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John Tregaskis.

Souvenir of the re-union of the blue and the gray, on the battlefield of Gettysburg, July 1, 2, 3 and 4, 1888. How to get there, and what is to be done during the year online

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Online LibraryJohn TregaskisSouvenir of the re-union of the blue and the gray, on the battlefield of Gettysburg, July 1, 2, 3 and 4, 1888. How to get there, and what is to be done during the year → online text (page 20 of 29)
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The influences of that day drove all idea of sleep from the minds of the
Veterans.

Mrs. Pickett came into town from the Springs Hotel in the evening and
held a reception, the townspeople extending cordial greeting and sympathy,
the band serenaded her, and after she had retired the Veterans of both
Armies started a camp fire at the Washington Hotel which was maintained all
night. Most of the speakers were Virginians, and one after the other they
told of the feelings that possessed them. The general idea was tersely con-
veyed by Chaplain Ferguson at the close of his address : "I am the most
conquered man you ever met— conquered here by love ;" and then, with up-
lifted hand, he called the assemblage to prayer and invoked divine blessings
on the actions of the great gathering on this scene of former strife. With
this most appropriate ending the camp fire was closed, to allow the men to
prepare for their departure.

Escorted to the train by the members of the 69th ana 71st Veterans,
good-bys were exchanged, and the parting words, in instances where the meet-
ing had been the renewal of acquaintanceship, were touching. All seemed
loath to part, and two or three were carried some distance away as the train
moved out, so closely were hand-clasps maintained. Then, with a unani-
mous yell on the one hand and a hurrah on the other, the Veterans parted,
hoping to meet again.

The cordial fraternization of the Blue and the Gray on the field during
those three days, and the prospect during the three days of the coming July,
seems to be a realization of Lincoln's prophetic utterance in his first inau-
gural, in his touching appeal to the South. 'MVe are not enemies, but
friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it
must not break, our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory,
stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and
hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union
Avhen again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our
nature. "



CIGARS.



CIGARS.



THE PLACE TO BUY THEM IS




164 Nassau Street, Tribune Building,

New York.

Veterans, Tourists and Lovers of a Good Cigar can always find the article they need
at that number.

Choicest Brands of Imported Cigars constantly on hand.

JAMES O. PERRY,

Late of Astor House, and Fourteen Years corner Park Place and Broadway.
STOCK AND NEWS TICKEll.



Manuf.acturer of

Fine Gold and Silver





m



91 ESSEX ST.,

NEW YORK.



I would respectfully call attention to
the fact that I have catered to the wants
of the G.A.R. for the past twenty years,
and pride myself as being one of the
oldest and ablest manufacturers of G.A.
R. and Military Presentation Badges,
Rank and Corps Badges, and miniature
vest or scarf pins. Am sole proprietor
and originator of the celebrated Canteen
Charm. Prisoner of War, Woman's
Relief Corps, Sons of Veterans, and all
other Badges and Medals connected
with the G.A.R. Have also on hand
and make to order Shooting, Sporting,
Bowling, Boating, and in fact all varie-
ties, for all known organizations, either
Solid Gold, Silver or Plated.




XXI.



THE HAND-CLASP AT THE WALL,

SUBJECT OF ILLUSTRATION.



"With heart to heart and liand to hand,

Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg !
An emblem of united land,

Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg !
The arms that -waved the blade of steel
The earnest grasp of friendship feel;
While valor makes for peace appeal.

Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg I

No more the death-shots rattle fast,

Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg !
Nor cannon belch their fiery blast,

Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg I
But orchards show their summer bloom,
And flowers shed their sweet perfume
O'er many a fallen warrior's tomb,

Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg !

To joys like these let all awake,

Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg !
Our Union for the Union's sake,

Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg I
Though Peace again displays her charms,
We will not dread grim War's alarms.
But join against a world in arms,

Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg !

'* Shake, Johnnie, shake!" ''Shake, Yankee, shake!"
Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg !
The ties we bind no foe shall break,

Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg !
From every mountain top and lake.
From Northern wood and Southern brake,
"Shake, Yankee, shake I" ''Shake, Johnnie, shake!"
Gettysburg ! At Gettysburg !

Fkanktjn^ W, Fisf,



LARGEST! BEST!

THE

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

M U T U A r • L

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooo



INSURANCE CO.

OF NEW YORK.



Assets Over $118,000,000.
ISSUES HVHR\ DliSIRABLK FORM OF POLICY.

TT HAS PAID MEMBERS SINX^E ITS ORGANIZATION

Over $•307,000,000.



Its NKW Distribution P*plic3^ is the Most Liberal
ever offered by any Insurance Company.

The following fiu^ures show the growth of the Assets of The
Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York

^grom 1845 to 1888,

RECKONING A PERIOD OF EVERY TEN YEARS FROM 1845:

1845 $97,490.34

1835 2,850,077.56

1865 12,235,407.86

1875 72-446,970.06

1885 103,876,178.51

Jan. 1, 1886 108,908,967.51

" 1, 1887 114,181,963.24

'' 1, 1888 118,806,851.89



XXII



PROPOSED MONUMENT TO GENERAL ARMISTEAD.



The efforts made by Pickett's Division Association to dedicate a monu-
ment to the memory of General Armistead, and to be located whci ;; he
fell^ mortally wounded, inside the Unions lines, were at the re-union of the
Philadelphia Brigade and Pickett's Division strengthened by a united
effort on the part of the Philadelphia Brigade and Cowan's New York
Battery,

That action originated thus : Immediately after the ceremonies dedi-
cating the monument of Cowan's First New York Battery had been con-
cluded, Colonel Cowan, holding a most beautiful sword in his hand, stated
that he had read in the newspapers that the Philadelphia Brigade intended
to return to Pickett's Division the war flags caj)tured from them by that
Brigade at Gettysburg in 1863 ; and, while he considered that the crown-
ing act of reconciliation, he regretted that his Battery had no flags to
return to them.

On the afternoon of July 3, 1863, however, while his Battery was pouring
grape and canister into the ranks of Pickett's Division, at ten paces, a hand-
some young Confederate officer fell, with his grasp almost on his (Cowan's)
guns. There was nothing about his person to indicate who he was ; but
this beautiful and costly sword, inlaid with pearl, seemed to indicate that
its owner was a young man of high social standing in Virginia ; and ho,
Colonel Cowan, while having no captured flags to return, did desire to
place this sword in the custody of Pickett's Division Association, with the
request that they would make every effort to ascertain to whom it belonged,
and from whose body it was taken ; and restore it to the relatives or i. jendj
of the young man.



The scene was deeply impressive, and while Colonel Crocker, of Pickett^s
Division, to whom the sword was handed, was making a fitting reply to
Colonel Cowan, Sergeant John W. Frazier, of Baker's California Regiment
— the 71st of the Pennsylvania line — and the ranking regiment of the Phil-
adelphia Brigade — hastily wrote a resolution, passed it to Colonel William
E. Aylett and Colonel Andrew Cowan for their perusal, and upon tlieir
approval handed it to General t\". W. Burns, of Governor's Island, Xew
York Harbor, who commanded the Philadelphia Brigade upon the death of
General Baker — with the request that he submit it for the consideration of
those present. General Burns offered the resolution, immediately upon the
conclusion of Colonel Crocker's speech, and Colonel Cowan put it to the
meeting in this way :

"All who are in favor of that resolution please hold up their right
hand."

Instantly 500 hands rose high in the air.

"All who are opposed to it will please hold their right hand."

Not a hand Avent up in opposition.

That resolution read as follows :

Resolved: By the members of the Philadelphia Brigade Association, Cowan's First New
York Battery, Pickett's Division Association, and others here present, that the Gettysburg
Memorial Association be asked to grant to the organizations named, the privilege of
erecting a monument commemorative of American Heroism. The farthest point reached
by Pickett's Division inside the Union lines, near the "Bloody Angle,"' is suggested as the
spot for the erection of said monument.

The matter has been progressing steadily during the year, and on Wed-
nesday, May 2, Colonel W. R. Aylett, who took command of General
Armistead's Brigade, after the fall of the latter on the field on that fated
July 3, 1863, lectured to a hearty, generous and enthusiastic audience at the
Academy of Music in Philadelphia. The lecture on '* Gettysburg " was
delivered under the auspices of the Philadelphia Brigade, for the purpose of
raising funds with which to erect the proposed monument.

A Philadelphia j^aper, speaking of the lecture and the audience, said that
it was a fitting sequence to the re-union of the Philadelphia Brigade and
Pickett's Division in the " Bloody Angle " of the battle of Gettysburg on
the 3d of July, of 1887. All around the stage were grouped the veterans of
the Philadelphia Brigade, officers and privates, who had initiated and
carried to successful conclusion the re-union which Colonel Aylett graphi-
cally described as a scene never before witnessed in the history of the human
race, and an event which " Heaven saw and God and the angels approved."

Mrs. General George E. Pickett and her son, Miss Aylett, Colonel Charles
H. Barnes and Avife, Mrs. Whitacre, wife of the Secretary of the Philadel-
phia Brigade, and Mrs. Wilkinson, wife of Mayor Wilkinson, of West Pont,
Va., occupied the Prince of Wales box. When Colonel Aylett expressed



the thanks of General Pickett's widow and the Virginians for the hospitality
extended to them during their visit to Philadelphia the audience gave fresh
proofs of enthusiasm.

The vast building resounded with applause as General W. F. ('' Baldy ")
Smith took his seat on one side of the Virginian and General "W. W. Burns,
of the Philadelphia Brigade, was seated upon the other. When General S.
Wylie Crawford, who fought from the first gun fired at Fort Sumter until
the surrender at Appomattox, hobbled down upon crutches he was met with
a storm of cheers.

Scattered throughout the auditorium were many citizens of prominence.
Among them were President of Common Council William M. Smith,
Thomas Cochran of the Union League, United States District Attorney
John R. Eead, John Y. Huber, Postmaster William F. Ilarrity, John H.
Michener, John L. Grim, W. W. Goodman, Councilmen Andrew J. Maloney
and J. Fred Loeble of the First Ward, Major Roberts of the Seventy-second
Regiment, Representative John E. Faunce, W. W. Alcorn, Major John H.
Weeks, John Huggard, George D. McCreary, Colonel Robert P. Dechert,
Hibbert P. John, Colonel James 0. Reilly, Ex-Councilnian Joseph Han-
cock, Charles S. Keyser, James Butterworth, Colonel Joseph T. Tobias, and
large delegations wearing the buttons of the Grand Army of the Republic
and the Loyal Legion.

At the conclusion of the lecture, which was constantly interrujited by
applause, Mrs. Pickett and the ladies held an impromptu reception in the
green room, while Colonel Aylett dined with the Committee of the Brigade.
John W. Frazier called the meeting to order, and Secretary Whitacre read
letters of regret from Generals William T. Sherman and Joseph E.
Johnston.

The prospect now is that the monument will be dedicated during 1889.



XXIII.



THE NATIONAL CEMETERY AT GETTYSBURG.



After the Battle of Gett3'sburg the lierculean task of burying the dead
was rapidly attended to, the hot weather and rapid decomposition rendering
that duty imperative. Shallow ditches — and they were shalloM^ — were dug,
the bodies laid therein and a little dirt thrown over them. This imperfect
burial, in fact scarce burial at all. horrified visitors to the battlefield and
those who came seeking for the remains of their loved ones. The matter
was laid before Governor Andrew Curtin, and that patriotic old war Gover-
nor set the "ball rolling." Reappointed a number of citizens of Gettysburg
to purchase ground and provide for the proper interment of the dead.
Seventeen acres on the Baltimore Turnpike, adjoining the Cemetery of the
Evergreens, were obtained, each of tlie States whose troops had served on
the Union line in the battle paying a proportion of the expense. The title
was vested in the State of Pennsylvania in trust for the nation, and the Bat-
tlefield Memorial Association was created, consisting of one member from
each State, to whose care it was given.

"William Saunders laid out the ground, the dead were taken from all
parts of the battlefield, and conveyed to the enclosure. Many of the Union
dead were removed to the Xorth by their relatives, but still there remains
in the National Cemetery and near where the centre of the Union line
rested during the battle 3,575 bodies, of which 1,608 are ''unknown."

Within the Cemetery the statue of ^Major-General Reynolds, the fated
leader of the first day's fight, is erected — the Monument of the First Corps is
to occupy the spot where he fell. There, also, is the Xational ^lonument,
the allegorical figures of which are depicted on the illuminated covers of thi:



pamphlet. The National Moument, which is not the artistic structure it
might be, was designed by Mr. J. G, Batterson of Hartford, Ct. . who thus
explains his ideas.

The whole renderiug of the design is purely historical. * * * The superstructure is sixty
feet high, having a massive pedestal, twenty-five feet square at the base, and is crowned with a
oolossal statue representing the Genius of Liberty. Standing upon a three-quarter globe she
raises in her right hand the victor's wreath of laurel, while with the left she gathers up the folds
of our national flag, under which the victory was won. Projecting from the angles of the ped-
estal are four buttresses, supporting an equal number of allegorical statues representing re-
spectively War, History, Peace and Plenty. War is personified by a statue of the American
soldier, who, resting from the conflict, relates to History the story of the battle which this
monument is intended to commemorate. History in listening attitude records with stylus
and tablet the achievmeuts of the field and the names of the honored dead. Peace is symbol"
ized by a statue of the American mechanic, characterized by appropriate accessories. Plenty
is represented by a female figure, with a sheaf of wheat and fruits of the earth, typifying
peace and abundance as the soldier's crowning triumph. The main die of the pedestal is co-
tagonal in form, paneled upon each face. The cornice and plinth above are also octagonal
and are heavily moulded. Upon this plinth rests an octagonal moulded base bearing upon its
face, in high relief, the national arms. The upper die and cap are circular in form, the die
being encircled by stars equal in numbar with the States whose sons contributed their lives as
the price of the victory won at Gettysburg.

At the consecration of the Cemetery, November 19, 1864, President
Abraham Lincoln delivered his matchless oration. The monument was
completed in 1868, and after the addition of that address cast in bronze, to
the design, it was dedicated July 1, 1869.

From the Cemetery superb views of the battlefield and the surrounding
country may be obtained, and this, with the care taken of the grounds and
the perfect repose of its situation, makes it a fitting resting place for the
Nation's Dead.



XXIV.



NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE UNITED STATES.



The necessity for the Government to exclusively own the grounds in
which deceased soldiers and sailors of the late Avar should be buried was
demonstrated early in the struggle, and laws Avere passed empowering the
})urchase of lands for such purpose. Enactments to preserve the graves of
soldiers from desecration and to secure the remains a permanent resting
place, to be kept sacred forever, were also passed, and now every veteran of
the late war can be interred, if his family choose, in Government reserva-
tions secure from removal, and under the daily care and supervision of
Ignited States officials, with the flag they defended floating over them every
day from sunrise to sunset.

The following table of interments in the various National Cemeteries was
furnished us by the Quartermaster-General of the United States Army, May
22, 1888 :



INXeRMENTS IN THE NATIONAL CEMETERIES TO APRIL 30, 1888.



Knoivn.

Annapolis, Md 2,288

Alexandria, La 520

Alexandria, Va 3,401

Aniiersonville, Ga 12,779

Antietam, Md 2,854

Arlington, Va 11,903

Balls Bluff, Va 1

Barrancas, Fla 843

Baton Rouge, La 2,485

Battle Ground, D. C. . 43

Beaufort, S. C 4,757

Beverly, N. J ® 157

Brownsville, Tex 1,443

Camp Busier, 111 1,008



Un-
known.


Total.


204


2,492


789


1,309


123


3,524


943


13,722


1,829


4,683


4,349


16,252


24


25


711


1,554


532


3,017




43


4,493


9,250


7


104


1,379


2,822


354


1,362



Known, k

Camp Nelson, Ky 2,455

Cave Hill, Ky 3,354

Chalmette, La 6,863

Chattanooga, Tenn. . . 8,037

City Point, Va 3,719

Cold Harbor, Va 672

Corinth , Miss 1 ,782

Crovv)|, Hill, Ind 680

Culpeper, Va 456

CusterBattlcfipld,M.T. 261

Cypress Hills, K Y. . . 4,418

Danville, Ky 349

Danville, Va 1,175

Fayetteville, Ark 438



Un-




lOttrn.


Total.


1,189


3,644


583


3,937


5,734


12,597


4,963


13,000


1,438


5.157


1,286


1,958


3,937


5,719


32


712


912


1,368




201


366


4,784


8


357


153


1,328


776


1,214



INTERMENT-S IN NATIONAL CEMETERIES— CONTINUED.



Known.
106



Finn's Point, N. J

Florence, fc. C

Fort Douelson, Tenn. .

Fort Gibson, I. T

Fort Harrison, Va

Fort Leaven worth , Kan
Fort McPherson, Neb.

Fort Smith, Ark

Fort Scott, Kan

Fredericksburg, Va. . .

Gettysburg, Pa 1,974

Glendale, Va 235

Grafter, W. Va C34

Hampton, Va 5,507

JeifersonBari-acks,Mo. 8,715

Jefferson City, Mo

Keokuk, la

KnoxviEe, Tenn

*Laurie, Md

Lebanon, Ky

Lexington, Ky

Little Rock, Ark

+Logan's Cross Rds,Ey

London Park, Md 1,898

Marcella, Ga 7,195

Memphis, Tenn 5,163

Mexico City 384

Mobile, Ala 764

Total



206
158
233
242

1,161
257
740
429

2,488



475

623

2,109

592

840

3,303

346



Un-
known.
2,539
2,799

.511
2 213

575
1,060

293
1,1.50

161

12,785

1,611

961

620

493
2.906

334

33

1,046



112

?,354

366

208

2,963

8,818

750

113



Total.
2,645
3,005

669
2,445

817
2 221

550
1,890

590
15,273
3,585
1,196
1,254
6,000
11,621

809

6.55
3,155

869

953

5,6.57

712

2,106

10,158

13,981

1,134

877



Knoivn.

Mound City, lU 2,473

ITash villa, Tenn 11,831

Natchez, Miss 308

New Albany, Ind 2,1.53

New Berne, N. C 2,185

Philadelphia, Pa 1,967

Pillsbury Land'g, Tenn 1,334
Poplar Grove, Va 2,198



Port Hudson, La

Quincy, 111

Raleigh, N. C

Richmond, Va

Rock Island, 111

Salisbury, N. C

San Antonio, Tex

San Francisco, Cal . .

Seven Pines, Va

Soldiers' Home, D. C.



588
167
626
842
288
97
703
286
150
5,388



Springfield, Mo 873

Staunton, Va 234

St. Augustine, Fla. . . . 1,470

Stone River, Tenn 3,811

Vicksburg, Miss 3,899

Wilmington, N. C . . . . 713

Winchester, Va 2,098

Woodl'n, Elmira,N.Y. 3,068

Yorktown, Va 748



. 176,313



Un-




known.


Total.


2,763


5,235


4,701


16,532


2,780


3,088


676


2,828


1,091


3,276


233


2,190


2,363


3,596


4,001


6,199


3,239


3,837


55


322


571


1,197


5,700


6,. 542


20


308


12,035


12.132


225


927


11


297


1,218


1,368


288


5,676


734


1,607


523


757




1,470


2,334


6,145


12,716


16,615


1,577


2,390


2,382


4.4S0


7


3,075


1,435


3,183


148,830


335,143



* Removed to London Pai"k in 1884.
i- Now MiU Springs, Ky.



These figures include a number of civilians and Confederates, known
and unknown, buried during the existence of hostilities ; and the cem-
etery at the City of Mexico contains the bodies of all Americans who
died there entitled to the right of burial therein.



XXV.



ORGANIZATIONS



tUSTERED INTO THE UNITED STATES SERVICE
DURING THE REBELLION.



ARTILLERY.



INFANTRY.



States . § §

and jj- S"

Territories. • *

Maine 2

New Hampshire.. 1

Vermont 1

Massachusetts 5 4

Rhode Island 3 2

Connecticut 1

New York 27 10

New Jersey 3

Pennsylvania 23 28

Delaware 8

Maryland 4 4

Dist. of Columbia. 1 1

West Virginia 7 2

Virginia

North Carolina, ... 3

Georgia

Florida 2

Alabama 1 5

Mississipi-i 2

Louisiana 2

Texas 1 9

Arkansas 4

Tennessee 21 7

Kentucky 16 10

Ohio 13 18

Michigan 12 2

Indiana 13 1

Illinois 17

Missouri 30 26

Wisconsin 4

Iowa 9

Minnesota , 2 10

California 2 4

Kansas 9

Oregon 1

Nevada 6

Washington Ter..

New Mexico Ter.. 2 5

Nebraska Ter 2 4

Colorado Ter 3

Dakota Ter 2

U. S. V. V. Inf 't'y

U. S. Vol. Inf't'y

U. S. Col. Troops. 6
U. S. A. Regulars. 6

Totals 258 170



1


3


7


30


22


33


25


1




1


17


4


19


4


1


1


3


17




19


1


4


8


19


68


47


77


59


3




1


8


1


14


3


2




3


21




30




1.5




35


2.52


15


294


23






5


38


4


41


4


4





19


227


62


254


95




1


1


9


4


9


13






6


20


1


24


5








o


33


3


34






8


17
'2

"3


2

1

"2


24

"4

'2
1

'5
1


4
1

'2

'5

2

'9






i


3


2


7


2






r,


9




30


7






1


45


1


61


11


3




27


218


11


234


29


2




11


36


7


50


9


1




26


123


16


137


17


>)




8


157


9


176


9






6


64


20


94


46


1




12
4


53
46




58
55




i




3


11
9




14
11


10
4






3


10
1

i


5
3


19
2

'i




'9








c


11
2


8
2


16
6






1


16


2


3

io


2
2








6


1


6


1


11


4


10


102


18


119


23


5






19




30





23



.1..666 306



1,981



498



XXVI.



TOTAL NUMBER OF TROOPS FURNISHED BY EACH STATE AND

TERRITORY.



There were nine calls for vohmteers issued during the rebellion; be-
sides which, men were furnished by special authority during 1862 for
three months, the militia were called out for six months during 18G3,
for one hundred days in 18G-i; and still other troops were furnished at
various times without special calls from the General Government.

The following tables will show the total nianber of men furnished at
each of these calls, by >States and Territories, as well as the aggregate of
men furnished durins^ the war:



I.— CALL OF APRIL 15, 1851, FOR 75,000 MILITIA FOR THREE MONTHS.



Men

Quota. Furnished.

Maine 780 771

New Hampshire 780 779

Vermont 780 782

Massachusetts 1,5C0 3,7?)0

Rhode Island 780 3,147

Connecticut 780 2,403

New York 1P.,2S0 13,906

New Jersey 3,123 3,123

Pennsylvania 12,500 20,175

Delaware 780, 775

Maryland 3,123

West Virginia 2,340 900

District of Columbia 4,720

Totals— Quota, 73,391 ;



Quota.

Ohio 10,153

Indiana 4,683

Illinois 4,683

Michigan 780

Wisconsin 780

Minnesota 780

Iowa 780

Missouri 3,123

Kentucky 3, 123

Kansas

Tennessee 1,500

Arkansas 780

North Carolina 1,560

Men furnished, 91,816.



Men

Furnished.

12,357

4,686

4,820

781

817

930

968

10,.591

650



I.— CALL OF MAY 3, 1861, FOR 500,000 MEN.



Quota.

Maine 17,560

New Hampshire 9,234

Vermont 8,950

Massachusetts 34,868

Rhode Island 4,955

Connecticut 13,057

New York 109,056

New Jersey 19, 152

Pennsylvania. 82,825

Delaware 3, 145

Maryland 15, .578

West Virginia 8,497

District of Columbia 1,627

Ohio 67,365

Indiana 38,832

Illinois 47,785

Michigan 21,357

Wisconsin 21,753

Minnesota 4,899

Iowa 19,316

Missouri 31 ,544

Kentucky 27,237

Kansas 3,235

Nebraska Territory

Totals 611,827



, Men Fa

Six Months. Oue Year.


■iiished for—
Two Years.


Three Years.


Total.






18,104


18,i04










8,338


8,338










9,508


9,.508










32,177


32,177










6,286


6,286










10,865


10,865






30


950


89,281

11,523

85,160

1,826

9,355

12,757



Online LibraryJohn TregaskisSouvenir of the re-union of the blue and the gray, on the battlefield of Gettysburg, July 1, 2, 3 and 4, 1888. How to get there, and what is to be done during the year → online text (page 20 of 29)