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ECCLESIASTICAL MEMORIALS,

RELATING CHIEFLY TO

RELIGION,

THE REFORMATION OF IT,

AND THE EMERGENCIES
or THE

CHURCH OF ENGLAND,

UNDER

KING HENRY VIII. KING EDWARD VI.

AND

QUEEN MARY I.



LARGE APPENDIXES, CONTAINING ORIGINAL PAPERS,
RECORDS, &c.



One generation shall pniae thy works unto another, and dedare thy power —The memorial
of thine abundant kindness shall be shewed ; and men shall sing of thy righteousness.

Ptaim CTtlv. 4, 7-



BY JOHN STRYPE, M. A.

VOL. I. PART II.

OXFORD,

AT THE CLARENDON PRESS,
MDCCCXXII.



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APPENDIX:



CONTAINING



RECORDS, LETTERS,



AND OTHER



ORIGINAL WRITINGS,



REFERRED TO IN



THE MEMORIALS



UNDER THE REION OF



KING HENRY VIII.



VOL. I. PART n.



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AN

APPENDIX

TO THE

MEMORIALS ECCLESIASTICAL,

UNDER THE REIGN OF

KING HENRY VIII.



Number I.

S^ing Henry's letter to Sir David Owen, to provide an
htmdred men to go into France with Aim, in behalf of
the Pope against the French King.

By the King.
HENRY R.

XRUSTIE and welbeloved, wee grele you wel. AndMSS.D.G.
wheras wee, according to our dutie to God and to his^*^^-
Church, at the instant requests and desires of the Popes
Hohnes, and other Christen Princes, our confederates and
alli^, have for the defence of the said Church, bang by
our enemy the French Kinge oppressed, and the extincting
of the detestable schisme raised by certain perverse Cardi-
nalls, and maintained by the same King, entred actual war
against him ; entending, God willing, by the aid and assist-
ance of such of our confederates imd allies as shal joyn
with us in that Gods quarrel, to pursue and continue the
said wars, and personally to proceed into France with an
anny royal this next summer, as wel for that our purpose,
as for recovering oiur right there : wee signiiie unto you,

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4 APPENDIX OP

that for our better assistance in that behalf, wee have ap-
poynted you, among others, to pass over with us in this
journey and voyage, with the number of a hundred able
men, mete for the warrs, to be by you provided. Wherof
threescore to bee archers, and forty InUs on foot, sufficiently
4 harnessed and appointed for the warrs. Willing and desiring
you therefore not onely to prepare your self for that pur-
pose, but also with al spedie diligence to put the said num-
ber of men in convenient readines accqrdipglie: and to. as-
certaine us thereof by your writing on this ade the begin-
ning of April next coming at the farthest : and at the same ,
season to send unto us some discrete servant of yours, to
recejrve mony for jackets, and conducting of the said num-
ber. To the entent that yee, with the said number, may be
ready to set forward towards us, at any time after, when
wee by our writing shal require you so to do. And these
our letters, signed and sealed with our own hand and signet,
shall be as sufficient warrant and discharge unto you in that
behalf, as though the same had passed under our Great Seal
of England ; any act, statute, or ordinance, heretofore made
to the contrary concerning retainors notwithstanding. Faile
ye not to accomplish the premises, as ye tender the honour
and suretie of us, and of this our realme, and the advaunce-
ment and furtheraunce of this meritorious voyage, Yeven
under our signet at our mannor of Greenwiche, SS. Feb.
anno Reg. 4. .

^1

Number II.

King Henry to Ms Ambassador in Flanders^ in bdudfqf

Thomas Bamaby^ merchant.

To our trusty and right weJbeloved CounsaHer, Dr. Knight,
our Ambassador in the parties ofFlaundres.

By the King.
HENRY R.

MSS. G. H. TRUSTY and right welbiloved we grete you well. And
albeit that we, by our letters patents of save conduy te un-
der our Great Scale, have licenced and auctorised our Wel-



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RECORDS AND ORIGINALS. 6

biloved dubg^et, Thorny Bamaby, of our citie of London,
merchaunte, that he by himself, his servants, factors, or
attumeys, denyzens, or straungiers, shal use and occupie
the feate and entrecourse of al maner merchaundize, in al
places, and at al seasons, during the terme of yeres in
our said letters conteigned ; yet that notwithstanding, it is
shewed unto us on the behalf of our said sub^et^ that our
right dere and right entirely welbiloved cousine, the Duchesse
of Savoye, hath caused certain proclamations to be made of
lat£, that noe baye-salt, or wine, of the growing of the
parties of Fraunce, Normandy, Bretayne, or Gascoigne,
being of the connnodities of our auncient enemie, the
Frenshe King, shalbe brought or conveyede into the parties
of Flaimdres, or elsewher under her dominion, upon pajme
of forfeiture of the same, as we be enformed : we tenderly
mynding and willing the said Thomas Bamaby, to enjoy
the whole efiFect of pur said letters of save conduy te to hym
in this partie graunted, wol and desire you in such sub-
stantial and discrete wise, to solicite our said cousine Ihat
she wolbe contented to graunte unto the same Thomas his
letters patents of save conduyte, under hir Grete Seale, in 5
as large and ample manner as is speciiSed in our said letters
of saveconduyte. And for the more and better knowleage
herof, we send unto you, at this time, our trusty and wel-
biloved servant Sir John Wallop, Knight, with other oiir
letters directed unto our said cousiiie; whome we desire
you tienderly and diligently to favor in the spedy expedition
and furtheraunce of this cause. Wherby ye shal minister
unto us ful good pleasure. Yeven under our signet at our
monastery of Chartesaye the xiith daye of August.



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€ APPENDIX OF

Number III.
Kmg Henry to his Jmbassadors with the Prince ^Castile,
Jbr satis/bctkm to be demanded for staying of a merchant-
man, put in by stress of weather to Zealand.

To our trusty and right welbiloved CounsailorSy and
Knight Jbr our body^ Sir Edward Ponyngs, Comptroller
of our Household, and Maister William Knighty our Amr-
bassadors with our cousin the Prince of Castile ^

HENRY R. % **^ **^-
MSS. G. H. TRUSTY and right welbUoved, we grete you wel ; lating
you wit, it is comen to our knowledge, that where as a ship
lately to us belonging, called the Cast, laden by our wel-
biloved subgietts, John Alen, Hugh Clopton, and Richard
Permour, and others, with woUes, cloth, and othre mer-
chaundises and conunodities of this our reame, being in her
voyage towards the parties of Italye, was by excessive rage
and storme of weder, aftre many daun^ers and perillis, in
avoyding her extreme ruyn, driven by violence and/orce
into the parties of Zeland, taking for her refuge and socour
the road and watier nere unto Armewie; a pretence and
clayme was made in the name of our cousine, the Prince of
Castille, of certain tolls, customs, and othre exactions, called
the toll of Gravelyng and Zeland. Wherupon the officers
of our said couain caused not oonly the purser of the said
shi{^ to be arrested in the town of Middylborowe, and
committed unto prison, wher he remayned to his grete
payne, hurte, and prejudice ; but also with force of gonshot,
in manner of warre, caused our said ship to be horded, and
out of the same spoiled and toke al her sailles, and so de-
teigned, withhilde, and kept her from her voyi^, til such
tyme as our said subgietts were driven to put in suffident
suretie and caution to aunswer according to law. Which
said detaigning not oonly put our said subgietts to grete
and excessive costs and charges, and their tyme gretely
hindred, to thair expresse wrongs, but also hath been the
cause, that by the retai'dation of our said ship she now



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' RECORDS AND ORIGINALS. 7

lately fell into the daungier and hands of the Mores and
enfidels, enemys to Christs faith. Whidi infid.els, having 6
certain foists and galeb appointed for the warres, have not
oonly slayne diverse of our subgiets, the maryners and gon-
ners of our said shipp, but alsa have taken hir, and al the
said goodes and tnerchaundises, with the reridue of the
people being in her, whom they have and detaigne in prison
and captivity. And in as mbch as it is notary, ihat in caas
the said retardation had not been, our said l^Mp of al sdmili-
tude had not happened into the said daungier, we do not
impute the cu)^ and hbune therof in any persofo^ but oonly
in the offieers of our said couon. Which jacture, wrong,
and prejudice, we cannot ne woll suffice to puse without
suffident reformation and amends. And ccHuodering timt
it is contrary to al law, right, and consdence, that any tolls,
dustumes^ or othre impo&ations shuld be exacted of aay per-
son for any ship, goods, or meichaundises so forced and
driven in by wed^rs, specially where nothing is intended to
be put to sale; and for that also the tareaties of entefcourse,
which hath hert<^ore been made betwene les and our pro-
genitors, and our. said cousin and his pro^nitors, be ex*
pressely contrary hereunto ; we therfore wol and command
you, that shewing and extending this niatier at good length
to the conunissioQers of our said counn, ye not oonly re-
quire restitution of such mony or bonds as have been made
or payd in the name of our said subgietts for the said tolls,
whwby they may be clerely recompensed and discharged of
the same ; but also, f(H* the more aggravation of tins mati^,
ye demande amends, as well for our said ship, and the goods
and merchaundises, which, by meane of thie said retardation,
he now lost and taken, as is above said ; as also of al other
losses^ dammages, and Mndraunces, susteined by the same.
Endevomring you with all effect to reduce and bring this
matier to a good resolution, as our special trust is in you.
Yeven undre our signet, at our manour of <Sareenwich, the
xxii. day of July.



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8 APPENDIX OF

Number IV.
The constables of Tcumoy^ hmhg the Yeomen of the Kin^s.
guard iherey to Cardinal Woisey and the Privy Council;
certifying the, great hardships and inconveniences they
mtist undergo f if, according to a late order ^ their, wages
should be altered from quarterly to half-yearly payments.

Cott.Libr. WHEREAS it hath pleased your Grace to direct, &c.
* certifying your Grace and al the Lords of the Kings most
honcH:able Council, that wee, yeomen of the Kings most
honorable' guard, his poor senrants and daily orators, and
yours, being constables here, whose names be subscribed
evierich of us in his behalf, hath examined his company ac^
confing to his duty. And it is considered among us in ge-
neral, that it would be great prejudice and hurt to the said
garrison, if they diould be paid according to die tenor of
your Graces letters, for divers and many oonaderations.
H /.First, it is to be considered, that the said garrison doth
se^e three months before they receive th^ wages. And in*
continently at the recdpt of the same, they pay for meat
and drink, and for other things necessary, in the said three
months had 2md obtained upon thm credence. And what
time they have paid al their duty, many a one have not a
peny left to convey himself for the three months to come.

And besides and over that, many cme is in debt to the
sum of 10^. or 20«. some more, some less. This ccxnadered,
it should be much more harder with us and with the said
garrison, if we be put to the half years payment

Also, it is to be considered, that there is many a poor
man in the said garrison, as well single men as wedded
men. And wheras it is so, that single mea can wel convey
thoodselves from three months, but to be in debt more or less :
much niore harder it is with wedded men, having here his
wife and two or three or four children apiece, and 'some
more and some less. And wheras men convey themselves by
the space of three months, it should be much more harder
to convey themselves by the space of half a year.

Also, tho it be so, that victualers, which be not able of



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RECORDS AND ORIGINALS. 9

themfielyes to victual twenty or thirty persons, but they
should be greatly relieved out of the Kmgs odIei«; yet
other poor men that hath wife and children, and keepeth a
poor house by himself, is not relieved, except he have his
wages. For tho it be so, that meA may have bread and
beer upon their scores and tayles, yet slial not men have
flesh, fish, butter, eggs, cheese, nor other things necessary,
except they have ready mony. For the country victualeth
the city (or ready mony. For and if the country should
withdraw for lack of payment, it would cause great scarce-
ness to be among us, to the great hurt of the said garrison.

Also^ it is to be considered, that we be not among our
spedal fri^ids, as the King^s garrisons of Calais and else-
where; but we be among our friends by compulsion. And
in such friends is no great trust and fidehty ; but smal faith
or £ivour, without friendship or kindnes. For in the highest
part of al France, we of the said garrison may have for our
mony as much friendship as we may have in the said city
of Toumay : which hath been oftentimes proved. For what
time any of the said garrison hath not mony to convey them-
selves Mid their households, then taketh they a gage, and
iayeth the same to a townes man to pledge, for to have
mony therupon. And if their gage or pledge be of the
value of 90s. then he shal have dierupon the said pledge or
gage, 7^. or 8s. or therabouts. And if he fail of the day of
pajrment, incontinently he leeseth his gage or pledg, of what
valour soever it be. In which their so dcnng is no maner of
frienship.

Also, it is to be considered, that the Kings most gracious
coin- is not accepted here and in England accordingly. For
tho that it be so, that the garrison receive the Kings coin,
as the pence after the rate of England, nevertheles what
time that men shal buy victuals and other necessaries, the
peny starling is but worth a Flemish peny. And thus in
every threepence starling, there is one peny lost. And he
that taketh IM. by the day, his wi^s in buying any thifng
is but 8d. by the day. And he that taketh 8d. by the day
is in like maner; his wages cometh to Sd, starling, axid



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10 APPENDIX OP

8 Fkmish hal^ny. And like maner in al. other what wages
soever they take. Which is great Km and dommage to the
said garrison here: and shal continue by reason of the pay«
ment of the said pence. Except it shal please the Sings
Highnes to command the said pence to be called home agm
into the reahn <^ England, or else some other order and di-
rection therin to be had and taken. And also that the Kings
most noble cc»n of his gold, as his royal may hare course
for iOs. sterlii^; and his angd noble at 6tf. 8cL sterling;
and the crown at 4». 9d. sterling. Wheras the said garri*
son recdve them, as the royal, for 11^. sterling, the angel
noble for 7^* 9d. starling, and the crown for 4g, 6d. starhng.
And thus appeareth the impovershing tji the said garrison.

For it is to be considered, that the merdiant will sel their
wares and merchadize^ and likewise victuals; strangers,
their victuals, so that they take no loss by the said mony^
Wheras al the English victualers bear the loss, and othcars
of the said garrison.

Also^ that where men ]axk mony, meat, and drink, with
other necessaries which must needs be had : and that thing
which a man may buy for 4d. starling of ready mony, if it
be borrowed, it shal cost 6d. or Id* starling. Which should
be great hindrance to poor men: and should be never able
to recover it, if they should be pud by tlie half year, ae^
cording to the tenor of your Graces letter.

Also, it is to be considered, that in the Kings garrison
royal, as in Calais and elsewhere, no maltot is demaunded
nor paid : wheras we of the Kings garrison of Toumay pay
for every tun of wine 40^. sterling mdUoi; and for every
barrel of beer 12d. sterling. Also, we pay for fish, for flesh,
and fpr every other thing that is bought Which amounteth
to a great sum in the year; to the great hurt and dommage
of the said garrison.

Also, it is tQ bee considered, that in the Kings garrison
royal, as in Calais and elsewhere, is wel invironed ; as the
sea and England on the one »de, and the. marches of the
same on the other side: which be to them great firiends.
By whom the said garrisons of Calais and elsewhere be



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RECORDS AND ORIGINALS. 11

ixftaitiines relieved. And they have wore for a Fktimh
peny, than the garrison of Toumay hath for 9d. sterling*
Which commodities the Kings garri»m of Toumay lacketh
in every behalf. Also, there is in the Kings said garriscm ai
Cahus, divers merchants that do victual the said garrison for
half year to half year ; and with as easie price as men may
buy for ready mony. Wheras we, the said garrison of
Tournay, have no sudi friends, but the contrary. For
when the said garison lacketh mony, then the said garrison
lacketh victuals ; as at this present is wel proved.

Humbly we beseech your Grace, with al the Lords of the
Kings most honorable Council, that it may please your
Grace, with al the Lords of the Kings most honourable
CouncU, to be mean, and to inform the Kings Highness of
these the premisses, and other, for the relief of the said
garrison. And that it may please his Highness to have
consideration and remors : to this before rehearsed, in con-
sidering the true and faithful service, that we his poor ser-
vants, yeomen of his most honorable guard, with al the
whole retinue of the said garrison, have don unto his High-
ness heretofore, and hereafter intendeth to do: that it may
please his abundant goodness, to look upon the said garrison
with the ey of pity and of connderation, fdr the eactmemgQ
of the indempnity of the said premisses.

And that it may furthermore jdease his Highness to ooo^
mand, that provi£d<m of mony may be had to the deputy of
this his city of Toumay, and Treasurer, to content and pay
the garrison here accc»rdingly, by the three months, as it
hath been heretofore used.

And further, we humbly beseech your Grace, and al the
said Lords of the Kings most hcHiorable Council, your said
daily orators, to have consideration of the said premisses :
and for the information therof to the Kings Highness.

And furthermore, not to take displeasure with your said
poor men and daily orators, for their rude writing unto
your Grace ; which lacketh as wel learning, as good cbunsil.
But as they write unto your Grace after their natural witts,
and as poverty and necessity constraineth them to write ac-



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la APPENDIX OF

cording to the truth ; and further, for die preservation of
the said garrison, and the welfare of the same.

And thus your eaid poor men and daily orators be ever
bound to pray to God for your Grace, and for al the Lords
of the Kings most honorable Council, that yoiu* Honors may
long continue and endure.

John Prince. Tho. Gray. John Brodger.

Will. Bentall. Tho. Stribithil. Tho. Walett. .

Rich. Forster. Will. Harford. Rich. Stone.

Rob. Mitchel. Rich. Dobell. Rob. Axe.

John iErdeley. Evan Bodmer.



Number V.
Sir Richard Jemegan, Lord Deputy qfToumay^Mnd the
Council; their letter to the Cardinal, accompanyvngthe
. Jbtmer, written bjf. the constables.
Cotton. Li- PLEASETH your Grace to understand, that 28 day of
guia^ ' Aprillast past, we received your letter dated at Westminster
the 2S day of April; wherin your Graces pleasure is, that
upon deliberate communication had of sundry of our letters
sent unto your Gnwe for provision of mony, it was thought
by the Kings Grace^ and his most honorable Council, that
ioafflnuch as none of the Kings garrisons in any other place
be, or have been used to be paid their wages but half
yearly ; it standeth not with any necessity, that the garrison
of this town of Toumay should have continually so hasty
and speedy payment made to them at the end of every three
months : and for that cause the Kings pleasure is, that after
the third day of the said month of April finally determined,
the payments to be paid at the end of every half year, and
not before. So that the third day of October, and the third
day of April, shall be from henceforth our days of pa}rment
10 And for ease and better commodity of soldiers and victual-
lers, his pleasure is, that a prest of a thousand marks shal
be advanced and assigned to the garrison, to be deducted
and rebated at the half years payment. And over this, it is



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RECORDS AND ORIGINALS. 18

his'graeioUs [Measure, the premisses to be notified and db-
clared to al the garrison. And after, that we al cf our «
Council here, and captains of the retinue, do send a certifi-
cate s^ned and subscribed with our names; dedarii^ our
selves to be contented and conformable to receive the pay-
ment in form afore rehearsed; without any fardiar calling
or molesting the King and his Council in that behalf, &c.

Pleaseth your Grace, according to the Eii^ command-
ment and your Grace in this behalf; we have called before
us al the captains, men of arms, vinteners, and constables ;
and declared and shewed them the Kings pleasure and your
Graces, taken in the premisses, with the whole circumstance
of your Graces letter; to the end, that they and every of
them should assemble their companies, to advertise them
the same ; and that they should conform themselves to fol-



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