John J. Bailey.

Waldimar. A tragedy, in five acts online

. (page 6 of 6)
Online LibraryJohn J. BaileyWaldimar. A tragedy, in five acts → online text (page 6 of 6)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


hero of the piece, is a powerfully drawn, and original charac-
ter. Some of the scenes in which his feelings as a father and a war-
rior are brought in conflict, are susceptible of producing a thrilling
effect. In the hands of Mr. C. Kean, this character cannot but be suc-
cessful. There is a feeling of the tender and pathetic, in the act-



ing of this young tragedian, which will find ample scope for ex-
hibition in the scenes with the daughter, Hersilia ; nor will he be at
a loss for an opportunity to display his power, in the delineation of
passion, in the scenes witli Claudius. The latter character is well
conceived, and is one of prominent interest.

The author of Waldimar has not, with many modern writers,
exhausted his strength on the leading characters. In this he is
sustained by the improving taste of the day. His play is intended
for the closet as well as for the stage. In this light we hail the
production as the more creditable to cur rising literature, and as
the more deserving of our decided approbation. Our stage has
often witnessed the favourable reception of foreign dramas of
doubtful superiority — let not our taste, and our national feeling also,
be libelled, by the exhibition of apathy towards an American Tra-
gedy which possesses such high claims to our admiration.

Ainerican Advocate.

We have, as before mentioned, read this Tragedy, and have been
so much pleased with it, that our hopes of its entire success are
very sanguine. Waldimar, the hero, is a strongly drawn cha-
racter, — several of the situations, in which the art of the Dramatist
has placed him, give scope for feeling and action. Hersilia, the
heroine, has also some fine scenes ; indeed, the interest is not confined
to one character alone, but is divided among four or five.

Mercantile.

Fewer in number, but equally unsuccessful with European as-
pirants, have been the attempts made in this country to produce a
good Tragedy. The like causes have led to the same results, and
the progress of improvement in dramatic literature is far behind
the advance which America has made in the other walks of polite
letters. The author of Waldimar has shown himself to be aware of
the difficulties encountered by preceding writers, in the necessity
they have felt themselves under, of fashioning their creations to suit
the capricious notions of particular actors. He has shown a confi-
dence in his own powers — a confidence which deserves to be
commended — in confining himself to the acknowledged unities of
the drama. He has strengthened his characters, and wrought up
the interest of his scenes, with an especial reference to the proper
denouement of his plot.

Our synopsis of this play must be brief. Waldimar, the princi-
pal character, or hero of the piece, is a distinguished general under
Thedosius the Great, and during the action of the play is Governor
of Macedonia. The stern vindictiveness of his character, the dis-
position to tyrannize over and oppress the subjects of his sovereign,
had rendered his administration unpopular with the people. He



is supported by his soldiers against the citizens — disavows and con-
temns the authority of the Senate — and proceeds to the extremity of
ordering a slaughter of the inhabitants. The character of Waldu
mar, throughout these exciting scenes, is strongly drawn, and the
interest admirably sustained. He is opposed in his mad career by
Claudms, a brave and popular soldier. This character is like-
wise exceedingly well delineated. The latter personage is a suitor
of Hersilia, the daughter of Waldimar. The under-plot, connect-
ed with the story of their loves, is well maintained, and is skilfully
interwoven with the principal action of the drama. There is a
rough old soldier of the Clytus school, called Rufus, and "a gay
bold-faced villain," by the name of Martian, both having intimate
connexion with the progress of the plot, and both strongly marked
characters. To each of the personages named, the author has
awarded a full share in the business of the play, but in the charac-
ters of Waldimar and Hersilia, he has shown his greatest power.
Several of the scenes between the father and daughter are wrought
up to a pitch of surpassing interest. In short, the peculiar charac-
teristics of this Tragedy are, a plot where natural events are
allowed to occur in a natural way — a succession of interesting
incidents, all tending directly and progressively to the denouement —
and the whole told in unaffected language, occasionally exhibiting
fine bursts of poetry.

The play of Waldimar has not been written solely with a view
to effect on the stage. The author has prepared himself to enter
the lists with those who write to be read. He may well felicitate
himself upon tlie production, which will give him an enviable rank
among American writei-s. — Albion.

Last evening the Park Theatre was crowded, to witness the first
representation of Waldimar. We will not now enter into a critique
of the play, but shall wait to see it performed again, before passing
a final verdict — yet we must repeat, that the audience were una-
nimous in favour of Waldimar. — Mercantile Advertiser.

Waldimar, the new Tragedy, produced at the Park Theatre
last night, was completely successful, and received with marks
of favour throughout. The characters are all well and distinctly
drawn. The description Martian gives of the pleasures and
" glories " of the chariot races, and the athletic sports to which
he is so enthusiastically attached, is glowing, graphic, and
effective.

Waldimar, who is the hero of the piece, and the chefd^csuvre of
the author, makes use of much better language than any of his
compeers. Great attraction centres in this character. The author
has given it prominence, spirit and effective situations. The tableau



presented when Martian, whom he supposed dead, enters, was im-
posing and beautiful. The house dwelt upon it with long and re-
iterated applause. — Standard.

This new tragedy was perfectly suscessful last evening ; it went
off with the round approbation of a crowed house, and its an-
nouncement for Thursday was received with plaudits and bravos
from all sides. The whole piece made a highly favourable im-
pression. — A?nerican.

The public have already pronounced judgment upon the Tra-
gedy, which was, indeed, completely successful ; and, if dependence
may be placed upon the prompt and continued plaudits of a large
and intelligent company, the general admiration of the daily press,
and several testimonials from eminent literary individuals, it pos-
sesses merits of no common order. The language is chaste, yet
melodious and declamatory. Whatever may be the difference of
opinion respecting the rank of this Tragedy, among similar native
productions, all unite in awarding great praise to the author, for
the elegance of the language, the dramatic management of several
parts of the dialogue, and the really strong effect of the story upon
the audience. — Mirror.

" Waldimar.''^ — This new tragedy has ex'cited great interest
among the literati of the day, and been crowned with a success
that must be as gratifying to the author as it is honourable to the
country. It has drawn forth a display of talent on the part of
Mr. Charles Kean, that has added greatly to his former well-merit-
ed reputation, and proved by his admirable conceptions, chaste
performance, and beautiful readings of the part he sustains, that
he possesses a genius of a highly original cast, and powers as a
tragedian of the very first order — his attitudes were peculiarly
beautiful, and both classical and true to nature. — Albion.

This effort of native genius was played last evening for the
second time, with much applause, and it may therefore be now
pronounced to be a successful play.

For ourselves, we can truly say, we were much interested. The
dialogue and the incident were both in the tragic vein. The cha-
racters of Waldimar and of Hersilia are calculated to create great
interest, and they were both well sustained. We have neither
time nor information (not having read it) to give it the examination
we could wish. The prologue we were not so fortunate as to
hear; the epilogue was spirited, appropriate, and well spoken.
To sum up our views on this production, and its performance, we
have little doubt it will be a favourite with the public.

American Advocate.



6

Its success on the two previous nights of its presentation will, no
doubt, procure a full and fashionable house ; we should hope so, at
least. The tragic muse has been often courted of late, but has
been seldom successfully won, particularly in this country. In-
deed, to produce in this exalted walk of literature a popular drama,
is no easy task, when Ave consider that the selection of a subject of
suitable dignity, the support of an interesting dialogue, well sus-
tained by appropiate " dramatis personce, " all of exremely difficult
attainment, will not insure public approbation. The success of a
Tragedy possessing all the previous requisites must depend upon
pathetic incident, well adapted to a proper stage eifect.

That all this should have been well achieved by a young gen-
tleman, not professionally engaged in literary pursuits, while it
gives strong evidence of native genius, cannot fail to impress every
one with thoughts of the study, the care, and the anxieties, to
which it must have given rise. It is from these considerations we
repeat the hope, that a liberal public will not withhold their coun-
tenance and support to American talent. — American Advocate.

Since its first representation, the piece has been materially im-
proved — the actors have mastered the language, and are prepared
to do it justice — those parts which were hitherto too diffuse have
been curtailed and condensed — the plot is more compact and con-
secutive — so that, with the very clever acting of Mr. Kean, the
Tragedy, as a whole, presents strong attractions, and merits of a
high order. — Standard.

We certamly never witnessed more complete success than that
which attended the third performance of tliis Tragedy, last evening,
at the Park Theatre, to a numerous and highly respectable au-
dience. It gains upon the public at every succeeding representa-
tion, as we honestly confess it does also with ourselves. The
author has reason to feel proud of his production. To us, also,
it is a scource of great delight, thus to record another instance
of triumph to an American manufacture of so high an order.

Ainerican Advocate.



. • > :>
:> .^ ^^

» >



"> > >■



' 5> J>.> Vi> >



> » > »









^ ) )> > >> :> ) J :»
-. > » y y :»

• > > i> > ) '^



> 1












0» ::}£» Ds>> '> ^;
v.v, -^i> .)^ >^^ ^.
:>> ^> :> > >,

> » >>>^>\^^ ^
^ ) X> >^ ^ x^2> >

y-^^y 3):> :>>^>-?
>^))> :>>> ^ y^ '

>))X> :3I'3 3,'3> >

^:xj> >:^^Y^^ -^
>y'^) :>'>3 3^'>> >



> > ->



•> > >



>:> > ' > > r>

» > ) > D >

23 > ■ » > >

^^ > J * > >



^3 ) ^ ) y ')' >



■ >)» );>> >„>

, - ► ^^.» >-553 ^ ^

3> •'^)> yj\>y ■>
:3^^'o >-)>■>> >

3 > • ■>> 3 ro > >
3^o> )>> > >
3>'» )jpe> > > =

3)X> 3)>i> > >
3>2> 3JS> ) 3

3-^')) :>:»>> 3 >



>a> 3)i>> >

)>> J>;;^> >

>0& J>3y» >

> l> > >vD> >

> « ■>)5)» 3
3 1 > 3 i> > >
) > 3 3))3 » >
3 3>;>>> ^
3 * yySiyy ^
3 » >J> i»0 3 )

■ .3»3>0>>3> >
' 3^^3»3> >
> >3^3>0 > .
• 3;3:>33>.> > -;

>3 >) )>3 3

3 3> )> > >

^ :> ^> 3:s> > ^

> )3> )3>

^^L-F >3>^ >

3>> ?:»)

3X3 »^
>>3 >:!>'

>^3 >^^ y

^^^^ 3

-:»3 j>3>3 >
:> 3 3 ji>3 3

> > 3 ^> >
30_3 3>3 ^

3 > > >3> >

3 > 3 333 ^

3> J. ^3 3 >

> ;> 3 3>> 3

> > j> ^> >

3 > ■_) "3y >



-»> ^ » >> ) 3 >

y^j ) » 3> 3 J) 3'

>:> z> '^>3 3 3

>■» .> ;:» "> > > i» :» ? 3 ) :x>

' >»3 3>^^> 3 ,3> 3» 333
_»^ » J> :>3v:> > j;^ 3^ )>^33'>;

j::^ >» > 3:>»> ) "2^

::»► »> > 330) > 1^ t.

» _3~'^ ■> >3';» > /Tu :r

-» »-) > >3"' > y-g) ::

y> 3,)-> >, ^>-.. > '))7>

1> 3J> 3 3>^> 3 3)i>

33 »3 3 33" 3 ))!> . '

X> J*» 3 33'» y yy^ :



33 J^
» 33



>3

> >

>3 >
3 > -

)>

3 3

) >

) >



t>3 ^
>-> ^
>> 3



333 3 33«> y y-^

353 > » " > 3JS»

Zif3:> ^^3' > xs^

3):> 3 >3> i 3:s*



3>3 >



35> >>33 3 >lfc

3G» 333 > > >ll^

>» 3 ,))^> 3 31^

:»)> > >3> > >:3^

3»^>'^ >xj'- > :-^-



'3^ >:>» >

>^ >'3. ■>
~»i)^ >
'»' ^
*» 3'
3> 33B» >
'3 .»> 3
.^ .33et> >
^ 3l>3> )
► >> 33B> J

> 1> 3^

> 3 >r»3

> J> 3333

"> > > v>
3^ ^






3 3:>; -



> >



> > 3 r»>i






>> >>









^ > ^



> 2]^^;:)



^■:» > )> oo :> > ^ ::^ ^



> > ) r> >» ::* j> ^
» 3 :>)>»-> v^ -,



> ^ > > >

>> 3> >

> ^^ >-> ■ >



^^ >?-'5^>>> S;^






) > )^ » 3 ^o i> »^> -^ fy^ y^



>)^> ^ >^ >:> V^^ >-/-^^ > 3->-Tp ) —



> > :» >) > :?> 13









> > >

> ^ ■>> > '






> " > j

> > :
) :>

> 3 ■ :.
yy >



> » >

> ;> >

> > y

> ;^:> ""

■) ..'. y

> >3






>>

> >

> >

> >

> >



> ■> 3.^:»






3o ^ ^



35 ^ 5



3>:> ^>



^ :»3 :>

^ y



^^



.> > .


>3>


> ■■


T>


3


3


)


3


>


>


>


o


3


3


^


")











1 2 3 4 6

Online LibraryJohn J. BaileyWaldimar. A tragedy, in five acts → online text (page 6 of 6)