern, heartless, reft of the sweet spells which

swage
The throes of passion, and which gladden

age.
No child's sweet pranks, once more to make

us young ;
No ties of place about our heart-strings flung ;
No public haunts to cheer ; no festive tide
When harmless mirth and smiling wit pre-
side ;
A life which scorns the gifts by heaven

assigned,
Nor knows the sympathy of human kind.



THE MARRIED AND THE SINGLE. 269

''Prophets and teachers, priests and victor

kings,
Deck'd with each grace which heaven-taught

nature brings,
These were no giant offspring of the earth,
But to the marriage-promise owed their

birth : —
Moses and Samuel, David, David's Son,
The blessed Tishbite, the more blessed John,
The sacred Twelve in apostolic choir,
Strong-hearted Paul, instinct with seraph

fire.
And others, now or erst, who to high heaven

aspire.
Bethink ye ; should the single state be best,
Yet who the single, but my offspring blest ?
My sons, be still, nor with your parents

strive :
They coupled in their day, and so ye live."

Thus marriage pleads. Now let her rival

speak —
Dim is her downcast eye, and pale her cheek ;
Untrimm'd her gear ; no sandals on her feet ;
A sparest form for austere tenant meet.



270 APPENDIX.

She drops her veil her modest face around,
And her lips open, but we hear no sound.
I will address her: — "Hail, O child of

Heaven,
Glorious within ! to whom a post is given
Hard by the Throne where angels bow and

fear,
E'en while thou hast a name and mission

here,
O deign thy voice, unveil thy brow and see
Thy ready guard and minister in me.
Oft hast thou come heaven-wafted to my

breast,
Bright Spirit ! so come again, and give me

rest."



. . . ''Ah, who has hither drawn my back-
ward feet,
Changing for worldly strife my lone retreat ?
Where, in the silent chant of holy deeds,
I praise my God, and tend the sick soul's

needs ;
By toils of day, and vigils of the night,
By gushing tears, and blessed lustral rite.



THE QUEEN OF SEASONS. 271

I have no sway amid the crowd, no art
In speech, no place in council or in mart.
Nor human law, nor judges throned on high,
Smile on my face, and to my words reply.
Let others seek earth's honors ; be it mine
One law to cherish, and to track one line,
Straight on towards heaven to press wdth

single bent.
To know and love my God, and then to die

content."

Oxford. ^^34'



THE QUEEN OF SEASONS.
(a Song for an inclement May.)

All is divine

which the Highest has made,
Through the days that He wrought,

till the day when He stay'd ;



272 APPENDIX.

Above and below,

within and around,
From the centre of space,

to its uttermost bound.



In beauty surpassing

the Universe smiled,
On the morn of its birth,

like an innocent child.
Or like the rich bloom

of some delicate flower ;
And the Father rejoiced

in the work of His power.



Yet w^orlds brighter still,

and a brighter than those,
And a brighter again,

He had made, had He chose ;
And you never could name

that conceivable best,
To exhaust the resources

the Maker possessed



THE QUEEN OF SEASONS. 273

But I know of one work

of His Infinite Hand,
Which special and singular

ever must stand ;
So perfect, so pure,

and of gifts such a store,
That even Omnipotence

ne'er shall do more.



The freshness of May,

and the sweetness of June,
And the fire of July

in its passionate noon.
Munificent August,

September serene.
Are together no match



for my glorious Queen.



O Mary, all months

and all days are thine own,
In thee lasts their joyousness,

when they are gone ;
18



274 APPENDIX.

And we give to thee May,

not because it is best,

But because it comes first,

and is pledge of the rest.

The Oratory. 18^0,



HEATHEN GREECE.

(a song.)

Where are the Islands of the Blest ?

They stud the ^gean Sea ;
And where the deep Elysian rest ?
It haunts the vale where Peneus strong
Pours his incessant stream along,
While craggy ridge and mountain bare
Cut keenly through the liquid air,
And, in their own pure tints array'd.
Scorn earth's green robes which change and

fade.
And stand in beauty undecay'd,
Guards of the bold and free.



TO EDWARD CASWALL. 275

For what is Afric, but the home

Of burning Phlegethon ?
What the low beach and silent gloom,
And chilling mists of that dull river,
Along whose bank the thin ghosts shiver, —
The thin wan ghosts that once were men, — -
But Tauris, isle of moor and fen.
Or, dimly traced by seamen's ken.

The pale-cliff' d Albion.
The Oratory. 18^6.



TO EDWARD CASWALL.

(a gift for the new year, in return for
his volume of poems. )

Once, o'er a clear calm pool,
The fulness of an over-brimming spring,
I saw the hawthorn and the chestnut fling
Their willing arms, of vernal blossoms full
And light green leaves : the lilac too was theic.
The prodigal laburnum, dropping gold,
While the rich gorse along the turf crept near.
Close to the fountain's margin, and made bolJ
To peep into that pool, so calm and clear : — -



276 APPENDIX.

As if well pleased to see their image bright
Reflected back upon their innocent sight ;
Each flower and blossom shy
Lingering the live-long day in still delight,
Yet without touch of pride, to view,
Yea, with a tender, holy sympathy,
What was itself, yet was another too.

So on thy verse, my Brother and my Friend,

— The fresh upwelling of thy tranquil spirit, —

I see a many angel forms attend ;

And gracious souls elect,

And thronging sacred shades, that shall inherit

One day the azure skies.

And peaceful saints, in whitest garments

deck'd;
And happy infants of the second birth : —
These, and all other plants of Paradise,
Thoughts from above, and visions that are

sure.
And providences past, and memories dear.
In much content hang o'er that mirror pure,
And recognize each other's faces there,
And see a heaven on earth.
The Oratory. January z, 18 ^8.



INDEX



All-bountiful Creator, who

All is divine ......

All tender lights, all hues divine
And w^ould'st thou reach, rash scholar mine
Are these the tracks of some unearthly Friend
As, when the hand some mimic form would

paint

Banish' d the House of sacred rest .
Between two comrades dear .

Bide thou thy time

Cease, Stranger, cease those piercing notes
Christ bade His followers take the sword
Come, Holy Ghost, who ever One .
Creator of the starry pole
Day's herald bird .....
Dear Frank, this morn has usher'd in
Death was full urgent with thee. Sister dear
Deep in his meditative bower .

Did we but see

Do not their souls, who 'neath the Altar wait

277



PAGE
162
271

34
41

264

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176

52
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no
156
169
148
236

26

lOI

82
126



278 INDEX.

Each trial has its weight; which, whoso bears

Ere yet I left home's youthful shrine

Faint not, and fret not, for threaten'd woe

Father of Lights, by whom each day

Father of mercies infinite

Framer of the earth and sky .

" Give any boon for peace " .

Glory of the eternal Heaven .

Hark, a joyful voice is thrilling

Haunting gloom and fitting shades

Hid are the saints of God

How can I keep my Christmas feast

How didst thou start, Thou Holy Baptist, bid

How shall a child of God fulfil

I am rooted in the wall ....

I bear upon my brow the sign

I bow at Jesu's name ....

I dream'd that, with a passionate complaint

I have been honor'd and obey'd

I rise and raise my clasped hands to Thee

I sat beneath an olive's branches grey

I saw thee once, and nought discern'd

If e'er I fall beneath Thy rod .

In childhood, when with eager eyes

In service o'er the Mystic Feast I stand .

Jesus, Maria — I am near to death .

Ladies, well I deem, delight .

Latest born of Jesse's race

Lead, Kindly Light, amid the encircling gloom



INDEX. 279



Let heathens sing Thy heathen praise

Let us arise, and watch by night

Light of the anxious heart

Lord, in this dust Thy sovereign voice

Lord of unbounded space

" Man goeth forth " with reckless trust

Man is permitted much .

Many the guileless years the Patriarch spent

May the dread Three in One, who sways

Mid Balak's magic fires .

Mortal ! if e'er thy spirits faint

Moses, the patriot fierce, became

My Father's hope ! my childhood's dream

My hom.e is now a thousand miles away .

My oldest Friend, mine from the hour

My smile is bright, my glance is free

Now is the Autumn of the Tree of Life .

Now that the day -light dies away .

Now that the day-star glimmers bright .

O aged Saint ! far off I heard .

O comrade bold of toil and pain

O God from God, and Light from Light .

O God, of Thy soldiers ....

O God, unchangeable and true

O God, who canst not change nor fail

O God, who hast given , . . •

O heart of fire ! misjudged by wilful man

O Holiest Truth ! how have I lied to Thee

O Holy Lord, who with the Children Three



28o INDEX,

O Lord and Christ . . . ...

O Lord ! when sin's close-marshaJl'd line
O Lord, who thron'd in the holy height .
Oh ! miserable power ....

O piteous race . . ...

O prophet, tell me not of peace

O purest Symbol of the Eternal Son

O rail not at our kindred in the North .

O, say not thou art left of God

O that Thou wouldest rend the breadth of sky

O ye who seek the Lord ....

Of the Father Effluence bright.
Once, as I brooded o'er my guilty state .
Once cast with men of language strange .
Once, o'er a clear, calm pool .
One only, of God's messengers to man .
Paler have grown the shades of night
Peace loving man, of humble heart and true
Poor wand'rers, ye are sore distress' d
Prune thou thy word=;, the thoughts control
Say, has thou track'd a traveller's round.
Say, who is he in deserts seen .
Secure ia his prophetic strength.
See, the golden dawn is glowing
She is not gone ; — still in our sight .
Sleep has refresh'd our limbs, we spring .
Some one whisper' d yesterday.

Souls of the just

Supernal Word, proceeding from



INDEX.



2«I



The Angel-lights of Christmas morn .

The ark of God has hidden strength

The better portion didst thou choose, Great

Heart

The Church shone bi'ightly in her youthful days
The dawn is sprinkled o'er the sky .
" The Fathers are in dust, yet live to God "
The number of Thine own complete
The red sun is gone ....
The time has been, it seem'd a precept plain
The world has cycles in its course, when all
There is in stillness oft a magic power
There is not on the earth a soul so base
They are at rest ....
They do but grope in learning's pedant round.
Thou champion high
Thou to wax fierce .

Thrice bless'd are they, who feel their loneli-
ness . . . . .
Thy words are good, and freely given
Time was, I shrank from what was right.
To-day the Blessed Three in One
Two brothers freely cast their lot
Unveil, O Lord, and on us shine
Unwearied God, before whose face
We are not children of a guilty sire.
Weep not for me ,

What time my heart unfolded its fresh leaves
When first earth's rulers welcomed home



282



INDEX.



When first God stirred me, and the Church's

word .....

When Heaven sends sorrow
When I am sad, I say
When I look back upon my former race
When I sink down in gloom or fear.
When I would search the truths that in me burn
When mirth is full and free
When royal Truth, released from mortal throes
Whence is this awe, by stillness spread
Whene'er across this shiful flesh of mine
When'er goes forth Thy dread command
Where are the Islands of the Blest ?.
Where'er I roam in this fair English land
While Moses on the Mountain lay .
Who madest all and dost control
Whom all obey ....
Why, dear Cousin why .
Why loiterest within Simon's walls .
Why, wedded to the Lord, still yearns my heart
" Woe 's me ! " the peaceful prophet cried
Ye cannot halve the Gospel of God's grace



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Online LibraryJohn Henry NewmanHymns → online text (page 8 of 8)