Copyright
John Tregaskis.

Souvenir of the re-union of the blue and the gray, on the battlefield of Gettysburg, July 1, 2, 3 and 4, 1888. How to get there, and what is to be done during the year online

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Online LibraryJohn TregaskisSouvenir of the re-union of the blue and the gray, on the battlefield of Gettysburg, July 1, 2, 3 and 4, 1888. How to get there, and what is to be done during the year → online text (page 1 of 29)
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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES



3 3433 07952582 4



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1860





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LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

OF NEW YORK.



W. A. BREWER, Jr., President.
WILLIAM HAXTUN, Vice-President and Secretary,



Assets, 19,000,000.

The Combination Policy of the Washington

Secures Protection for a Term of Years, the Savin<^s of an Endow-
ment, and Permanent Insurance for Life.

The Combination Policy of The Washington guarantees to the
holder of a $i,ooo policy $1,500 at maturity. A Policy for $5,000 is a
conti-act for $7,500. A Policy for $10,000 is a contract for $15,000.

vSay the amount of the Policy is $30,000, the insured is guaranteed
at maturity $30,000 CASH and a paid up Life Policy for $15,000 ;
total, $45,000, together with 2.11 accumulated and unused dividends.

A MAN mav not be able to save enough from his daily earnings
to leave a vSufficient Sum to his Family, should death or misfortune
defeat his plans ; but A MAN may obtain a policy by a small pre-
mium that will do that and MORE. His WIFE has a right to de-
mand this protection. His CHILDREN are entitled -to it. As en-
dowment, his OLD AGE requires it.

The policies of The Washington are incontestable after three years^
with privileges of residence and travel unrestricted after two years.
Address

E. S. FRENCH,

SUPERINTENDENT OF AGENCIES,
No. 21 CORTLANDT StREET, NeW YoRK CiTY.



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AUTHORIZED AND COPYRIGHT EDITION.



SOUVENIR



or TMB



R E - U N I O N

The Blue smoThe Gray,



ON THB



Battlefield of Gettysburg,

July I, 2, 3 and 4, 1888.



^ow TO get there.



AfM)



WHAT IS TO BE DONE DURING THE YEAR.

Tr eqas\$i^^"3ft Wa:J1

I '^



NEW YORK.
TBB AMERtCAIf GRAPBIC CO.

1888.



N\>Ai



261723B

-"■^TOif, LENOX AND



1943




Entered according to act of Congress, in the year iSSS, as the

OFFICIAL PROGRAMME,

and Copyrighted by

JOHN TREGASKIS,

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



Chapter.

Frontispiece — " First Glimpse of the Battlerield."

Introduction I.

Poem— " 'i'3 and '88" II.

How to Reach (iettysburg- and What it Will Cost III.

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Battle <if Gettysburg; Illustration — Memorial Church IV.

Annual Meeting of the Army of the Potomac V.

What the Society of the Army of Northern Virginia Will Do VI.

Monuments to be Dedicated during i883 — Lists of Exercises and 18 Illustrations VII.

Meade and his Commanders ; 21 Portraits VIII.

Organization of the Army of the Potomac, with Commanding Officers at Gettysburg IX.

Lee and his Commanders ; 5 Portraits. How Well They Fought X.

Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, and Commanding Officers at Gettysburg.... XI.

Detail of Losses in each Army at the Battle XII.

Description of the Battlefield, with Table of Elevations, and M.\p showi.ng the Location of the

Monuments to be Dedicated during 1888 XIII.

Tables of Distances to Points of Interest on the Battlefield XIV.

Proceedings of the Last Meeting of the Army of the Potomac XV.

Proceedings of the Last Meeting of the Army of Northern Virginia XVI.

Officers of each Society and Committees having the Re-Union in charge XVII.

Provision made for all who attend the Re-Union XVIII.

Hotels and Board ing-Houses in and around Gettysburg XIX.

The Blue and the Gray— Re-Union of Philadelphia Brigade and Pickett's Division, 1887 ;

2 Illustrations XX.

Poem— "The Hand-Clasp at the Wall ;" Illustrated XXI.

Proposed Monument to General Armistead ; Illustrated — "The Historic Clump of Trees" XXII.

The National Cemetery at Gettysburg XXIII.

National Cemeteries of the United States and Interments therein to April 30, 1888 XXIV.

Organizations Mustered into the United States Service during the Rebellion XXV.

Total Number of Troops Furnished by each State and Territory XXVI.

Average of Infantry Losses by Brigades at Gettysburg XXVII.

Total Casualties during the War XXVIII.

Chronological List of Battles and Skirmishes during the War XXIX.

Veteran Associations — Names and Addresses of Secretaries XXX.

A Wounded Prisoner's Experience in Gettysburg .' XXXI.

The Forces Engaged at Gettysburg XXXII.

Absolution Under Fire ; Illustrated. Baby's Shoe XXXIIT.



W0R20JUN'34



TREGASKIS & CO.

Publishers of the Official J^rooratnnie.

WILL ISSUE AFTER THE RE-UNION

AN ACCOUNT OF ALL THE

Proceedings of this Anniversary,

INCLUDING THE DEDICATION OF MONUMENTS.



I^Ae work will include a Short (History of (Every Qrganization,
that took part on the field; a Biographical Sketch of (Every dOom-
mander who was present in the (Battle; of (Every <^rmy {Corps,
(Brigade, (§egiment. Battery, Staff and (Company that can be obtained.

(portraits of all will be given with the sketches.



ANY VETERAN WHO PARTICIPATES IN THIS RE-UNION CAN HAVE
HIS OWN PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH IN-
CLUDED BY PAYING THE COST OF THE PICTURE
AND SUBSCRIBING FOR THE BOOK.



Write for Circular containing Further Particulars.

TREGASKIS & CO., 767 Broadway, Room 8, New York



Secretaries of Veteran Associations are requested to send Local Ne-ws-
papers containing jtotices of their affairs.



INTRODUCTION.



Gettysburg.

Twenty-five years ago the valley in which is situated the borough of
Gettysburg was resonant with the roar of artillery, the rattle of musketry,
and the angry voices |of over one hundred and fifty thousand combatants.
For three long and sultry days the tide of battle swept through and around
the little town, drenching with blood the only spot north of Mason and
Dixon's line on which a general engagement between the Union and Con-
federate forces took place. Thousands joined the great majority during the
battle, and many thousands more from injuries received on those eventful
days.

The Battle of Gettysburg was the turning point in the great Civil War,
which, lieginning at Sumter, ended at Appomattox. All the force and
antagonism of the conflict was concentrated here, and sucli an idea as this
Re-Union gathering Avould have been laughed to scorn at that time by every
3ombatant.

But the survivors of those contesting armies now meet on the battlefield,
not again as foes ; not as representatives of any party or issue ; but as
American citizens, who, having tested each other's courage, enduranoe,
and love of principle, unite in demonstrating that the war is over ; that
as honorable foes, having accepted the arbitrament of the sword, they now
meet to grasp each other's hands as friends and brothers, rejoicing in a
result which enables them to claim joint interest in one great, growing and
prosperous country ; and that as a united people they are capable of the
greatest things, in joeace, in war, or in any position that the Ruler of the
Universe may call upon them to occupy.

The programme of this great, this unique gathering of the Veterans of
the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Xorthern Virginia, together



with many facts concerning the Battle of Gettysburg, the Armies who
fought there, the men who held command there, and the services at the
dedication of the several monuments- will be found within these images.

John Teegaskis.



A WORD FOR OURSELVES AND OUR ADVERTISERS.

A series of delays in the issuance, acceptance and. promulgation of the official formalities,
indispensable to a Re- Union of such dimensions and importance, postponed the date of this
publication from May 1 to June 1, and again to June 15. One compensating incident was the
fact that its publishers were thus enabled to better estimate and provide for the wide jDopular
demand for their Memorial Magaz'ne. Orders for it came in turough G. A. R. Posts in every
State of the Union in such quantities as to justify an initial edition of thirty thousand copies,
instead of ten thousand, as at first pi oposed. They were also enabled to make more adequate
provisions for the demand sure to come troin the general travelling and reading public. The
Re-Union Souvenir Programme and Report will be sold on all trains leading to and from
the scene of the celebration, on the grounds, and may be had from newsdealers everywhere,
or during the remainder of the year from the office of the publishers, No. 769 Broadway, New
York City (removed from Room 31, Cooper Institute).

The vast amount of research, arrangement and correspondence involved in this work have
prevented its publishers from expending much time in bringing it to the attention of adver-
tisers. Our advertising pati'onage is accordingly all the more select, and the more worthy of
the confidence of readers. It comprises only those whose patriotic sympathies and national
instincts led them readily to identify themselves and their businesses with the most unique
soldier jubilee in history.

'■^UR Railroad Advertisers. — To the railroad enterprises represented in these pages we
especially invite attention. While almost every railroad in the land had a direct interest in
ian event so inviting to tourists, and so directly calculated to promote fraternal feeling and
inter-communication between all sections, we bespeak for those which are here catalogued
the good will and patronage of our reader.

The Gettysburg and Harrisburg Railroad passes through the heart of the South
Mountaius, and as picturesque scenery as can be found in America. The gap is narrow and
funnel-shaped, causing a constant current of air along the line of the road that tempers the
heat of the day and makes the nights deligutfully cool and pleasant. One of the attractions
of the Re-Union will be to sojourn along the line of the Gettysburg and Harrisburg, visiting
the battlefielii each day, and returning to the road side village selected, by the 10:20 train
each night.

The Pennsylvania Railroad, one of the most enterprising and far reaching in the
extent of its territory, scarcely requires us to call attention to its facilities for accommodat-
ing the travelling public. It is iutitled to the patronage of all who desire to visit the battle-
field, ai:d we hope every veteran, his family, and his friends, will buy the tickets by this line
— the first to concede the I'educed rate, and the first to look after the soldiers' iuteiest whUe
paj'ing due regard to its own.

A Great Industry and its Founder.— The attention of manufacturers among our i-ead-
ersthe country over will be concentrated upon the full page cut representing the world-
famed Reliance Works of Messrs. Edward P. Allis & Co., located in Milwaukee, Wiscoi^sin.
This establishment derives additional general interest from the fact that it is the product of
a single contemijoraneous lifetime, and is the largest of its kind in this country under indi-
vidual, as distinguished from corporate, ownership. It sends grist and saw mills, engines
and other machinery to England, Japan, Australia, and to South America, as weU as to the
remotest points of the North American Continent. One of its latest contracts was to furnish
Chicago with new pumping engines for $369,000. The senior proprietor, a man of rai'e siin-



plic'ity of manners and lineiiess, cuuibiued w ith fi'ire of characcer, isKuovvn in tliis liictropolis
and in the capitals of Europe as a discriminating and mnnific-eiit patron of art. In tlie North-
west lio is a power a'iko in thought, in politics, and in practical affairs. He never haa any
unadjustable diflerences with the vast community of those whom he emplsys.

Battlefield Monuments. — One of the most ent°rprismg ard spcfP!=sful firms engaged
in erecting moimment stones on the field at Gettysburg is Messrs. F;-ederick & Field of
Quiucy, Mass. This is the only establishmoiit possessing their own quarry ; and from this,
situated on Gulp's Hill, they supply' material not only for all their O'vu work, but to other
parties in the same line of business. Another feature of this liou«;e is that it does all its own
woik in every brnnch of the trade. It is ready and able to put u;> moiniinental work in
every section of the country.

Fine Art Bronze Work. — Notably among the increasing number of bronze foundery«
in this country is that of Hon. Maunce J. Power of New York, known as the Natural Fin©
Art Foundery. Its leputation, always of the best, is steadily increasing, and its success in
business is only another evidence of what business capacity and strict integrity can
accomplish.

The "Washington Life is an insurance company which we can personally recommend
with peculiar heartiness and sincerity. Aside from its universally recognized soundness and
conservatism, and the attractiveness of its improved and unique system of Combination In-
surance, it is commended to our approbation and regard by fourteen years' experience as a
policy holder of the uniform spirit of friendliness and hospitality which animates all its
officers and departments. From the day when introduced to the Washington Life, to the
present, we have noted what seemed to be a family resemblance in the geniality of its
officers and efficient corps of agents, among whom are many well known business men dis-
tributed throughout the country. Those who deal with this company will find themselves, as
we have done, unexpectedly in a circle of friends. " Devotion to the interest of its policy
holders" is justly the motto of the Washington Life, and we have no doubt but that the
spirit of that motto inspired tlie system of Combination Insurance mentioned by the Com-
pany on another page and fully described in its catalogues and circulars which may be had
on application by mail.



THIS EDITIO^^ IS 10,000 COPIES.
20,000 more will be printed and in circiilation on Jnly 1,

ADVETiTISE:\tENTS FOR WHICH WILL ]!B ACCEPTED UP TO JuNE 26.

EXTRA EDITIONS WILL BE PRIXTED AS CALLED FOR.

During tlie entire year THE SOUVEXIR will be for sale in qnantitiea
from 1 to 1,000 bj

TREGASKIS & CO., 707 Bkoadwat (Room 8),

New York City.

John Tregaskis, Geo. W. Coonet.



II.



^63 AND '88.



Cover with a mantle of roses
The graves of our dead.
Who were the lieroes who bled.
Whether they followed or led,
Nothing discloses.

Weed-grown the ramparts, and still

Are the desolate trenches.
The fort on the crest of the hill,
The cannon that mangle and kill.
The frosts of the winter now chill.
The earlv rain drenches.

What though we thought they were wrong !

Were they worse than all others ?
From the same mountains and ])lains.
With the same losses and gains.
With the same blood in their veins,
They wei'e our brothers.

Slumber the sword in its sheath;
Unto the carnage of death

Let no man draw it.
How earth is likest to hell
Nobody better can tell

Than we Avho saw it.
Limb torn asunder from limb.
Blood till our eyesight grew dim.
Filling the cup to the brim
As devils bore it.

Peace comes again to the land —
Friendship we must not withstand —
Offers once more her hand

Now and forever.
Keep us, God, in Thy sight.
Guard us and guide us aright;
Never may factionist blight

Or traitors dissever. Fran-klin^ W. Fish.



III.



HOW TO REACH GETTYSBURG AND WHAT IT WILL COST.



The energetic efforts of General Daniel Butterfield, Chairman of the Co™;^i"«« °^ Jrans^
Jtetioa of the Army of the Potomac, resulted in a very great reduction m the rates of fare

Railroad to the Battlefield. ^- , ^.^

T ower rates can be obtained in any locality by clubbing together and purchasmg tickets.

The actLTSes from the principal points for Single Round Trip Tickets .lU be as foUows

from the points named :



S8 70

15 35
20 35
23 95
20 15

16 85



Parties
Single of 20 or
Rate. More

Danville $10 85

Augusta, Ga. 19 85
Montgomery 25 30
Mobile, Ala. . 28 85
New Orleans 30 So

Atlanta 20 ^5 .,

Boston, Mass., $13.97 Rail
road, $12.55 Steamer.

Sin-gle
Kate.

New York, N. Y $6 55

Jersey City 6 5o

Brooklyn o '?

Newark, N.J 6 3.^

Elizabeth, N. J 6 20

Trenton, N. J 4 §»

St Louis, Mo 21 50

Peoria, III 21 60

Corrf Pa"^'"!::::::: IS I' l MlifoM centre, O.

Philadelphia |"t Fi'JuTo •■.:■. it

^^SrarportV;:-: O irrdti?dJunc - -



Single 1
Bate

Wllkesbarre $5 00

Erie IJ 'j^

Altoona 5*5

Pittsburg 8 «2

Baltimore, Md ^ lo

Washington, D. C... .3 -io
Washington. Pa.... 10 00
Wheeling, W. Va... 10 00

Steubenville, 10 00

Cadiz, O u- }? S^

Urichville June, O. 10 bo
NewComerstown.O. 10 60

Coshocton, 11 05

Newark, O iil^

Columbus, 12 75

Loudon, O If 50

Xenia, O...... 1* 00

Cincinnati, O If On

Ppringneld, O U 00

Dayton, O..,,..^... 14 00

14 00

00

14 25



Greenville, O
Richmond, Ind



Single 1
Rate.

. .$14 50 I
15 25 I



Single
Rate.
..$12 25
. . 12 25
12 65



Mansfield, O
_ Crestline, O.

?^^^^:^' II ^ ! K|2clusky,0. 13 15

ilrion Ind . . 16 00 Van Wert, O ...... . lo 00

New Castle ind .... 15 75 Fort Wayne, Ind. 15 00

Anderson ,ind 15 75 Columbia City, Ind. 15 2-5

#Uvond Ind 16 10 Warsaw, Ind 15 7o

lokomi, Ind •■■:::. le 75 | Plymouth^ Ind..-. 16 f^



Loganspbrt, Ind.... 16 75

Chicago, 111. 1' 50

r .'.'vnbus, Ind 16 20

Madison, Ind 16 50

Seymour, Ind tS "^

Louisville, Ky 17 50



Valparaiso, Ind.... 17 50

Youngstown, 10 7o

Newcastle, Pa.. .. 10 50

Sharon, Pa 10 /5

Greenville, Pa 10 75

Tiffin, 13 00



i^^J^'^\^'^::::io?!:^?^v%,b.::::: II
lSV:::;:;::;i?ISiKJJ^a^::::::::

Wooster, O 12 25 1

Tickets will be of the iro=-clad form a»d must be stamped at Gettysburg to i™e retura

Te';^ faitb of tbe veterans bas -» P.^f r^otT^f^; Tr S:^rLS7Z
knowledge.



Where large parties go the rates are fixed at one mile each way, so that if 500 can an-angr
to charter a train the price of tickets will reach the low sum of $4.40 each from New York
City, $4 4.5 from Elmira, S4.20 from Xe-.vark and 3.10 from "Wilmington, Del

After the Re-Union is over the folowing are the regular single ticket excursion rates to
Gettysburg and return from the places named :



Altoona, Pa $7 30

Atlantic Cit.y, N. J... 7 70

Avoudale, Pa 5 10

Belief onte, Pa 7 20 I

Beloua, y. Y 10 90 i

Beverly, N.J 7 00 1

Bordeutown, N. J 7 3^

Braddoek, Pa 11 6.5

Bridgeton, N.J 7 70

Bristol, Pa 7 15

Brooklyn, N. Y 10 00

Brvn Mawr, Pa 5 80

Buffalo, N. Y 15 4.5

Biirliugton, N. J 7 15

Canandaigua, N. Y..11 60
Canton, Pa 7 35



Cape May, N.J $8 20

Chester, Pa 6 75

Connellsville, Pa 11 70

Cresson, Pa 7 90 |

Curwensvllle, Pa. . . . 8 60 |

Deal Beach, N. J 10 20

Elbero '.N. J 10 20 I

Elizabeth, N.J 9 yo

Elmira, N. Y 8 85

Erie, Pa 15 65

Germantown, Pa 6 45 j

Jersey City, N. J 9 80

Lancaster, Pa 3 45 1

Long Branch, A. J. . .10 20
Monmouth Junc.N.J. 8 20



jXonongahelaC'y,Pa$13 20

Newark, N.J 9 50

Newark, N. Y 11 85

New Brunswick, N.J. 8 60

New York, N. Y 9 80 I

Norristown, Pa 6 20

1 )cean Beach, N. J 10 05 |

Ocean Grove, N. J .... 10 20
Pei.n Yan, >'. Y 10 65

Philadelphia, Pa 6 20

Phillipsburg, Pa 7 65 j

Pittsburg, Pa 11 95

Pottsville, Pa 8 9S

Princeton, N.J 7 10 I

Kahwaj', N. J 9 05



Reading, Pa $7 45

Reuovo, Pa 7 85

Schuylkill Haven,Pa 8 70

Shamokin, Pa 4 90

Shenandoah, Pa. .. 9 55
Sodus Point, N. Y.. ..12 55

Trenton, N.J 7 45

Tyrone, Pa 6 70

Waterford, Pa 14 90

Watklns, N. Y 9 75

West End, N.J ...10 20
Westmoreland, Pa.. 6 40

Wilkesbarre, Pa 6 70

Williamsport, Pa 5 75

Wilmington, Del.... 7 30



In addition to the above, special excursions are arranged with tickets good for the round
trip and for one day's accommodation (breakfast, dinner, supper, and lodging) at Eagle
Hotel. It is good for passage three days from and including date of sale, but is not good to
stop off. The rates for these are :



Altoona, Pa $7 45 I Lewisburg, Pa $5 40

Brooklyn, N.Y 9 20 Manayunk, Pa 6 65

Columbia, Pa 4 tO | Nanticoke, Pa 6 85

Germantown, Pa 6 80 I Newark, N. J 8 80

Huntingdon, Pa 6 45 New York, N.Y 9 00

Lancaster, Pa 4 60 | NorrlstowTi, Pa 7 00



Northumberland, Pa$5 20 I Shamokin, Pa $5 70

Philadelphia, Pa. ... 6 50 Shenandoah, Pa 9 80

Pottstown, Pa 7 70 | Sunbury, Pa 5 15

Pottsville, Pa 9 35 I Tyrone, Pa 7 05

Reading, Pa 8 25 Wilkesbarre, Pa 7 05

Schuvlkill Haven, Pa 9 25 | Williamsport, Pa. . . 6 30



The rates of boarding generally in Gettysburg are $1 per day in private houses. The hotels
charge : Springs Hotel, §2.50 and §3 per day, and from $10 to §16 per week ; Eagle Hotel,
?1.50 and §2 per day. The other hotels charge from SI to §2 per day.



Time Table of Gettysburg and Harrisburg Raib-oad that will be in effect from June 25 to
July 7. 1888:



TRAINS TO GETTYSBURG.
Leave. P. M. P M.

Pittsburgh (P. R. R) 7:15



Altoona
New York



.10:55
. 8:00



Philadelphia

Lancaster

Williamsport

Sunbury



....11:25
A M.
.... 1:25
.... 1:25
.... 2:50
P.M.

Hagerstown (C. V. R. R.).10:00

Chambersburg " ..10:45

A.M.

Harrisburg " . 4:45

Carlisle (G. & H. R. R.). . 5:20*
Mount Holly " . . 5.35

Arrive.
Gettysburg " .. 6:50



1:00
12:15
A.M.

4:30

6:25



8:35
8:50



I TRAINS FROM GETTYSBTTRG

A.M. A.M.] Leave. A.M.

— 8:00 Gettysburg 9:00

7:00 11:50 Arrive.

— 9:00 Mount Holly Springs. . .10:03

Carlisle 10:25

7:40 11:50 Harrisburg 10:10

P. M. P. M.

9:35 2:00 Chambersburg 1:45

8:15 12:20 Hagerstown 2:40

9:40 1:43 1 Sunbury 12:52

8:20 12:01 I Williamsport 2:15

9:15 12:58 i Lancaster 12:58

11:45 3:30 PhUadelphia 3:15

P. M. I

12::i5 4:10 New York 6:20

12:50 4:25 Altoona 3:30

1:50 5:33 I Pittsburgh 8:20 11:55 —



P.M.


P.M.


P. M


1:00


5.00


*10:20


2:00


6:08


11:20


2:15


6:30


11:40


3:00


7:25


12:20
A.M.


5:11


7:45


6:22


6:00





7:05


5:30





5:10


7:00





6:50


4:45


9:35


2:20


6:50





4:25


9:35


_


7:10


7:50





4:05



Special trains that will be run on>y from June 25 to July 7 inchwtne.



VISITING THE BATTLEFIELD.



A short rapid transit railroad extends from the Gettysburg and Harrisburg Depot to Little
Round Top Park, a walk of only three minutes to the summit, where General Weed was kiUed,
and from which point General Meade viewed the progress of the battle.



The hack rates at all tines, except during such a thronged season as the Re-Uuion, is likely
to be, are as follows : Three dollai"S for one or two persons : a horse and buggy for one, or a
two seated carriage with one horse, and a driver that acts as guide for t"ro persons, or a car-
riage with two horses and ^uide, for $5. The carriage seats five pers<jiis besi.les the guide.
For all parties above five, the charge is $1 per head. These charges entitle the passengers to
a ride over the laattlefield of the second and third days' fight, and includes Gulp's Hill, Ceme-
tery Hill, National Cemetery, Emmittsburg Road to the Peach Orchard, the Wheat Field,
Devil's Den, Round Top, and in Battlefield Avenue' to the Angle where Hancock repulsed
Pickett's charge, Ziegler's Grove, and back to Gettysburg. It requires from four to five
h iiirs to make the drive, and the time depends on how long the passengers wish to spend at
the different points of interest. The distance is about eleven miles.

At the time of the Re-Union the town will be filled with hacks from all around the country,
the owners of which hope to make all the money they can. They cannot be regulated,
c'large what they please, and Gettysburg gets the blame for it. There will be hacks from
places fift^y and sixty miles away. Most of them will deal fair, but some will take ad-
vaitage of any one.



IV.



THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG



The celebration of the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Battle of G-ettys-
burg promises to be one of the most striking events in history.

In spite of the foolish efforts of a few cranks at Washington, who jirofit
by the privilege given them by the rules of the House to interpose capricious
objection, and thus defeat the measure to provide the means to shelter the
thousands of expected veterans, preparations are steadily going on, and
the Blue and the Gray will fraternize on the field of battle, furnishing the
world with a lesson that every nation should take to heart.

The celebration of the anniversary is counted from the first moment a
dedicating party reaches the field until the last visit for such purpose is
paid ; or, during 1888, from June 12 to October 10. This period of time
will iiiclude the Ee-Uuiou of the Two Armies, and the programme in chrono-
logical order is as follow^s (details of exercises are given in Chapter VII. of
this book):



Online LibraryJohn TregaskisSouvenir of the re-union of the blue and the gray, on the battlefield of Gettysburg, July 1, 2, 3 and 4, 1888. How to get there, and what is to be done during the year → online text (page 1 of 29)