Copyright
John Ryan.

The history and antiquities of the county of Carlow online

. (page 1 of 45)
Online LibraryJohn RyanThe history and antiquities of the county of Carlow → online text (page 1 of 45)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Gc

941.8801
R95h
1813557



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL
GENEALOGY COLLECTION



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LiBRARY



3 1833 00725 2833



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center



http://www.archive.org/details/historyantiquitiOOryan



^ /

THE ^ • -f ^ v; /



HISTORY. AlVD ANTIQUITIES



COUNTY OF CARLO W.



BY JOPIN RYAN,. ESQ., M.R.S.L,



Condo et compono quae mox depromere poiaim. Hor.

La docte antiouite fut toiijours venerable: Boileau.
Nature has implanted in our breasts a lively impulse to extend the narrow
span of our existence, by the knowledge of tiie evcntd that have happened
on the soil which we inhabit, of the character:) and actions of those men
from whom our descent, as individuals or as a people, is derived. Gibbon.



DUBLIN:



RICHARD MOORE TIMS, GRAFTON-STREET:
GRANT AND BOLTON, DAME-STUEET.

1833.



r:)



o



o



1813557



-<! r-' ^



^



X- c






C—


^ , ^


O










*" — ' u ,




:y ^'


_;-<


a"; ^






'_.


H ^


r-\


: 1^


^' -


. a


y_






' — ■




w-*-^ ^ ^


p"'


yH^




U. (—»




cr ?;•








•^


o


; — '


"-^


^


f-1-


H-^


^^T^


^ ■


rt!










W


n




O


7i)


•^


rf


ri


O


«-^


■-^


^


►1


o


CO


►-^


Oj




o->


O




p



^'y.A



///•'



^ .


■/•'




,/ ■ Ji ^.


4^.


a. aa









'^p^ /'it



r-ra, , //-//r



1 ictcvi'ucr.




/ivf. H,nuCs-_ _. , _




- ...__


/l,ll. .


- .. .


.-. ^.


/^ys




- i^S.'S'f'V.


//•^^y,^




^i\n,..


a„rL:,.A;y,„„




fe


CLrih,. / ( n4,s


» A'-,/,


J!IL-It«-


f-nrn, //c.sr..




ra .»


/Ur,.„nJ linr/,;..




: A v:.:/.


hc„n,/artt', ,/■ /U


Y//,fS


.... f ., .-1-,,., .,



1






■ y;H:<J4H4



T. O'FLANAaAN, PRINTER, 26, BA.CH£L0R'S-WALK, DUBUH.




.7, 'h'tjiit^



TO THE PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENTS, AND MEMBERS OF THE

ROYAL SOCIETY OF LITERATURE,

THIS WORK IS RESPECTFULLY

DEDICATED :

BY TIIBIR MOST
OBEDIENT HUMBLE SERVANT,

THE AUTHOR.



PREFACE.

To the disadvantage and to the discredit of Ireland^
literature has heretofore been hut little cultivated or en-
couraged by her inhabitants. To the disadvantage, because
mental culture is one of the most effectual agents in the
civilization and moral regencratitm of any people:

Ingenuas didicisse (ideliterartea

EmoUit mores, nee iinit esse feros. Uvid.

To the discredit, because a neglect of the arts, sciences,
literature, betrays an absence of those noble, intellectual
aspirations which mainly distinguish man from the lower
orders of creation. These positions are incontrovertible,
and therefore, any elaborate support of them would bo
superfluous.

1 shall now briefly advert to the past and present state
of that branch of literature to which the following work
appertains.

The prospect in this case is far from cheering. While
in Great Britain, every county, and many baronies, pa-
rishes, cities, towns, villages, and even private houses,*
have had their historians and antiquaries, little, indeed,
has been done in Ireland. With the exception of Smith's
histories of Cork, Waterford, and Kerry, published in
the last century, and others " few and far between," the
local records of the country yet remain to be collected, its
ancient structures are yet to be visited, explored, and
accurately pourtrayed.f It is not difficult to account for
the immediate cause of this circumstance: public support
has not been forthcoming; and even now, the attendant
dirtUullies are such as would, perhaps, deter most persons
from the pursuit: in fact, no small share of enthusiasm
is necessary to carry a work on antiquities, (or indeed on any
other subject), in Ireland, to a successful conclusion. The
example of our English and Scotch fellow subjects,
however, was striking ; the deficiency existed ; and the
author, feeling an interest in his native county, resolved at
all hazards, to collect its history and survey its antiqui-
ties. The present volume is the result of his determination.

Knowing that in too many instances writers have been
led into gross blunders by improjierly attempting to des-

• The following are a few of thete works, with the prices marked in the booksellei'i
catalogue :

Hutchin^on'g Hist, of Dorsetshire, 2n(l edit. ^ vols fol. Price 50/. 0*. Od. I

Doctor Robert Pint's Natural Hiktory of Statl'oidshire 2/. IOj. Od.
WriRht'i Hictory and Antiquities of the coiinty of Rutland 1 /. lUt. Hd.
Dr. Leigh's Natural Hi>tory and Antiquitie.s of LAncashire 18j. Orf.
Sir Peter Leycester's Historical Antiquities of Che.'ilerO l.'it. Od.
Allen's History of Lamheth, Svo. 1/. 1.5*. 0(/.
Faulkner's History of Chelsea, 2 vols. Svo. new edit. 2/. 2x.
Hist, and AntiquitiesofHengravehnll, in the county of Suffolk, by John Gage, Esq. F.S.A.

fThe low price of lis-Hd. is placed on the present History and Antiquities of the county
of Carlow and its accompanying map, partly in order to enable individuals of all classes
to procure copies. The work may be fairly said to contain as much matter s« woul I
form two octavos, printed in the manner now gener.-il with new publications.

•f The Statibti.-ul Surveys of the Royai Dublin Society are chiefly agricultural ; but one
short chapter I't ing devoted to history and antiquities. Gazetteers, or topographical dic-
tionaries, must be nece»j«ril> brief as to each particular district.



Vi VREVAVE.

cribe places and structures which they had never seeu,**^
the author resolved on visiting' every ancient phice, or
building, in the district to which his work relates. He
has, accordingly, traversed the shire from north to south,
and from east to west; from Rathvilly to St. Mullins,
and from Old Leighlin to Ilacketstown have been atten-
tively explored ; and if he has failed in obtaining compre-
hensive information on the present state of the antiquities
of the county of Carlow, it has not been from deficiency
in physical exertion. Like Sir Walter Scott, (in his
rambles through the border country, when collecting mat-
ter for his exquisite works), the author adopted the pedes-
trian mode in his survey ; by far the best where minute
inquiry is the object ; though he cannot say, that he has
often walked thirty (Scotch) miles a day, as Sir Walter is
stated by one of his biographers to have frccjuently per-
formed.f Such, in short, was the ardour of the author's
search for information, that the hunjorous lines applied by
Burns to the facetious antiquary Captain Grose, migiit
with equal justice iiave been applied to him. A mass of
matter, however, has by this means been collected, re-
lating not merely to the ancient structures, but to most of
the time-honoured burial-grounds of the county.

Regarding literary information, the most approved ori-
ginal works have been consulted ; nuiiuiscripts have been
inspected ; the public records have been searched ; and
application has been made to every accessible source. As
relates to one authority, Keating, a word or two is ne-
cessary. The precise degree of credit due to him, it is
difficult to ascertain. O'Ueilly stylos him neither more nor
less than the *• llerodolus of Ireland," while Sir Ri-
chard Cox says, "as for the histories ihat treat of the
times before the English conc^uest, Doctor Keating's
is the best;" but an important (|ualification of this opinion
follows: " itis after all,'' says Cox, " but an ill-digested
heap of very silly fictions."

Wlio shall decide when doctors disagree ?
Certainly,we, ourselves, have detected very serious flaws in
Keating's chronology, and there is assuredly, a want of
verisimilitude in many of his statements ; but we conceive,
that we should not be justified in altogether rejecting
him as an authority ; which would, besides, be at variance
with the practice of several modern writers of judgment.

• Instances could he multiplied, but the followine; may be taken aj a jaiiiple. Dei-crib-
ing tbe column orected on thebcene of the battle ol tbe Boy lie, a late writer eajs: " Tlicie
hie inscriptions in Kngli.«h on the four f\Ae> of it, ctiitlng the purposes tor which it was
erected, underneath one of which if a tiatin irccriptioii, mentioning thnt the lirsl stone wan
Uid in 1736," &c.— T,\e Sorthern Tournt. By P. D. Ihinly, E.-q. JI.H.I.J. p. 17. Nowwl.at
IS the fact? There is Au/ owe in?orjption on the ul.pli^k- ^a^ t/ie can te>tify from personal
ot»ervalion), and that l« in Kneiuh. ftAimg i»e p^iMJ of ere. t.on. Ac. We fear the ton
/HI src:;ld plij:* cut klLe reliaBCr on » iuij«, i» 4'. vj eir.y in tie fic-j^riOi;, U:/a »
kii lacorr-cou-f- • ind izcMupeut^f.

Tie a£tlor . ; - !uid Ui mere pitajure m ta tx<:aruoiii oa foot, (ttaicii Vite ar.t ceea
eoaaiMii t.'. Ir.; a J.; tiiaa h* rrer ei^^ciTtJ witJi eitj*ri*o»f k. f.g. jaunCiaj-eai, ioneo*. •,
Of My oti« cf tie uiiccifti modes oHceotnjt.oa-



piit;i'Aci::. vii

I The fact seems to be, that his history of Irelaud is a

compound of truth and error ; from which the latter should,
if possible, be cautiously winnowed, while the grains of
valuable historical fact should be as carefully preserved.

Regarding the result of his applications to individuals
for local information, the author cannot complain. While

!?■ be certainly is not enabled to say that success was inva-

riable, or that intelligence was, in all instances, freely
conununicated, he is, assuredly, not compelled to make a
report so unfavourable as that of JMr. Dutton, author of
the Survey of the county of Clare, who thus writes in the
preface to that work: "Had I," he says, " not considered
myself bound to fulfil my promise to the Dublin Society,
this survey of the county of Clare would never have
been published; that ungracious illiberal silence, with
regard both to the hundreds of letters I wrote, and to the
reiterated verbal applications I made, (and which to the
disgrace of Ireland, is complained of in almost every
survey that has been published), would otherwise have
urged me, at an early period, to decline all further pro-
gress. Some, to whom 1 applied, (whose rank in life
should have placed them above such gross ignorance),
asked me what a survey was, what it was about, &c. ; and
somi, very wittily, wished to know, was it to take an account
of all the pigs inEnnis and Killaloe, with a multitude of
other remarks equally sagacious and liberal." — The au-
thor of the present work, unquestionably, did not, in all
cases, meet an enlightened disposition to aiford useful or
interesting information ; but, to the credit of his native
county, he can with truth assert, that in no instance did
he encounter barbarism such as that related by JMr. Dut-
ton. Let us hope that the day will speedily arrive, when
the gentry of Ireland, universally, will duly appreciate
the advantages of mental cultivation, and the benefits
arising from the diffusion of useful literature.

The history concludes at the year 1800, for the follow-
ing reasons : firstly, it is usual to close every work of the
kind at some well-defined era ; and secondly, the present
generation must be perfectly acquainted with the transac-
tions of the last thirty years. The chief and important
feature in the history of our county since the Union, we
will, however, mention. It consists of a recent effort on
the part of the Romish priests and the agitators to destroy
the ancient and salutary influence of the gentry over their
tenantry, and to usurp the power of returning the count/
members to parliament. In this latter, they completely
succeeded at the general election of ]831; and they have
since maintained their unjust and pernicious ascendancy
A detail of the causes which ensured their first successand
subsequent supremacy, is needless, and would occupy



ViiJ PREFACE.

more space than could be well atForded in this place. It
will suflice to observe, thatthe gentry themselves, are not
altogether blameless in the affair. This, in the spirit of
true friends, we think it our duty to state.

The author avows himself attached to Tory, Conser-
vative, and Protestant principles, but he can safely say,
that truth and impartiality have been closely studied in
the following work. He was not ignorant of Cicero's
rules for the historian; the first of which he declares to be,
not to state any thing false, and the second, to dare to
publish the truth.* The author trusts, that his adherence
to these laws is obvious in the following pages. Amicus
Plato, amicus Socrates, sed tnagis arnica Veritas.

It is worthy of remark, that several of the ancient families
connected with our county, who formerly were by no means
distinguished for their loyally to the throne, are now among
its firmest supporters. It is further a striking circumstance,
that so long as the members of these families remained
Romanists, so long did they continue disposed to rebellion,
butfrom the time of their adoption of the reformed religion,
their political conduct has been that of good subjects, it
has been steady, correct, and unimpeachable.

To the various gentlemen who contributed information
to the work, the author returns his best thanks. The
Dean ofSr. Patrick's,William11ai{ty, Esq..]\I.D.,
the Rev. H. Kingsmill, F.T.C.D., Samuel Litton,
Esq., M.D., and W. Shaw Mason, Es(j., are entitled to
liis particular acknowledgments, for facilities afforded by
them to the collection of valuable historical matter.

In imitation of the plan adopted by the Rev. Mr. Gor-
don and Dr. O'Halloran, in the publication of their his-
tories of Ireland, subscribers names were received ; and
the author has to express his thanks to the noblemen and
gentlemen who thus promoted the ^York, and thereby fos-
tered the growth of literature in this much neglected land.

That imperfections do not exist in the following work,
the author is not so presumptuous as to suppose. The
defective state of our public records, and the occasional
difficulty of access to those which exist, will be remem-
bered ; while the circumscribed limits of the county (the
smallest in Ireland excepting Louth) will not be forgotten.
And should the number, beauty, or interest of the ancient
works of art, be found not equal to that of some of the
neighbouring counties, the author confidently trusts, that
for such cii cumstance he will not be censured. Nor will
the reader be so unreasonable as to expect matter foreign
to the nature of the work, though, possibly, more absorb-
ing, or exciting, in its specific properties.

Dublin, I2t/i Julf/, 1833. J. It.

• De Orat. Lib. 2. cap. IS.



'• CONTENTS.

Page

Dedication iii.

Preface v.

CHAP I.

Geographical Sketch of the county of Carlow. ..... 7 11

CHAP. II.

Hy Cabanagh and Hy Drone anterior to the English
invasion of the twelfth century 15

CHAP. III.

From the arrival of the English, A.D. 1169, to the

death of Henry ir. A.D. 118!) 40

CHAP. IV.
Reign of Richard L A.D. 1189, to A.D. 1199 57

CHAP. V.
Reign of John. A.D. 1199, to A.D. 1216 59

CHAP. VI.
Reign of Henry III. A.D. 1216, to A.D. 1272 e.*?

CHAP. VII.
Reign of Edward L A.D. 1272, ^^ A.D. 1307 72

CHAP. VIII.
Reign of Edward II. A.D. 1307, <o A.D. 1327 73

CHAP. IX.
Reign of Edward III. A.D. 1327, to A.D. 1377... 78

CHAP. X.

Reign of Richard II. A.D. 1377, ^o A.D. 1399 84

CHAP. XI.
Reign of Henry IF. A.D. 1399, ^o A.D. 1412 87

CHAP. XII.
Reign of Henry F. A.D. 1112, to A.D. 1422 87

CHAP. XIII.
Reign of Henry VI. A.D. 1422, to A.D. 1460 89

CHAP. XIV.
Reign of Edward IV. A.D. I4G0, to A.D. 1483 S9

CHAP. XV.

Reign of Edward V.and Rich. III. A.D. 1483, to

A.D. 1485 90



X CONTENTS.

CHAP. XVI. Page.

Reign of Henry VI L A.D. 1485, to A.D. 1 J09 yo

CHAP. XVH.
Reign Henry VIII. A.D. 1500, to A.D. IfriT 91

CHAP. XVHI.
Reign of hdward VI. A.D. 1547, to A D. 1553 100

CHAP. XIX.
Reign of Mary. A.D. 1 553, to A.D. 1558. 102

CHAP. XX.
Reign of Elizaheth. A.D. 1558, to A.D. 1603 103

CHAP. XXI,
Reign of James 1. A.D. 1603, to A.D. 1625 114

CHAP. XXII.
Reign of Charles I. A.D. 1625, fo A.D. 1649 149

CHAP. XXIII.
The interregnum. A.D. 1649, to A.D. 1660.. ....... 183

CHAP. XXIV.
Reign of Charles II. A.D. 1660, to A.D. 1685 187

CHAP. XXV.
Reign of James II. A.D. 1685, ^o A.D. 1688 221

CHAP. XXVI.
Retgn of William III. A.D. 1688, to A.D. 1702 232

CHAP. XXVII.
Reign of Anne. A.D. 1102, to A.D. 1714 254

CHAP. XXVIII.
Reign of George I. A.D. 1714, to A.D. 1727 262

CHAP. XXIX.
Reign of George II. A.D. 1727, to A.D. 1760 269

CHAP. XXX.
Reign of George III A.D. 1760, to the year 1800 ... 286

CHAP. XXXI.

Present state of the Antiquities of the County of Car low, 326

CHAP. XXXII.

i^ome account of the respectable families ivho have been
long resident in the county of Carlow, and who pos-
sess property in it 356

Appendix 376






The reader is requested to correct the following Errata with his pen : ■

Page 15, line 13 — for counlri/ read eounl'j.

]9 28 is it.

5S 10 charter chapter.

165 24 forincd farmed.

169 17 Knglishntan— English,

-~ — 1575 25 jioiSfsscs poascsi.



THE

HISTORY AND ANTIQUITIES

or THE

COUNTY OF CARLOW.

CHAPTER r.

Geographical Sketch of the County of Cartowl

Prkviously to entering upon a detail of the history and
antiquities of tie county, it will be advisable to state its situation,
boundaries, extent and divisions. No great space will be required
for this purpose.

The county of Carlow, formerly termed Catherlogh, is situate
in the kingdom of Ireland, and province of Leinster. It is twenty-
■ix Jrish miles in length, from north to south, and twenty-three in
breadth from east to west. It is bounded on the north and north-
west by the Queen's county and the county of Kildare, on the
west by the county of Kilkenny, and on the east and south east
by the counties of Wicklow and Wexford. The number of barouiea
in the county, is six, viz. : Carlow, Forth, Idrone East, Idrone
West, Rathvilly and Saint iVlullins. The quantity of acres in
each, according to a survey made in 1781), is as follows :

Arable acres. Mountain and bog.
Barony of Carlow 18,48T ....

Forth 21,601 1,937

Baronies of Idrone 38,615 7109

Barony of Rathvilly 28,510

St. Mullinj 16,303 3,'lYl

123,.516 12,217

123,51tf



135,733.
Making a total of 135,733 acres in the whole county, or about
346 English square miles. The baronies are further divided into
parishes (all in the diocese of Leighlin), of which the civil distri*
Dution is as follows :



I. CARLOW BARONT



Ballynacarng, Killerig, Clodv, (part oO

Kcrnanstown, Ur-lin, ' Thumegurna,

Pamstown, (port of) Grangeforth^ KoUystovrn,

Carlow, ClonmuIsU.



B



13 HISTORY AND ANTIQUITIB*

Observations. — The ecclesiastical parish of Ballycrogue appears
to be only a townland in Ballynacarrig parish, forming part of the
union of Staplestown, Kernanstown, for baronial purposes, 14
considered a separate parish ; but according to the ecclesiastical
divisions, it appertains to Carlow parish, excepting the bog of Ker-
nanstown, which belongs to Urglin parish. The remainder of
Painstown parish is in ,the barony of Kilkea and Moone, county
Kildare. The town of Carlow is in the parish of that name.
The ecclesiastical parish of Aghade is only now known to exist as
a townland in Ardristin parish, which is in Rathvilly barony, but
for civil purposes is considered to be in Killerig parish. — The re-
mainder of Clody alias Cloydah parish is in the barony of Idrone
West. Thuraagurna is called in the ecclesiastical returns, TiUiow-
taaghymah, *

II. FORTH SARONT :

Barragh, (part oO Pubbledrura,

Myshall, (part of) Templepeter,

Ballon, Bendcnstown.

Observations. — The remainder of Barragh parish is in the
barony of Saint Mullins. A part of NewtoNvnbarry, formerly called
Bunclody village, is in Barragh parish. The remainder of the
village is in Newtownbarry parish, in the county of Wexford.—*
The village of Myshall is in the parish of that name. Three town-
lands of this parish are in the barony of Idrone East, and are in-
cluded in Fenagh parish. The village of Ballon is in the parish of
that name. The parish of Pubbledrum, according to the ecclesi-
astical arrangements, is considered as belonging to the parish of
Barragh. Bendenstown is called in the ecclesiastical returns Gil-
bertstown.

III. IDRONE EAST BARONY :

Slyguff, Nurney and Augba (part of)

Kiltennell, Fenagh, (partof>

Clonagoose, Loruni.

Diinlecliny,
Ballycllen, (part of)

'Observations. — A part of the town of Bagenalstown is in Dua-
leckny parish. The remainder of Ballyellen parish is in Saint
Mullens barony. The remainder of Fenagh parish is in the hali
barony of Shillelagh, county of VVicklow.

IV. IDRONE WEST BARONY :

Killi^nane, Tullowcrine,

Wells, Clody, (part oO

Old Leighlin^

, V. RATHVILLY BARONY:

Kathvilly, Hacket8town, (part oQ Benekery

Rathmore, Ardristin, Rahill and Broghillatown.

Tankardstown, Clonniore,

Tullowphelini, Haroldstown.

Observations. -^The town of Rathvilly is in the parish of that
nam^,' The townland of Lady town, though eurrounded by this parish,



©r THE COUNT T OV CARLOW.



15



belongs to the parish of Baltiuglass, in the barony of Upper Talbots-
lown and county of VVicklow. The ecclesiastical parish of Straboe
•ppearsonly to be a townland in Rathraore parish, according to the
civil divisions of the county. Tankardstown and Tullowphelim parish
appear to constitute the ecclesiastical parish of Tullow. The towa
of Tullow is in the parish of Tullowphelim. The town of ilack-
ctstown is in the parish of that name ; the remainder of the parish
in iu the barony of Ballynacor and county of Wicklow. Tlie town*
land of Ballyshane in Clonmore parish, is, according to the eccle-
eiastical divisions, considered to belong to Crycuni parish, in the
county of Wicklow. In Haroldstowu is the village of Coolmanagh.
Bi'iikery is not noticed in the ecclesiastical returns ; one half of it
pays tithe to the incumbent of Ballynacarrig parish, and the other
to the incumbent of Urglin parish ; this parish, though situated ia
the centre of Carlow barony, is designated in the old county ludp,,
as belonging to Ilathvilly barony.

V. SAINT MULLINS BARONT:

Moyacomb, (part of; IJallyellen (part oQ

Barragh, (do.) UUartl, (do.)

&iint Mulling, (do.)

Observations. — In this part of Moyacomb parish is the villago-
of donegal. The remainder of the parish, which, in the eccle-
Biastical returns, is called Clonegal, from the church being situated
in that town, is iu the counties of Wexford and Wicklow. Kil-
davin village is in Barragh parish. The remainder of fcjaint MuUins
parish, containing four townlands, is in the barony of Bautry,
county Wexford. Tinnehinch vnllage is in Saint Mullins parish.
The remainder of Ballyellen parish is in Idrone East barony. The
remainder of Ullard parish is in the barony of Gowran, and county
of Kilkenny.*

The ecclesiastical divisions of the diocese of Leighlin (including
the entire county of Carlow) are as follows. Subjoined to each
parish iu an initial indicative of its denomination, and figurea
specify the number of livings..



1. Wells, ^R.

Bollynochen. \ chap.
S. Nurrcy, R.

3. KillinaDe, R.

4. Shrule
Slatey
Cloydah
Painstovm.

5. Cloumore, R.

6. Tccolme, V.

7. Ullard,
Graigue.

8. Aghold, ^R.
MuUinacuffej Tlinp. C.
Crycrim, f"Imp. C.
Liacolcman. j ^^^P* ^*




^R.



9. Tullowmagrimah, \
Ballycrogue,
Ballynacarrig.

10. OldLeighlin, > R.
TuUowcriiie. J Imp. C,

11. St Kill, R.

12. Powcrstown. R. & V.

13. Lorum. ') V.
SlvguiV, ^ V.
Ballyellen. 3 R.

14. Grange Silv, R.

15. Kiltennel } V.
Clonagoose ^ V.

16. KilmacahiU, V.
IT. Agha ;V.

Dualeckney 5 V.



• Returns under Pop. Act. — I cannot here avoid noticing a list of pariahcB
liven in "The Traveller'a new Guide through Ireland," than which nothing
•an be more incorrect.



u



HISTORT AND ANTiqUITIKa'



18. Tertiplepeter, R.

19. St. Mullins, Imp. C.

20. Old Leighlin. P.C.

21. Carlow, R.

«2. Urglin, 1 R.

Grangeforth, > R.
Killerick. ) Imp. C.

23. Killeshin, R. & V.

24. Fenagh, R.

25. Fenagh,
Castlemore,
Ballybenard,
Tullowbeg.
Drumphey,
Ardowen.

36. Clonmulsk. R.

27. Grangemonk. V.

28. Kellystown. K.

29. Myshall. R. & V.

30. Tullow. R. & V.

31. Gilbertsto\vn,^R.
Aghade, fV.
Ardristan, TV.
Ballon. 3 V.

33. Barragh, V.

33. Kiltcgan, ?V.
Kilranelagh. S R- & V.

34. Baltinglass. R.

35. Hacketstown,



Online LibraryJohn RyanThe history and antiquities of the county of Carlow → online text (page 1 of 45)