Joseph E. (Joseph Emerson) Worcester.

A new primary dictionary of the English language ... online

. (page 22 of 67)
Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA new primary dictionary of the English language ... → online text (page 22 of 67)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


ity ; superior ; of great merit.

¥x-cel'si-or, a. More elevated. — 2, n.
Wood shredded and curled, used in up-
holstery, for packing goods, &c.



5x-cept', V. a. To leave out ; to exclude. —
2, V. n. To make objections. — 3, prep.
Exclusively of ; not including.

Ex-cept'ing, prep. With the exception of.

Ex-cep'tion, n. Act of excepting ; exclu-
sion ; tiling excepted : — objection.

Ex-cep'tion-a-ble, a. Liable to objection.

Ex-cep'tion-al, a. Implying or constituting
an exception ; rare ; peculiar.

Ex-cess', n. Moi-e than enough ; extrav-
agance : — intemperance.

Ex-ces'sive, a. Beyond due bounds ; vehe-
ment ; extreme.

ipx-chanfe', v. a. To give one thing for
another ; to barter : — to interchange. — 2,
n. Traffic ; barter ; thing exchanged : —
adjustment of accounts: — place where
merchants meet to transact business.

Ex-cheq'uer (eks-chek'er), n. English
court in charge of the public treasury : —
treasury.

Ex-ci§e', n. Tax upon goods produced and
consumed at home. — 2, v. a. To levy an
excise : — to cut out or off.

Ex-ci"§ion (eks-sizh'un), n. Act of ex-
cising ;' extirpation ; destruction ; ruin.

Ex-ci'ta-ble, a. Easily excited or stimu-
lated. — Ex-ci-ta-bil'i-tj:, n.

Ex-cite', V. a. To rouse ; to stimulate.

Ex-cite'ment, n. Act of exciting ; agitation ;
commotion ; that which excites.

Ex-cit'ingr, p. a. Tending to excite.

Ex-claim', v. n. To cry out ; to call ; to
shout : — to censure vehemently.

£x-cla-ma'tion, n. Yehement outcry : —
noisy censure: — mark [!] indicating
emotion.

Ex-clam'a-to-rjr, a. Containing, express-
ing, or using exclamation.

^x-cliide', v. a. To shut out ; to debar : — ts
expel.

3j:x-clii'§ion (eks-klii'zhun), n. Act of ex-
cluding"; rejection ; pi'ohibition : — expul-
sion.

Ex-clu'sive, a. Able or tending to exclude :

" — not taking into account.

Sx-com-mii'ni-cate, v. a. To exclude from
communication ; to expel from fellowship.

fix-com-mii'ni-cate, a. Excluded from
church fellowship.— 2, n. Excommuni-
cated person.

£x-com-mii-ni-ca'tion, n. Act of excom-
municating ; exclusion from church fel-
lowship.

Ex-co'ri-ate, v.'a. To skin ; to abrade.

Ex-co-ri-a'tion, n. Abrasion of the skin.

fix'cre-ment.'w. Dung :— refuse thrown off.

Ex-crSs'cence, n. Unnatural or superfluous
protuberance or outgrowth: — tumor; wart.

Ex-crete', v. a. To eject from the body as
waste or injurious.

Ex-cre'tion, n. Ejection of a waste sub-
' stance from the body : — waste substance
ejected.

Igx-cru'ci-ate (eks-kru'she-at), v. a. To
afflict with gre'at pain ; to torture.



EXCKUCIATING



115



EXPEDITION



^-eru'ci-at-inff, p. a. Very painful ; tort-
uring. "

Bx-ciSl'pate, v. a. To acquit ; to justify.

jlx-cul-pa'tion, n. Acquittal ; vindication.

■gx-cur'sion, n. Kamble ; wandering ; jour-
ney : — digression.

Ex-ciir'sive, a. Rambling ; wandering.

¥x-cii§'a-ble, a. That may be excused.

¥x-cii§e' (eks-kuz'), v. a. To apologize
for : — to pardon : — to release from an obli-
gation.

5x-ciise' (eks-kiis'), n. Reason alleged for
an action ; plea ; apology : — pretext.

£x'§-cra-ble, a. Hateful ; detestable.

Ex'e-crate, v. a. To curse : — to abominate.

Ex-e-cra'tion, n. Curse : — detestation.

Ex'e-ciite, v. a. To carry into effect : — to
complete : — to put to death legally.

fex-e-cS'tion, n. Act of executing ; perform-
ance : — death inflicted by law.

£x-e-cii'tion-er, n. One who puts to death
condemned criminals.

55-ec'iIi-tive, a. Having the power to act :
— putting the laws in force. — 2, n. Person
or power that administers the government.

]g!?-ec'{i-tor, n. One who puts into effect a
testator's will.

E5-ec'u-trix, n. Female executor.

E5-em'plar, n. Example to be followed.

Sj'em-pla-rjr, a. Worthy of imitation ;
correct : — warning : — explanatory.

3?5-em-pli.-fi-ca'tion, n. Illustration.

43?-em'pli-fy, v. a. To illustrate by ex-
ample.

]g!5-empt' (egz-gmf), v. a. To privilege ; to
excuse. — 2, a. Free by privilege • ^ot
liable. — 3, n. Person exempted.

iP$-emp'tion (egz-em'shun), n. Immunity
or freedom from service or duty ; privilege.

£x'er-ci§e, n. Labor or practice, as for
health, amusement, or training, or as
belonging to one's occupation : — student's
task or test : — ceremony ; rite. — 2, v. a. To
employ or practise, as the mind, body, or
faculties : — to train : — to task ; to afflict.
— 3, V. n. To use exercise.

55-ert', V. a. To use with effort ; to put
into exercise ; to do or perform.

E?-er'tion, n. Effort ; endeavor ; attempt.

Eg: ha-la'tion, n. Act of exhaling ; emis-
sion" of vapor ; vapor.

E$-hale', V. To emit or vanish in vapor.

E?-haust', V. a. To consume all of: — to
empty : — to weaken ; to tire.

:55-haus'tion (egz-hawst'yun), n. Act of
exhausting ; state of being exhausted ;
emptiness : — weakness ; weariness.

E5-hSust'ive, a. That exhausts: — thorough.

E5-hSust'iess, a. That cannot be exhausted.

^5-hib'it, v. a. To show publicly. — 2, n.
That which is exhibited : — paper offered
in court as evidence.

£x-hi-bi"tion (eks-he-bish'un), n. Act of
exhibiting" ; public show ; display.

E5-hil'a-rate, v. a. To cheer ; to enliven.

^^-hH-a-ra'tion, n. Hilarity ; animation.



]E?-hbrt', V. a. To incite to good ; to per-
suade ; to advise.

£x-hor-ta'tion, n. Act of exhorting ; in-
citement to good ; persuasive discourse.

Ex-hu-ma'tion, n. Act of exhuming.

:?$-hume', V.' a. To dig out of the earth or
from the grave.

Ex'i-i^ence, ) n. Pressing necessity ; ur-

Ex'i-|-en-cx, J gency ; emergency.

Ex'i-|-ent, a. Pressing ; urgent.

Ex'ile, n. Banishment : — person banished.

E?-ile', V. a. To drive from a country ; to
banish.

E?;-ist', V. n. To have existence or life ; to
be : — to remain. [which exists.

E?-ist'ence, n. State of being ; life : — that

Ex' it, n\ Departure : — death : — passage out.

Ex'o-dus, n. Departure : — second book of
the Old Testtiment.

E5;-on'er-ate, v. a. To clear of blame ; to
acquit ; to free.

E?;-on-er-a'tion, n. Act of exonerating;
acquittal of "blame.

E?;-br'bi-tance, n. Excess ; enormity.

E^-br'bi-tant, a. Unreasonable ; excessive.

Ex'or-ci§e, v. a. To expel, as evil spirits : — ■
to" purify from evil, or from malignant
spirits.

Ex'or-ci§m, n. Expulsion of evil, or of evil
spirits : — conjuration for this.

Ex'or-cist, n. One who exorcises.

B$-ct'ic (egz-ot'ik), a. Foreign ; not native.
— 2, n. Word, custom, plant, or animal
introduced from abroad.

:?x-pand', V. To spread out ; to lay open :
— to distend ; to dilate.

Ex-panse', n. Wide extent : — firmament.

Ex-pan' sion, n. Act or process of expand-
ing ; enlargement ; amplitude : — extent :
— space. [ — diffusive.

Ex-pan' sive, a. That expands ; spreading :

Ex-pa' ti-ate(eks-pa'she-a.t),v.m. To range
at large : — ^to enlarge upon in language.

Ex-pa' tri-ate, v. a. To banish.

Ex-pa-tri-a'tion, n. Banishment ; exile.

Ex-pect', V. a. To look or wait for, good or
evil : — to require.

?x-pect'ance, 1 Same &s expectation.

Ex-pect an-cx, J -^

Ex-pect'ant, a. Waiting in expectation.

Ex-pec-ta'tion, n. Act of expecting ; an-
ticipation : — hope ; trust : — prospect of
good.

Ex-pec' to-rate, v. To eject from the breast,
chest, or lungs, by coughing and spitting.

Ex-pec-to-ra'tion, n. Act of expectorating ;
matter expectorated ; spittle.

Ex-pe'di-ence, ) w. Quality of being ex-

Ex-pe'di-en-cjc, J pedient ; fitness ; suitable-
ness.

Ex-pe'di-ent, a. Proper ; necessary ; ad-
visable. — 2, n. Means to an end.

Ex'pe-dite, v. a. To quicken ; to facilitate.

Ex-pe-di"tion (eks-pe-dish'un), w. Haste;
speed : — military or other important enter-
prise ; voyage or march of importance.



EXPEDITIOUS



116



EXTERMINATION



£x-pe-di"tious (eks-pe-dish'us), o. Quick ;
speedy ; nimble : — diligent.

]px-pSl', V. a. To drive or shut out.

Ex-pend', V. a. To lay out ; to spend.

JEx-pen'di-tAre, n. Sum expended ; cest.

Ex-pense*, n. C!ost ; money expended,

^Jx-pen'sive, a. Extravagant ; lavish : —
costly ; dear.

:|!x-pe'ri-ence, «. Knowledge gained by
practice and observation : — trial ; proof. —
2, V. a. To prove or know by experience :
— to undergo.

5x-per'i-ment, n. Operation to discover or ;
prove some truth ; trial ; proof. — 2, v. n.
To make experiment.

^x-per-i-men'tal, a. Founded on experi-
ence or experiment.

]|:x-pert', a. Skilful ; dexterous ; adroit. —
2, n. One vrho has skill : — scientific wit-
ness, [tion for.

fix'pi-ate, V. a. To atone or make repara-

£:x-pi-a'tion, n. Atonement ; reparation.

£s'pi-a-to-rx, «• Making expiation.

fix-pi-ra'tion, n. Act of expiring : — emission
of breatih*:— death : — end ; termination.

Ex-pire', V. a. To breathe out ; to exhale.

" — 2, V. n. To emit breath : — to die : — to
terminate.

IBx-plain', v. a. To make plain or intelligi-
ble ; to clear up ; to illustrate.

£x-pla-na'tion, n. Act of explaining ; that
which explains : — mutual understanding.

Ex-plan' a-to-rjT) «• Containing explanation.

^x'ple-tive, w. Unnecessary word used to
fill a space : — oath. — 2, a. Used to fill up
a space.

Ex-plip'it, a. Plain ; direct ; express.

¥x-plode', V. To burst, or cause to burst,
with a loud noise : — to bring into disrepute.

Ex-ploit', n. Great or heroic act ; achieve-

" ment ; deed. — 2, v. a. To utilize ; to make
available.

£x-ploi-ta'tion, n. Act of exploiting, as
the natural wealth of a country.

£x-plo-ra'tion, n. Act of exploring, as for
geographical discoveries.

Ex-plore', v. a. To search into for the pur-
pose of discovery ; to examine thoroughly.

Ex-plor'er, n. One who explores.

Ex-plo'§ion (eks-plo'zhun), n. Act of ex-
ploding : — violent outbreak of feeling.

Ex-plo'sive, a. Bursting ; causing explo-
sion. — 2, n. Substance that may explode.

Ex-po'nent, «• Representative, as of a party
or cause : — figure showing how often a
quantity is to be multiplied by itself, as a^.

Ex-port', V. a. To carry or send abroad, as
merchandise, &c.

Ex'port, n. That which is exported to a
foreign market.

fix-p^r-ta'tion, n. Act of exporting ; that
which is exported to a foreign market.

]Bx-po§e', «. a. To lay open to view ; to
show up : — to explain : — to make liable.

.Expo86 (6k&-p9-za.'), «. Explanation: —
shameful disclosure.



£x-po.§i"tion (eks-p9-zish'un), n. Disclos-
ure": — explanation : — public exhibition.

]|;x-post'i&-late, V. n. To reason or remon-
strate earnestly.

l^x-post-ti-la'tion, n. Act of expostulating ;
earnest remonstrance.

¥x-po§'i{ire (eks-po'zhur), n. Act of expos-
ing ; state of being exposed : — situation
with respect to sun, air, the points of the
compass, or to danger : — expose.

Ex-pbund', v. a. To explain ; to interpret.

¥x-press', V. a. To sqiKjeze out : — to repre-
sent by sight or sound ; to utter : — to de-
note : — to send by express. — 2, a. Explicit ;
plain : — swift and regular. — 3, n. Messen-
ger or conveyance on a special errand : —
regular and quick conveyance, as for
merchandise.

Ex-press' a|-e, n. Charge for carrying by

' express.

Ex-press'i-ble, a. That may be expressed.

Igx-pres'sion (eks-presh'un), n. Act or
method of expressing ; that which is ex-
pressed : — representation by sight or
sound : — phrase ; utterance. [nificant.

Ex-pres'sive, a. Full of expression : — slg-

Ex-press'ix, <M^- III direct terms ; plainly.

Ex-piil'sion, n. Act of expelling ; ejection.

Ex-pul'sive, a. Able to expel.

Ex-pun^-e' , c. a. To efface ; to erase.

Ex-piir'gate (or eks'pur-gat), v. a. To
purify, as a book, from any thing noxious
or erroneous.

Ex-pur-gra'tion, n. Act of expurgating ;
purification from any thing noxious or
erroneous.

Ex'qui-§ite, a. Excellent • — fastidious : —
extreme or acute, as pleasure or pain.

Sx'tant, a. Standing out to view : — now in
being ; still existing.

Ex-tem-po-ra'ne-ous, \ a. Uttered or per-

?x-tem'po-ra-rj, / formed without pre-
meditation ; sudden.

?x-tem'po-re, a. & ad. "Without premedita-
tion.

Ex-tem'p7-rize, v. To speak or do extem-

" pore or in haste.

?x-tend', V. To stretch ; to expand : — to
reach : — to offer : — to diffuse.

Ex-ten' sj-ble, \ ^ rj,YxsLt may be extended.

Ex- ten' sue, J •'

Ex-ten' sion, n. Act of extending ; expan-
sion ; dilatation . — extent : — difiPiision.

Ex-ten' sive, a. Large ; wide ; comprehen-
sive.

Ex- tent', n. Size ; bulk ; compass.

]^x-ten'6-ate, v. a. To make thin or rare,
or small in bulk : — to lessen by apology ;
to palliate.

Ex-ten-6-a'tion, n. Palliation ; mitigation.

5x-te'ri-or, a. Outward ; external. — 2, n.
Outward surface.

]gx-ter'mi-nate, v. a. To root out ; to de«
stroy completely : — to kill.

?x-ter-mi-na'ticn, v. Act of exterminating ;
total destruction ; — slaughter.



EXTEKNAL



117



FACIAL



^x-ter'nal, a. Outward ; exterior : — visible.
— 2, n. " Outward or visible part.

]px-tinct', a. Extinguished : — no longer ex-
isting :— -dead.

ipx-tinc'tion, n. Act of extinguishing or
destroying ; destruction ; annihilation : —
death.

jpx-tjn'guish (ek-sting'gwish), v. a. To put
out ; to quench : — to supprebs ; to destroy.

5x-tin'guish-er, n. Utensil to extinguish
a candle, lamp, or fire.

Ex-tir' pate, v. a. To| eradicate.

:i;x-tir-pa'tion, n. Eradication.

:5x-tol', V. a. To praise ; to laud.

:px-tort', V. a. To gain or draw from by
compulsion or violence ; to exact.

^x-tijr'tion, n. Act or practice of extorting ;
illegal exaction ; oppression, [rapacious.

Ex-tor' tion-ate, a. Partaking of extortion ;

jlx'tra, a. Additional ; unusual ; special.
— 2,'m. Something extra, [extraordinary.

Extra-. Latin prefix, signifying beyond — as,

¥x- tract', V. a. To draw out, as by force or
chemical action : — to select or choose.

£x' tract, w. Substance extracted : — quota-
tion.

^px-trac'ti^n, n. Act or operation of ex-
tracting ; extract : — origin ; lineage.

£x-tra,-di"tion, n. Delivery by one govern-
ment to another of a person accused of a
crime.

jpx-tra'ne-ous, a. Not a part of ; foreign ,
of different substance.

^x-traor'di-na-rx {or gks-tra-or'de-na-re),
a. Unusual ; remarkable.

5x-trav'a-gance, «. Quality of being ex-
travagant : — excess ; prodigality ; waste.

5x-trav'a-grant, a. Irregular; wild :— ex-
cessive : — wasteful ; lavish.

^x-treme', a. Utmost ; farthest : — greatest.
— 2, n. Highest degree ; utmost point : —
end ; termination : — -pi. points at the great-
est distance apart :— distress ; urgency.

¥x-tre'mist, n. Supporter of extreme doc-
trines or practice.

]px-trem'i-t3:, n. Utmost point ; highest
degree : — end : — necessity : — suffering.



£x'tri-cate, v, a. To disembarrass ; to free
from perplexity ; to liberate.

£x-tri-ca'tion, n. Act of extricating ; lib-
eration ; disentanglement.

Ex-trin'sic, a. External.

ipjf-ii'ber-anoe (egz-yu'ber-ans), w. Over-
abundance ; great plenty.

5?-u^ber-ant (egz-yu-ber-ant), a. Over-
abundant ; copious ; rich, [which exudes.

£x-^-da'tion, n. Act of exuding ; that

^x-iide' (eks-yud'), v. To force or sweat
out ; to ooze ; to discharge.

¥?-iilt' (egz-ulf), V. n. To rejoice exceed-
ingly ; to triumph.

E?-ult'ance, n. Joy ; triumph.

E5-iilt'ant, a. Rejoicing exceedingly.

E^-ul-ta'tion, w. Act or expression of ex-
ultance ; *ioy ; triumph.

^^-illfing-lx, ad. Triumphantly.

Eye (i)> "• Organ
or power of vision ;
sight: — perception ;
judgment : — n o t i c e ;
vigilance : — small hole
in the end of a needle :
— any thing shaped
like an eye : — eyelet ;
loop : — seed-bud of a
potato or other plant. — 2, v. a.
to observe attentively.

Eye'bSll (i'bawl), n. Globe of the eye.

Eye'bro^ (I'broii), n. Hairy arch over the
eye ; brow.

Eye' -glass, n. Glass to assist the sight.

Eye'lash, n. Hair that edges the eyelid.

Eye'let (i'let), «. Small hole for the light
or to see through, or for a lace or cord.

Eye'lid (i'lid), n. Skin that shuts over the
eye.

Eye' shot, n. Glance • range of vision.

Eye'sight (I'sit), n. Sight of the eye.

Eye' sore (i'sor), n. Something offensive to
the sight.

Eye'-t68th (I'toth), n. ; pi. Eye'-teeth.
Pointed tooth in the upper jaw next bo-
hind the incisors.

Eyr'x (ar'e) n. Same as «ne.




Eye.
To watch ;



F.



Fa, n. Syllable applied to the fourth sound
in the musical scale.
Fa'ble (fa'bl), n. Tale to enforce
some moral, or merely to amuse : — myth :
— falsehood. — 2, v. To feign ; to tell
falsely : — to write fiction.
FSb'ric, n. Building ; edifice : — construc-
tion ; texture : — ^manufactured cloth.
Pab'ri-cate, v. a. To build ; to construct :

— to devise falsely.
PS.b-ri-ca'tion, n. Act of fabricating ; con-
struction ; Ihing fabricated : — falsehood.
Tab'^-list, n. Writer of fables.



Fab'i\-lous, a. Feigned : — increcfible ; enor-
mous. — Fab'n-lous-lj:, nd.

Fa-(ade', n. Front of a building.

Face, «. Fore part of the head ; counte-
nance : — front : — surface : — appearance : —
boldness. — 2, v. a. To confront ; to front
upon : — to oppose boldly : — to cover in
front. — 3, V. n. To turn the face.

Face'-card, n. Playing card bearing a
king, queen, or knave.

Fa9'et, n. Little surface, as on a gem.

Fa-cl'tious (fa-se'shus), a. Witty ; gay.

Fa'ci^l (fa'shal), a. Relating to the face.



FACILE



118



FANATICISM



PSj'ile (fSsMl)) «• Easy : — ^pliant ; flexible.

Fa-cil'i-tate, v. a. To make easy or easier.

Fa-cil-x-ta'tion, n. Act of facilitating.

ra-cil'i-tx, «. Ease : — dexterity : — ready
compliance : — means of easy performance.

TsLg'ing, n. Ornamental covering.

Fac-sim'i-le, n. Exact copy.

Fact, n. That which is, or which exists ;
reality : — thing done ; act.

Fac'tion, n. Political party : — dissension.

Fac'tious (fak'shus), a. Given to faction ;
turbulent ; seditious.

Fac-ti"tious (fak-tish'us), a. Artificial.

FJc'tor, n. Merchant's agent : — one of the
elements in a product or result.

Fac'to-rx, n. Residence or place of business
of "factors ; factors collectively : — estab-
lishment for manufacturing.

Fac-to'tum, n. One who does all sorts of
work ; handy man.

Fac'ul-tx, n. Natural power of mind or
body ; " ability ; dexterity : — privilege : —
department in a college ; officers of a de-
partment, or of the whole college : — mem-
bers of a profession.

Fade, v. n. To lose color ; to wither : — to
vanish. — 2, v. a. To cause to fade.

Fag, v. n. To grow weary : — to drudge. — 2,
V. a. To compel to drudge. — 3, n. Drudge.

Fag-end', n. End' of a web : — untvnsted
end of a rope : — refuse.

Fag'ot, n. Bundle of sticks, or of iron or
steel bars. — 2, v. a. To bundle together.

Fah-ren-heit', a. Noting the ordinary ther-
nwnieter scale of 212 degrees.

Fail, V. n. To lack : — to decay ; to wane : —
to cease ; to disappear : — to miss ; not to
succeed : — to become insolvent. — 2, v. a.
To desert ; to disappoint : — ^to be wanting
to. — 3, n. Omission ; deficiency.

Fail'ing:, n. Deficiency : — lapse : — fault.

Fail' ire (fal'yur), n. Deficiency: — cessa-
tion : — omission : — want of success : — de-
terioration : — ^bankruptcy.

Fain, a. Glad ; pleased. — 2, ad. Gladly.

Faint, n. Swoon. — 2, v. n. To svt'oon : — to
grow enfeebled : — to lose courage or zeal.
— 3, a. Lacking strength or spirit : — not
bright : — timid : — dejected.

Faint' -heart-ed, a. Cowardly ; timid.

Fair (far), a. Of light color; white: —
spotless : — beai;tiful : — not cloudy : — fa-
vorable ; — plain ; unobstructed : — open ;
candid : — just: — legible : — pretty good. — 2,
ad. Frankly ; complaisantly. — 3, n. Stated
market : — sale of fancy goods for a charita-
ble purpose.
Fiir'x (far'e), n. Imaginary diminutive
being, capable of kind or unkind acts
toward man.— 2, a. Relating or belong-
ing to, or given by, fairies.
Faith (fath), n. Active belief ; trust in God
or in Christ : — creed :— fidelity ; ancerity :
— promise.
Faith'ful, a. Loyal ; upright :— -worthy of
belief; — firm in religion.




Falcon.



Faith'less, a. Without faith ; false.

FSl'con (faw'kn), n. Hawk, formerly
trained for hunt-
ing birds, rabbits,
&c.

Fan, V. n. [i. fell; p.
fallen.] To drop
or sink to a lower
place or worse
condition ; to be-
come prostrate : —
to lose in strength,
value, or reputa-
tion : — to die : — to
sin : — to happen :
— to come into one's possession : — to be
uttered carelessly. — 2, n. Act of falling or
sinking ; tumble : — cascade ; cataract : —
death : — degradation : — ruin : — sin : — de-
crease : — cadence : — autumn.

Fal-la'cious (fal-la'shus), a. Producing
mistake ; deceitful ; delusive.

Fal'la-cy, n. Deceptive or false appear-
ance or argument.

Fail'en {fal'ln),p. from faU.

Fal'li-ble, a. Liable to error ; frail ; im-
perfect. — Fal-li-bil'i-tx, w.

Fal'low (fal'lo) a. Pale red, or pale yellow :
— untUled : — ^unsowed : — neglected. — 2, n.
Land left unsowed after being ploughed.

Fal'low-deer, n. Small European deer.

FSlse, a. Not true ; not genuine ; counter-
feit : — untruthful ; faithless.

Faise'hood (fals'hfid), n. False assertion.

FSl'si-fy, V. a. To counterfeit ; to forge :
— ^to make false : — to disprove. — 2, v. n. To
utter falsehoods.

Fai'si-tx, n. Contrariety to truth ; error,

Fal'ter, v- n. To speak brokenly ; to stam-
mer : — to waver ; to totter.

Fame, n. Rumor : — celebrity ; renown.

Famed (famd), p. a. Renowned.

Fa-mil'iar(fa-mil'yar), a. Well acquainted
"or known : — affable : — unceremonious. — 2,
n. One long acquainted : — demon sup-
posed to attend at call.

Fa-mil-i-ar'i-tx (fa-mil-ye-ar'e-te), n.
'intimacy: — undue freedom in speech or
act.

Fa-mil'iar-ize (fa-mil'yar-Iz), v. a. To
make familiar : — to make easy by habit.

Fam'i-lj:, "• Persons of common origin :
— those who live in one house.

Fam'ine, n. Scarcity of food.

Fam'ish, v. To afilict or be afflicted with
hunger ; to die of hunger.

Fa'mous, a. Renowned ; celebrated.

Fan, n. Instrument or machine for putting
the air in motion, for cooling the person,
for blowing a fire, or for winnowing grain.
— 2, V. a. To cool or blow with a fan.

Fa-nat'ic, n. Wild enthusiast.

Fa-nat'ic, \ a. Filled with fanaticism ;

Fa-nat'i-cal, / wildly enthusiastic.

Fa-nat'i-cigm, n. Wild enthusiasm, as
upon religion.



FANCIFUL



119



FEAST



Fan'ci-ffll, a. Imaginative ; visionary : —
whiinsical ; fantastic.

Fan' ex, «• Imagination : — idea : — ^fondness ;
love : — caprice ; whim ; humor. — 2, v. n.
To imagine ; to suppose. — 3, v. a. To
imagine : — to like. — 4, a. Pleasing the
fancy : — ornamental ; elegant.

Fang, n. Long, pointed tooth : — claw.

Fan-tas'tic, ) «. Not real ; imaginary :

Fan-tas'ti-cal, J — whimsical ; capricious.

Fan'ta-sx, "'• Same as fancy.

Far, ad. To or at a distance : — -very much.
— 2, a. Distant ; remote.

Farce, n. Short comic drama : — mere show ;
absurdity. [crous.

Far'ci-cal, a. Eelating to a farce ; ludi-

Fare, t7. n. To travel : — to happen, well or
ill : — to be in any state, good or bad : — to
feed. — 2, n. Price of passage in a vehicle :
— food.

F4re-well', \ ad. Adieu. — 2, w. Departure :

Fire'well, J — adieu. — 3, a. Taking leave.

Far-fetched', a. Strained ; forced.

Fa-ri'na, n. Flour ; meal ; starch.

Fir-i-na'ceou3, a. Mealy ; floury ; starchy.

Farm, n. Land cultivated by a farmer. — 2,
V. a. To lease or take on lease : — to culti-
vate.

Farm'er, n. One who farms ; cultivator : —
one who collects taxes on shares.

Farm'ingr, n. Business of a farmer.

Far-ra'gS, n. Confused medley.

Far'ri-er, n. Shoer of horses ; horse-doctor.

Far'row (far'ro), n. Litter of pigs. — 2, v.
To bring forth pigs.

Far'-sigrht-ed (-sit-ed), a. Seeing far: —
prudent.

Far'tfier, ad. More remotely : — moreover ;
further. — 2, a. comp. More remote ; fur-
ther.

Far'tfiest, a. superl. Most distant ; furthest.
— 2, ad. Most remotely ; furthest.

Far'tfeingr, n. Fourth part of a penny.

Fas'ci-nate, v. a. To enchant : — to charm.

Fas-ci-na'tion, n. Act of fascinating ;
charm ; enchantment.

Fash'ion (fash'un), n. General custom or



Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA new primary dictionary of the English language ... → online text (page 22 of 67)