John Phillips Downs.

History of Chautauqua County, New York, and its people (Volume 3) online

. (page 66 of 101)
Online LibraryJohn Phillips DownsHistory of Chautauqua County, New York, and its people (Volume 3) → online text (page 66 of 101)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


it might readily be converted into marketable lumber.
He purchased 160 acres of land in the township of
Kiantone from the Holland Land Company, and subse-
quently returned to Vermont. Between 1808 and 1812
he made a second trip to Chautauqua county for the
same purpose. Eventually another parcel of land was
secured from the Holland Land Company, this tract in
Poland township, a part of it on the main road
between Jamestown and Kennedy, seven miles
east of Jamestown, and two and one-half miles
west of Kennedy, now in the possession of
Wayne N. Cheney. The stream which furnished the
power for the conversion of the timber into lumber was
known as Cheney's brook, later named Dry brook. Eb-
enezer Cheney was a man of remarkable physical en-
durance, as is proved by the long distance he covered on
foot. While prospecting for timber sites to and in
Chautauqua county, he frequently traveled for weeks at
a time without seeing a human being, his way often
lying through dense forests of primeval growth.
Through woods so thick that sunlight could scarcely
penetrate, with giants of the forest towering often one
hundred feet to the first limb, and fifty, seventy-five,
and one hundred feet beyond, he made his way, often
having to climb a high tree or hill to sight his bearings,
with only the rivers and streams as dependable paths
and guides. The game of the woods supplied him with
the means of subsistence. There were plenty of bears,
deer, panthers, wolves and smaller species, and the
birds of the forests were numerous, and the streams
were abounding in fish. Strange as it may seem, the
most fierce animals gave him little trouble as they had
their own natural prey. He came on an errand
of peace, and the Indians, who were the sole
inhabitants of the wild country, let him pass un-
molested. Throughout his life he enjoyed visits to new
territories, and on one occasion he traveled on foot
through Western Pennsylvania and down the Ohio
river as far as the settlement, now the city of Cincin-
nati, crossing the Ohio by wading. He went to various
parts of the counties adjoining Chautauqua, and passed
through Fredonia and Jamestown when there were but
a few log cabins in these places. After his second trip
to Chautauqua county he returned to Vermont, gathered
his belongings, and with his family returned to the place
he had explored so thoroughly, locating in Kiantone
township, clearing a piece of land, building a house of
logs, and there making his permanent home. He died



Aug. 12, 1S28. Among his children were Nelson E., of
whom further; Levi, Seth, Maria, Abigail, and Ruby.

Nelson E. Cheney, son of Ebenezer (2) Cheney, was
born in Wardsboro, Windham county, Vt., Nov. 30,
1793. As a youth of fifteen years he accompanied his
father to Chautauqua county, and later returned with
all of Ebenezer Cheney's family to settle in Kiantone
township. After his marriage he located in Poland
township, on land purchased from his father, who orig-
inally bought it from the Holland Land Company, and to
this tract he added from time to time until he held
title to more than 800 acres. He devoted himself largely
of lumber operations, built a sawmill of good size at
Cheney's brook in 1832-33, and there sawed much of the
timber cut in the neighborhood. A large part of the
product of his mill was rafted down the Conewango
creek, the Allegheny and Ohio rivers to Pittsburgh and
Cincinnati. Nelson E. Cheney, in addition to his pri-
vate lumbering interests, was one of the founders of the
National Chautauqua Bank of Jamestown, and a man
of influence and standing in the locality. He is buried
in Levant Cemetery. He married Hannah Merrill, and
they were the parents of: i. Maria, died aged eighteen
years. 2. Emery M., of whom further. 3. Nelson, a
well known physician of Chautauqua county and Corn-
ing, N. Y., later in life a well known lecturer on Eng-
lish literature. 4. Newell, a teacher and farmer, active
in public life as collector of internal revenue, member
of the County Board of Supervisors, and of the New
York State Legislature ; he held the rank of captain of
the Ninth Regiment of New York Cavalry during the
Civil War, served under General Sheridan in the Shen-
andoah Valley, and was historian of the Ninth Cavalry.

Dr. Emery M. Cheney, son of Nelson E. and Hannah
(Merrill) Cheney, was born on his father's homestead
near Kennedy, Chautauqua county, N. Y.. March 21,
1832. He was educated in Warren Academy. Warren,
Pa.; Randolph Institute, Randolph, N. Y., and the Uni-
versity of Buffalo, from which last named institution
he was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi-
cine in 1873. He has since practiced his profession in
Frewsburg, East Randolph and Poland Center, and is
one of the oldest physicians in point of service in the
county. His professional work has included consider-
able surgery, and for ten years he was examining sur-
geon for the Pension Bureau of the United States. Dr.
Cheney is a member of numerous medical associations
and societies, including those of Cattaraugus and Chau-
tauqua counties. He is a Republican in political faith,
and has steadfastly supported the party of his choice.
Further it is a remarkable and quite unusual record for
a family to hold that his father and he have lived
through the terms of every president of the United
States during the tenure of office up to this writing. He
married, at Levant, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Dec. 5,
1S62, Amanda Tracy, and there were two sons of this
marriage : Wayne N., of w^hom further ; and Frederick,
born March 30, 1S74, a business man and farmer of
Falconer, married S. M. De Bell.

Wayne Nelson Cheney, son of Dr. Emery M. and
Amanda (Tracy") Cheney, was born at Poland. Chau-
tauqua county. N. Y., Aug. 14, 1867. During his youth
he attended Jamestown Academy, and upon the com-
pletion of his education took up the active work of life.



^^s



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY



He has owned the farming property on which he now
lives for a number of years, having managed this for
his father many years prior to coming into its posses-
sion. He has dealt largely in lumber, and in this line
and in agriculture has spent his active years. Mr.
Cheney is widely known in Chautauqua, is a member
of the local grange, and, like his father, a staunch Re-
publican.

Wayne Xelson Cheney married, at Poland Center,
July J!, iSq2, Lottie B. Johnson, born Sept. 29, 1863,
daughter of Hugh and Cordelia cSpragiie) Johnson.
Tliey have one daughter, Florence, bom at the home-
stead, Xov. 22. 1S93, educated in the district schools and
Jamestown High School, and for a number of years a
school teacher. She married J. Edward Carr, born in
Hall, Ontario countj-, N. Y., Aug. 16, 1894. Mr. and
Mrs. Cheney are attendants of the Seventh Day Ad-
ventist Church of Jamestown, and interested partici-
pants in community affairs.



WARREN BEEDLE LOOK— New York has ac-
quired a well deserved reputation for the large number
of keen, progressive business men she has sent out in
all directions, not a few of whom have come to the con-
clusion that Jamestown and Chautauqua county ofters
in many respects, advantages not to be found in some of
the larger cities in the State. Warren B. Look has be-
come known in the highest circles of the business world
as a man to be implicitly trusted and one with whom
it is a satisfaction to transact business. He was born
in Collinsville, III, Jan. 2. 1S84. the son of Arthur War-
ren and Josephine Arvilla (Logan) Look, prominent
residents of that city.

He obtained his early education in the public schools
of Collinsville, and in 1903 was graduated from the
St. Louis Manual Training School at St. Louis, Mo.
After completing his course he entered the employ of
the Art Metal Construction Company at St. Louis. In
1908. when the St. Louis branch was consolidated with
the Jamestown, N. Y., factory, he was transferred to
Jamestown as assistant superintendent, and in 1910 was
made general superintendent. In 1917, he resigned and
went actively into oil production, in which business he
was largely interested for some time, and l)ecame the
treasurer of the Empire State Oil Company.

Mr. Look is a great lover of nature, has traveled ex-
tensively and gets much enjoyment from plant, bird
and animal life, and enjoys all out-doors at all times of
the year. He owns and mana.ges successfully one of the
largest and best equipped and stocked farms in Chau-
tauqua county. Mr. Look is a Republican and votes for
the men and principles that the thinks to the best in-
terest of the people. Fraternally, he is a member of
.Mt. Moriah Lodge. No. 145, Free and .\cccpled Masons,
and Western Sun Chapter, No. 67, Royal Arch Masons.
He is also a thirty-second degree Mason, a member of
the Buffalo C'msistory, and a member of the Ancient
Arabic ("Jrder Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a
member of the Moon firook Country Club, Rotary Club,
and i-^ clitc'hlc to membership in the Sons of the r>!evo-
lution and the Sons of Veterans. In religious aftilia-
tions, .\Ir. Look and his family arc members of .St.
Luke's Episcopal Church of Jamestown, and are active
in all of its business, as well as social affairs.



On Dec. 31. 11307. at Jacksonville. III., Mr. Look was
united in marriage with .Agnes E. Thornborrow, a
daughter of John A. and Eliza A. Thornborrow. To
this union have been born two sons, Warren Travis,
Dec. 2. 1908, and John A. Logan. July 8, 1915.

Mr. Look is a business man of discerning judgment
and keen foresight. His business dealings bring him
in contact with hundreds of persons, and nothing but
the strictest adherence to the principles of honor and
integrity has ever been attributed to him.



ALBERT DeFOREST YOUNG, well known resi-
dent and physician of Mayville, N, Y., at present chief
of staff in the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Department
of the Hudson Street Hospital of the United States
Public Health Service in New York City, is one of the
prominent members of his profession in Chautauqua
county. He is a son of James and Mary (Messenger)
Young, long time residents of Corry, Pa., where Albert
DeForest Young was born, April 18, 1873. James
Young, now deceased, was a veteran of the Civil War,
having served throughout it in many important battles.

Albert DeForest Young was educated in the public
schools of his native city, and in 1895 graduated from
the Cleveland Medical College, now the Homoeopathic
Department of Ohio State University. He came to
Chautauqua county, N. Y., and located in Panama, in
the year of his graduation, and practiced for eight years,
subsequently removing to Jamestown, where he prac-
ticed until coming to Mayville in 1907. While in Pan-
ama, he was health officer for the village and for the
township of Harmony for eight years. During the
summer of 1903, he took a post-graduate course in the
New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital.
Dr. Young practiced continuously in Mayville with much
success from 1907 until 1918. He was health officer in
Mayville from 1907 until he resigned in 1915, and presi-
dent of the town Board of Education, 1917-18. He is
a member of various medical organizations, including
Chautauqua County Medical Society. He is a member
of the Masonic fraternity, being a thirty-second degree
Mason, and a member of the Shrine ; member of the
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of the
Maccabees. Woodmen of the World, and William L.
Travis Post, No. 493, .A.merican Legion.

Dr. Young enlisted in the Medical Corps of the
United States army in 1918 and was commissioned
captain ; he trained at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., and went
overseas during the latter part of 1918 with Evacuation
Hospital Unit, No, 28, of the 88th Division, This unit
saw service at Eelfort and Nantes, France. He was
returned to the United States, in April, 1919, on account
of ill health, and was honorably discharged from
United States Army General Hospital, No. 24, Pitts-
burgh, Pa., July S, 1919. In September, 1919, he went
to New York City and took a course, specializing in
diseases of tlie eye, ear, nose and throat in Manhattan
Hospital. On completing this course, he was appointed
chief of staff in the Hudson Street Hospital, which he
continues to the present (1021) but retains his family
residence in Mayville.

Dr. 'N'onng married, in P;in;mia, Chautauqua county,
N. Y., Jan. 27, 181)7. I'.leanor Cook, daughter of Deforest
and Adclia (Hawkins; Cook, lifelong residents of the



BIOGRAPHICAL



559



town. To Dr. and Mrs. Young were bom the following
children: I. Donald C, born June 2, 1898; educated
in the Jamestown and Mayville public and high schools
and in the University of Michigan; enlisted in the
S. A. T. C. of the University, where he served until
the close of the war; married Ann Christenson, of
Detroit, Mich. 2. Stanley D., born Oct. 30, 1900; edu-
cated in Jamestown and Mayville public and high
schools. 3. Florence E., born Jan. II, 1902; educated in
Jamestown and Mayville schools. 4. James L., born
May 29, 1903 ; educated in Mayville schools. 5. Paul
A., born Dec. 3, 1913, now attending school in May-
ville.



COLONEL WILLIAM FRIES ENDRESS—

This distinguished family is of extremely ancient line-
age. Im Hof, a baronial race, spreading out into many
branches, is still flourishing in the principal lines, namely,
the Swabian, the Franconian and the Italian, with many
subdivisions. In the records of the twelfth century it
is frequently found under the name of "de Curia" or
"in Curia." As early as the thirteenth century it di-
vided itself into two principal branches, which assumed
different arms. The elder branch remained at the
original seat of the race, in the city of Laningen, in
Swabia (now Bavaria) where a village called Imhoff
may yet be found.

(I) Johann Im Hof, called Johann (2), who died
A. D. 1341. is the progenitor from whom all the race
is descended. He dwelt upon his estates at Laningen,
and procured through his wife, Anne Von Gross, citi-
zenship in Nuremburg. He was adopted among the
families capable of holding the office of senator. He
had issue.

(II) Konrad, married and had issue.

(III) Konrad (2), died in 1449. He had issue.
(I\") Johann (3), born in 1419, died in 1499. He had

issue.

(V) Johann (4), born in 1461. died in 1526. He was
burgomaster of Nuremburg; married and had issue.

(VI) Andreas, otherwise called Endres, was bom
about 1490. and was a member of the senate, or Rath,
of Xuremburg, in the year 1530. As senator he at-
tended the Diet of Augsburg and is styled "Herr En-
dress im Hoff" by Saubertheim in his History of the
Augsburg Diet, written in 1631. He married and had
issue.

(V'll) Endress, born about 1513, married and had
issue.

(VIII) Nicholas Endress, removed from Nuremburg
to Wertheim, on the north bank of the Mayn river,
about 1560.

(IX) Peter Endress, son of Nicholas Endress, born
about 1569, was judge of the Criminal Court of the
district.

(X) Nicholas (2) Endress, son of Peter Endress,
was born in 1603. He married and had issue.

(XI) Andress Endress, son of Nicholas (2) En-
dress. born in 1634, married and had issue.

(XII) Philip Jacob Endress, son of Andress Endress,
born in 1682, died in 1762.

(XIII) John Zacharias Endress, son of Philip Jacob
Endress, was born in 1726, and was educated in the
University of Tubingen, now the University of Wirtem-



burg. He was an extensive traveler; was captured in
the Mediterranean sea by Corsairs of Algiers, the
famous sea pirates of that day, and sold into captivity
in Algiers. Subsequently a Neapolitan merchant (a
Roman Christian) redeemed him into freedom, took
him to Italy and furnished him wth means to return
to his native land. In 1766 he came to America and
located in Philadelphia, Pa., where he accumulated
considerable property near the corner of Vine and
Third streets: He was an officer in the Continental
army in the War for Independence, was captain in the
Philadelphia Guards, and as a result of his action in
the Federal cause his buildings were burned to the
ground when the British occupied the city. He died
in 1810, and was buried at Easton, Pa. He married,
Sept. 13. 1768, Mrs. Maria (Henrici) Sansfelt. a widow
of French Huguenot extraction. They had a child.
Christian Frederick Lewis, mentioned below.

(XI\') Christian Frederick Lewis Endress, D. D.,
son of John Zacharias Endress, was born in Philadel-
phia, March 12. 1775. He was graduated from the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, which institution honored him
with the title of Doctor of Theology in 1820. Through-
out most of his lifetime he was connected with Trinity
Lutheran Church, pastor from 1S15 to 1827 at Lancas-
ter, Pa., succeeding Dr. Henry M. Muhlenberg, founder
of the Lutheran church in America. About 1814, with
his friend. Col. Nathaniel Rochester, he removed to
Dansville, N. Y., in the far-famed Genesee Valley,
where they purchased large tracts of land. Subsequently
Colonel Rochester went further on to the Falls of the
Genesee and established the city which bears his name.
Dr. Endress did not remain in Dansville, but returned
to Pennsylvania, locating at Easton, where he died Sept.
27, 1827. In 1801, he married Margaretha Fries. They
had a son. Isaac Lewis, mentioned below.

(XV) Judge Isaac Lewis Endress, son of Dr. Chris-
tian F. L. Endress, was born in Easton, Pa., Sept. 14,
1810, died in 1870. He was educated in Dickinson Col-
lege, Carlisle, Pa. When his family left Pennsylvania
for Vv'estern New York, he entered the law office of
Judge Ewing, of Trenton, N. J., where he remained
about one year. He then went to Rochester and en-
tered the law offices of Messrs. Rochester & Ford, and
later was in the offices of Messrs. Barnard & Hill.
Eventually he was admitted to the bar at Rochester,
where he initiated the practice of his profession, and
whence he removed to Dansville in 1832. He continued
to reside at Dansville during the remainder of his life,
and as a lawyer obtained an enviable reputation and
lucrative practice. For some thirteen years he was as-
sociated with Judge John A. Van Derlip in the practice
of law, under the style of Endress & Van Derlip. He
was an old line Whig as a young man, and after the
formation of the Republican party, transferred his al-
legiance to that organization. He was appointed to the
office of judge in 1S40 by Governor \\'illiam H. Seward;
was presidential elector in 1856; was elected a member
of the State Constitutional Convention, 1868; was a
delegate to the National Republican nominating con-
vention of 1868; and was several times a member of the
Republican State Committee. He was president of the
board of trustees of Dansville Seminary, and for a
number of years was one of the town railroad commis-



BIOGRAPHICAL



559



town. To Dr. and Mrs. Young were born the following
children: I. Donald C, born June 2, 1898; educated
in the Jamestown and Mayville public and high schools
and in the University of Michigan ; enlisted in the
S. A. T. C. of the University, where he served until
the close of the war; married Ann Christenson, of
Detroit, Mich. 2. Stanley D., born Oct. 30, 1900; edu-
cated in Jamestown and Mayville public and high
schools. 3. Florence E., born Jan. II, 1902; educated in
Jamestown and Mayville schools. 4. James L., born
May 29, 1903; educated in Mayville schools. 5. Paul
A., born Dec. 3, 1913, now attending school in May-
ville.



COLONEL WILLIAM FRIES ENDRESS—

This distinguished family is of extremely ancient line-
age. Im Hof, a baronial race, spreading out into many
branches, is still flourishing in the principal lines, namely,
the Swabian, the Franconian and the Italian, with many
subdivisions. In the records of the twelfth century it
is frequently found under the name of "de Curia" or
"in Curia." As early as the thirteenth century it di-
vided itself into two principal branches, which assumed
different arms. The elder branch remained at the
original seat of the race, in the city of Laningen, in
Swabia (now Bavaria) where a village called Imhoff
may yet be found.

(I) Johann Im Hof, called Johann (2), who died
A. D. 1341, is the progenitor from whom all the race
is descended. He dwelt upon his estates at Laningen,
and procured through his wife, Anne Von Gross, citi-
zenship in Nuremburg. He was adopted among the
families capable of holding the office of senator. He
had issue.

(II) Konrad, married and had issue.

(III) Konrad (2), died in 1449. He had issue.

(IV) Johann (3), born in 1419, died in 1499. He had
issue.

(V) Johann (4). born in 1461. died in 1526. He was
burgomaster of Nuremburg; married and had issue.

(VI) Andreas, otherwise called Endres, was bom
about 1490, and was a member of the senate, or Rath,
of Nuremburg, in the year 1530. As senator he at-
tended the Diet of Augsburg and is styled "Herr En-
dress im Hoff" by Saubertheim in his History of the
Augsburg Diet, written in 1631. He married and had
issue.

(VII) Endress, born about 1513, married and had
issue.

(VIII) Nicholas Endress, removed from Nuremburg
to Wertheim, on the north bank of the Mayn river,
about 1560.

(IX) Peter Endress, son of Nicholas Endress, born
about 1569, was judge of the Criminal Court of the
district.

(X) Nicholas (2) Endress, son of Peter Endress,
was born in 1603. He married and had issue.

(XI) Andress Endress, son of Nicholas (2) En-
dress. born in 1634, married and had issue.

(XII) Philip Jacob Endress, son of Andress Endress,
born in 1682. died in 1762.

(XIII) John Zacharias Endress. son of Philip Jacob
Endress, was born in 1726, and was educated in the
University of Tubingen, now the University of \\'irtcm-



burg. He was an extensive traveler ; was captured in
the Mediterranean sea by Corsairs of Algiers, the
famous sea pirates of that day, and sold into captivity
in Algiers. Subsequently a Neapolitan merchant (a
Roman Christian) redeemed him into freedom, took
him to Italy and furnished him wth means to return
to his native land. In 1766 he came to America and
located in Philadelphia, Pa., where he accumulated
considerable property near the corner of Vine and
Third streets.- He was an officer in the Continental
army in the War for Independence, was captain in the
Philadelphia Guards, and as a result of his action in
the Federal cause his buildings were burned to the
ground when the British occupied the city. He died
in 1810, and was buried at Easton, Pa. He married,
Sept. 13, 1768, Mrs. Maria (Henrici) Sansfelt, a widow
of French Huguenot extraction. They had a child,
Christian Frederick Lewis, mentioned below.

(XI\') Christian Frederick Lewis Endress, D. D.,
son of John Zacharias Endress, was born in Philadel-
phia, March 12. 1775. He was graduated from the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, which institution honored him
with the title of Doctor of Theology in 1820. Through-
out most of his lifetime he was connected with Trinity
Lutheran Church, pastor from 1815 to 1827 at Lancas-
ter, Pa., succeeding Dr. Henry M. Muhlenberg, founder
of the Lutheran church in America. About 1814, with
his friend. Col. Nathaniel Rochester, he removed to
Dansville, N. Y., in the far-famed Genesee Valley,
where they purchased large tracts of land. Subsequently
Colonel Rochester went further on to the Falls of the
Genesee and established the city which bears his name.
Dr. Endress did not remain in Dansville. but returned
to Pennsylvania, locating at Easton, where he died Sept.
27, 1827. In 1801, he married Margaretha Fries. They
had a son, Isaac Lewis, mentioned below.

(XV) Judge Isaac Lewis Endress, son of Dr. Chris-
tian F. L. Endress, was born in Easton, Pa., Sept. 14,
1810. died in 1870. He was educated in Dickinson Col-
lege, Carlisle, Pa. When his family left Pennsylvania
for W^estern New York, he entered the law office of
Judge Ewing, of Trenton. N. J., where he remained
about one year. He then went to Rochester and en-
tered the law offices of Messrs. Rochester & Ford, and
later was in the offices of Messrs. Barnard & Hill.
Eventually he was admitted to the bar at Rochester,
where he initiated the practice of his profession, and
whence he removed to Dansville in 1832. He continued
to reside at Dansville during the remainder of his life,
and as a lawyer obtained an enviable reputation and
lucrative practice. For some thirteen years he was as-
sociated with Judge John A. Van Derlip in the practice
of law. under the style of Endress & Van Derlip. He
was an old line Whig as a young man, and after the
formation of the Republican party, transferred his al-
legiance to that organization. He was appointed to the



Online LibraryJohn Phillips DownsHistory of Chautauqua County, New York, and its people (Volume 3) → online text (page 66 of 101)