John Russell Russell (Earl) John Russell Bedford (Duke of).

Correspondence of John, fourth Duke of Bedford, Volume 2 online

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infantry, viz. Pole's, Anstruther's, Sandford's and
Sebright's, and three regiments of dragoons, viz.
Mostyn's, Yorke's, and Whitley's at Newry, and I
make no doubt, that should the French be hardy
enough to hazard themselves at any distance from
their ships, the troops I shall be able to get together
in a very few days, will be more than sufficient to
protect the country from any violence, and to drive
them out of this country. But, unfortunately, as
there were no more troops in that part of the
country where the enemy now is, but a few com-
panies of Strode's and Browne's regiment, sufficient
to guard the French prisoners who were sent there
from the South, at the time the expedition under
Duke d' AiguiUon was expected in that part of the
kingdom, I fear Belfast, which is, I believe, the
richest town in this kingdom, after Dublin and

DD 3



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406 cokkKkSPondence of

1760. Cork, must inevitably fall into their hands, and
_____ ppQ^ably contributions may be levied on Lisbume,
Hilsborough, and the further parts of the county of
Down. Neither I nor any other person in this city
received any further intelligence of this matter, till
half past seven this morning, when I received a
second letter from Major-General Strode, a copy of
which is here enclosed, by which you will perceive
that Lieutenant-Colonel Jennings, has suffered
himself* with four companies of Strode's under his
command, to be made prisoners of war. I am
sorry not to be able to send you a more circuna-
stantial account of this affair, but as Major-General
Strode is not on the staff here, I propose sending
off immediately to Newry, Major-General Fitz-
william, of whose intelligence in his profession, and
of whose zeal in his Majesty's service I have an
high opinion. I hope his Majesty will approve the
steps I have taken, and will not think I have sent
too small a force to oppose the enemy, as it is abso-
lutely necessary to keep a strong garrison in this
city; and Cork and many of the other parts of this
kingdom must not be left unguarded, as very

* Walpole says/' ridiculous as charge of negligence. The acU-

this campaign was, it was no joke vity of the Irish government is

to the Duke of Bedford; Jennings further confirmed by the cone-

and his puny force had shown spondence with Sir Robert Wilmot

themselves willing to do their ut- at this period. It appears, indeed,

most. The success of Thurot that the detachment at Carrick-

was a glaring comment on the fergus was deficient in ammuni-

negligence of his Grace's admin is- tion, but that want can hardly be

tration." — Memoirs, \oliupA23. imputed as a fault to the Lord

The letters in this collection will Lieutenant of Ireland,
prove the falsity of Walpole's



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THE DUKE OF BEDFORD. 407

probably this very insignificant disembarkation i76o.
may be only the prelude of some greater, and
meant to take off my attention, from an object of
more moment. This is what you must infallibly
be better judges of in England, where you have more
intelligence than it is possible for any of us here to
have, and I shall, therefore, impatiently wait for let-
ters from you, as well to know whether his Majesty
shall be graciously pleased to approve what I have
done, and likewise to hear, whether you conceive there
is a likelihood of an attack in any other quarter of
the kingdom. For God's sake let us have upon the
roasts a few frigates and sloops.

I am, &c.

Bedford.



DUKE OF BEDFORD TO THE EARL OF ROTHES.

DubLn Castle, February 25. I76O.

As I find there is a great uneasiness in this
town, and an apprehension of a run on the banks
occasioned by the warlike preparations made for
the North, which it is believed would be increased
should I leave this city to-morrow as I intended ;
I am obliged to lay that aside, and therefore your
Lordship will please to proceed as you shall judge
proper with the army under your command, as in
the present circumstances I cannot possibly have
the pleasure of joining you.

D D 4



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408 CORR£SPOKD£NCE OF

1760-

MAJOR-GENERAL STRODE TO THE DUKE OF
BEDFORD.

BelfMt» Febniirj 22. 176O.

My Lord,

I beg leave to acquaint your Grace, that
last night, at seven o'clock, Lieut. -Col. Jennings^
of the 62d regiment, which I have the honour to
command, together with four companies were made
prisoners of war at Carrickfergus. And this
morning about eight o'clock a flag of truce came
into town, and made a demand of the several
articles undermentioned, to be delivered this day at
two o'clock, promising to pay for them*, and
threatening in case of refusal to bum Carrick-
fergus, and afterwards to come up and bum this
town also : — with which demand the gentlemen of
Belfast thought it best to comply.

About five or six hundred of the country militia
have come to town to-day, but are very ill provided
with arms, and have great scarcity of ammunition ;
though I spared them part of what I had.

I am informed the French lost about four or
five at Carrickfergus, and our people about three
or four.

I am, &c.

William Strode.

* A list of stores is inclosed.



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THE DUKE or BEDFOBD. 409

1760.

MARQUESS OF TAVISTOCK • TO THE DUKE OF

BEDFORD.

London^ February 27. I76O.

My dearest Father,

I cannot thank you enough for sparing a
moment fix>m all the business which this descent of
the French must have engaged you in, to let me
hear from you. I am in hopes so trifling a force
will not wait your arrival, but that General Strode
will be able, at least, with his five companies and
the militia, to retaliate the affair of St. Caz upon
them, especially as in this country they give us a
most despicable account of Thurot's equipment ; and
I think it can be no affront to the Irish nation to
believe all their accounts extremely exaggerated, if
not entirely false. I have, however, the comfort
to think that if your presence should be necessary
(which I hope in God it wlU not), the men you
command will I am certain do their duty. I am
very sorry that four companies should be made
prisoners, but as I am ignorant of the circum -
stances, I am in hopes it is not owing either to
want of spirit or conduct. I hope this will find all
at the castle in perfect peace and quietness, and that
so trifling an attempt will not have alarmed in the
least my mother and sister, whose quiet I am the
most concerned for.

Believe me, &c.

F. T

* Only son of the Duke of Bedford.



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410 CORRESPOKBBNCE OF

1760.

DUKE OF BEDFORD TO MR, SECRETARY PITT.

(Separate.)

Dublin Castle^ March 2. I76Q.

Having in my letter to you of the 23d of
last month, mentioned that Lieut.-GoL Jennings
with four companies of Major-General Strode's
regiment under his conunand, had suffered himself
and them to be made prisoners of war in the castle
of Carrickfergus, which was the best account I
could then give you in consequence of the only
accounts I had then received relating to that affair
from Major-General Strode, I think it incumbent
on me, in order that no aspersion may be thrown
on that gentleman's charaxjter as an officer, to in-
form you, that upon the strictest inquiry I have
made into it, from the Earl of Rothes and other
officers who have since been upon the spot, to
declare that no man could have made, with the
small number of men under his command, a gal-
lanter or better judged defence of any place, under
the circumstances he was in, than Lieut.-Col. Jen-
nings did, and that had he had 150 men more with
ammunition sufficient (which was not the case), he
would undoubtedly, in my opinion, have preserved
Carrickfergus, which though he did not succeed in,
he was undoubtedly, under God, the cause of pre-
serving Belfast from pillage, and saving the loss of
at least 100,000/. to his Majesty's subjects, that town
having had at least to that value in linen goods and



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THE DUKE OF BEDFORD. 411

money. The very soldier-like behaviour of this 1760.

gentleman, obliges me in justice to give this ample —

testimonial of his merits on that day, and to re-
commend him, on that account, to his Majesty's
fiiture favour in promoting him to a lieutenant-
colonelcy in an older regiment.*



DUKE OF BEDFORD TO MR. SECRETARY PITT.

Fowerscourt, March 24. I76O.

I was on Thursday last honoured with your
letter of the 13th instant, inclosing to me that very
extraordinary one (not to give it a harsher name)
of Mr. Haven the sovereign of Belfast to you. The
assertion in it, of no arms having been put into the
hands of any Protestant in that part of Ireland
since the commencement of the present war, is most
manifestly false, I having denied them to no one
Protestant gentleman who has asked for them, as
has been candidly confessed in the House of Com-
mons, even by those very gentlemen who have
been most adverse in parliament to my adminis-
tration ; and it is very remarkable, that this very

* Thurot set sail agsun^ after Gilbert Elliot, who commanded

the capture of Carrickfergus^ some frigates at Kinsale, that

taking with him the Mayor and gallant officer went to sea^ and

two other gentlemen. But the falling in with the French squa-

Duke of Bedford having given dron captured the whole of them^

intelligence of his departure to after an action in which Thurot

Captain Elliot^ a brother of Sir was killed.



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412 CORRESPONDENCE OF

1760. gentleman who, in his letter to you of the 22d of
last month, taxes me and my predecessors with so
shameful a neglect, had never applied to me, and
was indeed unknown to me even by name at the
time the letter was wrote. I leave it, Sir, to your
judgment to determine whether so insolent and so
unprovoked an attack upon his Majesty's lieutenant
of this kingdom, shall not receive from you such a
check, as may prevent the like impertinencies to
me, and trouble to you for the future.



SECRETARY PITT TO THE DUKE OF BEDFORD.

(Private.)

St. James's Square, April I9. I76O.

My Lord,

My office letters will acquaint your Grace
that I lost no time in laying before the King your
Grace's desires with regard to the Lords Justices ;
and which, from his Majesty's reliance on your
Grace's views for his service, and from the known
merit of the subjects in question, could not fail to
meet with the royal approbation ; it is with great
satisfaction that I congratulate your Grace on your
approaching return by the middle of next month
into his Majesty's presence, after so successful a
conclusion of affairs in Ireland; at which time it
will be a very sensible pleasure to me to assure
your Grace in person, that I shall ever esteem it a



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THE DUKE OP BEDFORD. 413

real honour to merit in any degree your Grace's 1760.

approbation.

I am, &c.

W. Pitt.



MR. RIGBY TO THE DUKE OF BEDFORD.

Dublin Castle, April 29- 17^0.

My dear Lord,

The packet due this day arrived last night
at eleven o'clock ; and I think it better to send your
letters by Foster the messenger, who I hope wiU
be with you before you go to bed to-night, rather
than wait for the post to-night. He will attend
your Grace's commands, and bring back any orders
you may have.

I enclose your Grace copies of letters which I
received last night from Mr. Sharpe and Mr. Wood.
I hope from Sharpe's letter that it is not quite im-
possible but some bills may be returned to us by
the end of this week : the minutes of yesterday will
show your Grace that we adjourned till Friday on
that account. By Wood's letter and its enclosure,
you wiU perceive the measure of Lord George's
(Sackville) fate is not yet full. I take for granted
he will be expelled the House of Commons.* When

* " Well, the big week is over ! parison of what was intended

Lord George's sentence, after all and desired, and truly not very

the communications of how ter- severe, considering what was

rible it was, is ended in proclaim- proved." — Walpoles Letters, vol.

ing him unfit for the King's iv. p. 40.
service. Very moderate, in corn-



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414 CORRESPONDENCE OF

1760. he went there, he went smiling up to the Speaker,
who made him a very cold bow, and turning to his
son, who was standing by him, said, ^^ Is that man
mad to come to this place ? " The Vice-Chamberlain
has been with him to forbid him the court, and also
to Lord Bute and Sir William Irby to acquaint them
of his message.

There are no events stirring in this place; if any
occur worth your Grace's notice, you shall have
immediate intelligence of them. The mercy which
you extended to the dragoons yesterday was re-
ceived with the loudest acclamations : the poor devils,
by all accounts, were real penitents, and the secret
was incompwably kept.

I am, &c.

Richard Rigby.



MR. RIGBY TO THE DUKE OF BEDFORD.

Pall MaU^ May 28. I76O.

I write to your Grace to avoid being sus-
pected of negligence, rather than to inform you of
any occurrence whatever, for I never knew this
town more barren of events. I have been to court
to-day, and was most graciously received both by
the monarch and the courtiers. I have not seen
the King look so weU these many years ; be en-
quired much after you, as did the Lady, both after
your Grace and the Duchess. There are no mi-



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THE DUKE OF BEDFORD. 415

nisters to be seen. Mr. Pitt is in his bed with the 1760.

gout;. Lord Holdemesse in Yorkshire with his

militia ; and the Duke of Newcastle at Claremont,
where he stays till Friday morning, when I propose
seeing him. I hear your Grace is to be received
most graciously, and it is hoped that you will be
as well pleased with the ministers as they with you.
I saw Lady Betty yesterday at Lord Gower's;
they are both in perfect health and beauty.



DUKE OF NEWCASTLE TO THE DUKE OF BEDFORD.

Kensington^ June 27- 17^^ past three o'clock,

I would not stay for the Extraordinary
Gazette to send your Grace the great news which
arrived here this morning, that the siege of Quebec
was carried, all the enemy's frigates there burnt,
thirty-two pieces of heavy cannon taken, and ten
field pieces. The French retired to the place from
whence they came, and their whole force said to be
reduced to 5000 men. I see by Murray's* letters,
that he thinks their affairs quite over in that part of
the world. I send your Grace Mr. Hunter's note.
I most sincerely congratulate you upon this
great and most seasonable good news.

* General Murray, a brave and to surrender to the Spaniards in
adventurous officer, who when 1782.
governor of Minorca was forced



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416 CORRESPONDENOS OF

1760.

THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM PONSONBY TO THE
DUKE OF BEDFORD.

DabUn, June SO. 176O.

My Lord,

I beg your Grace will pardon the liberty I
take, in troubling you upon a subject which is of
the utmost consequence to me and my fSeimily.

Lord Harrington having some time ago wrote to
Mr. Clements that he wished to sell his employment
of Comptroller of the Customs in this port, Mr.
Clements mentioned it to me ; and I wrote to some
of my firiends in London, to say that if you should
be pleased to approve of Lord Harrington's resig-
nation, I should be glad of this employment upon
the terms which he had proposed to Mr. Clements,
who told me that he declined it. Lord Harrington
and my friends have accordingly agreed upon the
terms; but as his lordship's patent runs during
pleasure only, the favour I would entreat firom
your Grace is, that this patent (through your
Grace's most powerful interest with his Majesty)
may be granted to a friend of mine for my use
during the lives of my three sons, WiUiam, John,
and George.

As this is matter of the highest importance to
my family, I must take the liberty of entreating
your Grace's protection upon this interesting oc-
casion.

I am, &c.

William Ponsonby.



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THE DUKE OP BEDFORD. 417

1760.
DUKE OF BEDFORD TO MR. PONSONBY.

Stratton Park, July 25. 176O.

Dear Sir,

I received but two days ago your letter of
the SOth of last month, which the Earl of Bessbo-
rough sent down to Mr. Rigby at this place. I write
by this post to inform his lordship that I am told
the Earl of Harrington does at present decline the
parting with his employment, upon the answer I
gave to his letter to me, intimating his desire of
doing so, that I could not move the King to grant
his successor, whoever he should be, a larger term
than what his lordship had ; and that I hope neither
his lordship nor you will think I could, with any
propriety, move his Majesty to grant an employ-
ment now held during pleasure only for a term
determinable on three lives, after the many favours
I have so lately obtained for his subjects in Ireland,
and more especially as I know that the granting
employments for lives is very disagreeable to him.

I am, &c.

Bedford.



DUKE OF NEWCASTLE TO THE DUKE OF BEDFORD.

Newcastle House, July I9. I76O.

My dear Lord,

I had the honour of your Grace's letter of
the 11th ; and as I am always happy to obey your

VOL. II. E E



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118 CORRESPONDENCE OF

1760. commands, I have this day executed them with the

King in the manner which I hope will be to your

satisfaction. I did not understand that I was to
lay the particular recommendations before the King.
I had no paper left with me by your Grace ; I only
took heads : so all I could do was to read these
heads to the King. The enclosed is what I took
down, and I acquainted his Majesty that I had
really forgot the names of the Lords who were to
be promoted to be Earls. The King very readily con-
sented to every person your Grace shall propose ;
and his Majesty was so willing to give the Irish
pensions, that indeed I did not trouble him with
naming the three or four last. I think myself very
happy in having thus succeeded in what your Grace
was desirous that I should name first to the King.
The Spanish Ambassador dines at Claremont on
Wednesday next the 18th : had I imagined your
Grace intended to be in town at that time, I should
sooner have desired the honour of your Grace's
company that day at Claremont to meet the Spanish
Ambassador. I shall be infinitely obliged to your
Grace, and it will do me a particular favour, if you
will come.

I am, &c.

HoLLES Newcastle.*



* Promotions^ Peerages^ Places, Peers to be promoted.

and Pensions, agreed to by Lord Mornington to be created
the King, July l6. 1760. an Earl."



"^""May 1. Mr. Trevor Hill that his son-in-law, Lord Mom-
was with me to make his request ington, may be made an Earl."



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THE DUKE OF BBDFOBD. 419

1760.
MR. RIGBY TO THE DUKE OF BEDFORD.

St. James's Place^ September 8. 1760.

Mr. Calcraft has sent to Lady Betty by this
post all the intelligence which has arrived from
Germany. I was at court, where all the ministers
were, and all I could learn was a confirmation of
what he has wrote. The Duke of Newcastle showed
me the King of Prussia's own letter to the King
upon his victory, where the story was veryprettily
and modestly told. Here is a Prussian officer come
who was in the battle. His Majesty seemed in pro-
digious health and spirits.

I have heard no other events of any sort. It is
thought Lord Ligonier will not get over his illness ;
and Will. Kepple, who is field officer in waiting,
told me he had set his heart upon your Grace's
having the first regiment of Guards. I went from

Lord Ludlow to be created an Privy CounciUon to be made.

EaJ-L Earl of Drogheda.

Lord Farnfaam to be created a Lord Famham.

Viscount. Sir William Fownes.

Lord Russborough to be ere- Benjamin Burton, Esq.

ated a Viscount.

Peers to be created. Mr. Attorney-general to be

Sir Thomas Taylor to be ere- Chief Justice of the King's Bench.

ated a Baron.(> Mr. Solicitor-general to be At-

Mr. Cole, a Baron.« tomey.

Mr. Browne of Westport, a Mr. John Gore to be Solicitor-
Baron.^ general.

Mr. Holmes of the Isle of Mr. Anthony Foster to be

Wight, a Baron.® Counsel to the Commissioners.



»» Created Baron Headfort. ** Baron Monteagle.

c John Cole, created Baron « Created Baron Holmes.
Mountilorence.

£ E 2



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420 CORRESPONDENCE OF

1760. court to Holland House: Mr. Fox, Lady Caroline,

and Lady Sarah pay their respects to you on

Wednesday, and propose staying till Monday.

The Duke of Newcastle has desired me to call at
Newcastle House to-morrow morning ; I dare swear
he has no business with me, and that a quarter of
an hour's conversation is the sole purpose. I shall
go to Mistley afterwards. No business of any sort
by the post from Ireland to-day.



DUKE OF BEDFORD TO LORD BARRINGTON.

Wobum Abbey, October 1. I76O.

I inclose your Lordship an extract of a
letter I received but yesterday from my son, of so
old a date as the 21st of last month, it having been
sent to Chatsworth, where he believed me to be. It
relates to a plan we have long thought of — ^inocula-
ting, during the course of this winter, as many of
the men as shall be willing to undergo that operation.
As very few of your countrjrmen have had that
distemper, the giving it them by inoculation seems
to my son and me a work of private charity and
humanity to those we wish weU to, and at the same
time of utility to his Majesty's service ; as the bat-
talion will, I hope, be rendered by it exempt from
a distemper which is often more fatal to a young one
than the fatigues and hazards of the severest cam-
paign. I must submit the reasonableness of my



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THE DUKE OF BEDFOBD. 421

son's request to your Lordship's judgment : all that 1760.

I can add to it is, that I do entirely approve of it ;

and that if we do succeed in the application now
made, that all care shall be taken to give no um-
brage to the town where our battalion shall be
quartered of spreading the distemper amongst them ;
but that separate and lone houses shall be taken, as
well for the preparing and inoculating the men, as
for the airing them after they shall have got over
the distemper. The weather is now grown so wet,
that I hope to hear soon of aU the camps breaking
up.

I am, &c.

Bedford.



THE LORDS JUSTICES, ARCHBISHOP OF ARMAGH,
LORD SHANNON, THE SPEAKER, TO THE DUKE
OF BEDFORD.

Dublin Castle, November 7. 1760.

My Lord,

No packets are arrived yet from England
since Friday the 31st of October, on which day we
received by express from your Grace the notification
of the death of his late Majesty.*

The fermentation which a general election must
always occasion is already begun ; and we think it
incumbent upon us to lay before your Grace our

* George the Second died on the 25th of October^ between
seTen and eight in the morning.

E E 3



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422 COBRESFONDEKCE OF

1760. thoughts with regard to the time that it may be

most fit for his Majesty's service and the welfare of

the country, to dissolve the present and to re-issue
the writs for the calling of a new parliament.

We are persuaded that your Grace will be of
opinion that this great work should be begun and
ended as soon as possible. If it is long delayed, the
animosities will of course increase every day, and
the whole country would become a scene of idleness
and riot. Another consideration has occurred to us,
which we think is of no small weight. Your Grace
has had some experience of the difficulties which the
appointment of sheriffs brings upon the government
in times less interesting than the present ; and it is
our wish, in order to avoid the infinite trouble as well
as the imputation of partiality to which we must be
exposed, that the present sherifis, of whom it cannot
be said that they are made to answer any private
• purposes, should transact that business, which we
think may be done, if your Grace should approve of
the method ; and from this moment no time should
be lost in carrying it into execution.

If we can receive from your Grace his Majesty's
commands for dissolving the Parliament any time
before the end of the month (though every day
gained will be of advantage), we can immediately
proceed in council with the legal form of a bill, and
transmit it to your Grace, and may hope to receive
it again, returned under the great seal from Eng-
land, before the 20th of December at latest ; the
writs may then be issued imitiediately, and the forty



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TUE DUIvE OF BEDFORD. 423

(lays in which they are returnable will be expired 1760.



Online LibraryJohn Russell Russell (Earl) John Russell Bedford (Duke of)Correspondence of John, fourth Duke of Bedford, Volume 2 → online text (page 27 of 33)