Joseph E. (Joseph Emerson) Worcester.

A new primary dictionary of the English language ... online

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tive.

Di-liite', v. a. To make thinner or weaker
"by mixing. — 2, a. Thin ; weak ; diluted.

Di-iu'tion, n. Act of diluting ; state of
being "diluted ; diluted substance.

Dim, a. Obscure : — dull of apijrehenfiion :
— dark ; dusky. — 2, v. To make or be-
come dim.

Dime, v.. Silver coin, of ten cents.

Di-men'sion, n. Size ; bulk ; extent.

Di-min'ish, v. To decrease ; to lessen.

Dim-i-nii'ti9n, n. Decrease ; lessening.

Di-min'i-tive, a. Small ; little. — 2, n.
Noun denoting small, young, or dear
object.

Dim'i-tj;, «• Fine cotton fabric, usually
figured or striped.

Dim'ple, v. Small indentation, — 2, v. To
form, or mark with, dimples.

Din, n. liOiul noise ; noipy confusion.



DINE



95



DISCEKNMENT



Sine, V. To eat or give a dinner.

Dmer'-dong', n. Sound of bells ringing.

Dm'Jhee, T (ding'ge) , n. Small East Indian

Din'lhjr, J boat : — ship's smallest boat.

Din'gle (ding'gl), n. Little dale.

Din'fjr, a. Dull or dark in color : — soiled ;
dirty.

Din'ing-rSSm, n. Room to dine in.

Din'iier, n. Chief meal of the day : — feast.

Bint, n. Dent : — ^force ; power.

Di-oe'e-san, ) n. Bishop. — 2, a. Pertaining

Si-o-ci'san, j to a diocese. [ric.

Di'o-cese, n. Bishop's jjirisdiction ; bishop-

D3fp, V. a. To plunge or immerse : — to ladle
out : — to lower a flag. — 2, v. n. To enter
slightly : — to sink ; to incline. — 3, n. Act
of dipping : — inclination downward ;
angle of inclination : — kind of sauce : —
tallow candle.

Diph-the'ri-a, n. Malignant and contagious
disease of the throat.

Diph' thong (dip'-), n. Union of two vowels
in one sound.

Di-plo'ma, n. Certificate of a degree or
honor conferred.

Di-plo'ma-cjf, n. Art of negotiating between
nations : — skilful management ; tact.

Dip|lo-mat, I ^ Q^^g versed or employed

Dip'lp-mate, Y^^ diplomacy.

Di-plo'ma-tist,J ^ •'

Dip-lo-mat'ic, a. Relating to diplomacy or
diplomats : — tactful ; artful.

Dip'per, n. One that dips : — ladle : — water-
fowl of several species.

Dire, \ a. Dreadful ; horrible ; disas-

Dire'fiil, J trous.

Di-rect', a. Straight ; undeviating : — sin-
cere : — plain ; express. — 2, v. a. To aim
or point : — to manage ; to order : — to show
the way : — to address, as a letter.

Di-rec'tion, n. Act of directing ; aim : —
line of motion : — guidance : — command :
— address, as of a letter.

Di-rect'ly, ad. In a direct manner : — im-
mediately ; soon.

Di-rec'tor, «. One that directs : — manager :
— guide.

Di-rec' tor-ate, n. Office of a director ; di-
rectors collectively.

Di-rec'to-rx, n. Collection of directions : —
address book : — board of directors.

Di'rS'e, n. Mournful or funeral music.

Dir'i-l-i-ble, a. That may be steered.

Di'rk, n. Kind of dagger.

Dirt, n. Loose earth ; mud : — filth : — any
thing mean or low. — 2, v. a. To soil ; to
dirty.

Dirt's:, «• Unclean : — dingy : — foul ; filthy :
— mean : low. — 2, v. a. To foul ; to soil :
— to disgrace.

Dis-. Latin prefix, signifying asimder — as,
disperse : negation — as, disrelish : priva-
tion — as, dislodge : intensification — as,
disannul.

DJs-a-bil'i-tjr, n. Want of power or quali-
fication ": — that which disables.



Di9-a'ble, v. a. To deprive of force S7
ability ; to weaken ; to disqualify.

Dis-a-bii§e', v. a. To undeceive.

Dis-ad-van'tai'e, n. Unfavorable, detri-*
mental, or unprepared condition ; detri-
ment ; loss.

Dis-ad-van-ta'|-eous (-ta'jus), a. Injuri-
ous ; unfavorable ; detrimental.

Dis-af-fect', v. a. To fill with discontent
or ill-will.

Dis-af-fec'tion, n. Disloyalty ; ill-will.

Dis-a-gree', v. n. To be unlike or unsuited :
— to differ in opinion : — to quarrel.

Dis-a-gree'a-ble, a. Unpleasant ; offensive.

Dis-a-gree'ment, n. Act or state of dis-
agreeing ; dissimilarity : — difference of
opinion : — quarrel.

Dis-al-lo^', V. a. To refuse to allow, sanc-
tion, or acknowledge : — to reject.

Dis-an-niil', v. a. To annul completely.

Dis-ap-pSar', v. n. To vanish.

Dis-ap-pear'ance, n. Removal from sight.

Dis-ap-point^ v. a. To fail to gratify : — ^to
frustrate.

Dis-ap-pbint'ment, «. Act of disappointing ;
defeat of hopes or plans.

Dis-ap-pro-ba'tion, \ H. Act of disap-

Dis-ap-pr8v'al, * J proving ; dislike ; cen-
sure.

Dis-ap-pr8ve', v. a. To refuse sanction to :
— to condemn ; to censure.

Di§-arm', v. a. To deprive of arms ; to
render weak or harmless.

Dis-ar-ranl'e', v. a. To put out of order or
arrangement ; to unsettle.

Dis-ar-ranf-e'inent, n. Disorder ; derange-
ment.

Dis-ar-ray', v. a. To undress : — to over-
throw ; to disorder. — 2, n. Disorder ; con-
fusion : — undress.

Di§-as'ter, n. Misfortune ; calamitj\

Dig-Ss'trous, a. Unlucky ; calamitous.

Dis-a-vo-^', V. a. To disown ; to deny.

Dis-a-vb^'al, n. Denial ; rejection.

Di§-band', v. To retire from military s^-
vice ; to dissolve or disperse.

Dis-be-lief , n. Act of disbelieving ; re-
fusal to believe, or accept as true.

Dis-be-lieve', v. a. To refuse to believe, or
accept as true.

Di§-bUr'den (-bilr'dn), v. a. To ease of a
burden ; to unload.

Di§-biirse', v. a. To expend ; to pay.

Di^-biirse'ment, n. Act of disbursing ; gum
disbursed or expended.

Disc, n. Same as dislc.

Dis-card', v. a. To dismiss ; to cast off ; to
reject. — 2, n. Cards discarded.

Di§-cem' (diz-zern'), v. To distinguish : —
to perceive ; to discover ; to see.

Di§-cern'i-ble, a. Perceptible.

Dig-cem'ingr (diz-zern'ing), p. a. Judi-
cious ; sagacious.

Dig-cem'ment (diz-zem'ment), «. Act or
"power of discerning; sagacity; judg-
ment.



DISCHAKGE



96



DISH



Dis-charf e', v. a. To unload : — to set free :
— to dismiss : — to pay : — to perform or exe-
cute : — to fire, as a gun or missile weapon :
— to utter. — 2, v. 7i. To let go or deliver a
charge- — 3, n- Act of discharging ; thing
discharged or emitted : — dismissal : — re-
lease ; afcsolutioi) : — ^payment : — perform-
ance : — explosion.

Dis-ci'ple, n. follower ; adherent : — pupil.

Dis-ci-pli-na'ri-an, a. pertaining to disci-
pline. — 2, 71. ' 6ne strict in discipline.

Dis'ci-pline, n. Education : — government :
— subjection : — correction ; chastisement.
— 2, V. a. To instruct : — to govern : — to
correct ; to chastise.

Dis-claim', v. a. To disown ; — to renounce.

Dis-claim'er, n. One who disclaims : — re-
nunciation or disavowal of a claim.

Dis-cl5§e', V. a. To uncover : — to reveal ;
to tell.

Dis-clo§'ure (dis-klo'zhur;, n. Act of dis-
closing : — that which is disclosed.

Dis-col'or, V. a, To change as to color, or
from the natural hue ; to stain.

Dis-eol-or-a'tion, w. Change of color ; staia.

Dis-com'fit, v. a. To defeat ; to frustrate.

Dis-oom'fit-ire, n. Defeat ; frustration.

Dis-cSm'fort, n. Want of comfort : — dis-
tress. — 2', t7. a. To disturb ; to distress.

Dis-com-mode', v. a. To put to inconve-
nience ; to disturb.

Di3-com-po§e', v. a. To disorder ; to vex.

Dis-com-po§'ire (dis-k9m-po'zhur),M. State
of being discomposed ; disorder ; agitation.

Dis-con-cert', v. a. To defeat : — to confuse.

Dis-con-nect', v. a. To separate ; to disunite.

Dis-con-nec'tion, n. Disunion ; separation.

Dis-con'sQ-late, a. Hopeless ; sad.

Dis-con-tent' , n. Dissatisfaction ; uneasi-
ness : — discontented person. — 2, a. Dis-
contented.

Dis-con-tent' ed, p. a. Uneasy ; dissatisfied.

Dis-con-tin'i-ance, 1 n. Separation : — ia-

Dis-cpn-tin-ii-a'tion, j" terruption ; c e s s a-
■ tion. [to stop.

Dis-con-tin'ie, v. To cease ; to leave off ;

Dis'cbrd, ) n. Want of concord or har-

Dis-cbrd'ance, j mony : — strife.

Dis-cbrd'ant, a. Inharmonious.

Dis'cbunt, n. Allowance or deduction.

Dis-cbiliit', V. a. To deduct a part from : —
tc lend or accept after deducting a part : —
to forestall.

Dia-cbiin'tc-nance, n. Disfavor ; disregard.
— 2, V. a.' To disapprove : — to abash.

Di3-cour'afe (dis-kur'aj), v. a. To deter;
to dissuade : — to depress.

Dis-cour'a|-e-ment, n. Act of discouraging ;
determMit ; that which discourages.

IXis-course' (dis-kors'), n. Formal treat-
ment ; treatise ; sermon : — conversation. —
2, V. n. To converse.

Dis-cour'te-ous, a. Rude ; uncivil ; impo-
lite. — Dia-coUr'te-sx, n.

DJ3-ciSv'er, v. a. To remove : — to lay bare ;
to tell : — to find out.



Bis-c6v'er-3f:, n. Act of discovering ; thing
discovered.

Dis-cred'it, n. Lack of credit : — dishonor ;
reproach. — 2, v. a. To disbelieve : — to dis-
grace.

Dis-cred'it-a-ble, a. Disgraceful.

Dis-creet', a. Prudent ; cautious.

Dis-crep'an-cjj, n. Difference ; disagree-
ment ; inconsistency.

Dis-crete', a. Distinct ; disjoined.

Dis-cre"tion (dis-kresh'un), n. Prudence;
eagp,city : — liberty of judgment.

Dis-ere''tion-al, ) a. Left to discretion or

Dis-cre"tion-a-rj;, J choice.

Dis-crim'i-nate, v. To distinguish.

Lis-crim-i-na'tion, n. Act or faculty of dis-
criminating : — ^mark that distinguishes.

Dis-ciir'sive, a. Argumentative : — desul-
tory.

Dis-ciiss', V. a. To talk over ; to examine
into : — to consume.

Dis-ciis'sion, w. Examination ; debate.

Di§-dain', v. a. To scorn ; to despise. — 2, n.
Contempt ; scorn : — haughtiness.

Di§-dain'ful, a. Scornful ; haughty : — ^fas-
tidious.

I}i§-ea§e' (diz-ez'), n. Disorder of ncdnd or
body. — 2, V. a. To afflict with disease.

Dis-era-bark', v. To go or send to land.

Dis-em-bar-ka'tion, n. Act of landing.

Dis-em-bar'rass, v. a. To free from embar-
rassment ; to libei-ate ; to extricate.

Dis-em-bod' J, v. a. To divest of the body :
— to discharge from military service.

Lis-em-bb^'el, v. a. To take out the
bowels of.

Dis-en-chant', v. a. To free from enchant-
ment, fascination, or delusion.

Dis-en-ciim'ber, v. a. To disburden ; to free
from encumbrance.

Dis-en-g-ag'e', v. a. To liberate ; to detach.
— i, V. n. To set one's self free.

Dis-en-tan'grle, v. a. To free from entangle-
ment ; to disengage ; to unravel.

Dis-es-teem', n. Disregard ; dislike.

Dis-fa'vor, a. Dislike ; disregard.

Dis-fig'i-ra'tion, n. Disfigurement.

Dis-figr'ire, v. a. To mar ; to deface.

Dis-figr'iire-ment, n. Act of disfiguring ;
defacement ; that which disfigures.

Dis-fran'chige, v. a. To deprive of the im-
munities and privileges of a citizen.

Di3-fran'chi§e-ment, n. Act of disfran-
chising ; state of being disfranchised.

Dig-gbrfe', v. To eject : — to give up.

Di§-grrace', n. Dishonor ; shame. — 2, v. a.
To bring dishonor or shame upon.

Dig-grace'fai, a. Shameful ; vile ; base.

Dig-fuige' (diz-giz'), r. a. To conceal or
change the appearance of. — 2, n. Dress or
manner to deceive ; false appearance.

Dig-gust', n. Aversion ; dislike. — 2, v. a.
To produce aversion or dislike ; to ofFend.

Dig-gust'ing:, p. o. Causing disgust.

Dish, n. Vessel for serving food : — ^food in a
dish. — 2, V. a. To serve or put in a dish.



DISHEAETEN



97



DISPUTATIYE



Dis-heart'en (-har'tn), v. a. To discourage.

Di-shev'el, v. a. To spread disorderly, as
the hair.

Dish'ful, n. Capacity or contents of a dish.

Di§-hon'est (diz-on'est), a. Not honest ;
faithless ; deceitful.

Di§-hon'es-tx (diz-6n'es-te), n. Want of
honesty ; faithlessness ; fraud.

Di§-hon'or (diz-on'ur), n. Want of honor :
— disgi-ace ; reproach. — 2, v. a. To dis-
grace : — to vilify : — to refuse to pay.

Di§-hon'or-a-ble (diz-6n'ur-a-bl), a. Not
honorable ; shameful ; base.

Dis-in-cli-na'tion, n. \ Aversion ; dislike.

Dis-in-cline', v. a. To make averse.

Dis-in-fect', v. a. To free from infection.

Dis-in-fect'ant, n. Substance that prevents
or removes infection.

Dis-in-fec'tion, n. Act of disinfecting.

Dis-in-l-en'ii-oiis, a. Unfair ; crafty.

Dis-in-her'it, i'. a. To cut off from, or de-
prive of, an hereditary right.

Di§-in'te-gTate, v. To separate into parti-
cles ; to break up.

Di§-in-te-gra'tion, n. Separation into par-
ticles.

Di§-in'ter-est-ed, a. Unselfish ; impartial.

I)i§-jbin', V. a. To separate ; to part.

Di§-j(5int', v. a. To put out of joint : — to
break in pieces. — 2, v. n. To fall in pieces.

Di§-junc'tion, n. Disunion ; separation.

Di§-junc'tive, o. Separating ; disuniting.

Bisk, n. Circular flat plate : — quoit : — face
of a heavenly body.

Di§-like', n. Aversion ; repugnance. — 2,
V. a. To feel dislike for.

Dis'lo-cate, v. a. To disjoint.

Dis-lo-ca'tion, n. Disjunction ; displace-
ment.

Di§-lod|-e', V. a. To remove ; to drive from.

Di§-lod|-e'ment, n. Act of dislodging.

Di§-loy'al, a. Not loyal ; disobedient ; faith-
less.

Di§-loy'al-t5c, **• Want of loyalty or fidelity.

I)i§'mal, a. Sorrowful ; gloomy : — frightful.

3)i§-man'tle, v. a. To strip or throw ofi", as
fittings or furniture : — to throw down ; to
make useless.

Di§-mast', V. a. To deprive of masts.

Di§-may', v. a. To terrify ; to aifright ; to
dishearten. — 2, m. Terror ; fear.

Bi§-mem'ber, v. a. To separate limb from
limb ; to disjoin.

Dig-mem'ber-ment, M. Division; separation.

Di§-miss', v. a. To send away.

3)i§-mis'sal, \ n. Act of dismissing ; dis-

Di§-mis'sion, J charge.

Di§-mbunt', v. a. To throw down. — 2, v. n.
To descend ; to alight.

Dis-o-be'di-ence, n. Neglect to obey.

Dis-o-be'di-ent, a. Not obedient.

Dis-o-bey' (dis-o-ba'), v. To refuse or
neglect to obey.

Bis-o-bli^e', V. a. To offend by unkindness
or incivility ; to displease.

Dis-o-blifing, p. a. Not obliging.



Di§-br'der, n. Irregularity ; confusion : —
disease. — 2, v. a. To disturb : — to make ill.

Di§-br'der-lj^, a. Confused : — lawless.

Dig-br-gan-i-za'tion, n. Disturbance : — de-
struction of order or structure.

Di§-br'gan-ize, v. a. To destroy the order
or structure of ; to disorder.

Di§-own' (diz-on'), v. a. To refuse to ac-
knowledge ; to disavow ; to deny.

Dis-par'a§e, v. a. To lower in rank or esti-
mation ; to undervalue.

Dis-par'a§e-ment, n. Depreciation.

Dis-par'i-tx, ii. Inequality ; difference.

ris-pas'sion-ate, a. Cool ; calm ; impartial.

Dis-patch', n. & v. a. Same as despatch.

Dis-pel', V. a. To drive away ; to scatter.

Dis-pen'sa-rx, n. Place where medicines
are compounded and distributed, especially
to the poor.

Dis-pen-sa'tion, n. Distribution ; — admin-
istration : — exemption from law or service.

Dis-pen'sa-to-rx, «• Book of directions for
preparing medicines. — 2, a. Granting dis-
pensation.

Dis-pense', v. a. To deal out ; to distribute :
— to administer.

Dis-perse', v. To scatter ; to separate.

Dis-per'sion, n. Distribution ; diffusion.

Dis-pir'it, V. a. To discourage.

Dis-place', v. a. To put out of place ; to re-
move : — to depose.

Dis-place'ment, w. Act of displacing : —
amount of movement : — measure of a ship.

Dis-play', v. a. To expand ; to unfold : — to
exhibit :— to show ostentatiously. — 2, n.
Exhibition : — ostentatious show.

Dis-plea§e', v. To offend ; to irritate.

Dis-plea^'Are (dis-plezh'ur), n. Dislike;
disgust ; offence ; anger."

Dis-po§'al, n. Act, power, or method of
disposing ; arrangement : — management.

Dis-poje', V. a. To arrange ; to adjust : — to
incline : — to adapt.

Dis-po§ed' (dis-pOzd'), p. a. Arranged ;
settled : — inclined ; of a certain disposition.

Dis-po-§i"tion (-po-zish'un), n. Arrange-
ment ; order :— management : — tendency :
— temper or frame of mind.

Lis-po§-§ess', V. a. To put oiit of possession.

Dis-po§-§es'sion (dis-poz-zesh'un), n. Act
of dispossessing ; ejection.

Dis-prai§e', n. Blame ; censure : — dishonor.

Dis-prS6f' , n. Proof of falsity or error.

Dis-pro-por'tion, n. Want of proportion,
symmetry, or suitableness.— 2, v. a. To
join unfitly : — to misshape.

Dis-pro-por'tion-al, \ a. Unsuitable ; un-

Dis-pro-por'tion-ate, j fit ; inadequate.

Dis-pr8ve', v. a. To prove false or erro-
neous ; to confute.

Dis-pii'ta-ble, a. That may be disputed ;
doubtful. [reasoner.

Dis'pA-tant, M. Controvertist ; arguer ;

Dis-pii-ta'tion, n. Argumentation ; dispute.

Dis-p6-ta'tious, 1 a- Inclined to dispute ;

Dis-pu'ta-tive, J contentious.



DISPUTE



98



DISTRESS



Sis-pute', V. To debate ; to discuss : — to
"controvert : — to quarrel. — 2, w. Debate :
— controversy ; quarrel.

Dis-qual-i-fi-ca'tion (-kw61-), «. Unfitness ;
disability : — that which disqualifies.

Dis-qual'i-fy (-kwoF-), v. a. To make un-
fit ; to disable.

Dis-qui'et, n. Uneasiness ; anxiety. — 2, v. a.
To make uneasy or anxious.

Dis-qui'et-ness, 1 w. Uneasiness; restless-

Dis-qui'e-tiide, j ness; anxiety.

Dis-qui-§i"tion (dis-kwg-zish'un), w. Trea-
tise or discussion.

Dis-re-grard', w. Neglect ; contempt. — 2,
V. a. To slight ; to neglect.

Di§-rel'isli, n. Dislike ; distaste. — 2, v. a.
To dislike ; not to relish.

Dis-re-p4ir', «. State of being out of repair.

Dis-rep u-ta-ble, a. Dishonorable ; low.

Dis-r?-pute', n. Discredit ; ill repute.

Dis-re-spect', n. Incivility; want of respect.

Dis-re-spect'ful, a. Kude ; uncivil.

Di§-robe', v. To undress ; to uncover.

Di§-rupt', V. a. To tear asunder.

Di§-rup'tion, \ n. Act of disrupting; breach;

Di§-riip'tfi"re, J rupture.

Dis-sat-is-fac'tion, n. State of being dis-
satisfied ; uneasiness ; discontent.

Dis-sat'is-fy, v. a. To fail to satisfj' ; to
discontent ; to displease.

Sis-sect', V. a. To cut in pieces and ex-
amine minutely.

Sis-sSc'tion, n. Minute analysis or exam-
ination ;' thing dissected.

Dis-sem'ble, v. To disguise ; to pretend.

Sis-sem'i-nate, v. a. To scatter as seed ; to
diffuse ; to propagate ; to sow.

Sis-sem-i-na'tion, n. Propagation.

sis-sen' sion, n. Disagreement; strife.

sis-sent', v. a. To disagree ; to differ. —
2, n. Act of dissenting ; disagreement.

Sis-sent'er, n. One who dissents : — one who
separates from the established church.

Sis-ser-ta'tion, n. Discourse ; treatise.

Bis-sev'er, v. a. To sever.

Bis'si-dSnce, n. Discord ; disagreement.

Bis' si-dent, a. Varying ; not agreeing.—
2, n. One who dissents.

Sis-sim'i-lar, a. Unlike ; different.

Sis-sim-i-lSr'i-ty, \ n. Unlikeness ; differ-

Sis-si-mil'i-tude, J ence ; want of resem-
blance.

Sis-sim'd-late, v. n. To dissemble.

Sis-sim-i-la'tion, n. Act of dissembling ;
deceit ; hypocrisy.

Sis' si-pate, v. a. To disperse ; to scatter : —
to waste. — 2, v. n. To live idly or prodi-
gally : — to vanish ; to disperse.

Sis'si-pat-ed, p. a. Addicted to dissipation.

Sis-si-pa' tion, n. Waste ; dispersion : — dis-
solute life ; excess. [arate.

Sis-so'ci-ate (dis-so'she-at), r. a. To sep-

Sis-so-ci-a'tion ^dis-so-shg-a'shun), w. Sep-
aration ; disunion.

Sis'sQ-lute, a. Loose ; unrestrained ; de-
bauched ; vicious.




Distaff.



Sis-so-lii'tion, n. Act of dissolving : — de-
composition ; destruction ; ruin :— death :
— disorganization.

Si$-§olve', V. To melt : — to break up : — to
destroy or be destroyed : — to solve : — to
annul.

Sis'so-nance, n. Discord ; disagreement.

Sis'so-nant, a. Unharmonious.

Sis-suade' (dis-swad'), t;. a. To discourage ;
to deter by advice or persuasion.

Sis-sua'§ion (dis-swa'zhun), n. Advice or
persuasion against a thing.

Sis-sua'sive (dis-swa'siv), a. Tending to
dissuade.

Bis-syl-lab'ic, a. Formed of
two syllables.

Bis-syl'la-ble, n. Word of two
syllables.

Bis'tafF, n. Staff from which
the flax is drawn in spinning.

Bis'tance, n. Extent of space
or time : — reserve : — dislike. —
2, V. n. To leave behind ; to
surpass ; to outstrip.

Bis'tant, a. Remote in time or place ; far :
— reserved : — ^incongruous : — ^indirect ; not
obvious.

Bis-taste', n. Aversion ; dislike.

Bis-taste'ful, a. Offensive ; disagreeable.

Bis-tem'per, n. Illness : — disease of ani-
mals : — ill-humor : — kind of painting. — 2,
V. a. To disease : — to disorder ; to disturb.

Sis-tend', v. To stretch out ; to expand.

Sis-tSTi'ti9n, n. Expansion ; a stretching.

Bis'tiph, «. Couplet ; two poetic lines.

Sis-til', V. To fall, or let fall, in drops : — to
practice, or subject to, distillation.

Bis-til'late, n. That which is distilled over.

Bis-til-la'tion, n. Act or process of sep-
arating a substance from grosser admix-
tures, by evaporation and condensation.

Sis-til'le-ry, n. Place where spirits are
"distilled.

Sis-tinct', a. Different ; separate : — plain.

Sis-tinc'tion, n. Discernment : — difference :
— division : — elevation of rank or char-
acter.

Bis-tinc'tive, a. Marking distinction.

sis-tin' giiish (dis-ting'gwish), v. a.
make distinct: — to discriminate:
honor ; to make famous. — 2, v. n.
make distinction.

Bis-tin' eruish-a-ble, a. Discernible.

Sis-tin'guished (-gwisht), p. a. Celebrated ;
eminent : — extraordinary.

Sis- tort', V. a. To deform ; to pervert.

Sis-tor'tion, n. Act of distorting ; perver-
sion ; deformity : — grimace.

Sis-tract', v. a. To separate : — to perplex ;
to make mad.

Sis-trac'tion, n. Act of distracting ; dis-
turbance'; perplexity: — madness ; insanity.

Sis-trough t' (dis-trawf), a. Distracted.

sis-tress', n. Calamity ; misery ; misfor-
tune : — anguish ; agony. — 2, v. a. To af-
flict ; to embarrass.



To
•to
To



DISTEESSING



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DOGGKEL



Dis-tress'ingr, a. Afflicting ; painful.
Dis-trib'Me, v. a. To divide among many ;

to deal out :— to classify.
DIs-tri-bii'tion, n. Act of distributing ; al-
lotment : — classification.
Dia-trib'A-tive, a. That distributes.
Dis'trict, M. Province ; territory. — 2, v. a.

To divide into districts. — 3, a. Relating

eo a district.
Dis,; trust', v. a. To doubt; to discredit. —

2, v Suspicion ; doubt ; discredit.
Sts-trftjt) .tfil, a- Suspicious ; diffident.
Dis-tiirb ,* ;- a. To Agitate : — to confuse ;

to perplex . -to hinder.
Sis-tiirb'ance, <*- Confusion ; perplexity.
Bis-iin'ion (dis-yiin'yun), n. Want of

union ; separation : — discord.
DIa-4-nite' (dis-yu-nlf), v. To separate;

to divide ; to set or be at variance.
Bis-use' (dis-yiis'), n. Cessation of use.
Dis-iife' (dis-yiiz'), v. a. To cease to use.
Sitch, n. Trench in the ground for water :

— moat. — 2, V. To dig ditches in : — to

throw into a ditch.
Dit'to, n. The same thing. — 2, ad. As said ;

in like manner — usually abbreviated to

do., or to two inverted commas ["] .
Dit'ty, w. Little poem ; song.
Di-iir'nal, a. Daily.
Bi-van', n. Grand council of Turkey : —

sofa ; coach.
Dive, V. n. To plunge head-first : — to go

deep : — to search or work under water. —

2, n. Plunge, as into water ; swoop.
Di'v^r, n. One who dives : — one who works

or searches under water : — water-fowl that

dives.
Di-verf'e', ) v. n. To tend various ways from
Di-verl-e', j one point.
Di-ver i'ence, n. Act, state, or amount of

diverging ; difference ; disagreement.
Di-ver'Jent, a. Receding from each other.
Di'ver§ (di'vgrz), a. Several ; various.

Di-vlrse' I "* ^iff®'^^^* ' varied ; unlike.

Dj-ver'si-fy, v. a. To make, or distinguish
as, different or various ; to vary.

Di-ver'sion, n. Act of diverting : — amuse-
ment ; sport ; allurement.

Di-ver'si-tx, n. Difference ; variety.

Di-vert', v. a. To turn aside ; to draw away
from : — to amuse ; to entertain.

Di-vest', V. a. To strip : — to deprive of.

Di-vide', V. To part or separate ; to dis-
unite : — to distribute. — 2, w. Ridge of
land.

Div'i-dend, n. Share ; part allotted in divi-
sion : — share of interest : — number to be
divided. [compasses.

Di-vid'er, n. One that divides : — pi. pair of

Div-i-na'tion, n. Act of divining ; predic-
tion of future events.

Di-vine', a. Pertaining to, or proceeding
from, God ; godlike ; sacred : — supremely
excellent. — 2, n. Theologian ; clergyman.
— 3, V. Te foretell by signs : — to conjecture.



Div'ingr-bSll, «. Hollow chamber in whicu
men may work under water without
injury.

Div'ing-dress, n. Water-tight dress or
armor in which a diver may work under
water.

Di-vin'i-tv, n. Divine nature or quality ;
God : — angel : — false god : — theology.

Di-vig'i-ble, a. Capable of being divided. —
Di-vi§-i-bil'i-tx, n.

Di-vi"9i9'n (de-vizh'un), n. Act of di-
viding ; disunion : — part divided or set off :
— discord : — part of a military or naval
force : — process of finding how many times
one number is contained in another.

Di-vi'§or, n. Number which divides.

Di-vorce', n. Legal separation of husband



Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA new primary dictionary of the English language ... → online text (page 18 of 67)