John Henry Newman.

Selection adapted to the seasons of the Ecclesiastical year from the Parochial & plain sermons of John Henry Newman online

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.Tsity of California.



SELECTION

to tJ?e >eaison0 of te <Eccle0iaj0tical



FROM THE



PAROCHIAL AND PLAIN SERMONS



Up t&r flame



Edition. Crown 8f.

Lectures on the Doctrine of Justification.

New Edition. Crown Sew.

Sermons bearing upon Subjects of the Day.
cdby thcko. \v. J O.I'ELAND, 1'.

Fifteen Sermons preached before the Univer-

of Oxford, between A.D. 1826 and 1845.
AVw Edition* Eifkt Volt. Crown 8cv. 51. tatk. Sold ufa>.

Parochial and Plain Sermons. Edited by the 1

Cor ELAND, B. D., Rector of Farnhmro,

K I VINGTONS

London, $Eforft, anD



SELECTION

jatrapteti to tlje >ea<son0 of tlje (Ecclegiagfttcal gear



FROM THE



Parochial & Plain Sermons



JOHN HENRY NEWMAN, B.D.

\\

SOMETIME VICAR OF ST. MARY S, OXFORD



r^s^

fUHIVBRSITT]



RIVINGTONS

WATERLOO PLACE, LONDON
anti eiambritice



PREFACE.

THE present volume has for its design the publication,
in a convenient and inexpensive form, uniform with the
rest, of a selection of about fifty from the " Parochial and
Plain Sermons " of the Author ; such as might be accept-
able at once to those for whose benefit the Sermons were
originally designed, and not unacceptable to others into
whose hands the book might fall, in the interest of a
common faith and love.

In the short Preface to the eight volumes mention was
made of the effect of the Sermons "in bringing out the
fundamental Articles of the Faith, and their bearing on the
formation of the Christian character." It is well to state
here that the choice made in the Selection has been made
with special reference to that bearing.

The Author in his earliest work, the " History of the
Arians," 1 which preceded the first volume of the Sermons,
while insisting on the duty of the Church to define and
1 First edition, p. 163.



v

preserve the faith once delivered to it by the imposition of
creeds, speaks of " the ministers of Christ " as " answerable
for the formation of one, and one only, character in
heart of man."

This may be fairly called the keynote of his teaching.
It seems to have been his great aim from the first, under a
solemn sense of this responsibility, to trace on the heart,
f illustration, the features of that char-
acter, and to show, with deep study of our moral nn*
and far-react \\ faith on the basis of exact

and definite doctrine energizes in enlarged and expansive
love,

is the pervading spirit nU

f the eight volumes, and it is matter of deep interest
to note, in his 1 time on "Subjects of the Day,"

the affecting terms in which tin* Author, amidst sad experi-
ence of the evils of disunion, reflects on " the abundant
nee which we have on all sides of us, that the division
lurches is the corruj earls." *

may be hoped that these remarks on the tone and
tenor of the Sermons at large will go far in recommending
such a Selection of them as from their bearing on
formation of the Christian character may best contribute
to the promotion of mutual sympathy between estranged
communions and alienated hearts. The Selection, there-



Preface. vii

fore, is rather ethical than theological. It consists, with
the exception of a few special sermons for the most im-
portant Days, mainly of such as, though not ranging strictly
and methodically with the Calendar, will be found more
or less adapted for reading in the Seasons as they pass.

In accordance with the principle on which the eight
volumes were edited in 1868, the Sermons are unaltered,
except by the substitution of the words " Holy Eucharist "
for "the Lord's Supper" in one place, and "Holy Com-
munion " for " Communion Service " in another, these
substituted terms, or the like, being used already in
other sermons, and commending themselves to many into
whose hands it is desirable that the volume should fall.

It only remains to say, with regard to the arrangement,
that as there are very rarely more than six Sundays between
the first Sunday in the New Year and Septuagesima, and
very rarely six in Epiphany when there is a second Sunday
after Christmas, the whole number, " six " before and after
Epiphany, are placed under the general head "Epiphany;"
and as the sermons after Trinity are confined to twenty-
two, the six in Epiphany may be used though one may
have been used before.

W. J. C.

October 1878.



CONTENTS.



SERMON I.
(Advent.)

^SELF-DENIAL THE TEST OF RELIGIOUS EARNESTNESS.
ft is fn'gfj time to afoake out of sleep. ROM. xiii. 1 1 . . .



SEXMON If.

(Advent.)
DIVINE CALLS.

Eno tljc Horti came, ana stooo, ana called as at otfyer times, Samuel,
Samuel. Cfjett Samuel ansfoerco, ,&pcaft; for &f)2 srrbant
fjearet^. i SAM. iii. 10 ........ n

SERMON III.

(Advent.)

THE VENTURES OF FAITH.
Efjeg sag unto Jljtm, OTU are able. MATT. xx. 22 . . . . 20

SERMON IV.
(Advent.)
WATCHING.

e Jjceo, baatc^ ant( prag ; far ge fcnafo not ^jfjeit tfjc time is.
MARK xiii. 33 ....... . . .28



CanUnls.

SERMON V.
(Christmas Day.)

KM I..P.I s |

fin* the angr! nil unto Ibrm. Jrar Ml : for. bcbotl, I brinf yen foot
ttfenap tC grill jop. tobirb fball br to ill propU. J0t onto f tu it
bm flits la| m the dtp ( Bit* *abwur. tofjtdj ts Chmt the
lor*. :



< New Year's Sunday.)
I. \I-SE or TIME.

Uttflrtrt Ibff ban* 6n5rtb to 00. DO U tottb Ibf w^t ; for th

no toork. nor brtwr. not knotoUDgr. nor totsBom. in tbc gtitir.
tobtthct t|M Mit ECCLH. u. 10 . 4 >

AM/O.Y /'//

(Epiphany.)
REMEMBRANCE or PAST MERCIES.

i am not toorthp of the Utst of all ibr mmus, and of all Ibr tndfi.
) Cbou but tbotoro unto Cb| lUL Owe. uuiit. to



(Eplphan
lUjt4cf.ntbfl^Tlaltoaj,anlafainIa|, Bijttff.-riut M 4 . 6,



(Epiphany.)

TIP
WI)ttibalUmanp^f mrxt ban gr for fjts ioulf-M .6 .70



Contents. xi

SERMON X.
(Epiphany.)

CHRISTIAN MANHOOD.

31 bias a cfjito, 31 spafte as a rfjito, 31 unHerstoofc as a cfn'la, 31
tf)0ugf)t as a cjjilo ; but fojjm 31 became a man, 31 put afoag cJjiloisfj
tfjtngs. i COR. xiii. ii . . . / . \ .78



SERMON XI.
(Epiphany.)
- SINCERITY AND HYPOCRISY.

H tfjere be first a drilling mint!, it fs accepted according t0 tfjat a man
fyatfj, anil not accorljing to tfjat fje fjatfj not. 2 COR. viii. 12 .87



SERMON XI I.

(Epiphany.)

CHRISTIAN SYMPATHY.



JFar berilg |e taak not on gim tfje nature of angels, but pje took on
pjim tfjeseeU of ^brafjam. HEB. ii. 16 ..... 96



SERMON XIII.

(Septuagesima.)

PRESENT BLESSINGS.

31 fjabe all, anti abound : 31 am full. PHIL. iv. 18 . . . 104

SERMON XIV.
(Sexagesima.)

ENDURANCE, THE CHRISTIAN'S PORTION.
all tfjese things are against me, GEN, xlii. 36 . . . .113



xii Contents.

SERMON XV.
(Qulnquagesinuu)
LOVE, THE ONE THING NEED*

MM

Chotiff) I speak toitb thr tongues oC mm antt of angels, an* Ijibr not
chinip. E am become as sounomg brass, or a tinkling esmtaL t

;

SERMON -VIA
(Lent.)

THE iNMvn.t AI ITY or THE SOUL.
Che spirit shall return unto 600, toho gabr it. ECCLES. \i - . 132

SERMON XI //.

(Lent.)

I.IM IHK SEASON or REPENTANCE.

flnl tobrn EMU brarv the toorta of hts fithrr. hr rnrb toith a fmt ani
r i;rr Ding btttrr rrp, ant utD unto hts father, i3lro mr. rorn me also.
m| fat^tr. GEN. *xvit. 34

SERMON XVIII.
(Lo

Bonn N

i to up that tohich if brbm* of thr affluiioni of Christ in mp flesh for
ftts boop'i salu, tohteh is the Chure^.-CuL. L 24 . ' ; s

SER.MOX MX.

'I' i MIS or CHRIST AT THE GRAVE or LAZARUS.
Jesus sail, 8B)m hate re laid him? the? safe unto I)tm. lord,



eome ant set. Jesas torpt. rfjrn said the Jetos, ISrholD hoto ftr
loort hisj.-JoHii xL 34-3^



Contents. xiii

SERMON XX.

(Lent.)
CHRIST'S PRIVATIONS A MEDITATION FOR CHRISTIANS.

PAGE

ge knoto tfje grace of our 3Lorfc 3esus (Jurist, tfjat, tfjougfj |e &jas
ricfj, get for gour sakes |e became poor, tfjat ge tfyrougfj J^ts
pofcertg migfjt be ricfj, 2 COR. viii. 9 166

SERMON XXL

(Lent.)
THE CROSS OF CHRIST THE MEASURE OF THE WORLD.

Into 31, if 31 be ItftcU up from tfjc eartfj, bill Urafo all men unto He.
JOHN xii. 32 175

SERMON XXII.
(Good Friday.)

THE CRUCIFIXION.

ge frag oppressed, antJ J^e bas afHictctJ, get p^e opencfc not Jgts mout^ ;
Je is brought as a lamb to tfj? slaughter, antJ as a sfycep before f)er
sfjcams is tjumb, so p^c opened) not |is mouttj, ISA. liii. 7 .182

SERMON XXIII.

(Easter Day.)

KEEPING FAST AND FESTIVAL.

& time to beep, an& a time to lattgfj : a time to mourn, anU a time to
tfancc. ECCLES. iii. 4 189

SERMON XXIV.
(Easter Tide.)

WITNESSES OF THE RESURRECTION.

Jgim (5otr raiseti up tftc tfjirtr oag, antJ s^oiueti ?im openlg ; not to all
tfje people, but unto Witnesses chosen before of &oo, eben to us fefto
into eat an5 Urink iuit^ f^im after %e rose from tfje tieaU. ACTS x.
40, 41 196



xv



SERMON A
(Easter Tide.)
A PARTICULAR PROVIDENCE AS REVEA m ,.

Goo ifrst mr. (*r.N iA4



SERMON XXVI.

(Easter Tide.)

CHRIST MANIFESTED IN REMEMBRANCE.

shall glonfp fflf. J"H\ xvi i :



JTJTf 77.
(Easter Tide.)

TH

tor look not at thr things tohtfh art trrn. but at thf things tohirh
for thr things tohich arr tern .ur trmporal, but the
things tohrh arr not srrn arr rtrrnal. - <>K. tv. 18 .

SERMON X\\ 111.
(Easter Tide.)

\\

toho trstifirth thrsr things, with, 5urrlp E romr quifklp. Iwm.
Eorn 10, romr, lord Jesus. JO -'; '

tension.)

N OK Vh I"

thfi? toonhtpprd >im. and rrtutnro to 3ausalim teith grrat jof :
ano torrr contmuallu in thr *mplr. praising an! blcmtf Sol.

^44



Contents. xv

SERMON XXX.
(Sunday after Ascension.)

RISING WITH CHRIST.

ge tfjen be risen foitfj CTfjrtst, seek tfyose tfjings fofn'cfj are abobe,
fofjere (fjrist stttetf) on tfje rigfjt fjanli 0f (5oo* .Set gour affretion
on tfjings abobe, not on things on tfje eartfj, jfor ge are oeatj, anU
gour life is ijttJ biitfj ^Tfjrist tn 00* COL. iii. 1-3 . . . 252

SERMON XXXI.
(Whitsunday.)
THE WEAPONS OF SAINTS.
tfjat are first sfjali be last, anti tfje last sfjall be first. MATT.

xix. 30 260

SERMON xxxii.

(Trinity Sunday.)

THE MYSTERIOUSNESS OF OUR PRESENT BEING.

H bjtll praise Ef)ee, for E am fearfttllg ana foanoerfullg mane ; marbel^
lous are 2Tf)g biorks, anti tfjat mg soul knobjcti) rigfjt biell.
PSALM cxxxix. 14 269

SERMON XXXIII.

(Sundays after Trinity.)

HOLINESS NECESSARY FOR FUTURE BLESSEDNESS.

Holiness, foitfjottt fofytcfj no man sfjall see tfje HorU. HEB. xii. 14 . 277

SERMON XXXIV.

(Sundays after Trinity.)

-THE RELIGIOUS USE OF EXCITED FEELINGS.

&fje man out of fofjom tfje oebils foere cepartetJ besought ?im tfjat fje
inigijt be bitfj 5tm ; but Jestis sent fjtm abiag, sagtng, Return to
tfjine objn fjouse, ann sfjob fjofo great things roo ^atf) oone unto
t^ce. LUKE viii. 38, 39 286



xvi Contents.

SERMON XXXV.
(Sundays after Trinity.)

MOT

Lrt no mm drrnbr htmsrlf. if inf man among pou smnrth to br totsr
in this tooriD. Irt htm brtonu Cool, that hr map br tour, /or thr
totsoom or this toorlfi ts foolishnrsi toith 600. /or it is tontttn,
ftr takrth thr toisr in thru oton rraftinrs*. i COR. iii. 18, 19 . 293

SERMON -V.V.V/7.

(Sundays after Trinity.)

SCRIPTURK A RECORD or HUMAN SORROW.

hrrr is at Jrrusalrm bo thr shrrpnurkrt a pool, tohuh is nllro in thr
JUrbrrtu tonfur ttrthrsoa. habmg fior porrhrs. En thrsr lap. a grrat
multttuCr of impotrnt folk, of blmo, halt, toithruB, toaitmg for thr
motJing of thr toatrr. . 302

SERMOX .V.V.VI7A
(Sundays after Trinity.)

DANGER or Rn

nUr onto DOU that arr rich ! for pr hatr rrcribro pour ronsolatum.

I vi. 24 . 309

SERMON XXXVIIL

(Sundays after Trinity.)
OBEDIENCE WITHOUT Lovi i. \RACTER

Chr tooro that Goo puttrth in mp mouth, that shall E sprak. NUMB.

^

SEKM< /.V.

(Sundays after Trinity.)

M.IKAI NS.

Br surr pour sin tutll fino POU out. NIMH, xxxii. 23 ... 331



Contents. xvii



SERMON XL.
(Sundays after Trinity.)
THE GREATNESS AND LITTLENESS OF HUMAN LIFE.

e tmgs of tfje gears of mg pilgrimage are an fjunorefc ano tfjirtg
gears : febi anti ebil fjabe tfje fcags of tfje gears of mg life been ; anti
fjabe not attained unto tfje oags of tfje gears of tfje life of mg fathers,
in tfje Dags of tfjeir pilgrimage, GEN. xlvii. 9 .... 341

SERMON XLI.

(Sundays after Trinity.)

MORAL EFFECTS OF COMMUNION WITH GOD.

ing fjabe 31 oesireti of tfje Eoro, bjfjicfj bjtll require; ebent^at C
mag ofcrell in trje fjouse of trje 3Loro all tfje Bags of mg life, to befjolo
tfje fair beautg of tfje ILoro, anti to bisit pjis temple. PSALM
xxvii. 4 349

SERMON XLI I.

(Sundays after Trinity.)

THE THOUGHT OF GOD THE STAY OF THE SOUL.

ge Ijabe not receibctJ tfje spirit of bonoage again to fear, but ge fjabe
receibeto tfje .Spirit of adoption, fofjerebg be erg, ^ibba, JFatfjer.
ROM. viii. 15 358

SERMON XLI I I.

(Sundays after Trinity.)

THE POWER OF THE WILL.

jFinallg, mg brethren, be strong in tfje ILorti, anti in tfje pofoer of fis
migfjt EPHES. vi. 10 . . . . . . . 367

SERMON XLIV.

(Sundays after Trinity.)

THE GOSPEL PALACES.

$e built gis sanctuarg like fjigfj palaces, like tfje eartfj bfjicfr W fjat^
established for eber. PSALM Ixxviii. 69 . . . . 377



xviii Contents.



SERMt

(Sundays after Ti
RELIGION A WI.ARIXISS TO TIU NAU KAI M

JMr bath no form nor romrlmn ; ano tobrn tor shall sec Kim. ihrn <s' *
no brautf that tor should ocstrr Jtym. K\. hu. a -384

SERMOX XI.VI.
(Sundays after Trinity.)

Tin \V.kii. KMY.

knoto that tor arr of Goo, ano lip toholr toorlo lirth in tmdiro
mm i Jons v. to . 192

SERMON XlVJt

(Sundays after Trinity.)

lobco thf praisr of mrn morr than the praisr of Go*.-

. 400



SERMON XLVIIL

(Sundays after Trinit
RELIGION i i< nit

lastr ano wr hoto granous thf loro is: blrwo ts the man that
uuslrtb m Kim.- I'SALM <xuv. 8 . 410



SERMON XI
(Sundays after Trim

MENTAL PR\
toitbout erasing. i THUS. v. 17 . 417



Contents. xix

SERMON L.

(Sundays after Trinity.)
CURIOSITY A TEMPTATION TO SIN.

ISnter net into tfje patfj of tfje fotcfceti, antJ go not in tfje foag of cbil men,
it, pass not fog it, turn front it, ana pass Bfoag. PROVERBS



iv. 14, 15 ........... 424

SERMON LI.

(Sundays after Trinity.)
MIRACLES NO REMEDY FOR UNBELIEF.

IntJ tfje ILorU sato unto floses, gob long bill tfjis people prouofce
iftfle? anti fjobj long bill it foe ere tfjeg foeiiebe |Ee, for all tfje signs
fofn'cfj 31 jaue sfjobeti among tjjem? NUMB. xiv. 11 . . .432

SERMON LIT.

(Sundays after Trinity.)

JEREMIAH, A LESSON FOR THE DISAPPOINTED.

Be not afraiti of tfjeir faces : for 31 am fottfj tfjee to fceltber tfjee, saitfj tfje
ILortJ. JER. i. 8 ......... 441

SERMON LI II.

(Sundays after Trinity.)

THE SHEPHERD OF OUR SOULS.

31 am tfje gooti .SfjepfjertJ : tfje gooo .Sfiepfjerti gibetifj |^is life for tfje
sijeep, JOHN x. 11 ......... 451



SERMON LIV.
(Sundays after Trinity.)

DOING GLORY TO GOD IN PURSUITS OF THE WORLD.
etfjer, therefore, ge eat or Urinfe, or fofjatsoeber ge 50, tro all to t^e
glorg of (KoU. i COR. x. 31 ....... 459







SERMON I.

(ADVENT.)

S>elf=liemal tlje tot of IReKfffoug

/zz^yJ time to awake out of sleep " ROM. xiii. n.



BY "sleep," in this passage, St. Paul means a state of
insensibility to things as they really are in God's sight.
When we are asleep, we are absent from this world's action, as if
we were no longer concerned in it. It goes on without us, or, if
our rest be broken, and we have some slight notion of people
and occurrences about us, if we hear a voice or a sentence, and
see a face, yet we are unable to catch these external objects
justly and truly ; we make them part of our dreams, and pervert .
them till they have scarcely a resemblance to what they really
are ; and such is the state of men as regards religious truth.
God is ever Almighty and All-knowing. He is on His throne in
heaven, trying the reins and the hearts ; and Jesus Christ, our
Lord and Saviour, is on His right hand; and ten thousand
Angels and Saints are ministering to Him, rapt in the con-
templation of Him, or by their errands of mercy connecting
this lower world with His courts above ; they go to and fro, as
though upon the ladder which Jacob saw. And the disclosure
of this glorious invisible world is made to us principally by
means of the Bible, partly by the course of nature, partly by the
floating opinions of mankind, partly by the suggestions of the
heart and conscience ; and all these means of information con-
cerning it are collected and combined by the Holy Church, which
heralds the news forth to the whole earth, and applies it with
power to individual minds, partly by direct instruction, partly
by her very form and fashion, which witnesses to them ; so that
the truths of reliion circulate throuh the world almost as the






Self-denial the Test



light of day, every corner and meat having aome portion of

)CMM| ray*. Such in the atate of a Christian country.
Meanwhile, bo* i it with thane who dwell in it f Th. ..nls of
the text remind n* of th.-ir r..n<litii>n. They are u lnl-

the minister* ng the armon .1 all

Oi mak of Him. they "wul -ly. an itt th<

day." Many live altogether a though the day shone not on them.

the shadow* still endured; and far the greater part of them
are but very faintly sensible of the great truths preached amun.i
them. They see and bear aa people in a dream; tin

<;..! with th-, r .. .'.191; if startled

for a moment, till they soon relapse into slumber; they refuse

I awakened, an* I think their happiness consist**
as they are.

do not f ni\ liivthn u. that

are in the sound slumber of -m Th arable state, whu 1

. hope wa M r..mliti..ii ..f i. w men, at

least in a place like this. But, allowing tin-. v t there is great
reasnn for fearing that very many of you are not wide awake : that
though your dream* are disturbed, yet dreams they are ; and
that the view of religi- \-\ think to be a true one, is

not that vision of the Truth which yon would see were your eyes
open, but such a vague, defective, extravagant as a

man sees when he is asleep. At all events however this may
will be useful (plea**. you ask yourselves, one by



one, the quest I am in the right way T

/ foot* that 1 have real faith, and am

'^instances of these times render it very diffico)
answer this question. When the world waa against Cl
it was comparatively easy. one sen* now

for not mean there are not mri-ul-nt. lawless men,

who would bring all things into confusion, if th.-y mtild ; who
hate religion, and would overturn every established institution
which proceeds from, or is connected with it Dotibtlenn there
are very many anch, but from such men religion has u
fear. The truth baa ever flourished and strengthened under
sedition. But what we have to fear is the opposite fact, that all
the rank, and the utaticm, and the intelligence, and the opulence
<>f th< .. )>rofeseedly with religt* have cause to

fear fn.m the very circumstance that the institution! of

.-;..:...: :-:.-' - - v ;, -i, . : : _ ,. n . ,

bey who so baaed them! Miserable is
the x h lies upon those who have attempted, and partly



of Religious Earnestness. 3

succeeded, in shaking that holy foundation ! But it often
happens that our most bitter are not our most dangerous enemies ;
on the other hand, greatest blessings are the most serious temp-
tations to the unwary. And our danger, at present, is this, that
a man's having a general character for religion, reverencing the
Gospel and professing it, and to a certain point obeying it, so
fully promotes his temporal interests, that it is difficult for him
to make out for himself whether he really acts on faith, or from
a desire of this world's advantages. It is difficult to find tests
which may bring home the truth to his mind, and probe his heart
after the manner of Him who, from His throne above, tries it
with an Almighty Wisdom. It can scarcely be denied that
attention to their religious duties is becoming a fashion among
large portions of the community, so large, that, to many in-
dividuals, these portions are in fact the world. We are, every
now and then, surprised to find persons to be in the observance
of family prayer, of reading Scripture, or of Holy Communion,
of whom we should not have expected beforehand such a profes-
sion of faith ; or we hear them avowing the high evangelical
truths of the New Testament, and countenancing those who
maintain them. All this brings it about, that it is our interest
in this world to profess to be Christ's disciples.

And further than this, it is necessary to remark, that, in spite
of this general profession of zeal for the Gospel among all respect-
able persons at this day, nevertheless there is reason for fearing,
that it is not altogether the real Gospel that they are zealous for.
Doubtless we have cause to be thankful whenever we see persons
earnest in the various ways I have mentioned. Yet, somehow,
after all, there is reason for being dissatisfied with the char-
acter of the religion of the day; dissatisfied, first, because
oftentimes these same persons are very inconsistent ; often, for
instance, talk irreverently and profanely, ridicule or slight
things sacred, speak against the Holy Church, or against the
blessed Saints of early times, or even against the favoured
servants of God, set before us in Scripture ; or act with the
world and the worse sort of men, even when they do not speak
like them ; attend to them more than to the ministers of God,
or are very lukewarm, lax, and unscrupulous in matters of con-
duct, so much so, that they seem hardly to go by principle, but
by what is merely expedient and convenient. And then again,
putting aside our judgment of these men as individuals, and
thinking of them as well as we can (which of course it is our duty
to do), yet, after all, taking merely the multitude of them as a



4 Sclj'dtnial ///e 7

MII of a state of things, I own I am suspicious of any
religion that is a people's religion, or an age's religion. Our
Saviour say*, " Narrow the way." This, of course, must not
be interpreted without great caution ; yet sun mle tenor

of the Inspired Volume leads us to believe that Hi* Truth will

)>e heart -d by the many, that it u against

itnan feeling and opit the course of the

irld. and -o far forth a* it M received by a man, will be opposed

tmiM-lf, i < mains alx..it him. next

by all other*. o far forth as they have not receiv The

in durkncmi" in the token of true religion; and,

though doubtless there are seasons when a sudden enthusiasm

uriiw ,r of tli. n the

in whose 94 light ih.- .i.wn "were willing for a season



I'rtce," 1 so an even "to be baptised of him, confessing tin ir
Mas"'), yet such a popularity of the Truth is /,*/ sudden, comes
at once and goes at once, has no regular growth, n* *tay.

error alone which grows and is received heartily on a huge
cab. St Paul has * warning agai tri N ing

it will ever be heartily accepted, whatever show there may

: a general profeMion of it. in hi, Ut Kpi^i,-. uhore he tells

thy, among other sad prophecies, ;i men and

neduct r- Oiull wax worse and wonc, ioed, has that

r in it. that it forces men to profess it n. i-ut when

they go on to act, instead of obeying tl, they substitute some

in the place of it < >u these accounta, when there is mu.-h
talk of religion in a country, and much congratnl.itii<n that there
is a general concern for it, a caution* mind will feel anxious lest
some counterfeit be, in fact, honoured instead < f it lent it be

\\. Ml. -.

baa become popular, and lest the received form have no more of

truth in it than i* ju-t neoesiary to racomroenti it to the reason
and conscience: lest, ntnsformed into an

aiupl of 1 :.'),?. rather than the Ugh .ting

(uhi.i.

*inn of religion is thought respecteble anl the

and orderly dame* of the ctuniniinity. tl. tance

ur anxiety ai r own state before

I may say) increa>< reasons*

because you are in danger of doing nuht ftom motifs ,

texty because you may, perchance, be cheated of the



of Religious Earnestness. 5

Truth, by some ingenuity which the world puts, like counterfeit
coin, in the place of the Truth.

Some, indeed, of those who now hear me, are in situations
where they are almost shielded from the world's influence, what-
ever it is. There are persons so happily placed as to have reli-
gious superiors, who direct them to what is good only, and who
are kind to them, as well as pious towards God. This is their
happiness, and they must thank God for the gift ; but it is their
temptation too. At least they are under one of the two tempta-
tions just mentioned ; good behaviour is, in their case, not only



Online LibraryJohn Henry NewmanSelection adapted to the seasons of the Ecclesiastical year from the Parochial & plain sermons of John Henry Newman → online text (page 1 of 56)