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Justin Morgan
Prom wood cut in "Morgan Horses"



Frontispiece.



The picture of Justin Morgan that we present as a frontispiece is from Mr. Linsley's
book, where it appears with the following letters :

ST. JOHNSBURY, VT., JULY 7, 1856.
D. C. Linsley, Esq.

Dear Sir : Your favor of the 3d inst. is at hand, as also the accompanying drawing of
old Justin Morgan. I knew the horse well and owned him about seven years while in the
prime of his life. The drawing is a very faithful representation of him as he appeared while
I owned him, and I can suggest scarcely any alteration; perhaps none that would make it a
more faithful copy of the original. Yours respectfully,

DAVID Goss.

DERBY LINE, VT., JULY 21, 1856.

D. C. Linsley, Esq.: Your favor of the i8th inst., containing a 'drawing of the old
Justin Morgan, has this day come to hand, and I hasten to reply. In early life it was my
privilege to know the original Morgan horse perfectly well, and for some time to see him
daily at the time of his greatest popularity, and I have no hesitation in saying that the draw-
ing exhibited, in my judgment, is remarkably correct, and gives a very accurate delineation of
the horse as he appeared in life. I remain, dear sir, yours truly and very respectfully,

SOLO. STEELE.

CLAREMONT, N. H., JULY, 1856.
D. C. Linsley, Esq.

Dear Sir : I received a line from you yesterday, and with it a drawing of the old Justin
Morgan or Goss horse. As I have before told you, I knew the horse well, having seen him
often, and kept him one year while Joel Goss owned him. He was far the best horse I ever
had anything to do with, and my recollection of him is perfectly clear and distinct. The
drawing you send is a very excellent likeness of him, and I am pleased to see an effort mak-
ing, even at this late day, to preserve some record of him. Yours respectfully,

DAN. BALDWIN.







f Byerly Turk.


f D'Ai


r

f Crofts'


Jigg


L Daughter of


f Spanker J
(Old




Partner






|




f


Mor-
ton's
Imp.
Traveler


f Curwen's
I Dau. of .1 Bay Barb
( Daughter of
f Bloody Buttocks, Arabian
Bav


[ Unknown.
{Curwen's
Old Spot
Daughter of


f Selal
Unk
Ches






OAJ

Bloody \
Buttocks


Dau. of


{Grayhound
Brown


(see below),
f Makeless


Old
Ogel








Farewell I


Unk
Brim










( Daughter of














Dau




Lloyd's
Traveler'






f Clumsy

J


r Hautboy { {
( Miss D'Arcy's Pet ?








rOX


j


| Leedes' Arabian.










[ Bay Peg


( Young Bald Peg ]








Quiet








(


'






Cuddy '






















( Merlin


Bust


j


True
Briton
also
called




Imp.
Jenny i
Cam- '
eron




Dau. of


f Castaway
I Daughter of


( Daughter of

f Brimmer
| Royal Mare.


Unk
Son
Unk
D'A

Roy




Beauti-




I


" Gr'y Gran


tham 1 ^ T rown ' (


)\v 1 urk.






ful Bay
and
Traveler


- fBabra .


- Belvoirj Daiu of
' Godolphin Arabian.
Hartl'y's C


f Paget Turk. [ Leedes' Arabian
| Betty Percival J.

HoldernessTurki Dau g hterot








ham } Large |


Horse (


Daughter of


iviaKeiess oy u


Mare








i "Mare 7 }


F1 ^ ig {


Woodstock Arabian.
f St. Victor Barb.
Daughter of | Daughter of


f Win
1 Rov




Betty
I Leeds'




r Bay


Gray
"Hautboy


Hautboy
Unknown.


D'Arc

Royal








Bolton j




' Makeless by Oglethoi








r Bolton
Starling '


1


Daughter of -


f Brimn
Daughter of \










I


Son of Brown


low Turk. I Daugl


c




. Dau. of -




L Dau. of \


f Pulleine Arabfan.
Old Lady \ ( Rock\


C/3

d


f Godolphin Arabian.


Daughter of 4
( Daugl


3


f Darley Arab.




; g l


1 Dau. of




Childers x


j


Carele


b






( Betty Leedes j


Sister


o




Dau. of










f Young f Hony\


"Z








True Blue i










. Daughter of -


\ Daugl
f Cvor's










I Daughter of -j












I


Bonny












St. Vi






( Godolphin
Cade \ Arabian.


f Bald Gal-
loway


Gray "








L Roxana


.


Akast










Sister to












[ Chaunter


Daugl










f


ncirl^






Import-
ed


f Childers






Wildair


( Betty




ICh'rch's






- Steady








Wildair"






(


Gray












I Miss Belvoir^














(


Daug










.Dau. oi -
















Burt's






c


Tie?




Dau. of




Wildair Mare.
Untraced.


f Partner
( Sister








s Daughter of


j f


Gray!




( ?) Dau. f Sportsman I Arabian Ranger.
L ot } Untraced < Untraced.


^ Daughter of {




i Chest








I





ellow Turk.

j Lord Fairtax's Morocco Barb.



ark.

White Legged Low ther Barb.

ler Mare, breading unknown, but said to be well bred.

>e

ian.

f D'Arcv Yellow Turk.



of



Barb.

Place's White Turk, f Dodsworth



Daughter of ( Layton Barb Mare.

White Turk.
re.

said to be imported.

es' Arabian.

{Lord Fairfax's Morocco Barb.
f A n Anhian
Old Bald Peg ",, Ian '
I Helmsley Turk. s 1 Barb.

Unknown. r Ye llow Turk.



Barb.
Barb.



ellow Turk.
ire.



anker. -

\ Morocco Mare (see above).

rabian (see above).



f Fenwick Barb.
ire j Royal Mare.

low Turk.



rabian (see above).

D'Arcy's Yellow Turk.
Royal Mare.
f j Diamond, by Helmsley Turk, r r> t i f Helmsley Turk

* Sister to old' Merlin < TT i! j Unknown.

i i Unknown. l

Arabian.

Lonsdale Tregonwell Barb,
f Bustler by Helmsley Turk (see above).

Spanker (see above).
Barb.
ed s -1 Leedes' Arabian.

Dau. of Spanker out of Spanker's dam (see above).

's Arabian.

T 1.

. ( Hautboy (see above)
( Daughter of

k| B
( Daughter of



k. ( Royal Mare.

f ( Leedes' Arabian, r c- i / t, \

>f 1 Danphtpr of I Spanker (see above).

ib. * J j Spanker's dam.

f Careless Spanker (see above).

Sister to Leedes Leedes' Arabian.



Brownlow Turk.



Dau. of Spanker out of Spanker's dam (see above).



Unknown.
Paget Turk.

Betty Percival I Leedes Arabian. f s ker (see above)>

Byerly Turk. ST 1 Spanker's dam.

v Daughter of \ Spanker,

ixbury (see above). < Unknown.



( King William's White Barb, Chillaby.
( Natural Barb, Slugey.

( Makeless { ^glethorpe Arabian.

( Unknown. , . , T ,,,, , 01 . , ^ .

( Lord Lonsd Is f Skaftsbury Turk.
f Counselor \ Counselor \ Sister to Spanker (see above).

(D'Arcy's ?) ( Layton Barb.
[Bay Layton j f D'Arcy's Yellow Turk.



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nT v/olteY voij



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Inq8 or isjgi^ J io[->c,-ujo3

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>M T,



THE

MORGAN HORSE

AND

REGISTER

CONTAINING THE HISTORY AND PEDIGREE OF

JUSTIN MORGAN

FOUNDER OF

THIS REMARKABLE AMERICAN BREED OF HORSES
AND OF

HIS BEST KNOWN SONS AND GRANDSONS



ALSO PEDIGREE AND HISTORY SO FAR AS KNOWN OF MOST OF THE MORE PROMINENT
STALLIONS FOALED BEFORE l88l DESCENDED IN MALE LINE FROM JUSTIN MOR-
GAN, TOGETHER WITH THE PEDIGREES OF ABOUT ONE THOUSAND
ANIMALS REGISTERED IN CONFORMITY WITH THE
RULES OF THE MORGAN REGISTER



ILLUSTRATED



BY JOSEPH BATTELL



VOL. I



Round-hoof d, short-jointed, fetlocks [neat, not] long,
Broad breast, full eye, small head and nostril wide,
High crest, short ears, straight legs and passing strong,
[Full] mane, thick tail, broad buttock, tender hide.

Shakespeare



MIDDLEBURY, VT.

REGISTER PRINTING COMPANY

1894



SF



V



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1892,

By JOSEPH BATTELL,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.




Hast thou given the horse strength ? hast thou clothed his
neck with thunder?

Canst thou make him afraid as a grasshopper? the glory of
his nostrils is terrible.

He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength : he
goeth on to meet the armed men.

He mocketh at fear, and is not affrighted; neither turneth he
back from the sword.

The quiver rattleth against him, the glittering spear and the
shield.

He swalloweth the ground with fierceness and rage : neither
believeth he that it is the sound of the trumpet.

He saith among the trumpets, Ha, ha ; and smelleth the
battle afar off, the thunder of the captains, and the shouting.



333380



vi THE MORGAN HORSE

for nearly a century, probably originated. Thus certainly the progeny of
Janus, foaled in England in 1746, and imported to Virginia in 1752, got by
Janus, son of Godolphin Arabian, dam by Fox,and second dam by Bald Gal-
loway, became almost an established family, and, it is said, were very similar
to the Morgans both in contour and great speed. Thus the extraordinary
and useful qualities of the grand horse Messenger were impressed upon his
progeny ; and so, too, the original Morgan had this quality in a remarkable
degree.

We see, then, that by the aid of these two great principles, Heredity and
Prepotency, man can accomplish in breeding about anything that he wishes.
His part is one of selection. He chooses the individuals to be bred, and
Nature by her unerring laws does the rest.

Darwin says : " Although ,man does not cause variability and cannot
even prevent it, he can select, preserve and accumulate the variations given
to him by the hand of nature almost in any way which he chooses ; and thus
can produce a great result."

Again he says : " Selection may be followed either methodically and in-
tentionally, or unconsciously and unintentionally. Man may select and pre-
serve each successive variation, with the distinct intention of improving and
altering a breed, in accordance with a preconceived idea ; and by thus add-
ing up variations, often so slight as to be imperceptible by an uneducated
eye, he has effected wonderful changes and improvements. It can, also, be
clearly shown that man, without any intention or thought of improving the
breed, by preserving in each successive generation the individuals which he
prizes most, and by destroying the worthless individuals, slowly, though
surely, induces great changes. As the will of man thus comes into play, we
can understand how it is that domesticated breeds show adaptation to his
wants and pleasures. We can further understand how it is that domestic
races of animals and cultivated races of plants often exhibit an abnormal
character as compared with natural species ; for they have been modified
not for their own benefit, but for that of man."

John Fiske, in "Excursions of an Evolutionist," says: "The instances
are very numerous indeed in which variations and very marked ones, too
have been wrought in the characteristics of plants and animals through the
agency of man. The phenomena of variation presented by animals and
plants under domestication are so numerous and so complex that it would
require many volumes to describe them. Dogs, horses, pigs, cattle, sheep
rabbits, pigeons, poultry, silk-moths, cereal and culinary plants, fruits and
flowers innumerable have been reared and bred by man for many long ages,
some of them from time immemorial. These domesticated organisms
man has caused to vary, in one direction or another, to suit his natural or
artificial needs, or even the mere whim of his fancy. The variations, more-
over, which have thus been produced have been neither slight nor unimpor-
tant, and have been by no means confined to superficial characteristics.
Compare the thoroughbred race-horse with the gigantic London dray-horse
on the one hand, and the Shetland pony on the other ; or, among pigeons,



PREFACE vii

contrast the pouter with the fan-tail, the barb, the short-faced tumbler, or
the jacobin, all of which are historically known to have descended from one
and the same ancestral form. The differences extend throughout the whole
bony framework as well as throughout the muscular and nervous systems, and
exceed in amount the differences by which naturalists often adjudge species
to be distinct. Through what agency has man produced such results as
these ? He has produced them simply by taking advantage of a slight ten-
dency to variation which exists perpetually in all plants and animals, and
which exhibits itself in the simple fact that nowhere do we ever find any two
individuals exactly alike. Taking advantage of these individual variations,
the breeder simply selects the individuals which best suit his purpose, and
breeds them apart by themselves. The qualities for which they are selected
are propagated and enhanced through inheritance and renewed selection in
each succeeding generation, until by the slow accumulation of small differ-
ences a new race is formed. And thus we have peaches and almonds from
a common source, grapes to eat and grapes to make wine of, pointer dogs
and mastiffs, and so on throughout the list of cultivated plants and domesti-
cated animals."

It should not be forgotten that Nature herself is the great breeder, not
only entailing inheritances, or creating with prepotent force, but also making
her own selections through the great law of the survival of the fittest.

But if man can get what he breeds for it is very evident that he should
breed for the best. In late years the principal efforts of American breeders
of horses of the roadster class have been directed to produce the fastest
trotter or pacer. These efforts have been remarkably successful, but
certain results of form, style and uniformity have been largely overlooked
or sacrificed. It would seem to be full time when a higher aim should be
attempted. Not the fastest horse, but the best horse, should be the object of
breeding. For him who achieves this standard there will be abundance of
room. To meet this want THE MORGAN REGISTER has been established. Its
object, also, is to produce this horse as a type, so that in every colt we shall
be reasonably sure to get the horse we want. And the means used are what
are believed to be a necessary means for such result, a blood basis, which
will permit the great law of nature to operate, of "like producing like."

In this best horse constitution, form, style, disposition, intelligence
and beauty are all to be considered. A cheerful disposition for work is
very essential ; a truly satisfactory roadster needs no whip.

We have not in what we have written intended to diparage the great
quality of speed. The perfect horse should be the fastest horse. But
we should not accept speed, no matter how great, unless combined with
the other qualities essential to the perfect horse. It is, of course, more
difficult to produce all the desired qualities than a single one of them, but
it is easily within the great law of breeding, and therefore should be done.

In speed, too, as well as in superiority of form, style, intelligence and
beauty, the Morgan horse has always excelled. Because of it, in part, has
come his great reputation as a roadster ; and while perhaps a certain type



viii THE MORGAN HORSE

of Morgan horse might well be bred more fitted for draft than speed, and
another line might also be bred especially adapted to safe family use, the
fastest line of Morgan horses, we have no doubt, will continue, in the future
as in the past, to assert their superiority on the turf as well as on the road,
and the 2 :o8 of Lord Clinton in a race, we doubt not, will yet be reduced
to 2 :oo by a Morgan horse.

In preparing this work we have been very ably assisted by W. H. Bliss,
Esq., of Middlebury, Vermont. The work was begun with him in 1884, and
finds us still working together at its close. His excellent judgment as a
lawyer and eminent talent as a writer have been constantly at command,
and entered largely into the warp and woof of the book. We are also under
much obligation to the Hon. Chauncey Smith of Cambridge, Massachusetts,
one of the most eminent lawyers and clearest thinkers of the country,
for valuable counsel and advice.

We are also under special obligations to the "General Stud Book ", pub-
lished by the Messrs. Weatherbee of London, England, for information on
remote pedigrees, and other valuable historical matter. We have had occa-
sion to criticise their record of several American horses, that doubtless they
copied from American authorities, but as a whole their work appears to be
very carefully edited.

In Volume II. of THE MORGAN REGISTER, that is now very largely pre-
pared for the press, there will be hundreds of old-time Morgan sires that
do not appear in this volume. The arrangement will be in alphabetical
order, and all horses in this volume will be entered in that, and proper
reference made to the page on which they appear in this. In many cases
later or more extended information will appear of horses recorded in this
book. We shall also begin in Volume II. to record certain animals under
their dams, following in this the English, and, as we understand it, the
Arabian or oriental system of registration. Only the choicest of brood
mares will appear in this way, such as have proved most valuable from
their own quality or the character of their produce. A careful study of
the first volume of the English "General Stud Book", edition of 1891,
has convinced us that there is no system in which pedigrees can be so
accurately and concisely recorded, and so certainly traced, as this. In the
American system of separate record there are certain advantages, espe-
cially in giving the history of each animal, and in the greater facility in
which the record can be made, that make it desirable, as we think, to also
continue that system of recording.

Some of our friends have become impatient at the time consumed in
the preparation of this work, but to those who have ever undertaken
any similar work, or who understand its nature, this time will not seem long.
After nine years we bring the first volume to a close, with the second one
largely prepared. The preface to the first volume of the " General Stud Book "
shows that the collecting of pedigrees for that work began previous to 1791,
but the first volume was not published until 1808. Mr. Sanders D. Bruce,
editor of the "American Stud Book", states in the preface of his first volume,



PREFACE



IX



published in 1873, that more than twenty years had been taken in gathering
the information. Mr. Edgar, who published the first American stud book,
thus writes in his preface : " The compilation of a General Stud Book
in England has been one of immense labor, although that island is
a great deal smaller than this continent. Notwithstanding difficulties I
have attempted the completion of a work which has been begun by others,
who at last abandoned it as a piece of fruitless and unprofitable labor". He
then suggests that after many years of indefatigable study and anxious ob-
servation he has " at last brought the work to a close," and adds : " Many
are the works of human industry which to begin and finish are hardly ever
granted to the same person. He that undertakes the compilation of an
American Stud Book undertakes that which if it comprehends the fullest ex-
tent of his designs, he knows himself unable to perform, because perfection
is unattainable by man, though he may make nearer and nearer approaches
to it." And again, in the valedictory he says : " The compiler begs leave to
remind his fellow-citizens that no less than twelve gentlemen have attempted
this Herculean task and failed, and that he is the first who has succeeded in
bringing the result of his labors before the public. The past eighteen years
have been entirely devoted to travelling in various sections of the United
States, and in carrying on an extensive correspondence with gentlemen
throughout this country as well as in Europe. * * * and the matter con-
tained in the foregoing pages as well as in the second volume is the result ".
It will therefore be seen that standard works of this kind, if carefully
prepared from original sources, have always required many years in their
preparation. In our own work these years have been reduced by the assist-
ance of many competent helpers, to whom, and to all who have aided us in
obtaining information, we would here return our hearty thanks.

JOSEPH BATTELL.
BREAD LOAF INN, RIPTON, VERMONT, )
March i, 1894. j



viii THE MORGAN HORSE

of Morgan horse might well be bred more fitted for draft than speed, and
another line might also be bred especially adapted to safe family use, the
fastest line of Morgan horses, we have no doubt, will continue, in the future
as in the past, to assert their superiority on the turf as well as on the road,
and the 2 :o8 of Lord Clinton in a race, we doubt not, will yet be reduced
to 2 :oo by a Morgan horse.

In preparing this work we have been very ably assisted by W. H. Bliss,
Esq., of Middlebury, Vermont. The work was begun with him in 1884, and
finds us still working together at its close. His excellent judgment as a
lawyer and eminent talent as a writer, have been constantly at command,
and entered largely into the warp and woof of the book. We are also under
much obligation to the Hon. Chauncey Smith of Cambridge, Massachusetts,
one of the most eminent lawyers and clearest thinkers of the country,
for valuable counsel and advice.

We are also under special obligations to the "General Stud Book ", pub-
lished by the Messrs. Weatherbee of London, England, for information on
remote pedigrees, and other valuable historical matter. We have had occa-
sion to criticise their record of several American horses, that doubtless they
copied from American authorities, but as a whole their work appears to be
very carefully edited.

In Volume II. of THE MORGAN REGISTER, that is now very largely pre-
pared for the press, there will be hundreds of old-time Morgan sires that
do not appear in this volume. The arrangement will be in alphabetical
order, and all horses in this volume will be entered in that, and proper
reference made to the page on which they appear in this. In many cases
later or more extended information will appear of horses recorded in this
book. We shall also begin in Volume II. to record certain animals under
their dams, following in this the English, and, as we understand it, the
Arabian or oriental system of registration. Only the choicest of brood
mares will appear in this way, such as have proved most valuable from
their own quality or the character of their produce. A careful study of
the first volume of the English "General Stud Book", edition of 1891,
has convinced us that there is no system in which pedigrees can be so
accurately and concisely recorded, and so certainly traced, as this. In the
American system of separate record there are certain advantages, espe-
cially in giving the history of each animal, and in the greater facility in
which the record can be made, that make it desirable, as we think, to also
continue that system of recording.

Some of our friends have become impatient at the time consumed in
the preparation of this work, but to those who have ever undertaken
any similar work, or who understand its nature, this time will not seem long.
After nine years we bring the first volume to a close, with the second one
largely prepared. The preface to the first volume of the " General Stud Book "
shows that the collecting of pedigrees for that work began previous to 1791,
but the first volume was not published until 1808. Mr. Sanders D. Bruce,
editor of the "American Stud Book", states in the preface of his first volume,



PREFACE ix

published in 1873, that more than twenty years had been taken in gathering
the information. Mr. Edgar, who published the first American stud book,
thus writes in his preface : " The compilation of a General Stud Book
in England has been one of immense labor, although that island is
a great deal smaller than this continent. Notwithstanding difficulties I
have attempted the completion of a work which has been begun by others,
who at last abandoned it as a piece of fruitless and unprofitable labor". He
then suggests that after many years of indefatigable study and anxious ob-
servation he has " at last brought the work to a close," and adds : " Many
are the works of human industry which to begin and finish are hardly ever
granted to the same person. He that undertakes the compilation of an
American Stud Book undertakes that which if it comprehends the fullest ex-
tent of his designs, he knows himself unable to perform, because perfection
is unattainable by man, though he may make nearer and nearer approaches



Online LibraryJoseph BattellThe Morgan horse and register → online text (page 1 of 119)