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"'f IRISH PEDIGREES;

OR,

THE ORIGIN AND STEM

OF

THE IRISH NATION.

BY

JOHN O'HART,

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY IN IRELAND ; FELLOW OF THE

ROYAL HISTORICAL AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF IRELAND ;

MEMBER OF THE HARLEIAN SOCIETY, LONDON ; AUTHOR OF

' ' IRISH LANDED GENTRY WHEN CROMWELL CAME TO

IRELAND," ETC.



Where are the heroes of the ages past?
Where the brave chieftains, where the mighty ones
Who flourished in the infancy of days?
All to the grave gone down."

—HENRY KIRKE WHITE

" Man is but the sum of his Ancestors."

—EMERSON

^Uiniifii 3Un**icatt fE&Ustftl

IN TWO VOLUMES

VOL. I.



NEW YORK

P. MURPHY & SON

279 Church Street
1915



THE LIBRARY

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY
PROVO, UTAH



IRISH PEDIGREES.

VOL. I.



ABBREVIATIONS*



Arm. (Armiger),

A.T

b

bur.

C.L.H

Col

confc

C.T

Cust. Pac. (cuatos pacis)

d

dau

D.C

d.s.p

G.CL.H

La

L.H

Lieut. -Col

m

Mass

Mites

Mo

N.C

ob

ob. v.p.

O.L.H

P

Pa

plense setatis

PP

s.p. (sine prole)

B.p.m

temp

uum

U.S.A

Va

v-P

Vit

W. I. ...



Stands for Bearing Arms.

,, Arm<ie Territoriale.

,, born.

, , buried.

,, Knigbt of the Legion of Honour.

„ Colonel.

,, contemporary.

,, Chief of Tirconnell.

,, Custodian of the Peace.

,, died.

,, daughter.

,, District of Columbia.

,, died without offspring.

„ Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour.

,, Louisiana.

,, Legion of Honour.

,, Lieutenant-Colonel.

,, married.

,, Massachusetts.

,, A Soldier.

,, Missouri.

, , North Carolina.

,, he died.

,, he died in his father's lifetime.

,, Officer of the Legion of Honour.

n page.

,, Pennsylvania.

,, of man's age.

,, pages.

,, without offspring.

,, without male offspring.

„ in the time of.

,, unmarried.

,, United States, America.

, , Virginia.

,, in his father's lifetime.

i, living.

,, West Indies.



* Abbreviations : It is only the less obvious Abbreviations employed in this Work, and which
might not be intelligible to the general reader, that are heie given.



CONTENTS.





FACE




V


Preface to the First Edition .


xii


Preface to the Second Edition


xiv


Preface to the Third Edition,


xviii


References ....


xxii


Dedication .....


. xxiii



PART I.

I. The Creation .... 1

II. Ancient Irish Proper Names . 32

III. Irish Adhxes .... 36

IV. The Irish Lineal Descent of the
Koyal Family .... 37

V. The Lineal Descent of King
Philip V. of Spain . . .42

VI. The Pedigree of St. Patrick,
Apostle of Ireland ... 43

VII. The Pedigree of St. Brigid, the
Patron Saint of Ireland . . 43

PART II.

I. The Stem of the Irish Nation,
from Adam down to Milesius of
Spain 44

II. Roll of the Monarchs of Ireland,
since the Milesian Conquest . ., 50

PART III.

I. Families descended from Heber . 63

II. Families descended from Ithe . 274

III. Families descended from Ir . 299

IV. Families descended from Here-
351



mon



PART IV.



I. Addenda

II. Corrigenda



738
791



PART V.

I. English Invasion of Ireland

II. Cromwellian Devastation of Ire
laud



PAGE

792
799

803

S04



APPENDIX.

I. The Chief Irish Families in
Munster .....

II. The Territories of the ancient
Irish Families ....

Munster.

1. In Thotoond, or the counties of
Limerick and Clare :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans

(b) The New Settlers,* after the
English Invasion . . .

(c) The Modern Nobility .

2. In Desmond, or Cork and
Kerry :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans

(b) The New Settlers

(c) The Modern Nobility .

3. In Ormond or Dcsles, or Tip-
perary aud Waterford :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and

Clans 812

(6) The New Settlers . . . 814

(c) The Modern Nobility . . 815

Ulster.

III. The Principal families in Ulsrer.
I. In Oriel, or the Couuty Louth :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans 81Qk

(b) The New Settlers . . 816

(c) The Modern Nobility . . 816



S04

806
806



806
809
811



Settlers : In the former Editions of this Work the new settlers in Ireland, after its invasion
by the English in the twelfth century, were entered as "Anglo-Norman," ox "English" Families
But. we have found that many families whose names were so entered, are of Irish descent It is
therefore, in our opinioni more correct to enter them as "New Settlers," than as Anslo-Norraan o
•Cntjhsn. °



'



xxxn



CONTENTS.



2. In Monaghan :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans

(c) The Modern Nobility .

3. In Armagh :

(ci) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans

(b) The New Settlers

(c) The Modern Nobility .

4. In Fermanagh :

(«) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans

(b) The New Settlers

(c) The Modern Nobility .

5. In Ulidia, or Down and Part

of Antrim :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans

(b) The New Settlers

(c) The Modern Nobility .

6. In Dalriada (in Ireland), of

Part of Antrim and Derry :
(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and

Clans

(c) The Modern Nobility .

7. In Tirowen, or Tyrone :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and

Clans

(c) The Modern Nobility .

8. In Tirconnell, or Donegal :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans

(b) The New Settlers

(c) The Modern Nobility .

9. In Brefney, or Cavan and
Leitrim :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clan3

(c) The Modern Gentry and
Nobility ....

Ancient Meath.

IV. The Principal Families in the
Kingdom of Meath.

1. In the County Meath :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans . . . . .
(6) The New Settlers
(c) The Modern Nobility .

2. In Westmeath :

(c) The Modern Nobility .



81G
81G



817
817
817



817
818
819



819

820
820



S21
S21



822
823



824
825

826



S26
S2S



3. In Annaly, or Longford :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and

Clans

(c) The Modern Nobility .



833
833



82S
S31
S31



832



4. In Dublin, Kildare, and King's
Counties :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans 833

(b) The New Settlers . . 834

(c) The Modern Nobility . . 835

Leinster.

V. The Principal Families in
Leinster.

1. In Hy-Cinselagh and Cualan,
or the counties of Wexford,
Wick low, Car low, and Part of
Dublin :

{a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Clans 837

(b) Notice of Hy-Kinselagh . 838

(c) The New Settles . .838

(d) The Modern Nobility . . 839

2. In Ossory, 3. In Ofaley, 4. In
Lelx ; or Kilkenny, King's
County and Queen's County :

(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and
Claus 840

(b) The New Settlers . . 843

(c) The Modern Nobility . . 845

CONNAUGHT.

VI. The Principal Families in Con-
naught.

1. In the counties of Mayo and
Sligo :
(a) The ancient Irish Chiefs and



Clans .

(b) The New Settlers

(c) The Modern Nobility .


846
843
851


2. In Roscommon and Galway :

(a) The aucient Irish Chiefs and
Clans

(b) The New Settlers

(c) The Modern Nobility .


851

854
855


3. In Leitrim (See under "Bref-




ney.")
Ancient Irish Sirnames .


855


Celtic Families ....


858


Green were the Fields . . .


S59


Index of Sirnames .


861


Letters and Opinions . i.


S97



PREFACE.



In this Edition we have inserted all the Genealogies contained in the
Third Edition of Irish Pedigrees, as well as those given in our Irish
Landed Gentry when Cromwell came to Ireland; and, wherever
we could do so, we have given a description of the Armorial Bearings* of
each family whose genealogy we have traced.

From the large quantity of additional matter collected therefor, this
Edition became so voluminous, that it had to be divided into two Volumes.

In this Vol. we give the " Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation,"
and, so far as we could collect them, the genealogies of the families which
branched from that ancient stem ; together with the territories possessed
by the ancient Irish families in the twelfth century ; a Chapter on the
" English Invasion," and another on the " Cromwellian Devastation," of
Ireland.

In Vol. II. we give the " Families in Ireland from the twelfth to the
end of the sixteenth century," with the counties in which they, respectively,
were located ; the Names of the Settlers in Ireland under the " Plantation
of Ulster;" the Names of the Adventurers who came into Ireland
with the Cromwellian Settlement, or with the Revolution ; the Names of
the Huguenot and Palatine families which settled in Ireland ; the " Most
important families in Ireland, and the counties in which they were located,
at the beginning of the seventeenth century;" the Genealogies of
Anglo-Irish and other families which settled in Ireland since the English
invasion ; the Irish Brigades in the service of foreign nations ; the papers
contained in the Appendix to the Third Edition of our Irish Pedigrees,
and in the Appendix to our Irish Landed Gentry; the " Opinions of the
Press," from Newspapers and Periodicals in the Old and New World, etc.

A careful perusal of the Work will show that, in the wide field of our
genealogical research, we have been unable to collect all the Irish and
Anglo-Irish Pedigrees ; but, we are satisfied that we have collected all of
them that are preserved in our public archives, or that escaped the
ravages of the Elizabethan Wars,t and the Strafford and Cromwellian
devastations, in Ireland.

* Bearings : A drawing or illustration of any of those Armorial Bearings can, at
a moderate charge, be procured from Mr. William T. Parkes, of 12 Fleet-street, Dublin.

t Wars : For a description of the state of Ireland in the reign of Queen Elizabeth,
see Sir Charles Gavan Duffy'B " Bird' a- Eye View of Ireland."



viii PREFACE.

on the Slave-Emancipation question ; when, unhappily, the Federal Army*
of the North was pitted against the Confederate Army of the South.
That Federal Army was, it will be remembered, chiefly composed of
Meagher's Irish Brigade and of Corcoran's Irish Legion (two distinct
Brigades), besides several Regiments and many Companies in the " Union"
Volunteers, coming from certain States of the Union, all of whom served
in the Federal Army ; but in the Confederate Army in that War were
many distinguished Officers,! Irish by birth or descent, whose names, if we
knew them, we would also herein gladly record. Among those were
General " Stonewall" Jackson, General Patrick Ronayne-Cleburne ;
General (now United States Senator) Mahone, etc. In a future edition,
however, we hope to be able to give the names of all the Irish Officers in
the Confederate Army ; together with the names of any Irishmen (by birth
or descent) who at any time filled the Office of President of the United
States of America, or of Governor of any State in the Union ; or who in
any other position in any of our Colonies shed lustre on their Nation and
their Race.

And if God spares us, we shall give, in a future Edition of our "Irish
Landed Gentry when Cromwell came," the names of all the Irish
Landed Gentry in Ireland, A.D. 1641 ; and the names of the persons who
in every county in Ireland succeeded to those Estates, or to any portions
of them.

In the fervent hope that (see No. 81, p. 40, infra,) the relation which
the lineal descent of the present Royal Family of England bears to the
ancient Royal Stem of Ireland, would conduce to a kindly feeling on behalf
of Her Gracious Majesty towards ourself and our bleeding country ; we
humbly forwarded to Queen Victoria a presentation copy of the Third

* Army : Besides the Irish Brigade and the Irish Legion in the Federal Army,
there were several Regiments distinctively Iri^h in different States, and many Irish
Companies ; besides many Irish Officers whose Companies were partly Irish, such as :

The 37th New York Volunteers (" Irish Rifles").

The 40th do. do. (" Tammany Regiment").

Colonel Cass's Pennsylvania Regiment.

Colonel Mulligan's Chicago Regiment ; etc.
So that the names of the Irish Officers in the service of America would, even with
their brief records, fill a good-sized volume ; not to speak of the Irish Officers who
held command in the " Rebel" or Confederate Army. We might observe that every
full Regiment had about thirty-five officers.

+ Officers : The names of the Officers in Meagher's Irish Brigade are taken from
Captain Conyngbam'a " Irish-American Brigade and its Campaigns," published in
1866; and the names of the Officers in Corcoran's Irish Legion are taken from the
Official Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of New York. If in either Return
it be found that we omitted any name which ought to be inserted, we beg to say that
such omission was unintentional.

There is, we find, a large number of l^ish Officers at present in the Regular Army
of the United States of America.



PREFACE. DC

Edition* of this Work; in pp. 40-44 of which that " lineal descent" is
carefully traced, as it also is in pp. 37-41 of this Volume. It is needless
to say that Her Majesty graciously accepted and acknowledged the pre-
sentation.

As the Book of Genesis and the Writings of the Apostles contain
expressions and conceptions respecting the Creation, which cannot he clearly
interpreted unless by the latest results of Geological Science, we give in
pp. 1-32 of this Volume, a Chapterf on " The Creation," in which,
guided by Geological laws, we have humbly ventured to interpret those
expressions and conceptions without conflicting in any manner with the
account of the Creation contained in the Sacred Volume ! In our dutiful
veneration for the Visible Head of the Church to which we belong, we
respectfully forwarded anotherpresentation copy of that Edition also to Pope
Leo XIIL, for his gracious acceptance ; earnestly requesting the consider-
ation by His Holiness, not only of the views which we humbly propound in
that Chapter, but also of the Chapter headed u The English Invasion of
Ireland," in which it was stated, on the authorities therein mentioned, that
Pope Adrian}: IV., in the exercise of his Temporal Power, granted Ire-
land to King Henry II. of England. The chapter on "The English
Invasion of Ireland" is also given in pp. 792-799 of this Volume. It was

* Edition: A copy of that as well as a copy of this edition, may be seen in the
Library of the House of Commons, and in the Library of the House of Lords, London ;
as well as in the Library of Congress at Washington, D.C. ; etc.

f Chapter : It may interest our readers to look through that chapter iu its entirety ;
for, without entering into any religious controversy whatever on the subject, we venture
to say that it will help to throw light on the Edenic period of Man's existence before
his first sin !

% Adrian : On the vexed question of Pope Adrian's Bull, which wa3 dated from
Rome, a.d. 1155, it is sometimes urged that the said Bull was a- forgery : because, it is
alleged, Pope Adrian IV. was not at all in Rome in that year, for that he was in exile
at Beneventum, on account of a revolt caused by the arch-innovator Arnold of
Brescia. But it will be seen by reference to the following authorities, which a friend
of ours has brought under our notice, that Adrian IV. was, in the plenitude of his tern
poral power, in Rome, a.d. 1155 : In a life of this Pope, written by Cardinal A ragoniu?,
which is to be found in Muratori's " Rerum Italicarum Scriptores" Tom. III., Part L,

E. 441, it is stated that, so far from Arnold being able to drive the Pope out of Rome,'
is Holiness laid an interdict on the city in the very middle of Holy Week. The
Romans were so terrified that they drove Arnold out of the city. Frederick Barba-
rossa then seized him, and sent him back a prisoner to the Pope, who condemned him
to be hanged. An account of his execution, in the month of May, will be found in
Sismondi's " Eepubliques Italiennes," T. I., p. 316, Ed. Brussels, 1S26. Aragonins
givesan accountof the Pope's proceedings during the summer of 1155 : as, for instance,
his crowning, as Emperor, Frederick Barbarossa, the celebrated HohenstaufeD,
which took place in the month of June. In the autumn of 1155, Adrian IV. went
to Beneventum for the purpose of absolving William, King of Sicily, from his
excommunication, and receiving his homage (see page 445, Muratori, above mentioned).
In fact, Pope Adrian lV. was never so powerful at Rome as he was in that year ;
having the support of the Emperor, as well as that of his own troops. For further infor-
mation, the reader is referred to the great Benedictine Work : " Hutoire des Oaules et
de la Erance," T. xv., p. 661.



X PREFACE.

our privilege to receive from the Holy Father, per the Right Rev. Doctor
Kirby, Bishop of Lita, and Rector of the Irish College in Rome (through
whom the Presentation was made), the following kind and courteous
reply :

" Rome, 30th December, 1881.
"Dbar Sir,

"I had the pleasure to receive your esteemed letter of the 25th instant, which was
followed by your Work on the ' Irish Pedigrees,' a day or two after. I hasten to
inform you that I had the honour of an audience with the Holy Father on yesterday,
and I availed myself of the occasion to present him with your Work, which he
graciously received. I explained to him its object. He looked over it with interest,
and said that he would have it placed in the Library. He was pleased to authorize
me to send to you, together with his thanks for the Work, his Apostolic Benediction,
which I trust will be a help and an impulse to you to continue to employ your
superior talents for the advantage of our holy religion and country, in the production
of works useful to both ; thus meriting for yourself at the proper time the encomium
and promise of Divine Wisdom : ' Qui elucidantme vitam celernam habebunt.' Wishing
you every success in your most laudable undertaking, and all the blessings and graces of
this holy season,

" I am, yours sincerely,

" &? T. Kieby, Bishop of Lita, etc.
"John O'Hart, Esq.,

•' Ringsend, Dublin."

It only remains for us to express our grateful acknowledgments to the
late Sir Samuel Ferguson, LL.D., Q.C, and the Officers in his Department
with whom we came in contact in the Public Record Office ; to John K.
Ingram, Esq., LL.D., the Librarian of Trinity College, and his obliging
Assistants; to the Rev. M. H. Close, M.A., Major MacEniry, John T.
Gilbert, Esq., F.R.S., and J. J. MacSweeney, Esq., all in the Royal Irish
Academy, Dublin : for the uniform kindness and courtesy which we
experienced from each and every of them during our tedious researches in
their respective Institutions.

For other literary aid (see the Preface to Vol. II.) received from Alfred
Webb., Esq., Dublin ; Thomas O'Gorman, Esq., Sandymount, Dublin ;
C. J. Hubbard, Esq., United States, America; Rev. C. A. Agnew, Edin-
burgh ; S. Smiles, Esq., London ; Rev. George Hill, late Librarian, Queen's
College, Belfast; William J. Simpson, Esq., Belfast; and James M'Carte,
Esq., Liverpool, our best thanks are also due, and here respectfully
tendered.

As this Work unveils the ancestors of many of the present Irish,
Anglo-Irish, and Anglo-Norman families, of various shades of religious
and political opinions, we have endeavoured in its pages to subserve no
seet or party. And we beg to say that, while our Irish Pedigrees and
our IrisH Landed Gentry are necessarily national in character, there



PREFACE. a

is nothing in them to wound the feelings of Celt or Saxon, Catholic or
Protestant, Liberal or Conservative.

Hardinge (see his "Epitome" MS., in the Royal Irish Academy,
Dublin), in his " Circumstances attending the Civil War in Ireland in 1641-
1652," truly says:

" In the rise and progress of Empires, as naturally as in the lives of men, there
are events concerning which the biographer or historian would willingly remain silent,
did not the salutary lessons to be derived from them demand publication."

That sentence we freely adopt, and we heartily endorse the sentiment it
contains. We shall rejoice that we did not remain "silent," if the publication
of the facts which we record in this "Work will conduce to the removal of
the causes for discontent which have long distracted our afflicted country :

While History's Muse the memorial was keeping,

Of all that the dark hand of Destiny weaves,
Beside her the Genius of Erin stood weeping,

For hers was the story that blotted the leaves.

JOHN CHART.
Ring send School, Ring send,
Dublin : December, 1887.



FROM THE PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION.



As accounting for the appearance of this Work I should mention that,
from a certain family tradition, conveyed to me in my boyhood, it was my
life's ambition to meet with some ancient Irish Manuscript that would
throw light on my family pedigree. It was, therefore, that I hailed with
pleasure the publication, in 1846, of the Annals of the Four Masters*
(Dublin : Geraghty, 8, Anglesea Street), which Owen Connellan, Irish
Historiographer to their late Majesties George the Fourth and William
the Fourth, translated into English, from Irish Manuscripts preserved in the
Libraries of Trinity College and the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin. From
the same Manuscripts the late John O'Donovan, LL.D., M.R.I.A., also
translated and edited the " Annala Eioghachta Eireann ; or, The Annals of
the Kingdom of Ireland," by the Four Masters, from the Earliest Period
to the Year a.d. 1616. Dublin: Hodges and Smith, Grafton Street,
1851.

Those " Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland" I need not say I read with
care ; from them I derived a large fund of valuable information which I
freely employed in the compilation of this Volume.

For other information in connection with my subject, I am also
indebted to " The Tribes and Customs of the district of Hy-Maine,"f
published by the Irish Archaeological Society j " The Book of Rights ;"
Celtic Society; "The Topographical Poems by O'Dugan and O'Heerin :"£

* Four Masters : The " Four Masters" were so called, because Michael O'Clery,
Peregrine O'Clery, Conary O'Clery, together with Peregrine O'Duigenan (a learned
antiquary of Kilronan. in the county Roscommon), were the four principal compdera
of the ancient Annals of Ireland in the 17th century. Besides the above-named
authors, however, two other eminent antiquaries and chroniclers assisted in the com-
pilation of the Annala— namely, Ferfassa O'Mulconry and Maurice O'Mulconry, both
of the county Roscommon.— Connellan.

j Hy-Maine : "Hy-Maine" was the principality of the O'Kellys; a large terri-
tory comprised within the present counties of Galway and Roscommon, and extending
from the river Shannon, at Lanesborougb, to the county Clare, and from Athlone to
Athenry in the county Galway ; these O'Kellys were of the Clan Colla. The O'Kellys
in the ancient Kingdom of Meath, who were one of the families known as the " Four
Tribes of Tara," were descended from the Clan Colman of the southern Hy-Niall.

X O'Duqan and O'Heerin : Shane O'Dugan, the author of " O'Dugan 's Topography,"
was the chief poet to O'Kelly of Hy-Maine ; and died a.d. 1372. Giolla-na-Neev
O'Heerin, who died a.d. 1420, wrote a continuation of O'Dugan's Topography : these
Topographies give names of the Irish Chiefs and Clana in Ireland from the twelfth to
the fifteenth century. — Connellak.



FROM THE PREFACE TO FIRST EDITION. xiii

Irish Arch, and Celt. Society ; " Kollin's Ancient History :" Blackie and
Son, Glasgow; Yeatman's "Early English History:" Longmans, Green,
and Co., London ; Miss Cusack's " History of Ireland :" National Publica-
tion Office, Kenmare ; "Irish Names of Places," -by P. W. Joyce, LL.D.:
M'Glashan and Gill, Dublin ; O'Callaghan's " History of the Irish
Brigades:" Cameron and Ferguson, Glasgow ; Haverty's "History of
Ireland:" Duffy, Dublin; The Abbe* MacGeoghegan's "History of
Ireland ;" Keating's " History of Ireland," etc.

But the work to which I am most indebted for the Irish Pedigrees
is that portion of the Annals of Ireland known as " O'Clery's Irish
Genealogies;" so called because compiled by Michael O'Clery, who was the
chief author of the " Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland," above men-
tioned.

Actuated by the consideration that, should I neglect to publish this
Work or consign it to a future time, another opportunity for collecting
materials reliable as those now in my possession might never again
present itself, I have ventured to unveil the Irish Genealogies. In doing
so I beg to say that I had no sect or party to subserve ; for, in the Irish
Pedigrees are given the genealogies of families of various shades of
religious and political opinions.

J. CHART.
Ringsend School, Dublin,



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