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John M'Evoy.

Statistical survey of the county of Tyrone, with observations on the means of improvement; drawn up in the years 1801, and 1802 for the consideration, and under the direction of the Dublin Society online

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Online LibraryJohn M'EvoyStatistical survey of the county of Tyrone, with observations on the means of improvement; drawn up in the years 1801, and 1802 for the consideration, and under the direction of the Dublin Society → online text (page 1 of 17)
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STATISTICAL SURVEY

OF THE

COUNTY OF TYRONE,

WITH



OBSERVATIONS

ON

THE MEANS OF IMPROVEMENT ;

DRAWN UP IN THE YEARS 1801, AND 1802,
THE CONSIDERATION, AND UNDER THE DIRECTION

OF

Dublin S>onetg.



BY

M'EVOY.



PRINTED BY GRAISBERRY AND CAMPBELL,
^0. JO,



1802.



TO THE READER.



This REPORT is at present printed and circulated
for the purpose merely of procuring further infor-
mation^ respecting the state and husbandry of this
district, and of enabling every one interested in the
welfare of this country , tv cxa/mne it fully ', and con-
tribute his mite to its improvement.

The Society do not deem themsehcs pledged to
any opinion given by the Author of this Survey;
and they desire, that nothing contained in it be con-
sidered as thtir sentiments; they have only pub-
lished it, as the report of the gentleman, whose
name is affixed, and they publish it for the com-
ments and observations, of all persons, which they
entreat to be given freely, and without reserve.

It is therefore requested, that tbf observations on
reading this work may be returned to the Dublin
Society, as soon as may be convenient, and which
will meet with the fullest attention in a future
edition.



DA



DEDICATION.



TO THE RIGHT HON.

LORD VISCOUNT MOUNTJOY.



MY LORD,

WERE your Lordlhip's noble father
alive, gratitude and duty would have required
that this, my firfl eflay, fliould have been offered
to his protection. He would naturally have been
looked to, as the fuitable patron for an Agricul-
tural Survey of the County of Tyrone, to which
his improvements were fo ornamental, and in
which his character was fo highly refpected.

In full confidence, that his virtues will dill

accompany his fortune, and that what his tafle

began, your Lordfhip will bring to perfection,

a 2 I dedicate



IV DEDICATION.



I dedicate this imperfeft tribute of my rcfpcft to
your Lordfliip's patronage, and have the honour
to fubfcribe myfelf,

With great deference,
Your Lordfliip's mofl devoted
Humble fervant,

JOHN M'EFOr.



SASH, NEAR OMAGH,
1S02.



PRELIMINARY



A COMPLETE Agricultural Survey of a
county of fuch extent, opulence, and variety, as
the county of Tyrone, would require a writer of
much general information and fcientific refearch.
The only qualifications, which the writer of the
prefent eflay can pretend to have brought to his
fubjecl:, are, an acquaintance with agricultural
concerns from his earlieft age, and a local
knowledge of the county of Tyrone, obtained
from a refidence in it for many years.

The author had originally intended to have in-
troduced in this work fome fketch of the procefs
of the linen manufa&ure, but this has been anti-
cipated in the Survey of the County of Mo-
naghan, where the foil and management are
nearly the fame as in this county.

A botanical arrangement of the indigenous
plants has been laid afide, as a matter of too
much magnitude for a work of this kind ; but,

at



VI PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS.

at fomc future period, the author hopes to lay it
before the public in a feparate work.

For many valuable hints, as to the mode of
drawing up the Survey, and fuggeflions of ufeful
and important topics, the author returns his
grateful acknowledgments to the Right Hon.
John Fofter.

What has been faid refpefting Lord Mountjoy's
extenfive demefne and plantations at Rafli, in va-
rious parts of this work, it has been fince thought
expedient to bring under one general head, in
the form of an Appendix, that the reader, whoic
chief objeft may be that of ornamental improve-
ments, may have, without interruption, a cou-
ne&ed and perfpicubus view of the whole.



SUGGESTIONS



SUGGESTIONS OF ENQUIRY

FOR GENTLEMEN WHO SHALL UNDERTAKE THS FORMING OF

AGRICULTURAL SURVEYS.



GEOGRAPHICAL STATE AND CIRCUMSTANCES.

Situation and Extent,

Divifions,

Climate,

Soil and Surface,

Minerals,

Water.



AGRICULTURE.

Mode of culture,

Extent of it, and of each fpecies of grain fowed,

Courfe of crops,

Ufe of oxen how harnefled,

Nature and ufe of implements of hufbandry,

Markets for grain,

Ufe of green food in winter.



PASTURE,



tiii SUGGESTIONS

PASTURE.
Nature of it,
Breed of cattle-* how far improved,

- . . how far capable of further improyement,

Markets or Fairs for them,

General prices,

Modes of feeding how far houfed in winter,

Natural grafles,

Artificial grafles,

Mode of hay-making,

Dairies, their produce,

Prices of hides, tallow, wool, and quantity fold.



FARMS.

Their fize,

Farm houfes and offices,

Mode of repairing them, whether by landlord or tenant,

Nature of tenures,

General (late of leafes,

of particular claufes therein,

Taxes or Cefles paid by tenants,

Proportion of working horfes or bullocks, to the fize of farms,

General fize of fields, or enclofures,

Nature of fences,

Mode of hedge-rows, and keeping hedges,

Mode of draining,

Nature of manures.

GENERAL



OF ENQUIRY. a

GENERAL SUBJECTS.

Population,

Number and fize of villages and towns,

Habitation, fuel, food and cloathing of the lower rank their
general coft,

Prices of wages, labour, and provifions,

State of tithe, its general amount on each article what arti-
cles are exempt, and what charged by modus,

Ufe of beer and fpirits whether either or which is increafing,

State of roads, bridges, &c.

qf navigations and navigable rivers,

of fiflieries,

.', il> :> ' Lj ii^fcys
State of education, fchools, and charitable inftitutions,

of abfentee and refident proprietors,

of circulation of money or paper,

of farming or agricultural fbcieties,

of manufactures, whether increafing,

of encouragement to them, and the peculiar aptnels of
the fituation for their extenfion,

i' of mills of every kind,

of plantations and planting,

of the efFeds of the encouragement heretofore given to
them by the Society, particularifed in the lift annexed.

of any improvements which may occur for future en-
couragement, and particularly for the prefervation of
the trees, when planted,

of nurferies within the county aad extent of fales,

Price



x SUGGESTIONS, &c.

Price of timber andftate of it, in the county,

Quantity of bog and wafte ground,

Poflibility and means of improving it,

Obflacles to it and bed means of removing them,

Habits of induftry, or want of induftry among the people,

The ufe of the Englifli language, whether general, or how far

increafing,
Account of towers, caftles, monafteries, ancient buildings, or

places remarkable for any hiftorical event,
Churches refident clergy, glebes and glebe houfes,
Whether the county has been atfually furveyed, when and

whether the furvey is publifhed,
Weights and meafures, liquid or dry in what inftances are

weights afligned for meafures or vice verfa t
The weight or meafure, by which grain, flour, potatoes, butter,

c. are fold.



CONTENTS



CONTENTS.



CHAP. I.



GEOGRAPHICAL STATE AND CIRCUMSTANCEg.



Page

1. Situation and Extent I

2. Divifions - - - - 2

3. Climate - - - - 6

4. So/7 and Surface - - "7

5. Mines and Minerals - - 17
CM/ -21
lro; Or* - - - - 24
Clays, fuch as are ttfed for brick or pottery 25



CHAP.






CONTENTS.



CHAP. II.



AGRICULTURE.



Page
SECT. I. Mode of Culture - - -29

Obfervafions - - - 32

2. Extent of Culture , and of each Species of

Grain fowed - "34

3. Courfe of Crops - -40
Obfervations - - "42

4. Ufe of Oxen - ~ 44

5. Nature and Ufe of Implements of Huf-
bandry - - 46

6. Markets for Grain - - ~ 53

7. Ufe of green food in winter - ~ 54



CHAP. in.

ri - . \_r x ' tAi) k ,..\'. v

jc -.

PASTURE.

.SECT. I. Nature of Paflure - '57

2. Breed of Cattle hoivfar improved - 58
how far capable of

further improvement - - 6\

3. Markets and Fairs for Cattle - ib.

SECT.



CONTENTS. xiii

Page

SECT. 4. General Prices , v ~ - 63

5. .Mwfe of feeding Cattle - - 64
Cattle t bow far houfed in 'winter - 67

6. Natural Gra/es - 70

7. Artificial Grajjes - " T "74

8. Mode of Hay-making - "75
Obfervations - - "79

9.' Dairies their produce - 8 1

Obfervations - - - 82

I o." Prices of Hides t Talloiv, Wool y and

Quantity fold - - - 85



CHAP. IV.

FARMS.

SECT. I . Size of Farms - - - 90

2. Farm-hotifes and Offices - g$
Mode of repairing Houfes and OfficeSy

whether by Landlord or Tenant - 97

3. Nature of Tenures - "99

4. General State of Leafes - - roo
Of particular Claufes in Leafes - IO2

5. Taxes or Cejfis paid by Tenants ~ 104

6. Proportion of working Horfes or Bul-

locks, to tbeftze of Farms - 105

SECT.



li7 CONTENTS.

Page

SECT. 7. Generalize of Fields and Enclofures 106

8. Nature of Fences - . - 107
Mode of hedge-rows, *nd keeping hedges 1 09

9. Nature of Manures - - III
IO. Mode of Draining - - 115



CHAP. V.

POLITICAL ECONOMY.

SECT. I. Roads and Bridges - - 118

2. State of Navigationr and Navigable

Rivers - - - 131

3. State of Fifheries - 134

4. State of Manufactures - 135

A

Of encouragement to them t and the pe-
culiar aptnefs ofthejituationfor their
extenfton , - - 137

Lift of Bleach-greens ]* - 138

5. Population ,.^V' .'/ - 142



CHAP.



CONTENTS.



CHAP VI.



RURAL ECONOMY.



SECT. i. Prices of Wages, Labour, and Proviftons 143
2. Habitation , fuel, food y and clothing of

the lower rank ; their general coft 1 46



CHAP. VIL

GENERAL SUBJECTS,

SECT, I . Number and Size of Villages & Towns j 58

2. State of Tithe, its general amount on

each Article what Articles are ex-
empt , and "what charged by modus - 161

3. Ufe of Beer and Spirits whether either,

or lahich is tncreafing - - 161

4. State of Education, Schools, and Chari-

table Inftitutions - - - 163

5. Ofabfentee and reftdent Proprietors - 167

6. Of Circulation of Money or Pamper - 171

7. Of Farming or Agricultural Societies ib.
S- Of Milk of every kind - 172

b SECT.



i CONTENTS.

Page
SECT. 9. Of Plantations and Planting - -174

Of the Effecls of the Encouragement here-
tofore given to Planting by the Society,
particularized in the Lift annexed - 178

Of any improvements , -which may occur
for future encouragement^ and particu-
larly for the prefervaiion of Trees when
planted - - 181

10.- Of Nurferies within the County, and

Extent of Sales - - 183

1 1 . Prices of Timber, and State of it in the

County - - - - - 187

12. Quantity of Bog and Wajle Ground I 89
Poflibitity and means of improving it - 190
Obftacles to improvement, and the be/I

infant of removing them - 197

13. Habits of induflr^ or want of indu/lry

among the Peop.'e - 199

14. The ttfe of the Eng'ijh Language whe-

ther general, or how far incretfing 20 T

15. Account of Towers, Cjft!es, Mon.if-

teries, Ancient buildings, or places re-
markable for any hijlorical event - 202

1 6. Churches Rr/ident Clergy- Glebes,

and Glebf-houfes - 205

SECT.



CONTENTS.

Page
SECT. 1 7. Whether the County has been acJually

furveyed when and whether the

Survey is publi/hed 206

1 8. Wights and Meafures, liquid or dry-

in what inftances are Weights af-
figned for Meafures or vice v<rfa tb

19. The Weight or Meafure, by which

Grain, Flour, Potatoes, Butter, &c.
are fold - 207



APPENDIX.

- " ' t " i

n Account of Lord Mountjofs Improvements at Rajh t
and the manner of carrying them into execution, from
the year 1778, to the frefent time,

SECT. I . Seminary and Nurfery - - - I
2. The general Plan of fettling the great
outlines of the Demefne and its appen-
dages , ... - 4
5. Modes ofencloftng - x. , , - 7
Louth fence - - - 1 1
Sunk fence ~ "%^''. " " J 7
Drains as Fences in baggy and fivampy

fituations - ~ '-'j- - - 2*



CONTENTS.

Page
Living Fences -without a gripe or

trench - - . - - 24

Temporary dead Fences, made princi-
pally of Scotch fr, cut away at theftze
of eight or ten feet, or -when it begins
to injure plants of more value - 3 1

Common paling of poft and rail, Jbeep-

hurdles, &c. - - "34

4. Preparation of the Boils for planting 35
J. An account of the management of an
Oak wood, luhich had been for many
years on the decline, prior to the year
1792, : -52

6. Of the advantage offowing potatoes, as

a preparative to ajjljl thefpeedy growth
of Plantations', and alfo, for the mojl
effectual mode of laying doivn bad lands
to the greatejl perfection - "57

7. A description of the management 'of the

batiks of the river at Raft, fo far as
it accompanies the demefne - - 6 1
S. An Account of Ta/k, or Piece-ivork,
together "with a comparifon between
it and common Day Labour, with
fome remarks on labouring Tools and
Implements - - - - 74

SECT.



CONTENTS. xhc

Page

9. Manner of training up Boys, fo as to
become ufeful,Jteady Labourers, with
a number of ways to employ them to
the beji advantage the year round.
Alfo, feveral Modes, by which old
Men, when partly pajl their labour,
may be applied to advantage to them-
felves and their Employers - - 8 1
Obfervations with refpeSl to old Men
and their families the manner of
employing them with remarks on
dn hofpital intended to be ereftedfor
their reception - - - - 92



STATISTICAL



STATISTICAL SURVEY



OF THE



COUNTY OF TYRONE.



CHAP. I.

GEOGRAPHICAL STATE AND CIRCUMSTANCES.

SECT. 1 . Situation and Extent.

J. H E county of Tyrone is inland, being bounded
by the county of Donegal on the north, and north-
weft; by the county of Londonderry, on the north,
and north-eaft; by part of Loughneagh, and the
county of Armagh, on the eaft ; and by the coun-
ties of Monaghan^and Fermanagh, on the fouth, and
fouth-weft.

The county is very irregular, and much pointed
and indented in its circumference. The greateft ex-
tent from north to fouth is from Donnelong, on
the borders of the river Foyle, to Slieve-Beaygh
mountain, on the borders of the county of Monaghan,
being an extent of 33 miles; in Englifli meafure-
B ment



2 STATISTICAL SURVEY

ment 42 miles. The greateft length from eaft to
weft is, from the borders of Loughneagh, in the
parifli of Arboc, in the barony of Dungannon,
to the extremity of the parifti of Farmonomungan,
joining the counties of Donegal and Fermanagh,
being in extent 43 miles ; in Englifh meafurement
54.8 miles. Meflrs. M<Crea's map of the county,
made out in 1774, 1775* and 1776, and Dr. Beau-
fort's memoirs agree perfectly with the above ftate-
ment.

According to Dr. Beaufort's ftatement, the accuracy
of which we have no reafoa to fufpeft, the coun-
ty contains 467,700 acres, and, of courfe, 724 fquare
miles j in Englifh meafurement 751,387 acres, being
equal to 1163 fquare miles.



SECT. 2* Dtviftoru.

THE principal divifions are into baronies, namely;
Barony of Strabane,' to the north.

of Dungannon, to the eaft.

of Oogher, to the fouth.

of Omagh, partly to the weft; but a large

portion of it lies between the baronies of Strabane
and Clogher, and meets the barony of Dungannon
on the eaft.

The



OF THE COUNTY OF TYRONE. 3

The above baronies are divided into parifheg,- as

follows.

. ,

^ *

The barony of Strabane contains,

.L'id

1. Donaghedy.

2. Leckpatrick.

3. Caamus.

4. Urneyj a fmall part in Donegal.

5. Ardflra.

6. Upper Bodony.

7. Lower, do.

8. Cappagh.

9. Cumber; only a fmall part of this in the county.



T^f barony of Dungannon contains t

1. Liflbn, partly in the county Derry.

2. Kildrefs.

3. Derrylorne. lit) ,s"

4. Defertcreat.

5. Artray.

6. Ballinderry, partly in the county Derry.

7. Arboe.

8. Ballyclog. jans'^.i

9. Donaghendry.

10. Clannoe.

11. Tullyniflcal, V.

12. Drumglafs.

B 2 13. Killymon.



STATISTICAL SURVEY

** f*

13. KUlymon.

14. Clonfeckle.

15. Pomeroy.

1 6. Donaghmore.
17. Killifhill.
1 8. Aughaloo.

The barony of Closer contains,

,. Donacavey, or the parifti of Fintona.

2. Clogher.

3. Errigle-Keeran.

^ _ Frough, V. partly in the county Mona-

ghan.
5. Aghalurcher, partly in Fermanagh.

The barony of Omagh contains,

\

T i. Jfarmonraagnirk.
2. Clougherny.
o. Dr^omragh, or parifh of Omagh.

/

4. Dromore.

5. KUfkeery.

6. Longfield, lately divided into two Urings t
rn i, Farmonomufigan.

Total number of parijbes*



Barony of Strabane. 9

_. .- - of Dungannon. 1 8 -

Barony ot



OF THE COUNTY OF TYRONE. 5

Barony of Clogher. 5

' of Omagh. 7 .

39 in the whole.

There are only 35 parifhes, properly within the
county, as only a fmall portion of the remain-
ing four parifhes are marked within the limits of
the map of the county.

Except the pari(h of Tullynifkal, and the parifh
of Errigle-Frough, (both marked V. to denote a
vicarage) the whole of the parifhes are rectories.

Eccltftaftical divifton*

Belonging to the diocefe of Armagh, there ar,
160,500 acres.
20 parifhes.

19 benefices.

20 churches.

13 glebe-houfes.
6 glebes, wanting glebe-houles.
Belonging to the diocefe of Derry, there are>
233,100 acres,
ii parifhes.
II benefices,
13 churches.

B 3 9 glebe-



6 STATISTICAL SURVEY;-;- r iO

~JL glebc-houfos. . ,

2 glebes, wanting glebe-houfes.
Belonging to the dioccfe of Cloguer, there are,
68,000 acres.
, 4 parifhes.

7fl5^^ en ^ CeS '

5 churches,
t iif*, g^be-houfes.

2 glebes, wanting glebe-houfes.
The total of acres, in the ecclefiaftical diftrifts of
the county, appear to be. 463,700, being 4000 acres
lefs than the grofs amount of 467,700, which 4000,
I take for granted, are abbey-land, or fuch lands, a
are not fubject to tythes.



C f-r

SECT. 3. Climate.



THE latitude of a place does not always determine
the climate j fo with this county, whofe main latitude
is about



.3 ' t

The great variety of foil and furface, throughout

the county, caufes a great variation in the climate.
Wcfterly winds are moft prevalent the year round ;
hence follows the great humidity of our air, from
being fituated fo near the Atlantic Ocean.

o

Our autumns are generally very wet, and unfa-
vourable to the faving of crops of hay and corn.
November is fomctimes a favourable month.



/!



OF THE COUNTY OF TYRONE. ^

It is the inconftancy of the feafons we have moft
to guard againft ; either extremes are never known
to be intolerable.

The times of common occurrences in hufbandry
are, in a great meafure, determined by the climate.
Oats are fown from the middle of March to the
firfl of May; barley during the whde month of
May ; flax-feed about the fame time. The hay har-
veft, kt the weather be never fo favourable, is gene-
rally kept too late, .-j nr :



SECT. 4. Soil and Surface.

rijssojG



;:(! ' ; I Jl

IT would be found an endlefs tafk to enumerate
the great variety of foils and furfaces within the
county ; the following (ketch may, however, be de-
pended upon.

,11* L"V/

The mountainy parts are generally fhallow, wet,
and four ; in other parts dry, hufky, and peaty,
the depth feldom exceeding fix inches. In fome pla-
ces the fubftratum is tenacious, and hence we find
the tops and fides of mountains generally wet and
fpongy. In other parts, the fnbftratum is a black,
folid bog, which is equally as tenacious as ftrong
clay foil, and of courfe prevents the water frtim
finking, by which means the farface is equally as

bad.



* STATISTICAL SURVEY

bad as in the former cafe. But where the fubftra-
tum is open rock, gravel, or any other porous
body, through which the water may readily pafs,
the furface is always dry and wholefome, and very
well calculated for young Aock in fummer. Moun-
tains of the latter defcription are always j valuable
to the owners, as they get a better price for feeding
the flock, which are fent to them generally in May,
than thofe poffefled of land of the two firft de
criptions ; when the wet mountain lets only at five
or fix {hillings a /um* t the dry mountain claims ten
(hillings, and fometiraes more.

Soils of the foregoing defcriptions are peculiar to
the baronies of Strabane and Omagh ; the baronies
of Dungannon and Clogher are, generally fpeaking,
of as good a quality of land, as perhaps any in the
kingdom. A large traclt of the weft parts of the
barony of Dungannon, and of the north part of
the barony of Clogher, may be ranked with the
mountainy parts of the baronies of Strabaqe and
Omagh.

The

* A phrafe moft commonly ufed in this county ; a
cow three years old is a fum ; a two year old and one
yearling a fum ; three yearlings a fum ; a horfe is in forae
parts a fum and a quarter, but is mod commonly a fum.
A fum, bead collop, and ball, are fyncnimous, according
ID different countries.



OF THE COUNTY OF TYRONE. 9

The furface of the whole county is wonderfully
diverfified, hill and vale being the prevailing cha-
rac>er.

The mountains of the greateft magnitude are in
the barony of Strabane. The vaft chains of the Mun-
terloney mountains, ftretching into the county of Derry,
arc the moft confiderable ; Mullaghcairn,- or Cairn-
togher, with Befly Bell, and Mary Gray, and many
others are very confiderable. Mullaghcairn is the
higheft mountain in the county, which I have prov-
ed; the next to it is Knockfowel, part of which
is in the county of Derry. To the above may be
added the mountains of Ballygawley, on the weft
of the barony of Dungannon, and Morley on the
weft of the barony of Clogher.

In order to give the reader a more comprehenfive
view of the foil and furface of the county, I fhall
fet down Omagh, the affize town, as a common
centre ; and proceed with the principal roads, through-
out the county, to the extremities of it. But firft,
I fhall take a circular courfe, which will include
part of the barony of Omagh, the whole of the
barony of Clqgher, and more than two parts of
the barony of Dungannon. In the different excur-
fions, the crops ufually followed (hall be remarked,
which will, in fome meafurc, give an idea of the
quality of the foil.

Between



io STATISTICAL ^URVEY

Between Omagh and Dromore, dUVance about
feven miks, the lands are, in general, light and
gentle, very much undulated. In many parts the
foil inclines to a reddiih colour, a great indication
of fertility. Potatoes, flax, and oats, are the prin-
cipal crops i in fome fpots barley ; about the towa
of Dromore, the foil is not calculated for the lat-
ter. Limeftone is fcarce ; but as far as lime has
been tried, it has been found to anfwer extremely
well. Vaft quantities -of afhes are made from the
peaty foils, which are iri this direction tolerably
plenty, though the bogs are not numerous or ex-
tenfive.

Lime/tone is not found nearer to Dromore than
the parifh of Longfield, which abounds in that ar-
ticle, but the want of good roads renders it pre-
carious, and of courfe very expenfive.

From Dromore to Fintona, diftance about five
miles, light foil ; appears extremely well calculated
for fheep, as the fubftratum is in general fand and
gravel, which, of courfe, render the furface found
and wholefomc. Crops ; potatoes, oats, and flax, or
rather potatoes, flax, and oats in rotation, becaufe
in few fituations, in this courfe, flax will not anfwer,
unlefs fown immediately after potatoes, which is
almoft univerfaliy the cafe in their mountainy foils.
Two crops of oats in fuch fituarions are ufually
taken off after flax, which is wrong, as the laft
crop is frequently not worth reaping.

Between



OF THE COUNTY OF TYRONE. u,

Between Fintona and Five-mile-town, diftance about
feven miles ; about the former, the foil is thin and
cold, the fubftratum much inclined to ftrong tena-
cious clay. Near this town, a good plan of cutting
out a bog for prefent economy, and future profit, is
fpiritedly purfued by Mr. Eccles, which deferves
particular notice, .fince fo good a fyftem, I believe,
is not to be met with in the county, except near
Verner's ferry, on the borders of the Black-water,
which feparates the county of Armagh from this
county.

About half way between the above towns is a large
mountain called MurJey, which makes a great and
ftriking feature in the barony of Clogher. This moun-
tain affords a great capability for improvement, the
furface being in general a rich peaty foil, with a fub->
flratum of reddifti clay mixed with innumerable fmall
Hones. To render this mountain profitable, nothing
more need be done, than to mix the upper and lower
foils, which could be performed at little expence, fince
the fubftratum lies only at a fmall diftance from the
peat, or rich moor, the depth of which feldom exceeds
a foot. Nothing can fupport this obfervation better
than the fides of the road through the mountain,


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Online LibraryJohn M'EvoyStatistical survey of the county of Tyrone, with observations on the means of improvement; drawn up in the years 1801, and 1802 for the consideration, and under the direction of the Dublin Society → online text (page 1 of 17)