Joseph Campbell.

Sermons by the late Joseph Campbell, D.D., of the Synod of New Jersey : with a memoir by the Rev. John Gray, A.M., of Easton, Pa online

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SERMONS



BY THE LATE



JOSEPH CAMFBBLL^ D. D.



SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY.



WITH A MExMOIR



REV. J O II iV GRAY, A. IW.

OF EAsro.v, r-A.



B E L V I D E R E, N. J.
1612.



V-;



CONTENTS.



PREFACE.

MEMOIR OF Dr. CAMPBELL,

SERMON I.
WHAT GOD IS.

Canst thou by searching find cut God] Canst thou find out the Al-
mighty unto perfection] — Jobxi-7, ...... 1

SERMON II.

WHAT CHRIST IS.
What think ye of Christi— 3fa«/te«J xxii. 42, . - . - 9

SERMON IJI.
CHRIST LIFTED UP.

And I, if I be lifled up from the earth, will draw all men unto me. —
John xn. 32, 18



SERMON IV.
ON DIVORCE.

When a man hath taken a wife, and married her, and it come to pass
tliut she find no favor in his eyes, becau.«e he hath tuund some un-
cleaiiness in her; then iet tiim uritt her a bill of divorcement, and
give it in her hand, and send her out of his house. — Deuteronomy
xxiv, 1, 27

SERMON V.



THE WOMAN OF CANAAN.

Then came she and worshipped him, saying. Lord help me. — Mat-
thew XV. 25, 39



SERMON VI.

THE BACKSLinER.

Tliine own wickedness shall correct thee, and thy backslidings shall
reprove thee: know therelbre, and see, that it is an evil tiling and
bitter, that thou hast foisaken the Lord thy God, and that my lear
is not in thee, saiih the J.ord God ot liosts. — Jerendak ii. 19, .. 46

SERMON VII.

THE SOURCES OF CHRISTLAN COMFORT.

Comfort ye, comfort ye my people, saith your Go(\.— Isaiah xl. 1, 56

SERMON Vill.

ON THE LORD'S SUPPER.

And when he had given th.mks, he brake if, and said. Take, eat; this
is my body, which is bnd^en for you: this do in remembrance of
me,— 1 Corinthians xi. 24, 65



SERMON IX.



UNITY IN THE FAITH.



That tlipy all may be one; as thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee,
that they also may be one in us; llial tlie world may believe that
thou hast seat me. — Jukn x\ii. '21, - - '- - - - 74



SERMON X.

THE CHRISTIAN'S ANCHOR.

Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and steai-
faiit, and which enleretli into that within the vail. — Hebrews vi. 19, 83

SERMON XI.

DANGER OF SINNING AFTER BEING MADE WHOLE.

Afterward Jesus findeth him in the temple; and said unto him, Be-
hold, thou art made whole; sin no more, lest a worse thin;^ come
unto ihee.— John v. 14, 91

SERMON XII.
THE GOSPEL A LAW OF LIBERTY.

Bat whoso lookelh into the perfect law of liberty? and continuevh
therein, he beino^ not a forgetful hearer, but a doerof tiie wutd,lhis
man shall be blfessed in his deed.— James i. 25, - - - - 101

SERMON XIII.
THE EXCELLENCE AND INFLUENCE OF TIIE BIBLE.

The law of thy mouth is better unto mc, than thousands of gold and
silver. — I'salms cxix. 7'2, 109



VI CO\TE\TS.

SERMON XIY.
THE GOSPEL THE WISDOM OF GOD.

Howbeit we speak wisdom among' tliem that are perfect; yet nqt the
wisdom of this world, nor of the princes of this world, that come
to nouo-ht; but we speak the wisdom of God in a mystery, even the
hidden wisdom, which God ordained before the world unto our
glory. — 1 Corinthians ii. 6, 7, - - - - - ♦ - US

SERMON XV.
CHRIST'S SHEEP OBEY CHRIST'S VOICE.

My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me. —
Joh7i X. 27, 127

SERMON XVL
ON CHASTITY.

There is none grea;ter in this house than I; neither hath he kept back
any thinfj from me but thee, because thou art his wife: how then
can I do this great wickedness, and sin against God! — Genesis
xxx'ix. 9, 137

SERMON XVII.

HEARING AND SEEING.

Verily, Verily, J say unto you, the hour is coming, and now is, when
the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God; and they that hear
ehall live. — fu/in v. 25, 146

SERMON XVIII.

I^IORTAL LIFE.

Thou carries! them away as with a flood; thoy are as a sleep: in the
morning they are like grass which growelh vp.—Psahns xc. 5, - 155



tO.NTKXTS. Ml

SERMON XIX.

GOSPEL FRIENDSHIP.

A friend loveth at all limes, and a brother is born for adversity.— Pro-
vcrf/s .':vii. 17, 104

SERMON XX.

MESSIAH'S REIGN.

They shall not hurt nor destroy in all my holy mountain: for the
earth shall be full of the knowledge of ihe Lord, as the waters cover
the sea..— Isaiah xi. 9, ' - . . 174

SERMON XXI.

THE SACRED FIRE.

The fire shall ever be burning upon the altar; it shall never go out.
— Leviticus vi. 13, ...... - - 182

vSERMON XXII.
THE KING OF, THE KINGDOM.

Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jew?! for we have seen
his star in the east, and are come to worship him.— Matthew ii. 2, 193

SERMON XXIII.

ZEAL.

Not slothful in business; fervent in spirit; serving the Lord.— i?o-
mans \u. 11, «... 203



VI II CO X TEXTS.

SERMON XAIV.

THE PROPER. SUBJECTS AND MODE OF CHRISTIAN .
BAPTISM.

Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizinsf them in the nan^e of
the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost; teachinsr them
to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and lo, I
am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen. — Mut-
thctc xxviii. 19, 2U, 212

SERMON XXV.

THE GROANING CREATION DELIVERED.

And not only they, but ourselves al?o, which have the first-fruits of
the Spirit, even \va ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for
the a(ioption, to wit, the redemption of our body.— Roniajis viii. 23, 227

SERMON XXVI.
PARTS OF GOD'S WAYS.

Lo these arc parts of his ways, but how little a portion is heard of
him] but tiic thunder of his povver wiiocan understand! — iob xxvi. 14, 2H4

SERMON XXVII.
THE GOOD MAN.

For he was a good man, and full of the Holy Ghost, and of faith: and
much people was added unto the Lord.— Ac/s xi. 24, - - - 243

SERMON XXVIII.

ON THE RESURRECTION.

But now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the first-fruits of
them that slept.— 1 Corinthians xv. 20, 2.'j0



CONTKiVTS. IX

SERMON XXIX.

THE VOICE OF THE NEW YEAR.

Whereas ye know not what shall be on the morrow: for what is your
life'? It is even a vapor, that appearcth for a little time, and then
vanisheth away.— James iv. 14, 259

SERMON XXX.

CAUSE AND CURE OF THE ERRONEOUS OPINIONS
CONCERNING CHRIST.

When Jesus came into the coasts of Cesarea Philippi, he asked hia
disciples, sayintj, who do men say that I, the Son of man, am! And
they said, Some say that thou art John the Baptist; some, Elias;
and others, Jeremias, or one of the prophets. He sailh unto them,
But who say ye that I am? And Simon Peter answered and said,
Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God. And Jesus answered
and said unto him, Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-jona: for flesh and
blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in
heaven. — Matthew xvi. 13, 17, - - 266

SERMON XXXI.
LECTURE ON THE PURITY OF THE SCRIPTURES, - - 279

SERMON XXXIl.

THE PRODIGAL.

And he said, A certain man had two sons: And the younger of them
said to his father, Father, give me the portion of goods that falleth
to me. And he divided unto them his living. And not many days
after, the younger son gathered all together, and took his journey

into a far country, &ic.— Luke xv. 11, 21, 285

2



X CONTK.ITS.

SERMON XXXI 1 1.

THE CHRISTIAN A MAN OF PEACE.

Depart from evil, ami do good; seek peace, and pursue it. — Psalm
xxiv. 14, 296

SERMON XXXIV.

GROWTH OF GRACE IN THE HEART.

And he said, So is the kinj^dom of God, as if a man should cast seed
into the ground; And should sleep, and rise night and day, and the
seed should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how. For the
earth hringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear,
after that the full corn in the ear. But when the fruit is brought
forth, immediately he putteth in the sickle, because the harvest is
come— Mark iv. 26, 29, 305

SERMON XXXV.

TRUE AND COUNTERFEIT RELIGION.

Whosoever cometh to me, and heareth my sayings, and doeth them, I
vvill show you to whom he is like: He is like a man which built an
house, and digged deep, and laid the foundation on a rock; and
when the flood arose, the stream beat vehemently upon that house,
and CLuld not shake it; for it was founded upon a rock. But he that
heareth, and doeth not, is like a man that, without a foundation,
built an house upon tlie earth; against which the stream did beat
vehemently, and immediately it fell; and the ruin of that house
was great.— LuAe vi. 47, 49, 312

SERMON XXXVI.

GODLINESS AND ITS ADVANTAGES.

For bodily exercise profitelh little; but godliness is profitable unto all
things, having promise of the life that now is, and of that which is
to come.— 1 Timothy iv. 8, 320



SERMON XXXVII.

THE NECESSITY AND MEANS FOR A REVIVAL OF
RELIGION.

Wilt thou not revive us ajrain, that tliy people n^ay rejoice in thee.—
Pnalin Ixxxv. 6, '^^^



SERMON XXXVIII.
GOD'S FAVOR WITH ITS FRUITS AND EFFECTS.

I will be as the dew unto Israel: he shall jrrow as the lily, and cast
forth his roots as Lebanon. His branches shall spread, and his
beauty shall be as the olive-tree, and his smell as Lebanon. They
that dwell under his shadow shall return; they shall revive as the
corn, and grow as the vine: the scent thereof shall be as the wine
of Lebanon. — Hosea xiv. o, 7, - - - - - - * '^'^^

SERMON XXXIX.

WHO IS MY NEIGHB0R1

But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my
neighbor! — Luke x. 29, ..-.. - - 346

SERMON XL.

INFLUENCE OF GOD'S WORD ON NATIONAL CHA-
RACTER.

I the Lord have called thee in righteousness, and will hold thine hand,
and will keep thee, and give thee for a covenant of tiie people, fur
a light of the Gentiles. — /s«t«/i xlii. G, 13.35



XU CON'TEXTS.

SERMON XLI.

THE REVELATION OF THE JUDGMENT DAY.

For God shall bring' every work into judgment, with every secret
thing, whether it be good, or whether it be evil. — Ecclesiastes
xii. 14, 364

SERMON XLII.
INFLUENCE OF RELIGION ON THE AFFECTIONS.

And they said one to another, Did not our heart burn within us, while
he talked with us by the way, and while he opened to us the scrip-
tures?— LwAe xxiv. 32, - . 373

SERMON XLIII.

THE REASONS OF THE UNPROFITABLENESS OF
PREACHING.

Now in this that I declare unto you I praise you not, that ye come to-
gether not for the better, but for the worse.— 1 Corinthians xi. 17, 381

SERMON XLIV.

FRUITS OF THE SPIRIT.

And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the first-fruits of
the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for
the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body. — Romans viii. 23, 391

SERMON XLV.

MANNER AND IMPORTANCE OF SEEKING GOD.

When thou saidst. Seek ye my face; my heart said unto thee. Thy
face, Lord, will I seek.— Psalm xxv'il. 8, 400



CONTEXTS. XIU

SERMON XLVI.

THE REASONS WHY MEN PKRISH.

Multitudes, multitudes in the valley of decision: for the day of the
Lord is near in the valley of decision.— JofZ iii. 11, - - - 408

SERMON XLYII.
THE SHUTTING OF HEAVEN'S DOOR.

And while they went to buy, the bridegroom came; and they that
were ready went in with him to the marriage: and the door was
shut— Matthew xxv. 10, 415

SERMON XLVill.

JESUS CHRIST IMMUTABLY THE SAME.

Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to-day, and for ever.—HebrewK
xiii. 8, 421

SERMON XLIX.

HINDRANCES TO THE GOSPEL AND THEIR RE-
MOVAL.

Finally, brethren, pray for us, that the word of the Lord may have
free course, and be glorified, even as it is with you.— 2 Tlirssalo-
nians lii. 1, , 432

SERMON L.
ORDINATION AND INSTALLATION, 445



PREFACE.



I.\ the following sheets, a good man "being dead yet spcak-
elh." He redelivers, as it were, the message of his IMastcr;
and yet not he, at least in such a sense as to make him account-
able to the critic, for it is most probable that he never intended
to give one of these sermons to the public in this form, while it is
certain that he would not have done it without a careful and
thorough revision. Neither was the publication advised by llie
gentlemen who, amidst a multitude of arduous and pressing avo-
cations, made thie selections. These things are said, not to apo-
logize, nor to deprecate Christian criticism, for the sermons are
at rn^.e able and orthodox; but to place the publication before
the community in its true light, and on its proper basis.

While it was hoped that these sermons might be instrumental,
under God, to deepen impressions already produced on the hearts
and consciences of many to whom Dr. Campbell ministered; to



develope ihe latent principle of grace already Implanted; to lead
some, who remained unaffected under the living ministry, to
Jesus Christ, by addressing them, as it were, by a voice from
the dead; to keep the memory of "a good man and a just" green
in the hearts of his friends, and hand down his likeness, physical*
moral and mental, to their seed after them; it was also hoped,
and fondly desired, that some pecuniary profit might accrue from
it for the support of a family of little orphans to whom he was
tenderly attached. His only daughter was the widow of a
clergyman, who in dying left her the legacy of four orphans, and
left her nothing else except the savor of a good name. This
widowed daughter and her four orphans, to whom God had pro-
mised to be a husband and a father on the very day and mo-
ment when he took their earthly one, had become the peculiar
charge of Dr. Campbell. Indeed, God fulfilled his promise by
attaching this good man to them with a tenderness and strength
of affection rarely equalled, perhaps never exceeded. When he
fell, their earthly staff was broken! they were in a double mourn-
ing — they lost, at once, their parent and provision! At the mo-
ment of his death too. Dr. Campbell ceased from two of his most
interesting works, preaching Christ, and supporting this orphan
family. Hence this publication. It was thought and hoped that
by this means he might prolong his twofold labor of love — give a
crust to his orphan church and children!

Here, then, we have fully, and unreservedly unfolded the mo-
tives which induced the publication of this volume; but whether
they will justify the act is not for us either to know or say.
This much, however, we do know, and therefore say it, that
any effort, honestly and disinterestedly made to supply the needy
with the bread of life, and lend a little to the Lord by giving to
his own poor, will be regarded with kindness by a wise man, if



not warmly seconded by a good one. Surely, none but the
hand of an enemy will uncover the nakedness of a work done in
such a cause, and emanating from such a motive.

That this volume may, to some extent, be owned and blessed
by our divine Master, to the promotion of his own cause on
earih, is the prayer, as the hope is the sole i^ecompense, of those
who have prepared it lor the public.



A BRIEF MEMOIR



JOSEFH CAMPBELL, D. D.



A MOST striking sentiment, in one of the most masterly ora-
tions* of the age is, that at the founding of this nation "a com-
mittee of the world" presided! Not only that every country gave
of her materials to constitute the social fabric of American so-
ciety, but that the embodied genius and wisdom of all the earth
sat, representatively, in judgment, in selecting the elements and
disposing of the materials of which this last, though not least of
the great nations of the earth was composed.

On this principle, we may at once anticipate, and account for
a national greatness to which few, if any other people, have ever
arrived. Not only was there the admixture of dilFerent races,
with all the physiological and philosophical advantages resulting
therefrom, but in this forming process there were some of the
greatest and most gifted of the inhabitants of every civilized
country on earth. Not only was it composed, to a large extent
of the best races of the human family, but of the best specimens



* A dit-coursc on the formation and dcvelopcment of the American mind,
delivered before the literary societiepof Lafayette College at Easton, Pa,,
by the Rev. Robert J. Breckinridge, D. D.



XX MEMOIR or

of their respective kinds. Nor was this all, for as a natural and
necessary result of the above, not only were the most valuable
usages, culled from the experience of all other people, secured to
us, but the preponderating influence of the good and the valuable,
hke the rod of Aaron swallowing up the rods of Pharaoh's ma-
gicians, destroyed the foolish and vicious usages peculiar toother
countries.

In the earlier periods of immigration into this country, the un-
dertaking, from a concurrence of various causes, was one of dif-
ficulty and adventure; and the character of those who sur-
mounted the obstacles was, consequently, in keeping with the
nature of the enterprize. Jt required more means to meet the
expenses of the voyage and subsequent settlement, and as, a
general fact, the original immigrants were of a higher class as it
regarded wealth. The undertaking too, ^vas one of apparently
greater peril, requiring greater effort and more mental resources
than in subsequent periods; and consequently, the early immi-
grants were of a higher class as it regarded education, general
intelligence, and enterprize. And more than this, during the
revolutionary struggle, and the period immediately subsequent to
it, such was the rampant and rancorous virulence, and the un-
tiring and sleepless opposition of the European oligarchy to the
progress of that omnipotent principle that had armed an unknown
and feeble people, and nmde them victorious against the most
powerful and heroic nation on earth, that none from the eastern
side of the Atlantic looked upon this country with feelings of ap-
probation, except those who were deeply imbued with the spirit
of liberty. Few, at that time, had power to arise and brave the
monarchial influence wliich surrounded them as an atmosphere;
and few, if any, dared expose themselves to the perils, priva-
tions, and expenses, incident to the enterprize of emigration, ex-
cept those in whose hearts the love of freedom co-existed with
great resolves and noble purposes.

In some of the European nations, as it regarded the champion-
ship of liberty, "there were giants" in those days, and in none
were tlieie niore or greater, in proportion, than in Ireland;
among the descendants of those bravo and virtuous Scotch sires,



DH. CAMlRF.r,!,. XXI

who for llbcvt}' of conscience had left Ihcir country under ihe
reign of the silly and treacherous James. That imbecile and
unprincipled pedant while in Scotland pledged himself to sup-
port Presbyterianism, but no sooner had he ascended the English
throne than he renounced and persecuted Presbytery and sup-
ported Prelacy, giving as his reason, and perhaps as good and
true a reason as could be given, the royal maxim "no bishop, no
king." This vain and villainous prince had, no doubt, learned bv
experience, that the soil of Presbyterianism, though it nurtured
liberty, was fatal to the growth of tyranny; that of all religious
sj'stems, because peculiarly Biblical, it was necessarily the fore-
most and most efficient insupporting the doctrine of equal rights;
and hence when he desired to increase the prerogative of the
crown at the expense of the power of the people, he renounced
Presbytery and advocated Prelacy! The result was, that the
attempt to force prelacy or spiritual monarchy upon the people,
forced many of the people out of the countr}'. By this means,
some of the best and bravest of the Scotch Presbyterians went
over the channel and settled in the north of Ireland. These were
the men who held all earthly good as subordinate to libcrtv and
especially the liberty of conscience. The descendants of such
men were likely to be a race, that would follow freedom at all
hazards and in dispite of all opposition, into all the eaith. In ac-
cordance with this we find that, during the earlier period of our
republic, the mass of the enlightened protestant immii/ration from
[reland into this country, was Presbyterian, the descendants of
the very men who had, in their day, left their country for liberty
and religion. The sons, true to the princi])les of their noble sires,
embraced the first opportunity of displaying the love of freedom
which they inherited, by leaving the land of their parents adop-
tion for another, and that too from the same motive which had
expatriated their fathers, namely, because it offered more liberty.
Such then were the men, to some extent, by whom this land was
peopled; and such were the principles of tlie original sires of the
Presbyterian population of these United States;— men, not mere-
ly republicans and Americans, because, forsooth, they were born
here; but men, who possessing souls instinct with the spirit of



xxii MEMoui or

light and liberty, did deliberately and in the prime of manhood
make choice of it as their home, because it was the home of
freedom. Such men were indeed foreif^ners as it regarded their
physical nature, inasnuich as they were born in another spot of
God's earth, but there was nothing foreign in their hearts or
principles; — they were natives in regard to all that pertains to
man's nobler functions,— their native air was the breath of free-
don^, and wlierevcr freedom's breezes blew, there their spirits
found a hom(;!

A man m;iy be horn in a land, with the great moral and po-
litical principles of which, when he arrives at the years of men-
tal maturity, he has little, if any, sympathy. He may grow up,
without his knowledge or volition, in circumstances which he
repudiates, or lightly regards; but how will such men, though born
on the soil, compare, in point of every thing that contributes to
a nation's greatness, with the man of education and intelligence,
who in the strength of manhood looks over the earth and delib-
erately chooses, as his future habitation, the land in which exists
the greatest amount of freedom, and brings to it his character
and talents and love of liberty; while for it, he forsakes the home
of his childhood with all the long cherished aflfections and endear-
ed associations which have become interwoven with his very
nature! The one may be an Arnold, the other a Lafayette, and
a Washington will know how to distinguish and appreciate them.

To illustrate these sentiments we would refer the reader to
some of the men most distinguished during the period of the na-
tion's need; the men who were most sagacious in counsel, most
eloquent in debate, or bravest on the field of battle. We would
point to such men as Charles Thompson, the first Secretary of
Congress — a man venerable at once for his piety, principles and
learning, who by birth was a countryman of the subject of this
memoir, but in heart and spirit and action, an American. We
would refer to Alexander Hamilton, the first Secretary of the
Treasury — a man brave in battle, and profound as well as clo-
(|uent in debate; confessedly one of the first among the fore-
most men, thrown up by the political earthquake which con-
vulsed the continent, and produced the great struggle which has



im. CAMl'IiKI.L. XXIll

shaken to some extent, the "greater part of the earth! We would
refer to the great and good Withcr.spoon, one of the most distin-
guished of the pre-eminently wise men who enlightened and gui-
ded our counsels in the dark noon of our political night! We
would refer to Kosciusco, the brave Pole whose fame and char-
acter belong to the world — known and read of all nations and
kindred and people on earth, wherever the muse of history keeps
a record of great men and heroic deeds; — to him, of whom it is
so eloquently written

"That Freedom shrieked when Kosciusco fell!"

We would refer to the brave Barry, one of the first Commo-
dores in the service of the Republic; who performed feats of he-
roism, equal to any other for wisdom and political w



Online LibraryJoseph CampbellSermons by the late Joseph Campbell, D.D., of the Synod of New Jersey : with a memoir by the Rev. John Gray, A.M., of Easton, Pa → online text (page 1 of 42)