Joseph E. (Joseph Emerson) Worcester.

A new primary dictionary of the English language ... online

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practice : — form or appearance : — sort : —
method : — high society. — 2, v. a. To
shape ; to form : — to fit ; to adapt.

Fash'i9n-a-ble (fash'un-a-bl), a. Con-
formed to the fashion '; modish : — genteel ;
well-bred.

FSst, V. n. To abstain from food. — 2, n.
Abstinence from food. — 3, a. Firm ; fixed :
— strong : — profound : — dissipated : — swift.
— 4, ad. Firmly : — svdftly.

FSst'en (fas'sn), v. To make or become fast
or fixed : — to secure ; to tie ; to unite : — to
impress.

FSst'en-ingr, n. That which fastens.
Fas-tid'i-ous, a. Haughty ; proud : — over-
nice ; squeamish.
FSst'ing, n. Act of abstaining from food.
F^st'ness, n. Firmness ; strength : — swift-
ness : — stronghold ; fortified place.



Fat, n. Oily part of animal flesh : — best or
richest part. — 2, a. Plump : — gross : —
stupid: — wealthy; fertile. — 3, v. To
fatten.

Fa'tal, a. Appointed by fate ; inevitable :
— deadly ; mortal ; destructive.

Fa'tal-i§m, n. Doctrine that all eventa
happen inevitably.

Fa'tal-ist, n. Adherent of fatalism.

Fa-tal'i-tx, w- Invincible necessity : — ten-
dency to danger : — fatal occurrence.

Fate, n. Inevitable necessity ; destiny : —
final event ; death.

Fat'ed, a. Decreed by fate ; doomed.

Fa'ther, n. Male parent or ancestor ; one
who acts as a father : — creator : — the Crea-
tor, God. — 2, V. a. To adopt, or assume
responsibility for.

Fa'tfier-in-law', n. Father of one's husband
or wife.

Fa'tiier-land, n. One's native land.

Fa'ther-less, a. Destitute of a father.

Fa'tier-ljr, a- Like a father ; paternal.

Fath'om, n. Measure of six feet in length.
— 2,'v. a. To seek or find the bottom of.

Fatfi'om-less, a. That cannot be fathomed.

Fa-tlgue' (fa-teg'), n. Weariness: — labor;
toil. — 2, V. a. To tire ; to weary.

Fat'lingr, n. Aaimal fed for slaughter.

Fat' ten (fat'tn), v. To make or grow fat.

Fat'ty, a. Having fat ; greasy.

Fa-tii'i-tj:, n. Foolishness ; silliness.

Fat'i-ous, a. Foolish ; silly ; stupid.

FSu'cet, n. Pipe to empty a vessel, [gust,

F^ugh (faw) , interj. Noting contempt or dis-

Ftult, n. Defect ; blemish : — error ; mis-
take ; slight offence.

Ftiult'less, a. Exempt from fault ; perfect.

FSult'x, «• Having faults ; defective.

Fa'vor, v. a. To countenance ; to assist : —
to resemble. — 2, n. Regard ; good will ;
support : — ^kind act.

Fa'vor-a-ble, a. Kind ; propitious : — ad-
vantageous.

Fa'vor-ite, w. Person or thing especially
beloved. — 2, a. Regarded with especial
favor.

Fa'vor-it-i§m, w. Undue partiality.

F^wn, n. Young deer : — flattery. — 2, v. n.
To court favor servilely : — to flatter.

FSwn'ing-, n. Gross or low flattery. — 2, jj. a.
Servile ; cringing.

Fay (fa), n. Fairy ; elf.

Fe'al-tx, ^- Sworn fidelity ; loyalty.

Fear (f er) , n. Dread ; terror : — regard with
awe. — 2, V. To dread ; to be afraid : — ^to
reverence.

Fear'ful, a. Afraid : — awful ; dreadful : —
to be reverenced.

Fear'less, a. Free from fear ; intrepid.

Fear' some, a. Causing fear : — timid.

Fea'§i-ble (fe'ze-bl), a. That may be done;
practicable. — Fea-gi-bil'i-tj:, "•

Feast (fest) , n. Entertainment at the table ;
banquet : — festival. — 2, v. To feed, eat,
or entertain sumptuously.



FEAT



120



TEETILIZATION



Feat, n. Act ; deed ; exploit.

Featfi-er, v. Phime or covering of birds. —
2, V. a. To dress in feathers ; to deck : —
to turn edgewise, as an oat- : — to enrich.

F^atfi'er-3[, a. Pertaining to, resembling,
or covered with, feathers.

Feat'ire (fet'yur), n. Lineament of the
face : — prominent characteristic : — ^l. cast
of the face.

Feb'ru-a-rx, **. Second month in the year.

Fe-ciin'di-ts:, n. Fruitfulness ; fertility.

Fed, i. & jj. from feed. [federation.

Fed'er-al, a. Relating to a league or con-

Fed-er-a'tion, n. Act of federating ■, con-
federation : — league ; confederacy.

Fed'er-a-tive, a. Uniting in a league.

Fee, n. Hewara ; compensation : — land held
for feudal service : — ^unconditional inheri-
tance. — 2, V. a. To pay : — to bribe.

Fee'ble, a. "Weak ; debilitated ; sickly.

Feed, v. a. [i. &■ p. fed.] To supply with
food or provisions : — to pamper : — to
graze : — to fatten. — 2, v. n. To subsist : —
to pasture. — 3, n. Food, as for beasts.

Feel, V. [i. & p. felt.] To perceive by the
touch : — to handle : — to have sense of ; to
suffer. — 2, n. Perception by the touch ;
sense of touch.

Feel'er, n. Antenna ; tentacle : — <;overt
word or action to sound opinions of others.

Feel'ing, n. Sense of touch ; perception by
touch : — tenderness : — sensibility : — pi. af-
fections or passions. — 2, p. a. Having
sensibility ; tender.

Feet, n. ; pi. of foot.

Feign (fan), v. To invent ; to fabricate : —
to pretend ; to counterfeit.

Feint (fant). n. Pretence :— muck attack.
^~2, V. n. To make a mock attack.

Feld'spar, n. Same as felspar.

Fe-lig'i-tate, ». a. To wish happiness to ; to
congratulate.

Fe-lif-i-ta'tion, n. Congratulation.

Fe-lif'i-toQs, a. Happy ; blissful.

Fe-lig'i-tx, n. Happiness ; bliss.

Fe'line, a. Pertaining to, or like, a cat.

Fell, a. Cruel ; inhuman ; savage. — 2, n.
Hide of a beast : — hill ; mountain-slope : —
kind of seam. — 3, v. a. To knock or cut
down : — to sew with a level seam. — 4, i.

Fel'loe, n. S&me &s felly. [froixi fail.

Fel'low (fel'lo), n. Companion; mate: —
member of a college corpoi-ation or learned
society : — mean person.

Fel'low-feel'ing, n. Sympathy.

Fel'low-ship, n. Companionship ; intimacy :
— partnership : — sociability.

Fell'j:, w. Outward rim of a wheel.

Fel'on, n. One convicted of felony : — pain-
ful inflammation of a finger or toe. — 2, a.
Felonious.

Fe-lo'ni-oiis, a. Criminal ; wicked.

Fel'o-njr, w. Crime punishable by death or
imprisonment.

Fel'spar, n. Silicious mineral which forms
a. constituent part of granite and sienite.



FSlt, i. & p. from feel. — 2, n. Hide or skin :
— unwoven stuft made of matted fibres of
wool or hair : — hat. — 3, v. To mat into
felt : — to cover with felt.

Fe'male, n. One of the sex which brings
forth young. — 2, a. Feminine.

Fem'i-nine, a. Relating to women or fe-
males ; female ; tender ; delicate.

Fem-i-nin'i-t3^, n. Female nature.

Fem'o-ral, a. Belonging to the thigh.

Fe'mur, n. Bone of the thigh.

Fen, n. Marsh ; moor ; bog.

Fence, n. Wall or hedge for enclosing ani-
mals or protecting land : — defence ; art of
fencing. — 2, v. a. To enclose ; to secure.
— 3, V. n. To practise fencing.

Fen'cing, w. Art or act of defence and of-
fence with the sword : — act of building a
fence ; materials for a fence.

Fend, v. To ward off : — to defend : — to shut
out : — to provide.

Fend'er, n. Metal guard before a fire, to
prevent coals from falling on the floor : —
cushion or other device to protect a ship,
car, etc., from damage by collision.

Fe'ni-an, n. Member of a former society for
the overthrow of English rule in Ireland.

Fen'nel, n. Garden plant with yellow
flowers and aromatic medicinal seeds.

Fen'nx, a. Marshy ; boggy ; moorish.

Fer-ment', v. n. To swell or effervesce by
internal action, as of yeast or of alcoholic
decomposition : — to be agitated. — 2, v a.
To cause to ferment.

Fer'ment, n. That which causes fermenta-
tion : — commotion ; tumult.

Ftr-men-ta'tion, n. Act or process of fer-
menting ; cKange due to a ferment : — rest-
lessness.

Fern, n. Plant of many species, bearing its
seeds on the back of the leaves.

Fern'e-ry, n. Place for growing ferns.

Fe-r5'cious (fe-ro'shus), a. Savage ; fierce ;
c r u el. — F e-
roc'i-tXi w.

Fer'ret, n. Kind
of weasel used
for hunting
rats, rabbits,
&c.— 2, V. a. To
drive out of
lurking places :-

Fer'ri-a§-e, w. Fare paid for passing a ferry.

Fer-ru'fi-nous, a. Containing iron.

Fer'rule (fcr'ril or fer'rul), n. Metal ring
around the end of a stick, to prevent split-
ting.

Fer'ry, v. To carry or pass over the water
in a' boat. — 2, n. Place for ferrying : —
ferry-boat.

Fer'rx-boat, n. Boat for conveying pas-
sengers across a ferry.

Fer'tile, «. Fruitful ; prolific ; productive ;
rich. — Fer-til'i-tj:, n.

Fer-til-i-za'tion,' n. Act or process of fer-
tilizing ; enrichment.




Ferret,
-to search out.



FEKTILIZE



121



FIGUEE-HEAD



Fer'til-Ize, v. a. To make fertile ; to en-
rich ; to manure. [manure.
Fer'til-iz-er, n. That which fertilizes ;
Fer'ule, w. Rod for punishing children. —

2, v. a. To chastise with the ferule.
Fer'vent, ) a. Hot ; glowing : — eager ; zeal-
Fer'vid, J ous. — Fer'ven-cx, «•
Fer'vor, n. Heat :— warmth ; ai-dor.
Fes'tal, a. Relating to feasts ; festive.
Fes'ter, v. n. To rankle : — to corrupt : — to

suppurate. — 2, v. a. To cause to fester. —

3, n. Small inflammatory suppurating
tumor. I

Fes'ti-val, n. Day of civil or religious joy ;

joyful " celebration ; festive anniversary ;

least- — 2, a. Festal.
Fes'tive, a. Festal ; mirthful ; gay.
Fes-tiv'i-tj:, n. Social joy; joyfulness;

gayety ; festival.
Fes-toon', n. Garland suspended between

two points ; wreath. — 2, v. a. To adorn

with festoons.
Fetch, I', a. To go and bring : — to perform :

— to sell for : — to reach. — 2, n. Stratagem ;

trick : — ghost ; wraith.
Fete (fat), n. Feast ; holiday.— 2, v. a. To

entertain with a feast.
Fet'id, a. Stinking ; rancid.
Fet'iock, n. Tuft of hair that grows behind

the pastern joint of horses.
Fe''tbr, n. Stench ; offensive smell.
Fet ter, n. Chain for the feet : — restraint.

— 2, V. a. To bind ; to enchain.
Feild (f lid) , n. Deadly quarrel : — fief.
Feu'dal (fu'dal), a. Relating to feudalism ;

held by service to a superior lord.
Feu'dal-i§m, n. System of holding land by

military service.
Fe'ver, n. Disease characterized by an ac-
celerated pulse, bodily heat, and thirst : —

agitation : — painful anxiety.
Fe'ver-ish, a. Diseased with, or indicating,

fever ; hot : — fickle : — morbidly eager.
Few (fii), a. Not many ; small in number.
Fez, a. Red Turkish or Moorish cap.
Fiance (fe-6n-sa), «. Man betrothed.
Fiancee (fe-6n-sa), «. Woman betrothed.
Fi-as'co, n. Failure ; blunder.
Fi'at, n. Order or decree.
Fib, n. Untrue statement ; lie. — 2, v. n. To

tell a falsehood.
Fi'bre (fi'ber), n. Slender, thread-like sub-
stance, animal, vegetable, or mineral.
Fi'brous (fi'brus), a. Composed of fibres.
Fib'ti-ia, w. Outer and smaller bone of the

leg :— buckle or clasp.
Fic'kle, a. Changeable ; inconstant.
Fic'tion, n. Feigned or invented story ;

novel ; romance : — falsehood.
Fic-ti"tious (fik-tish'us), a. Counterfeit;

false ; imaginary ; not real.
Fid' die, n. Violin. — 2, v. n. To play upon

the fiddle : — to trifle.
Fid'dler, n. One who plays upon a fiddle :

— kind of small crab.
Fi-del'i-tx, "• Honesty ; faithfulness ; truth.



Fidf'et, V. n. To move by fits and starts. —
2, n. Restless agitation.

Fidi^'et-x, «• Restless ; impatient ; uneasy.

Fie (fl), interj. Expressing blame or con-
tempt.

Fief (fef), w. Land held of a superior lord
in fee or on condition of military service.

Field, n. Tract of ground : — ground en-
closed for cultivation or pasture : — scene
of battle ; battle : — room for activity :—
expanse.

Field' -gun, n. Same 2iS field-piece.

Field' -hand, n. Agricultural laborer.

Field' -mar-shal, n. Highest military rank
in Great Britain and other European
countries.

Field' -mouse, n. ; pi. Field' -mice. Mouse
that lives in the fields.

Field' -of- fi-cer, n. Officer of a regiment,
above the ra»k of captain.

Field' -piece, «. Small cannon mounted
upon a wheeled carriage, for use Id the
field of battle.

Field' -sport, n. Diversion of shooting, hunt-
ing, racing, &c.

Fiend (fend), n. Deadly or infernal enemy
or being : — Satan.

Filnd'ish, a. Infernal ; malignant, [lent.

Fierce' (fers), a. Savage; ferocious: — vio-

Fi'er-x, «• Consisting of, or resembling,
fire : — hot : — ardent ; impetuous.

Fife, n. Small wind-instrument of music.
— 2, V. n. To play on a fife.

Fifteen, a. & n. Five and ten.

Fifteenth, a. Next after fourteenth. — 2, n.
One of fifteen equal parts of the whole.

Fifth, a. Next after fourth. — 2, n. One of
five equal parts of the whole.

Fif ti-eth, «. Next after forty-ninth. — 2, n.
One of fifty equal parts of the whole.

Fifty, a. & n. Five times ten ; five tens.

Fig-, n. Small tree, and its round or ob-
long edible fruit : — thing of little conse-
quence.

Fight (fit), V. [i. & p. fought.] To con-
tend ; to combat ; to contest. — 2, n. Bat-
tle ; combat ; duel.

Fig'ment, n. Invention ; fiction.

Fig'i-ra-tive, a. Full of, or represented
by, figures, resemblances, or types ; meta-
phorical ; not literal.

Fig' Are (fig'yur), n. Form ; shape : — ap-
pearance : — statue : — character denoting
a number, as 1, 2, 3, &c. :— value : — meta-
phor ; emblem. — 2, v. a.
To form into shape : — to
represent : — to mark with
figures or designs : — to
Imagine : — to calculate.
— 3, V. n. To make a fig-
ure : — to act a part : — to
make a distinguished ap-
pearance.

Fig'ire-head, n. Carved
figure on a ship's prow : — one who is a
mere puppet.




Figure-head.



FILAGREE



122



FISCAL



FJl'a-gree, n. Same aa filigree.

Fil'a-ment, n. Slender thread ; fibre.

Fil-a-men'tous, a. Like, or composed of,
threads.

Fil'bert, a. Hazel-nut.

Filch, V. a. To steal ; to pilfer.

File, n. Device for keeping loose papers in
order : — set or series of papers, magazines,
&c. : — catalogue ; list : — line of soldiers : —
toothed tool for cutting or smoothing
metal, wood, &c. — 2, v. a. To range in
order : — to cut or smooth with a file. — 3,
V. n. To march in a file.

Fil'ial (fil'yal), o. Befitting a child.

Fil'i-bus-ter.'n. Military adventurer.

Fil'i-grane, \ n. Fine ornamental work in

Fil'i-grree, J gold, silver, &c.

Fil'lngg, n. pi. Particles rubbed off by a file.

FillJ V. To make or grow full : — to satisfy or
become satisfied. — 2, n. Fulness ; satiety.

FJl'let, w. Band for the head, &c. ; band-
age : — thigh of veal. — 2, v. a. To bind
with a bandage.

Fil'lip, V. a. To strike with the finger-nail.
— 2, n. Jerk of the finger from the thumb :
— stimulus.

FJl'ly, n. Young mare : — flirt.

Film, n. Thin skin or membrane : — slender
thread.

Fil'mjr, a. Composed of films.

Fil'ter, v. a. To strain or purify by a filter.
2, V. n. To percolate. — 3, n. Apparatus
for clearing or purifying liquors by strain-
ing.

Filth, n. Foul matter ; dirt ; grossness.

Filth'x, a. Nasty ; foul ; dirty.

Fil'traibe, v. a. To filter.

Fil'trate, n. That which is filtered.

Fil-tra'tion, n. Act or process of filtering.

Fin, n. Swimming organ of a fish.

Fi'nal, a. Last ; conclusive : — decisive.

Fi-nEl'i-tj:. «• State of being final, con-
cluded, or settled.

Fi-nanoe', n. Public revenue : — art of man-
aging public moneys.

Fj-nan'cial, a. Relating to finance.

Fin-an-cier', a. One skilled in the manage-
ment of money. — 2, v. n. To manage
financial operations.

Fin'back, n. Kind of whale.

Finch, n. Small bird of many kinds.

Find, V. a. [i. & p. found.] To obtain by
searching or accident ; to discover : — to
observe ; to perceive : — to supply : — to de-
termine judicially. — 2, v. n. To pronounce
a verdict. — 3, n. Act of finding ; dis-
covery ; thing found.

Find'ing', n. Discovery : — verdict.

Find'ingg, n. pi. Tools and materials used
by journeymen.

Fine, a. Small ; minute : — pure : — thin ;
keen : — delicate : — showy ; beautiful : — ac-
complished ; superior. — 2, v. a. To refine :
— to punish by a fine. — 3, n. Pecuniary
punishment.
Fin'?r-x, n. Gayety ; show ; trinkets.



Fi-nesse', n. Artifice ; stratagem.

Fin'ger (fing'ger), n. One of the extremi-
ties of the hand : — length and breadth of
the finger. — 2, v. a. To handle.

Fin'§er-post, n. Guide-board.

Fin'i-cal, a. Nice in trifles ; foppish.

Fi'nis, n. End ; conclusion.

Fin'ish, v. a. To complete ; to end : — to
perfect. — 2, n. Last touch ; polish.

Fi'nite, a. Limited ; not inflnite.

Fin'njr, «• Furnished with fins.

Fiord, n. Sa,m.e &s fjord.

Fir, n. Cone-bearing evergreen tree.

Fire, n. Heat and light produced by com-
bustion ; flame : — any thing burning ; con-
flagration : — light ; radiance : — ardor. — 2,
V. a. To set on fire ; to kindle ; to inflame :
— to animate : — to discharge, as a gun. — 3,
V. n. To take fire : — to discharge fire-arms.

Fire'-a-larm, n. Apparatus for giving no-
tice of a fire ; notice of fire.

Fire'-arm?, n. pi. Weapons for discharging
missiles by gunpowder or other explosive.

Fire'brand, n. Piece of wood kindled : — in-
cendiary : — one who infiames factions.

Fire' -brick, n. Brick that will not melt.

Fire' -clay, n. Clay for making fire-bricks.

Fire'-crack-er, n. Small noisy firework.

Fire' -damp, n. Inflammable gas in coal-
mines, wells, &c.

Fire'-en-§ine, n. Machine to extinguish
flres with water or chemical liquors.

Fire'-es-cape, n. Means of escape from a
building in case of fire.

Fire' -fly, n. Insect which emits light.

Fire'man, n. One employed to extinguish
fires :— one who tends fires.

Fire'place, n. Place for fire in a chimney.

Fire'-prSof, a. Proof against fires. — 2, n.
Fire-proof room or safe. — 3, v. a. To ren-
der proof against fire.

Fire' side, w. Hearth: — ^home. — 2, a. Near
the fire : — domestic.

Fire' wood (fir'wtld), n. Wood for fuel.

Fire' works (flr'wiirks), n. pi. Prepara-
tions of powder and other combustibles,
to be fired for display or amusement ;
pyrotechnics.

Fir'kin, «. Vessel containing nine gallons :
— wooden vessel for butter, lard, &c. ; 56 lbs.

Firm, a. Strong : — stable : — solid : — con-
stant ; resolute. — 2, n. Mercantile part-
nership or company, and its business name.

Fir'ma-ment, n. Celestial expanse ; sky.

First, a. Earliest or foremost in time, place,
rank, or estimation ; original ; chief. — 2,
ad. Before all others.

First' -born, a. First in order of birth.

First' -clSss, o. Of the first quality.

First' -fruits, n. pi. First produce of land ;
first profits of any thing.

First' Ijr, ad. In the first place.

First' -rate, a. Preeminent ; superior.

Firth, n. Rock -bound strait or inlet.

Fis'cal, a. Belonging to a public treasury :
— pertaining to business or finance.



FISH



123



FLAXSEED



Ush, M. Scaly animal living in water,
breathing through gills instead of lungs :
— flesh of fish as food. — 2, v. n. To seek
or catch fish : — to seek by artifice. — 3, v. a.
To catch : — to draw out of the water : — to
search for fish.

Fish'er, «. Fisherman : — animal of the
marten kind.

Pish'er-man, n. One who lives by fishing.

Fish'er-jr, n. Business, or a place, of fishing.

Fish'-hook (-hfik),n. Hook to catch fish.

Fish'ingr, n. Art, act,i or practice of catch-
ing fish. 1

Fish'-wife, n. Woman who sells fish,

Fiah'x, a. Consisting of, or like, fish : — in-
habited by fish : — incredible ; doubtful.

Fis'sure (fish'yur), n. Cleft; crevice.

Fist, n. Hand clinched or closed.

Fis'ti-ciiff's, n. pi. Combat with the fist.

Fist'i-la, n. Pipe : — sinuous ulcer.

Fit, n. taroxysm ; conmlsion : — temporary
attack : — intermittent return : — adjust-
ment ; suitability. — 2, a. Proper ; suita-
ble ; convenient. — 3, v. a. To suit ; to
adapt : — to accommodate or provide : — to
qualify : — to be adapted to.— 4, v. n. To
be proper, becoming, suitable, or adapted.

Fit'ful, a. Inconstant ; unsteady ; fickle.

Fit' ting:, p. a. Suiting : — fit ; proper.

Fit'ting§, n. pi. Equipments.

Five, a. & n. Four and one ; half of ten.

Five fold, a. & n. Five times as much.

Fix, V. a. To make fast or stable ; to settle :
— to appoint : — to put in order. — 2, v. n.
To rest : — to become firm or hard.

Fixed (fikst or fiks'ed),^). a. Made fast;
firm ; stable ; established. — Fix'i-tjr, n.

Fixt'ire (fiket'yur), n. Furniture fixed to
a house ; any thing fixed to a place.

Fizz, ) V. n. To hiss or sputter : — to fail

Fiz'zle, J ridiculously.

Fiz'zle, n. Ridiculous failure.

Fjord (fyord or fl-ord'), n. Eock-bound
strait or inlet.

Flab'bx, a. Soft ; not firm ; flaccid ; lank.

Flap' gid ( flak'sid) , a. Weak and soft ; lank ;
limber. — Flap-gid'i-tjr, «•

Flag', V. n. To grow dejected or feeble : — to
hang loose. — 2, v. a. To let fall :— to
cover with flat stones : — to signal with a
flag. — 3, n. Long-leaved aquatic plant ;
iris : — cloth bearing colors or a device, as
of a nation : — flat stone for paving.

Fla| - el-la'tion, n. Whipping ; scourging.

Flal-'eo-let (flaj'o-let), n. Small musical
wind-instrument resembling a flute.

Flag'^ingr, n. Foot-pavement of flag-stone.

Fla-fi"tious (fla-jish'us), a. Grossly
wicked ; atrocious ; profligate.

Flag' on, n. Vessel for holding liquor.

Fla'grran-cxi «• Quality of being flagrant :
— heat ; fire : — enormity.

Fla'grant, a. Ardent ; glowing : — enor-
mous ; notorious.

Flag'-ship, n. Ship which bears the com-
mander of a fleet.




Flamingo.



FlSgr'-stSff, n. Staff" for a flag.

Flag' -stone, n. Flat stone for pavii^g.

Flail, n. Instrument for threshing.

Flake, n. Scale ; layer ; film. — 2, v. Tc
form, or break into, flakes.

Fla'kjc, a. Consisting of flakes or layers.

FlS,m'beau (flam'bo), n. Lighted torch.

Flame, n. Lighted gas ; fire ; blaze : — ardor.
: — 2, V. n. To shine as fire ; to burn : — t©
break out, as in passion.

Flam'ing, a. Gaudy : — ar-
dent : — exciting.

Fla-min'go, n. Tall red
bird with long neck and
legs.

Flanfe, n. Projecting rim
on the tire of a wheel.

Flank, n. Part of the side :
— side of an army or fleet.
— 2, V. a. To attack on
the flank : — to secure on
the side : — to border.

Flan'nel, n. Soft woollen cloth.

Flap, n. Any thing that hangs broad and
loose : — motion or noise of a flap : — slap.
— 2, V. To beat or move with a flap.

Flap'jack, n. Broad, thin pancake.

Flire, v. n. To give a glaring or unsteady
light : — to expand outward. — 2, n. Un-
steady, glaring light : — expansion or di-
vergence.

Flash, n. Sudden blaze ; flame : — wit : —
something transient. — 2, v. n. To burst
out into flame, light, or wit : — to break
out suddenly. — 3, a. Low: — vulgarly
gaudy.

Flash'x, a. Gay ; showy ; gaudy.

Flask, n. Bottle : — powder-horn.

Flat, a. Horizontal ; level : — prostrate : —
absolute ; positive : — insipid : — not shrill
or sharp. — 2, n. Level ; plain : — shoal : —
dunce : — single story used as a dwelling :
— mark of depression of musical tone.

Flat'-ir-on (-i-urn), n. Instrument for
smoothing clothes.

Flat'lX) (t-d. Peremptorily ; positively.

Flat'te'n (flat'tn), v. To make or grow flat.

Flat'ter, v. a. To compliment ; to praise
falsely : — to raise false hopes.

Flat'ter-ing, p. a. Bestowing flattery ; art-
ful :— encouraging ; complimentary.

Flat'ter-x, n. Venal praise ; adulation.

Flat'wi§e, ad. With the flat side down.

Flaunt (flant), v. To display ostentatiously
or impudently. — 2, n. Ostentatious dis-
play.

Fla'vor, n. Power of pleasing or affecting
the taste ; relish ; savor : — odor. — 2, v. a.
To give a flavor or taste to.

Flaw, n. Crack ; defect : — gust : — uproar.
— 2, V. a. To break ; to crack.

Flax, n. Fibrous plant, of which linen is
made.

Flax'en (flak'sn), a. Made of, or like, flax ;
— of a light color.

Flax' seed, n. Seed of flax ; linseed.



FLAY



124



FLOW



Flay (fla), v. a. To strip off the skin.
Flea (fle), n, ' Agile blood-sucking insect.
Fleck, V. a. To spot ; to streak. — 2, n.

Spot ; stain ; streak.
Flec'tipn, n. Act or power of bending.
Fled, ». & i>. from fiee.
Fledfe, v. a. To furnish with feathers.
Fledg'lingr, n. Young bird newly fledged.
Flee, V. ' [i. & p. fled.] To run from danger ;

to escape.
Fleece, n. Wool shorn from one sheep. — 2,

V. a. To shear the wool from ; to clip : —

to plunder.
Flee'cy, a. Woolly : — ^like a fleece.
Fleer, v. To mock ; to jeer. — 2, n. Mock-
ing grimace ; mockery.
Fleet, n. Company of ships ; navy. — 2, a.



Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA new primary dictionary of the English language ... → online text (page 23 of 67)