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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES




The Mot4ntainy Singer



By SEOSAMH AfAcCATHMHAO/L




BOSTON

THE FOUR SEAS COMPANY

I919



Copyright, ipip, by
The Four Seas Company



The Four Seas Press
Boston, Mass., U. S. A.






A Line's A Speech

A lute s a speech;

So here's a line

To say this pedlar's pack

Of rnitie

Is not a boon —

But a journey through

Mount amy places.

Ever in vievj

Of the sea and the fields,

IVith the rough ivind

Bloiuing over the leagues

Behind!



626125



Contents



page

I AM THE MOUNT AINY SINGER 1 \

WHEN ROOKS FLY HOMEWARD 13

1 SPIN MY GOLDEN WEB 14

CHERRY VALLEY 15

DARKNESS 16

MY FIDIL IS SINGING 17

THE GOAT-DEALER 18

WHY CRUSH THE CLARET ROSE 19
LAMENT OF PADRAIC MOR CRUIMIN OVER HIS SONS 20

TO A TOWN GIRL 23

A MARCH MOON 24

A THOUSAND FEET UP 25

THE DARK 26

REYNARDINE 28

SNOW 29

I AM THE GILLY OF CHRIST 30

GO, PLOUGHMAN, PLOUGH 32

GO. REAPER 33

THE GOOD PEOPLE 34
THE STORM IS STILL. THE RAIN HATH CEASED 35

SCARE-THE-CROWS 36

A CRADLE-SONG 37

TWINE THE MAZES THRO' AND THRO' 39

A FIGHTING MAN 40

MY MOTHER HAS A WEE RED SHOE Al



fagc

BY A WONDROUS MYSTERY 44

I GATHER THREE EARS OF CORN 4fr

THE TINKERS 48

AS I CAME OVER THE GREY. GREY HILLS 49

A NORTHERN LOVE-SONG 50

TO THE GOLDEN EAGLE 51

A PROPHECY 52

1 MET A WALKING-MAN 54

THE NINEPENNY FIDIL 55-

GRASSLANDS ARE FAIR 57

WINTER SONG 58-

I FOLLOW A STAR 59

THE SILENCE OF UNLABOURED FIELDS 60-

THE BEGGAR'S WAKE 61-

THE BESOM-MAN 67 ■

EVERY SHUILER IS CHRIST 70

I WISH AND I WISH 7 J

I AM THE MAN-CHILD 12

FRAGMENT 74

AT THE WHITENING OF THE DAWN 75

WHO ARE MY FRIENDS 76

GLORIOUS CHILD-BEARER 77
CORONACH ' 78
TWILIGHT FALLEN 79
THE DAWN V/HITENE3S 80
THE DV/ARF 81

1 SEE ALL LOVE IN LOWLY THINGS 8>
TIS PRETTY TAE BE IN BAILE-LIOSAN 84



fage

CIARAN. MASTER OF HORSES AND LAND 86

DEEP WAYS AND DRIPPING BOUGHS 67

NIGHT. AND 1 TRAVELLING ^ 68

NIGHT PIECE ' 89

AT MORNING TIDE ^0

THE MAY-FIRE 91

I LOVE THE DIN OF BEATING DRUMS 93

THREE COLTS EXERCISING IN A SIX-ACRE 94

THE NATURAL 95^

ON THE TOP-STONE 96

THE WOMEN AT THEIR DOORS 97

MY LITTLE DARK LOVE 99

I HEARD A PIPER PIPING 101

THE CLOUDS GO BY AND BY 102

DAVY DAW 103

BLACK SILE OF THE SILVER EYE 107

A SHEEPDOG BARKS ON THE MOUNTAIN 109

DEAD OAKLEAVES EVER YV/HERE 110

A NIGHT PRAYER 1 1 1

1 AM THE MOUNTAINY SINGER 112

THE RAINBOW SPANNING A PLANET SHOWER 113

I WILL GO WITH MY FATHER A-PLOUGHING 1 14

THE SHINING SPACES OF THE SOUTH 1 1 6

LIKE A TUFT OF CEANABHAN 1 1 7

THE HERB-LEECH 118

WHO BLTyS LAND 120

THE POET LOOSED A WINGED SONG 12i

SIC TRANSIT 123-



The Mountainy Singer



/ Am the Moiaitainy Singer

I am tKe mountainy singer —

Tke voice of tne J)easant s dream.

Tlic cry oi tne wind on tne wooded nil',

TKe leaf) of tKe fisK m tKe stream.

Quiet and love I sing —
TKe earn on tKe mountain crest,
TKe cailm in Ker lover s arms.
TKe cKild at its motKer s treast.



Beauty end f)cace 1 sing —
TKe iire on tKe ot)en KeartK,
TKe cailleacK sf)]nning at Ker wKeel,
TKe f)lougK m tKe broken eartK.

Travail and fjam I sing —
TKe bride on tKe cKildmg bed.
TKe darlc man laboring at Kis rKymes,
TKe ewe in tKe lembmg sKed.

Sorrow and deatK I sing —
TKe canker come on tKe corn,

11



1 ke nsner lost in tke mountain lock,
Tke cry at tke moutk of morn.

No otker life I sing.
For I am 8f>rung of tke stock
1 kat broke tke killy land for kread.
And kuilt tke nest in tke rock!



12



When Rooks Fly
Momeward

When rooks fly komevvard
Ana snaaows fall.
vVnen roses fold
On the nay-yard wall,
Wnen Llmd motks flutter
J3y door and tree,
J. Ken comes the quiet
Of Christ to me.

W^nen stars look out
On tKe Ckildren's Patk
And grey mists gatker
On earn and ratk.
VVken nigkt is one
vVitk tke brooding sea.
1 ken comes tke quiet
Of Ckrist to me.



13



/ spin My Golden Web

I st)in my golden wet m the sun:
Tke ckerries trcmtle. tke ligkt is done.
A. suJden wind sweeps over the bay.
And carries my golden web away !



14



1



Cherry Valley

In CKerry Valley tKe ekerries tlow:
The valley JjatKs are wKite as snow.

And in tkeir time witk clusters red
1 ke scented kougks are crimsoned.

Even now tke moon is looking tkrougk
Tke glimmer of tke koney dew.

A petal tremkles to tke grass,
rke feet of fairies f)as8 and J)ass.

By thern, I know, all keauty comes
1 o me, a kakitan of slums.

I sing no rune. I say no line:
Tke gift of second sigkt is mine !



15



Darkness

DarKiiess.

I stoj) to watch a star snme m tne DOg-nole —
A. star no longer, but a silver ribbon of lignt.
I look at it, and f)ass on.



16



My Fiddle is Singing

My fiddle is singing
Into tne air ;
Tne wind is stirring.
The moon is lair.

A shadow wanders
Along tne road;
It stof>s to listen.
And drops its load.

Dreams for a sf)ace
lJ|)on the moon,
Tnen J>asses, nummmg
My mountain tune.



17



The Goat Dealer

Did you see tne goat-aealer
All m nis jacket-green?
I met nim on tne rocKy road
Xwixt tnis ana Baile-aoinn.

A nunarea nannies ran berore.
Ana a sne-aes Denma.
Tnen tne old wanderer nimselr.
Burnt red witn sun and wind.

He gave me tne time-a-day
And doitered over tne Kill.
Wallo{)ing kis gay asnj)lant
And snouting nis nil,

I tKmk I hear Kim yet.
TKo it s a giant s cry
From wKere I Kailed Kim nrst.
Standing uj) to tKe sKy.

Is tKat Puck Green I see beyond?
It is, and tKe stir is tKere.
By tKe Koly Kat, I Know tKen —
He's making for Puck Fair!

18



Why Crush the Claret Rose

Wky crusK tKe claret rose

Tliat Wows

So rarely on the tree?

WKerefore tke enmity, dear girl.

Betwixt tke rose and thee?

Art tkou not fair enougk

Witk tkat dark keauty given tkee.

Tkat tkou must crusk tke rose

Tkat klows

So rarely on tke tree!



19



Lament of Padraic Mor
mac Cruimin over his Sons

1 am Paaraic iVIor mac Cruimm.
Son of Domknall of tlie Skroud,
1 ij)er, like my kind Lcfore me.
To the nousenold of Macleod.

Death IS m the seed of Cruimin—
All my music is a wail;
Early graves await the f>oets
And the fujbers of tne Gael.

Samhain gleans tixQ golden karvests
Duly m tneir tide and time.
But my Dody s fruit is blasted
Barely J>ast tne Bealtem Jjrime.

Cetnlcnn claims the fairest iigliters
ritly for ner own, ner own,
But my seven sons are stricken
Where no tattle-f i^e is blown.

Flowers of tlie forest fallen
On f be sliding summ.er stream—

20



Lignt and liie and love are witn me.
Then are vanished into dream.

Berried DraRcncs or tne rowan
Rined in tne wizard wind-
Clan and generation leave me,
Lonely on the heath behind.

Who will soothe a father s sorrow
When his seven sons are gone?
>Vho will watch him in his sleefimg (
Who will walte him at the dawn?

Seven sons are taken from me
In the eomf)ass of a year;
Every bone is hose within me.
All my blood is w^hite with fear.

Seven youths of brawn and beauty

Movilder m their mountain bed,

\Jp m storied Inis-Scathach

Wkere their fathers reaf.ed their bread.

Nevermore ufson the mountain.
Nevermore m fair or field.

21



ohall ye see tnc seven cnam|)ion8
Of the silver-mantled sKield.

I will play tlie "Cumhadh na Cloinne,"
Wildest of tke rowtk of tunes
Gatnered ty tke love of mortal
t rom tne olden druid runes.

Wail ye ! NigKt is on tke water ;
Wind and wave are roaring loud —
Caotne for tke fallen ckildren
Q)i tke pipQT of MacLeod.



22



To A Town Girl

Violet mystery.
Ringleted gold.
Wkiteness of wkiteness,
WKerefore so cold?

Silent you sit there-
Spirit and mould-
Darkening tke dream
Tkat must never be told!



2a



A March Moon

A. iVIarcn moon
Over the mountain crest,
Ceanabhcn blowing:
rier neck and breast.

Arbutus berries
On the tree bead;
Her moutb oi {>assion.
i^ewy and red.

Cold as cold
And hot as kot,
one loves me ....
And Sne loves me not !



24



A Thousand Feet Up

A thousand reet uj) : twilight.
Westwaras, a clum|) or nr-trces silnouetted

against a bank or blvie cumulus cloua;
1 nc June afterglow like a sea behma.
1 lie movintain trail, white ana clear wliere numan

leet nave worn it. zigzagging nighcr ana nigner

till it loses itselr m tne soutnern skyline.
A. {)atcn of young corn to my rignt nana, swaying

and swaying continuously, tno hardly an air stirs.
A. lalcon wheeling oveiheed.

Tk



le moon rising.



1 he dam|) smell of the nignt m my nostrils.

kills, O kills.

To you I lift mine eyes !

1 kneel down and kiss tke grass under my izot.

Tke sense of tke mystery and infinity of tkmgs over-

wkelms me. annikilates me almost.
1 kneel down, and silentiy worskij).



25



The Dark

This IS tke darlc.

This IB the dream that came of the dark.

This 18 the dreamer who dreamed the dream
that came of the dark.

1 his is the look the dreamer looked who
dreamed the dream that came of the dark.

This IS the love that followed the look the
dreamer looked who dreamed the dream that
came of the dark.

This is the Lreast that fired the love that
followed the look the dreamer looked who
dreamed the dream that came of the dark.

This IS the song was made to the hreast that
fired the love that followed the look the
dreamer looked who dreamed the dream that
came of the dark.

This is the sword that tracked the song was
made to the hreast that fired the love that



26



followed tne look tne dreamer looked wno
dreamed tne dream that came of tne dark.

This IS the rof>e that swung tne sword that
tracked the song was made to tne Lreast
tnat nred tne love that followed tne look tne
dreamer looked who dreamed the dream that
came of the dark.

Tkis IS the dark that buried the roJ)e that
swung the sword that tracked the song was
made to the breast that nred the love that
followed the look the dreamer looked who
dreamed the dream that came of the dark.

TKis is the dark, indeed!



27



Reynardine

if by chance you look lor me
p8rnaj)s you 11 not me Und,
Tor I'll De in my castle —
Enquire lor Reynarame!

bun ana dark he courted me —
ills eyes were red as wme:
ixe tooK me for nis Icman,
Did my sweet Reynardine.

bun and dark the gay norn dIow^s,

ike beagles run like wind:

1 ney know not where lie narbours.

The lairy Reynardine.

If oy chance you look for me
Pernaf)S you ll not me nnd.
For I 11 DC in my castle—
Enquire for Reynardine!



28



Snow

Hills tnat were aark
At 8j)aring-time last nignt
Now m the aawn-rmg
Glimmer cold ana white.



29



I am the Gilly of Christ

1 am the gilly of Christ,
TKe mate of Mary s Son ;
I run tne roads at seeding time.
And wnen the narvest s done.

I slee|> among tne nills,

Tne neatner is my bed ;

I dif) the termon-well for drinlf.

And |)ull trie sloe for oread.

No eye has ever seen me,
Bvit sncf)nerds near me {)as6.
Singing at fall of even
Along tne snadowed grass.

The Deetle is my oellman,
Tne meadow-iire my guide.
The bee and bat my ambling nags
vVhen I have need to ride.

All know me only tne Stranger,
VV no sits on the Saxon s hcigkt ;

30



He burned the tacacK s little Kouse
On last Saint Brigid s NigKt.

lie su|)s on silver aisnes.
Ana arinks in a golden Korn,
out he will wake a w^iser man
U|)on the Judgment Morn!

I am tne Gilly or Christ,
The mate of Mary s Son ;
I run the roads at seeding time.
And when the harvest s done.

The seed I sow is lucky.
The corn I reaj> is red.
And whoso sings the Gill s Rann
vVill never cry for bread.



31



Go^ Ploughman^ Plough

Go, J)lougkman, t)lougn

The mearing lanas.

The meadow lanas,

Tne mountain lands:

All life IS La re

Beneath your share.

All love IS m your lusty hands.

U J), horses, now !

And straight and true

Let every brohen lurrow^ run ;

The strength you sweat

Shall blossom yet

In golden glory to the sun.



32



Go, Reaper

Go, rcaj)er.
Oj)eea ana reaf),
Cjo take tne harvest
Of tlie t)lougli :
The wheat is standing
Jjroaa ana aeef),
1 ne barley glumes
Are golden now.

L/abor IS Kara,

But it endures

JLiKe love :

Tne land is yours :

Cjo reaj) the lire

It gives you now.

O sunbrowned master

Oi tke t)lougk !



33



The Good People

1 ne millway f)atn Iooks like a wraith,
Xne lock is olack as ink.
Ana silently m stream ana sky
Xne stars oegm to blink.

I see tnem f)ass along the grass
vVith slow ana solemn tread:
Aoibneall, tneir queen, is in between —
A corf>se is at their head !

Xney wander on with faces wan.
And dirges sad as wind.
I know not. but it may be tnat
Tne dead s oi numan kind.



34



The Storm is Still,
The Rain hath Ceased

TKe storm is still, the rain nath ccasea
To vex tKe teauty or the east :
A linnet signetK m tne wooa
His Kermit song or gratitude.

So skall I sing wnen lire is done
To greet tKe glory of the sun;
And cloud find star and stream and sea
SKall dance for very ecstasy !



35



Scare-the- Crows

1 wojjence a day for scaring crowds—
Xno tne rain beats ana tne wind blows !

1 he scnolars thmK I ve little -wit.
But. Cjod ! I ve got my snare or it.

Vvny does tne gorbing land-snark
Leave J)lougned rigs for tne green f)arlc ?

vVnere little s to nnd, and nothing s to eat
But rabbits droJ)t)ing8 and f)Keasants meat.

He Knows better tnan come my way
Between tne moutn and tne tail oi day.

For one lick of my nurding wattle

Would lay nim out like a snowman s bottle !

And tne thoughts that rise in my crazed head
When the cloud is low and the wind s dead.

Where you see only clay and stones
I see swords and blanching bones

Bvit I 11 leave you now. — it s gone six.
And the smoke is curling over the ricks.

And it s hardly like that the land-shark
W^ill trouble the furrows after dark.



36



A Cradle Song



SleeJ), wnite love, slecf>,

A cedarn cradle Kolas tnee.

And twilight, like a silver-woven coverlid.

Enfolds tnee.

Moon and star kee^ cnarmed watcn

vJl^on tny lying ;

Water f)lovers tnro tlie dusk

Are tremulously crying.

SleeJ), w^nite love mine.

Till day doth snme.

Sleef). white love, sleef).

Tne daylight wanes, and deef)er

Gathers tne blue darkness

O er tne cradle of the slee|)Gr.

Cliodnna s curacns, carmine-oared.

On Loch-da-linn are gleaming ;

Blind oats nutter tnro tne nignt.

And carrion birds are screaming.

Sleef), wnite love mine.

Till day dotk snine.

37



Sleef), wkite love, sleej),
The holy mothers, Anne ana Mary,
Sit nign m heaven, dreaming
On trie seven ends of Eire.
Brigid sits beside them,
St)inning lamD-wnitc wool on whorls.
Singing fragrant songs of love
Xo little naKed toys and girls.
Sleef>, white love mine.
Till day doth shine.



38



Twine the Mazes thro"
and thrd^

Twine tKe mazes thro ana tnro
Over teach ana margent f»ale ;
Not a tawn apjjears in view.
Not a sail !

Round about!
In ana out !

Tkro tke stones ana sandy bars
To tke music of tne stars !
Tke asteroidal nre tnat dances
Nigktly in tke nortkern blue.
Tke brigktest of tke boreal lances.
Dances not so ligkt as you,

Cliodkna !
Dances not so ligkt as you.



39



A Fighting-Man

A ngnting-man he was.
Guts ana soul ;
His blooa was not ana red
As tnat on Cam s nand-towel,

A eo{)f)er-SKinnea six-iooter.
Hewn out or the rock.
VVno would stand uf) against
His nammer-KnocK?

Not a sinner —
No, and not one dared !
Giants snowed clean neels
Wnen nis arm was Lared.

I ve seen nim swing an anvil
Fifty feet.

Break a tough in two.
And tear a twisted sneet.

And tne music or nis roar —
L/ike oaks m tnunder cleaving ;

40



Lij^s foaming red frotn.
And flanks heaving.

God ! a goodly man,

A Gael, the last

Of tliose tliat stood witK Dan

On MullacK-Maist !



41



My Mother has a Wee
Red Shoe

My motlier lias a wee red snoe —
Sne Lovaglit it off a tacacn-man;
And all tlie neigKtors say it s true
He stole it off a Leatk-trogan.

Bacacn-man. Dacacn-man.

Wit ere did you get it?

Faitk now, says ne.

In my leatner wallet !

My father nas an arrow-head —

He Legged it off J)oor Peig na Blath ;

And Mor. tke talkmg-woman, said

SKe found it m a fairy ratn.

Peig na BlatK, Peig na Blatk,
Wkere did you get it ;
Faitk now, said ske.
In my wincey jacket!



42



My trotKer kas a cof)f)er t)ot —
He tryst it wi a snuiler-man ;
And gossif) says it s like as not
He trujff d it from a Clotnair-eeann.
Sliuiler-nian, snuiler-man,
WKere did you get it?
FaitK now. says he.
In my oreecnes f)ocKet !



43



By a JVondrous Mystery

By a wondrous mystery
Cnrist of Mary s fair boay
Uj)on a miaale winter s morn.
Between the tides of nignt ana day.
In Ara s Koly lele was born.
Mary went uJ)on ner knee
Travailing m ecstasy.
And Brigid, mistress of the birtn.
Full reverently and tenderly
Laid tke cKild uf»on the eartn.
Tncn tne dark-eyed rose did blow.
And rivers leajied from out the snow.
Earth grew lyrical : the grass.
As tne lignt w^inds cnanced to J)a8S—
Inan magian music more J)roiound—
Murmured in a maze of sound.
vVnitc incense rose uf>on tne nills
As from a thousand thuriDles,
And m tKe cast a seven-rayed star
Proclaimed tne news to near and far.

44



Tne 8ne;^nerd danced, the gilly ran.

1 ne Doatman left nis euraenan;
Tne King came riding on the wind
To oner gifts of coin and kind;
The druid droJ)f)ed nis ognam wand.
And said, "Another day s at Kand,
A newer dawn is in tne sky:
I J)ut my w^itncred 8af)ling by.
The druid Christ has taken breath

1 o sing the runes of life and death.



45



/ Gather Three Ears
of Corn

I gather tnree ears or corn.

And tlie Black Earl from over tne sea

Sails across in nis silver shij)s.

And takes two out of tne tnree.

I mignt Duila a house on tne nill
Ana a barn of tne 8j)eckly stone.
And tell my little stocking of gold.
If the Earl would let me alone.

But Ke nas no thougnt for me —
Only tne tnougnt of his snare.
And t\ve softness of tne linsey snifts
His lazy daugnters wear.

Tnere is a God in heaven.

And angels, score on score,

VVho will not see my heartnstone cold

Because I m crazed and {)Oor.

46



My cKiUer Kavc my blood.
AnJ wKen tKey get tKeir Learde
TKey wil] not be content to run
As gillics to tkeir kerds!

Tne day will come, maybe.
When we can nave our own.
And tke Black Earl will come to us
Begging tKe tacacn s Lone.



47



The Tinkers

"One ciarog tnows anotner ciarog,
And wky sliouldn 1 1 tnow you, you rogue?
"Tliey say a stroller will never f)air
Excef)t witn one of nis kind ana care . . .
So talked two tinkers pvom in the snough —
And tken. as tKe fun got a trifle rougn.
TKey flitted: ke witk kis corn-straw bass.
Ske witk ker load of tin and brass :
As mad a matck as you would see
In a twelvemontk s ride tkro Ckristendie.
He roared — tkey kotk were drunk as kell:
Ske danced, and danced it migkty well !
I could kave eyed tkem longer, but
Tkey staggered for tke Quarry Cut :
Tkat kalf-JDerck seemed to trouble tkem more
Tkan all tke leagues tkey d tram{)ed before.
Some 11 drink at tke fair tke morrow.
And some 11 suj) witk tke st)Oon of sorrow;
But wketker they 'II get as far as Droickid
Tke nigkt — well, wko knows tkat but (jod?

48



As I Came Over the Grey,
Grey Hills

As I came over the grey, grey mils

Ana over tne grey, grey water,

I saw tne gilly leading on.

And the wnite Christ following after.

vVhere and wnere does tne gilly lead?
And wnere is tne white Cnrist faring?
Tkey ve travelled tne four grey sounds of Ore,
And tlie four grey seas of Eirinn.

TKe moon it set and the wind s away.
And tlie song in tne grass is dying.
And a silver cloud on tne silent sea
Like a shrouding sheet is lying.

But Christ and the gilly will follow on
Till tKe ring in tne east is snowing.
And the awny corn is red on tne nills.
And tke golden ligKt is glowing !



49



A Northern Love- Song

Brigiam Ban or the Iint-wnitc locks,
Wkat was it gave you that flaxen hair.
Long as tne summer neatn in tne rocks:
Wkat was it gave you tnose eyes ox nrc.
LiJ)s so waxen ana cheek so wan?
Tell me. tell me, Brigiain Ban,
Little wnite oriae of my neart s desire.

Was it tne Good PeoJ)le stole you away.

Little wKite snangeling. Brigidm Banf

Carried you on in tne ring or tne dawn.

Laid like a queen on ner J)ur|)le car.

Carried j'^ou Lack twixt tne nignt and tne day ;

Gave you that fortune of flaxen hair.

Gave you tnose eyes of wandering nre.

Lit at the wheel of tne soutnern star;

Gave you that look so far away,

Li\p so waxen and cheek so wan?

Tell me, tell me. Brigidin Ban.

Little white bride of my neart s desire.

50



To The Golden Eagle

Wan Jerer of tKe mountain.
Winger of tlie Llue,
From tkis stormy rock
I send my love to you.

Take me for your lover.
Dark and fierce and true-
Wanderer of tKe mountain.
Winger of tke tlue!



51



A Prophecy

"rke loins of tke GallJackt
bnalJ witlier like grass —
Strange words I Keard said
At the fair or Dun-eas.

"A. bard snail be Lorn
Or the seed of tke folic,
lo breflK witk kis singing
1 ke bond and tke yoke.

"A sword, wkite as askes,
Skall fall from tke sky.
To rise, red as Llood.
On tke ekarge and tke cry.

"Stark J)if)ers skall blow.
Stout drummers skall keat.
And tke skout of tke nortk
Skall be keard m tke street.

"Tke strong skall go down.
And tke weak skall J)revail,

52



And a glory snail sit

On tne sign of the (jaoanal.

"Then Emer snail come
In good time by ner own.
And a man oi tne |)eof>le
bnall sf>eaK from tne tnrone.

Strange words I neard seid
At tne Fair of Dun-eas —
"Tne Gaodnaldaent shall live.
The Galldacnt snail J)ass !



53



I Met a JValking-Man

I met a walking-man;

His head was old and grey.

I gave him what I nad

To erutcn him on nis way.

The man was Mary s Son, I 11 swear;

A glory trcmtled in his nair!

Ana since tnat blessed day

I ve never Known the J)incn:

I J)lough a Droad townland.

And dig a rivcr-incn ;

And on my heartn tne nre is bngnt

For all that walk ty day or nignt.



54



The Ninepenny Fidil

My fatlicr and motlicr were Irisn,

And I am Irisn too:

I bougkt a wee iidil for ninef)ence.

And it IS Irisn, too.

I'm uf) in tKe morning early

To meet tne dawn or day.

And to tke ImtwKite 8 l)if)ing

Tne many s tne tune I t>lay.

One |)leasant eve in June time
I met a locKrie-man :
His face and hands were weazen,
His Keigkt WQS not a sj)an.
He toor d me for my ndil—
"You Icnow, says ne, "like you.
My fatKer and motner were Irisn,
And I am Irish, too!

He took my wee red ndil.
And sucn a tune ne turned —
TKe Glaise in it whisj)ered,

55



Tne Lionan in it m urned.

Says he, "My laa, you re lucky—

I wish t I was like you :

You re lucky in your Dirtn-star,

Ana in your nail, too!

He gave me back my nail.

My fidil-stick, also.

And ste|)J)ing like a mayboy,

ITe jumf)ea tne Leargaian ICnowe.

I never saw him after.

Nor met nis gentle kind ;

But, w^niles. I tnink I hear nim

A-wlieening in the wind !

My latner and mother were Irish,

And I am Insn, too:

I bought a w^ce ndil for ninefence.

And it 18 Irish, too.

I m uf) in the morning early

To meet tne dawn of day.

And to tne lintwhite s f)if)ing

Tke many s tne tune I Jilay.

56



Grasslands Are Fair

(jrasslanas are fair,
Pjougnlanas are rare.
Cjrasslanas are lonely,
Plougnlanas are comely.
Grasslands breed cattle,
Ploughlands feed |)eo|)le.
Grasslands are not wrougnt,
Ploughlands swell witK tkought.



57



Winter Song



Twould skin a lairy

It IS so airy.

Ana trie snow it nif>s so cola;

one^nera ana squire

Sit by tne nre.

Trie sneej) are in the fola.

You nave your wish —

A. reeking aisn.

Ana ruDolc walls about ;

So t>ity tne f)Oor

Tnat nave no door

Xo keef) tne winter out!



58



/ Follow a Star

I follow a star

Burning aec|) in tne blue.

A sign on the hills

Lit for me ana for you!

Moon-red is the star,
Halo-nngea like a rood,
CKrist s heart m its heart set.
Streaming witn olooa.

Follow the gilly

Beyond to tne west:

He leads wkere tke Cnrist lies

On Mary s white breast.

King. f)riest and f)rof)het —
A cKild. and no more —
Adonai tKe Maker !
Come, let us adore.



59



The Silence of Unlaboured
fields

TKe silence of unlaoourea nelas
Lies like a judgment on the air:
A kuman voice is never heard:
Tke sigkmg grass is everywhere —
TKe sigking grass, tke skadowed sky,
Tke cattle crying wearily!

Wkcre are tke lowland t)eo|)le gone ?
Wkere are tke sun-dark faces now?
Tke love tkat ke^t tke quiet keartk,
Tke strengtk tkat keld tke sj)eeding {)lougk?


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Online LibraryJoseph CampbellThe mountainy singer → online text (page 1 of 3)