John Yonge Akerman.

Ancient coins of cities and princes, geographically arranged and described online

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Aulerci Cenomani.

1. Obv. — Rude head of Apollo, to the right.

R — felikovesi. The head of a horse, to the right. —
AR.3. (Plate XIX. No. 6.)

2. Obv. — Male beardless head, to the right.

R — kesjo. The head of a horse, to the left. — AR.3.

(Plate XIX. No. 5.)

LEXOVII.

A people inhabiting the courttry now known as the Pays
de Lisieux, Noviomagus (Lisieux) being the capital. The
coin here described was first published by M. de la Saus-
saye, in the Revue Numismatique. 2

viridovix, chief?

1. Obv. — lixovio. Head of Apollo, to the right.

R — ..ovix. A horse (?) to the right ; above, an arrow (?)
between two pellets ; below, a wheel. — M.Z. R.8.

(Plate XIX. No. 7.)

1 Annee, 1839, p. 32 f, pi. xiv. 9 Annee 1841, p. 345.



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160 ANCIENT COINS OP CITIES AND PRINCES.

cisiambos cattos, chief.

1. Obv. — simissos pvblicos lixovio. A kind of cross, within

a radiated circle.

R — cisiambos cattos vercobreto. An eagle, with
expanded wings.— MA. R.4. (Plate XIX. No. 8.)

2. Ota.— cisiambos. Rude male beardless head, to the right.

R — ....SBMissos lexovio. An eagle, as on No. 1. —
MA. R.4. (Rollin.) Revue de la Num. Franc.
Annee 1836, vignette, p. 13.

These very interesting coins were attributed by the Baron Marchant to
a chief of the JEdui; but the specimens which came under his eye
appear to have been ill preserved. The examples here described are
illustrated by M. de Saulcy, in a communication to the Revue de la
Numismatique Franchise. ' The legends are thus read by that numis-
matist: — Semis of the Lexovians, Cisiambos Cattos, Vergobret.* The
Baron Marchant supposed that the Gauls, after their subjugation,
abandoned the Greek monetary designations, and thus exchanged
Dichalchos for Semissus.

LUGDUNUM COPIA.

Now Lyons. Lugdunum, or Lugudunum, 3 was the
capital of Gallia Lugdunensis, and was founded b.c. 43>
by Munatius Plancus, who, it is said, gave it the name, in
honor of Lugdus, an ancient Celtic king. The name of
Copia occurs on several marbles, cited by Gruter. 4
1. Obv. — Head of Victory, to the right.

R — lvgdvni. A lion walking, to the right; in the field,
a and xl.— AR.3. R.2. (Plate XIX. No. 9.)

JULIUS OffiSAR AND AUGUSTUS.

Obv. — divi. ivli. imp. CiESAR divi. f. The heads of Caesar
and Augustus, back to back ; between them, a palm
branch.

R — copia. The prow of a galley, with a mast ; above, a
star. M.9. R.2. (Plate XIX. No. 10.)

There are varieties.

1 Annee 1836, p. 6— 14.

8 Vergobret is considered to be a Celtic title.

3 A coin of Antony bears lvgvdvni.

4 Copia was, perhaps, originally an epithet. Coins of Albinus bear the
legend gen. lvo.



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GALLIA. 161

AUGUSTUS.

Obv. — c^sar mvi. f. Bare head of Augustus.

R — copia. A bull, to the right. — M.S. R.8. Mionnet,
Descr. Supp. vol.i. p. 148, from Panel.

REMI.
Now llheims.

1. Obv. — remos atisios. Beardless head, to the left ; behind,

a symbol.
R — A lion running, to the left; below, a garland (or a
dolphin) ; and on some a symbol. — MA. R.2.

2. Obv. — remo. Three male heads, side by side, to the left.

R — A figure in a biga, to the left. — M.S. R.2. (British
Museum.) (Plate XIX. No. 1 1 .)

3. Obv — Three heads, side by side, to the left.

R — remo. A figure in a biga, to the left. — M.3. R.l.

ROTOMAGUS.

Now Rouen.

1. Obv. — svticos. Female head, to the right.

R — ratvmacos. Two horses coupled, to the right. —
MA. R.6. (Plate XIX. No. 12.)

2. Obv. — ratvmacos. Female head, to the right

R — A horseman, galloping, to the right. — MA. R.6.

(Plate XIX. No. 13.)

3. Obv. — svticos. Female head, to the right.

R— Two horses coupled, galloping, to the right. MA.
R.6.

SEQUANI.

The territory of the Sequani lay between the Rhone and
the Arar. Their capital was Vesontio (Besancon). Though
the legends of these coins are invariably curtailed, they
are, by universal consent, assigned to the Seqifani.

1. Obv. — Rude head, to the left.

R — (se)qvano. A hog, to the left. — AR.2. R.6.

(Plate XIX. No. 17.)

2. Obv. — Similar types, but without legend. AR.2. C.

{British Museum.) (Plate XIX. No. 16.)

Y



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162 ANCIENT COINS OF CITIES AND PRINCES.

SENONES.

The capital of the Senones was Sens. The names on
these coins are supposed to be those of Gaulish chiefs. M.
de la Saussaye supposes that the letters CALEDV may
signify Caledunum, the name of the locality in which they
were struck, and that the two legends together probably
signify Caledunum Senojium. 1

1. Obv. — senodon. Beardless head, to the left.

R — caledv. A horse at liberty, to the left. — AR.3. R.l.

(Plate XIX. No. 14.)

2. Obv. — atevli. Beardless bust, with a collar, or torques, and

wings on the shoulders.

R — vlatos. A lion (?) to the right ; below, a pentagon ;
above, OO; in the exergue, a crescent. — AR.3.

(Plate XIX. No. 15.)

VELIOCASSES.

The capital of the Veliocasses was Rouen. The coin
No. 1 was published by the Marquis Lagoy, who proposed
to assign it to the Elvi, or Helvii ; but M. de la Saussaye
gives it to the Veliocasses, an attribution which is strength-
ened by the circumstance of the name Suticos being found
on the money of Rotomagus. 2

1. Obv. — svticos. Beardless head, to the right.

R — elioca©i. A horse at liberty, galloping, to the right ;
in the field, oo, and other symbols. — AR.4. Lagoy,
Notice, pi. xxxiii. (Plate XIX. No. 18.)

2. Obv. — ...vncos. Head of Apollo (?) to the right ; before, a

quartfoil; below, 0.

R — An ox walking, to the right; below, a hog; in the
field, ©, and other symbols. — AR.3. De la Saussaye,
Revue Numismatique, annee 1840, plate xvii. No. 12.



1 He thinks Caledunum may be Chaumont (Rev. Num. an ne'e 1840, p. 180).
a Rev. Num. anne*e 1838, p. 307.



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GALLIA. 160



VESONTIO.



The capital of the Sequani, now Besancon. The coin
here described was first noticed in the Revue de la Numis-
matique Francoise l by the Marquis Lagoy, who observes
that the type is altogether Gaulish, and that the legend
biso bears no analogy to the orthography of any other city
of Gaul.

Obv. — biso. retrograde. An equestrian figure, to the left, wear-
ing a kind of helmet.

R — An ox, standing, to the right; above, the head of an
ox,full-faced ; in the field, two symbols. — JE.3.

(Plate XX. No. 1.)



1 Ann& 1837, p. 405.



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1



164 ANCIENT COINS OF CITIES AND PRINCES.



GALLIA BELGICA.
AGRIPP1NA.

The modern Cologne.

Obv. — postvmvs p. f. avg. Radiated head of Posthumus.

R — col. cl. agrip. cos. mi. Equity, standing, with
scales and cornucopia. — JE.6. R.8.

CATALAUNUM.

Now Chalons sur Marne. The first of these coins is
given by M. de la Saussaye.* An example somewhat
similar is engraved by Pellerin. 2

1. Obv. — catal. or cataa. Helmed head, to the right.

R — A lion, walking, to the right : below, a hog : in the
field, two symbols. — MA. R.4.

2. Obv. — Similar legend. Head of Mars, to the left.

R — An eagle, standing on a thunderbolt: in the field, a
vase. — JE.4. R.4. Mionnet, Descript. vol. i. p. 81, Nos.
211, 212. Pellerin, Rec. pi. iv. No. 16.

EBURONES.

Now the Pays de Liege.

1. Obv. — Helmed beardless head, to the right.

R — ebvr. A helmed horseman, galloping, to the right.
AR.3. R.4.

2. Ota?.— -Same head.

R — ebvro. Same tvpe. — AR.3. R.4.

(Plate XX. No. 2.)



1 Revue Numismatique, anne'e 1840, pi. xviii. No. 1,
a Recueil, Planche iv. No. 17.



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GALLIA. 165

CHIEFS OF THE EBU RONES.

1. Obv. — Helmed head, to the right.

ft — ambiorix. An equestrian figure bearing a spear, to
the right. AR.4. R.4. Pellerin, Ucc. pi. iv. No. 19.

2. Obv. — Same types, with tambil. AR. R.4. Mionnet,

Descr. vol. i. p. 83.

The name Tambil is supposed, by French numismatists, to be that of a
Gaulish chief, predecessor of Ambiorix, as the Eburones were
crushed by Caesar after the defeat of the latter. 1 The coin inscribed
COM., and engraved in PI. XX. No. 15, is probably of some chief of
this people.

LEUCI.

The Leuci were the neighbours of the Mediomatrici and
the Sequani. The coins here described are published by
M. de la Saussaye, who founds his appropriation on the fact
of their being constantly discovered in great numbers in
Lorraine. 2

tog irix, Chief.

1. Obv. — togirix, in rude characters. Rude head, to the left.

ft — togir. in rude characters. A horse, galloping, to the
left. AR.2. C. (Plate XX. No. 3.)

2. Obv. — tog. Helmed beardless head, to the left.

ft — tog. A lion, running, to the right. Bil. 4. R.l.

(Plate XX. No. 5.)

3. Obv.— Another, of ruder work, with togir. on the reverse.

Bil. 4. C. (Plate XX. No. 6.)

4 . Obv. — Rude beardless head, to the left.

ft— toc. A horse, galloping, to the left. Bil. 4.

(Plate XX. No 7.)

5. Obv. — ivlivs. Rude head.

ft — togiri. A horse, galloping, to the left. AR. 4. R.8.

(Plate XX. No. 4.)

M. de la Saussaye observes, on the name of Julius, which occurs on this
coin, that it probably denotes that Togirix was a chief attached to the
Romans. See the coin of Duratius, chief of the Pictones, on which
the name of Julius appears.

' l See the remarks of the Marquis Lagoy in his Notice, p. 89.
2 Revue Numismatique, ann£e 1840, p. 184.



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166 ANCIENT COINS OF CITIES AND PRINCES.

6. Obv. — Another with q.ivli. AR.3. R.7.

Thirteen coins with this form of legend were discovered
at Dol, in Brittany, a few years since. !
See the coins of chiefs described under Solimariaca.

MAGUSA.

The very remarkable coin here described, was commu-
nicated by the Marquis Lagoy to the Revue Numis-
matique ; 2 and by him supposed to have been the money
of a Batavian city, named Magusa. This supposition is
founded on inscriptions discovered at West Capel, and other
places in Batavia, bearing HERCVLI. MAGVSANO, and
on the well-known coins of Postumus, with a legend thus
inscribed.

Obv. — magvs. Helmed beardless head, to the right.
R — A sea horse, to the right. — AR.3. R.8.

(Plate XX. No. 8.)

MEDIOMATRICI.
Now Metz.

1. Obv. — Head of Minerva, to the right.

R — medio. An equestrian figure to the right, bearing a
spear. — M. R.6. Pellerin, pi. iv. fig. 29.

2. Obv. — Same head.

R — medioma. A pegasu9. — JE.S. R.7. Mionnet, from
Hardouin.

SOLIMARIACA.

A city of the Leuci,- now Soulosse.

1. Obv. — Female head, to the left; before, a symbol resembling a
branch or tendril.
R — solima. A horse unbridled, galloping, to the left ;
above, Victory scattering flowers. El A. Rev. Num. an-
nee 1838, pi. xvi. fig. 1.

1 Proceedings of the Num. Soc. of London, Session 1843-44, p. 3.
a Anne*e 1840, p. 16. *



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GALLIA. 167

2. Obv. — Similar head.

ft — solima. A horse galloping, to the left ; above ®0.

ElA. R.7. Ibid. &g. 2.

3. Obv. — Similar head, without symbol.

ft — S. A horse galloping, to the left ; above, an eagle
withexpanded wings.

4. Obv. — solima. Beardless head, to the left.

ft — A horse galloping, to the left; below, a shell-fish.
AR.2. (Plate vv XT ~ ,AX

5. Obv. — solima. Beardless head, to the left.

ft — A horse bridled, galloping, to the left;
fish. AR.3. (Plate

6. Obv. — solima. Beardless head, to the right.

ft— COMMA. Similar type. AR.3. R.3.
annee 1838, p. 409.

7. Obv.— COAIMA. Similar head.

R— -COAIMA. Similar type. AR.3. R.3.
annee 1836, pi. iii. fig. 13.

See a very interesting dissertation on these coins by M
(Rev. Numismatique, anne*e 1838, p. 405), who suj
on the reverse to be that of the Gaulish goddess Solir

CHIEFS.

1. Obv. — Head, as on the preceding coins.

ft — abvcato. A horse galloping, to the 1
bird, with expanded wings ; below, ^P.
Rev, Num., annee 1838, p. 411.

2. Obv. — abvdos. The same head, with a collar, <

ft — abvdos. A horse and symbols, as No. 1 .
Ibid. p. 411.

3. Obv. — Same legend and type.

ft — abvds. Same type and symbols, with
ElA. R.4. Ibid. p. 4 12.

4. Obv. — avloib. Head, to the right.



1 M. de la Saussaye supposes the head on the coins of th«
and Cambolectri to be that of the Gaulish goddess Cambona



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168 ANCIENT COINS OF CITIES AND PRINCES.

R — sol i ma. A bird, with expanded wings, to the left ;
in the field, a crescent. AV. R.8. Ibid. p. 412.

M. de la Saussaye observes, that there is nothing in the fabric of this
coin to identify it with the other pieces of Solimariaca, and that it is
worthy of observation, that the bird, on other examples merely acces-
sory, is here the principal type of the reverse.

5. Q 0Vt — Head to the left, with the torques.

ft — abvdos. A horse galloping, to the left ; above, VV.
M.S. R.2. Ibid, p.413.

6. Obv. — Same head.

R — abvdod. Same type and symbols. M.S. R.2.

7. Another, with avdos. M.S. R.2. Ibid. p. 413.

8. Obv. — abv .... Same head.

R — A pegasus, to the left; below, ab. M.S. R.6. Ibid,
p. 413.

M. de la Saussaye remarks, that he discovered this coin himself in So-
logne, in the ancient ruins of the village of Teil, near the Roman road
from Tours to Bourges.

9. Obv. — Same head, with the torques.

R— . . . . ivnis(?) Type as No. 5. M.S. R.l. Ibid,
p. 414.

10. Obv. — Same head.

R— IIAP02. TypeasNo.9. JE.3. R.6. Ibid. p. 414.



TORNACUM.



Now Tournay.



Obv. — dvrnacos. Helmed beardless head, to the right.

R — avscro. A horseman bearing a spear, galloping, to
the right. AR.3. C. (Webster.) (PlateXX.No.il.)

UBII.

The Ubii were a people occupying the country on the
borders of the Rhine, their capital being the city now
called Cologne.

Obv. — nidi. Head to the right, with a collar of pearls ; before,
a star.



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OALLIA. 169

R — vbi. A horse, galloping, to the right : in the field, a
star and three circles. AR.3. R.l. Mionnet, vol. i.
p. 92.

The Marquis Lagoy thinks that Nidi is the name of some unknown
chief of the Ubii. 1



VEROMANDUI.

The modern Vermandois.

1. Obv. — ver. .. A horse, to the right: above, a wheel : in the

field, a symbol,
ft — . . . ve. A lion, to the right ; a monogram and c. iE.4.
R.l. Lagoy, Notice, p. 43.

2. Obv. — vero. A horse, galloping, to the right: above, a

wheel,
ft — ve. A lion, to the right : behind, io. MA. Lagoy,
Notice, p. 43.

VIRODUNUM.

Now Verdun.

Obv. — vjrodv. Helmed beardless head, to the right.

ft — tvroca. An equestrian figure with a spear, gallop-
ing, to the right. AR.4. R.4. Bouteroue. Mionnet,
Descript. vol. i. p. 84.



Notice, p. 42.



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170 ANCIENT COINS OP CITIES AND PRINCES.



ISLAND ADJACENT TO GALLIA.

CjESAREA.

Now Jersey. It is very probable that the coins known
among Numismatists by the designation of the Jersey type,
were minted in this island, although specimens have occa-
sionally been discovered in England. An example is en-
graved in the u Numismatic Chronicle," Vol. I. pi. i. fig. 12,
also in Hawkins's " Silver Coinage of England," pi. i.,
fig. 14, and Ruding's " Annals of the Coinage of Great
Britain," &c, pi. iii., figs. 49, 50 ; and the speculative anti-
quary may find food for conjecture in the Baron Donop's
account, with engravings, of several hundred coins of this
type discovered in Jersey a few years since, and supposed
by that writer to b» designed varieties illustrating the
worship of Indian divinities !

UNCERTAIN COINS OF GALLIA.

1 . Obv. — Female head, to the right.

ft — Two equestrian figures holding the lituusQ), proceed-
ing to the right.- A V.3. (Plate XX. No. 18.)
This coin furnishes an example of an imitated Greek type.

2. Obv. — ninno. Bare male head, to the left.

ft— ninno. A hog standing, to the left. — AR.2£. R.l.

(Plate XX. No. 13.)

3. Obv. — Helmed beardless head, to the right.

ft — com. A horseman, galloping, to the right. — AR.3. C.

(Plate XX. No. 15.)

his coin closely resembles that engraved in PI. xx. No. 2, both being
imitations of the consular denarius.



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UNCERTAIN COINS OF OALLIA. 171

4. Obv. — pixtilos. Beardless head, to the left.

ft — Pegasus galloping, to the left ; in the field, a pentagon
and other symbols.— MA. C. (Plate XX. No. 16.)

5. Obv. — pixtil. Beardless head, to the left.

ft — fi. Pegasus trampling on a prostrate human figure.—
MA. C. (Plate XX. No. 14.)

6. Obv. — Pictilos. Beardless head, to the right, with the pa-

ludamentum.
ft — A horse galloping, to the right, surrounded by unknown
symbols. — AR.4. R.4. M ionnet, Descr. vol. i. p. 92.

7. Obv. — pixtil or pixtilos. Head, to the right.

ft — A bird, with expanded wings, standing on a serpent (?)
within a distyle temple : in the field, six globules. — M.S.
C. Ibid. p. 93, Nos. 99 and 100 ; Rev. Num., 1887,
pi. iii. ^g. 13.

8. Obv. — Same legend and head.

ft— Same legend. A bird, with expanded wings, standing
on a human hand, which holds a branch bearing fruit. —
iE.3. C. Ibid. No. 101 ; Rev. Num., 1837, pi. iii. fig. 3.

9. Obv. — Same legend and head.

ft — A dog turning and seizing a lizard. — MA. R.l. Ibid.
103 1 Rev. Num. 1837, pi. iii. fig. 15.

10. Obv. — Pixtilos. Helmed head, to the right.

ft — A winged horse, with a bird's head, to the right : below,
a symbol.— ^.4. R.l. Ibid. No. 105.

11. Obv. — JSame legend and head.

ft — A winged figure, on horseback, bearing a palm : below,
a symbol.— ;E.3. R.l. Ibid. No. 106. Rev. Num.,
1837, pi. iii. fig. 14.

12. Obv. — Same legend and head.

ft— pixtilos. A lion to the left : above, © : below,
a cornucopia. — M.S . R.l.

13. Obv.— Same legend. Bare beardless head, to the right.

R — A seated female figure, to the left, holding in her hand

an object resembling the acrostolium : on each side, a plant :

below, a crab. — JE.3. R 2+ Mionnet, Descr. Supp. vol. i.

p. 158, No. 68; Rev. Num., Annee 1837, pi. iii. fig. 16.

The preceding ten coins are supposed to bear the name of a Gaulish

chief, Pixtilos or Pichtil. M. de la Saussaye observes that they are

found constantly in the central provinces of France, and that Pixtilos

probably governed one of the towns of the Arverni. 1



Revue Numismatique, anne*e 1838, p. 144.



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172 ANCIENT COINS OF CITIES AND PRINCES.

14. Obv. — Head of Apollo (?) with short curls.

ft — A winged figure astride an arrow, to the left. AV. 3.

(Plate XX. No. 17.)

This very remarkable coin has been published by M. de la Saussaye.

The type is supposed to illustrate the Gaulish myth of the Druid

Abaris, to whom Apollo is said to have given an arrow on which he

travelled through the air. 1

15. Obv. — dvbnorex or dvbnoreix. Female head, to the

right,
ft — Same legend. A soldier standing with a human head
in each hand. AR.4. C.

1 6. Obv. — Same legend and head.

ft — A military figure holding a standard, surmounted by
the figure of a hog. AR.4. C.

17. Obv. — Same legend and head.

ft — dvbnorex. A military figure standing, holding a
spear ; at his feet a hog. AR.4. C.

18. Obv. — pooctika. Helmed beardless head, to the left.

ft — roveca. A lion running, to the right. — MA. R.l.

19. Obv. — roveca. Beardless head, to the left, with a collar ;

before, 0.
ft— A horse, to the left; in the field, ©000.— M.8%.
R.l.

20. Obv. — roveca. Bust of Venus, to the right ; behind, Cupid

holding a garland.

ft — A horse, to the right; in the field, ©00© and a wheel.
—MA. R.3.

21. Obv. — roveca. A lion running, to the right.

ft — A horse, to the right ; in the field, a wheel and a star.
—MA. R.l.

22. Obv. — . . . veca. A beardless head, to the left ; on each

side, © ; below, a diota.
ft — poo vie a. A horse at liberty, to the left ; in the field,
©©.-—jE.3. R.l. Mionnet, Supp. t. i. p. 159, No. 73.

23. Obv. — Legend effaced. Beardless head, to the left.

ft — pootica. Same type; in the field, ©. — M.3* R.l.

24. Obv. — Diademed head, to the left.

ft — adnasati. A spearman galloping, to the right. —
AR.5. R.2. Mionnet, Descr., t. i. p. 85, No. 6.

1 Creuzer thinks this a personification of the art of writing. The myth is
amined by M. de la Saussaye with his accustomed sagacity. — Rev. Num.,
nee 1842, p. 165.



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UNCERTAIN COINS OF GALLIA. 173

25. Obv. — An eagle flying in the middle of a laurel garland.

R — ambactvs. A bull's head full-faced; above, a pentagon.
— M.S. R.4. Ibid. No. 9.

26. Obv. — Diademed beardless head, to the right; behind, a

monogram.

R — germanvs iNDUTiin {sic). A bull walking, to the
left.— MA. C.

This coin has been assigned to Indutiomartu, a Gaulish chief; but as
there were two personages of that name, the appropriation is still
unsettled. Vide Eckhel, D. N. V., vol. i. p. 78.

27. Obv.— tovtobocio. Male head, to the left.

R — atepilos. A lion rampant, to the right. — M.S. R.8.
Royal Cabinet, Paris.

This coin is given by Eckhel, Num. Vet. Anec, p. 4, and Is engraved by
M. Cartier, in the Revue Numism., Ann£e 1842, planche xxi. fig. 13.
Eckhel, Doct. N. Vet., vol. i. p. 79, observes that the name Toutobocio
resembles that of Teutobodtu or Teutobochus, king of the Teutones,
vanquished by Marius near Aix.

28. Obv. — drvcca. Female head, to the right.

R — Female figure standing, to the left ; her right hand
holding a serpent (?), her left elbow resting on a column. —
MA. R.8.

M. Cartier, who publishes this coin, observes that it is a palpable imi-
tation of a consular denarius of the Acilia family. 1

29. Obv. — tvr .... Diademed female head, to the right.

R — drvcca. Female figure standing, holding the hasta. —
M§. R.8.

30. Obv. — acvssros. Diademed female head, to the right.

R — A hog standing, to the right ; above, an ear of barley. —
MA. Rev. Num., 1842, pi. xxi. figs. 15 and 16.

31. Obv. — aremacios. Head, to the right.

R — A bird with expanded wings : in the field, a small bird,
a pentagon, and a serpent. — vE.3J. R.l. Mionnet,
Descr., vol.i. p. 86, No. 11.

32. Obv. — Beardless head, to the left.

R — bvcato. A horse galloping, to the left, with a bird
upon its back ; below, ©©©.— EL.5. R.3. Ibid. No. 1 8.

33. Obv. — giamilos. Laureated head of Apollo, to the right ;

behind, a symbol.

1 Revue Numismatique, annee 1342, p. 427, and pi. xxi., fig. 12.



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174 ANCIENT COINS OF CITIES AND PRINCES.

R— giamilos. An eagle, with expanded wings, holding a
serpent in its beak. — 2E.6. R.8. Mionnet, Descr. Supp.,
t. L p. 157, No. 52.

34. Obv. — binno. Female head, with long curls,

R— A horse at liberty, to the left.— AR.2|. R.l. Ibid.
No. 57.

In addition to the foregoing, there are a large number of
uninscribed Gaulish coins, which cannot be satisfactorily
classified, though the places of their finding are well known.
Thus the pieces engraved as British coins in Ruding's
second plate, figs. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, are
Gaulish, and of the kind discovered frequently in Brittany. 1
To these may be added the rude cast coins, having a human
head on one side, and on the other an animal, discovered in
great numbers on the site of the ancient Gaulish camp at
Amboise, and described and engraved by M. Cartier in the
Revue Numismatique. 2



1 On these coins the Androcephalos horse appears, a type which does not
occur in the British series.

9 Annee 1842, pi. xxii., figs. 21, 22, 23. Ruding, pi. iii. figs. 55 to 64 and
66 ; ibid. pi. iv. figs. 67 to 72, has engraved several coins which are known to
be Gaulish.



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ROGER, MARQUIS DE LAGOY,

AUTHOR OF AN ESSAT OK THE COINS Or CUNOBEUKUS,
MUfBBB OF TUB INSTITUTE OF FRANCE,



THB FOLLOWING ATTEMPT



ARRANGEMENT OF THE



COINS OF ANCIENT BRITISH PRINCES



RE8PECTFDLLY INSCRIBED.



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BRITANNIA.

It is confessed by those who have studied the coins of the
ancient Britons that we are, at present, without sufficient in-
formation to enable us safely to attempt their precise chrono-
logical or geographical classification. We have the assurance
of Caesar that the Britons had not a coinage of their own at
the period of his invasion, 1 and on this authority Eckhel main-
tained that they were unacquainted with a stamped currency
until a late period of the Roman empire. 2 Even in the ad-


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