Joseph E. (Joseph Emerson) Worcester.

A new primary dictionary of the English language ... online

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Spore, n. Reproductive substance of a flower-
less plant.

Sport, n. Frolic ; plaything : — mock : — out-
door diversion, as hunting, games, and the
like : — plant or animal that varies ab-
normally from type ; freak. — 2, v. To
play ; to game : — to vary abnormally from
type.

I^lrt'i^e, } "• ^^ ' ""^""^ ' •''^*'^-
Sports^ man, n. ; pi. Sports' men. One who
pursues' field-sports, a^ hunting, &c.



Sports'm^n-ship, n. Practice or skill of
sportsmen.

Spot, n. Blot : — taint ; disgrace : — small
place. — 2, V. a. To mark with spots : — to
disgrace : — to recognize. — 3, v. n. To be-
come spotted.

Spot'l^ss, o. Free from spots : — innocent.

S^5t't^^' } °' ^*^^®^ ^^*^ ^°^-

Spoft'§al, a. Nuptial ; matrimonial. — 2, n.
Marriage.

Sp'dii§e, «. Husband or wife.

Spoilt, n. Pipe or projecting mouth of a
vessel : — jet or column, as of water : —
waterspout. — 2, v. a. To pour with vio-
lence : — to recite volubly. — 3, v. n. To
issue as from a spout.

Sprain, v. a. To overstrain the ligaments.
— 2, n. Wrench ; lameness caused by

Sprang, i. from spring. [spraining.

Sprat, n. Small sea-fish, like the herring.

Spriwl, V. n. To stretch ; to spread out, as
the limbs.

Spray, n. Water in fine particles : — twig. —
2, V. a. To besprinkle with spray.

Spread (spred), v. \i. &p. spread.] To ex-
tend ; to expand : — to diffuse : — to cover. —
2, n. Extent ; expansion : — cloth or cover :
— feast.

Spread' -ea-gle, a. Bombastic ; boastful
M. Eagle with wings outspread.

Spree, n. Noisy frolic ; drinking-bout.

Sprig, n. Small branch ; twig : — brad
V. a. To mark or adorn with sprigs.

Spright (sprit), «. Spirit; sprite.

Spright'lx (sprit'le), a. Lively ; airy ; gay.

Spring, V. n. \i. sprung or sprang •,p. spning.]
To begin to grow : — to arise ; to issue : — to
leap ; to bound. — 2, v. a. To start : — to
discharge. — 3, n. Season between winter
and summer, comprising March, April,
and May : — elastic force or device : — leap :
— source : — motive.

Spring' -board, n. Elastic board used in
springing.

Spring:' -buck, 1

Spring' -boo, J

Springe, n. Snare with a spring-noose. — 2,
V. a. To trap with a springe.

Spring' -h^lt, n. Lameness or halting in a
horse.

Spring'-tide, w. Highest tide for the month,
at new and full moon — opposed to neap-tide.

Spring's:, «• Elastic : — full of springs.

Sprin'kle (spring'kl), r. a. To scatter : — to
bedew. — 2, v. n. To scatter drops : — to rain
slightly. — Z, n. Small quantity scattered.

Sprink'ling, n. A scattering in small drops ;
small quantity scattered.

Sprint, V. n. To run very rapidly. — 2, n.
Short, rapid run.

Sprit, n. Small diagonal boom for a sail.

Sprite, n. Spirit ; elf.

Sprit' sail, n. Sail mounted with a sprit.

SproQt, V. n. To germinate ; to shoot. — 2, it.
Shoot of a plant.



2,



2,



South African antelope.



SPEtJCE



289



STAFF



Spruce, a. Nice ; trim ; neat. — 2, v. To
trim; to dress; to prink. — 3, n. Various
epecies of fir.

Spruce'-beer, n. Beer tinctured with
spruce.

Sprung:, i. & 2). from spring.

Spry, a^ Nimble ; active ; lively.

Spud, n. Small narrow spade.



To foam.



Foam



— 2, n.
Frothy ; foamy,
-mettle.



Spiime, v.
scum.

Spii'mous, or Spii'my, a

Spian, i. & p. from spin.

Spunk, w. Touch-wood

Spunk'jr, a- Quick-tempered ; spirited.

Spiir, n. Goad worn on the heel by horse-
men : — incitement : — snag : — branch of a
mountain-range. — 2, v. To prick with a
spur ; to urge forward ; to hasten : — to fix
a spur to.

Spiir§e, n. Genus of plants with acrid milky
juice.

Spii'ri-ous, a. Counterfeit ; false ; illegiti-
mate.

Spiirn, v. To kick : — to reject with dis-
dain.

Spiirred (sptird), a. Wearing spurs.

Spiirt, n. Sudden ejection ; jet : — short but
violent effort. — 2, v. To throw or gush
out: — to make a sudden and violent ef-
fort.

Sput'ter, V. To throw out spittle in speak-
ing : — to speak confusedly. — 2, n. Moisture
thrown out in drops : — uproar.

Spy, n. Secret emissary to watch an en-
emy. — 2, V. To discover at a distance : —
to inspect secretly.

Spy' -glass, n. Small telescope.

Squab (skwob), a. Unfeathered : — thick
and stout. — 2, n. Short, fat person : —
young pigeon.

Squab'ble (skwob'bl), v. n. To wrangle. —
2, n. Quarrel ; wrangle.

Squad (skwod), n. Small party, as of sol-
diers.

Squad'ron (skwcd'run), n. Body of cavalry :
— section of a fleet.

Squal'id (skwol'id), a. Foul ; nasty ; filthy.
— Squa-lid'i-t^, n.

Squall, V. n. To scream, as a child. — 2, n.
Loud scream : — gust of wind.

Squtll'y, a. Windy ; gusty ; stormy.

Squa'lbr, n. Filth ; foulness.

Squa'mous, a. Covered with scales ; scaly.

Squan'der (skwon'der), v. a. To spend pro-
fusely ; to waste.

Squd.re, a. Having four equal sides and four
right angles : — forming a right angle : —
even: — honest; fair; equitable. — 2, n.
Figure with four right angles and four
equal sides : — square piece or space : — part
of a street between cross-streets: — instru-
ment for drawing right angles : — product
of a number multiplied by itself : — integ-
rity ; justice. — 3, v. a. To form with right
angles : — to fit : — to balance : — to multiply
by itself. — 4, v. n. To suit with.



Squash (skwosh), v. a. To crush into pulp.
— 2, n. Any thing soft : — plant and fruit
of the gourd kind.

Squat (skwot), v. n. To sit on the heels ; to
cower : — to settle on public lauds with-
out a title. — 2, a. Cowering : — short and
thick.

Squat' ter, w. One who settles on land with-
out a title.

SquSw, n. Indian woman or wife.

Squawk, v. n. To cry with a harsh voice.
— 2, n. Loud, harsh cry.

Squeak, v. n. To make a shrill noise. — 2, n.
Sharp, disagreeable sound.

Squeal, n. Shrill, sharp cry. — 2, v. n. To
cry with a shrill, sharp voice, or as a

pig-

Squeam'ish, a. Easily disgusted ; fastidious.

Squeeze, v. a. To press : — to oppress. — 2,
V. n. To urge one's way. — 3, n. Act of
squeezing ; compression : — hug.

Squelch, v. a. To crush ; to put down.

Squib, n. Little explosive fire-work : — skit ;
lampoon.

Squid, n. Cuttle-fish : — artificial bait for fish.

Squill, n. Bulbous medicinal root.

Squint, a. Looking obliquely. — 2, w. Oblique
look. — 3, V. n. To look obliquely or
awry.

Squint' -eyed (skwint'id), a. Having squint
eyes.

Squire, n. Contraction of esquire : — coun-
try gentleman. — 2, v. a. To attend ; to
wait on.

Squirm, v. n. To
twist about, as an
eel ; to wriggle.

Squir'rel (skwir'-
rel or skwur'rel),
n. Small, active
rodent animal,
with a bushy
tail.

Squirt, V. To throw
out or gush out iir a quick stream. — 2,
n. Pipe to eject liquor: — jet; quick
stream.

Stab, V. To pierce ; to wound : — to thrust. —
2, n. Wound with a sharp weapon : —
thrust : — attempt.

Sta'ble, a. Fixed ; steady ; firm. — 2, n.
House for horses and cattle. — 3, v. To
dwell or put in a stable. — Sta-bil'i-ty, n.

Sta'bling-, n. Accommodations for horsea
and cattle.

Stack, n. Large pile, as of hay or grain : —
column of chimneys ; chimney. — 2, v. a.
To pile up regularly in stacks.

Staff, n.; pi. Stave§, or Stave§. Stick for
support in walking, for ensign of author-
ity, to hoist a flag on, &c. : — prop ; sup-
port : — club : — straight handle : — stanza :
— set of lines and spaces to write music
on :-r(p^. Staffs) officers attached to a
commanding oificer : — assistants collec-
tively.




Squirrel.



19



STAG



290



STAEYE




SiS.g, n. Male of deer, especially of the red
deer.

Stafe, n. Raised floor or
platform : — theatre : —
resting-place in a jour-
ney : — degree of prog-
ress : — ntage-coach. — 2,
V. a. To represent on
the stage.

Sta§e' -coach, n. Public
passenger carriage.

Stag^ger, v. n. To reel :
— to hesitate. — 2, v. a.
To make to reel : — to
alarm.

Stag^^erg, n. pi. Apoplexy in horses.

Stagr'-hound, n. Hound used in hunting
deer.

Sta^'ing, n. Scaffolding : — travel by stage
coach.

Stag'nant, a. Not flowing ; sluggish : — im-
pure fi-om standing, as water.

Stag^'nate, v. n. To cease to flow ; to be
sluggish : — to become impure from stand-
ing.

Stag-na'tion, n. Act of stagnating.

Staid, a. Sober ; grave ; regular.

Stain, V. a. To color : — to discolor ; to blot :
— to disgrace. — 2, n. Coloration : — blot ;
blemish : — shame ; disgrace.

Stain'less, a. Without stain : — innocent.

Stdir, n. Step ; series of steps -.—pi. flight
of steps.

Stair'case, \ n. Flight of stairs, with the

Stair' way, J balustrade and walls.

Stake, n. Post : — wager ; pledge : — ^hazard.
— 2, V. a. To mark or defend with stakes :
— to hazard : — to wager.

Sta-lac'tite, «. Concretion of carbonate of
lime, pendent like an icicle.

Sta-lag'mite, n. Erect conical deposit of
carbonate of lime, on the floor of a cavern.

Stale, a. Kept too long ; stagnant ; musty :
— trite ; vapid.

Stalk (stawk), V. n. To walk with stately
st«ps. — 2, V. a. To hunt by stealth. — 3, n.
Stem of a plant, of a quill, &c.: — stately
gait.

StSU, n. Compartment for a horse, &c.;
stable : — seat in the choir of a church : —
booth for merchandise. — 2, v. To place or
keep in a stall : — to stick fast, as in the
mire. [purposes.

Stall'ion (stal'yun), n. Horse for breeding

Sttl'wart, a. Stout ; robust : — bold ; brave.

Sta'men, n. Fertilizing organ of a flower.

Stam'i-na, n. pi. Strength ; vigor ; endur-
ance.

Stam'i-nal, \a. Relating to, or consist-

Sta-min'e-oiis, J ing of, stamens.

Stam'i-nate, a. Having, or producing,
stamens.

Stam'mer. v. To speak hesitatingly. — 2, n.
Stammering utterance.

Stam'mer-ing, p. a. Hesitating in speech.
— 2, n. Impediment in speech.



Stamp, V. To strike with the foot : — to im-
press with some mark or figure : — to put
a stamp on. — 2, n. Act of stamping : —
die ; imprint : — ofiicial mark : — postage-
stamp : — mill for crushing ores.

Stam-pede', m. Sudden fright and scamper-
ing, as of wild horses. — 2, v. To scatter
in a panic.

Stanch, v. a. To stop the flow of, as blood :
— to prop. — 2, a. Sound ; trusty ; hearty.

Stan'ghion (stan'shun), «. Prop ; support.

Stand, V. n. [i. & p. stood.] To be upon the
feet : — to halt ; to remain : — to keep one's
ground : — to hold a course : — to be situated:
— to have rank : — to have meaning. — 2,
V. a. To endure : — to abide by : — to pay
for. — 3, u. Station ; situation : — halt : —
small table.

Stand' ard, n. Ensign ; flag : — standing tree :
— established rule or model. — 2, a. Having
permanent value : — affording a rule or
model.

Stand'ing, p. a. Stagnant : — permanent. —
2, n. Continuance : — station ; rank.

Stand'-pbint, n. Point of view.

Stand'-still, n. Complete halt.

Stan'za, n. Series of Unes forming a division
of a poem.

Sta'ple (str/pl), n. Market : — raw material :
— principal commodity : — important ele-
ment : — thread of textile fabrics : — iron
loop. — 2, a. Established : — principal.

Star, n. Luminous heavenly body : — badge
of honor : — fortune : — chief actor or ac-
tress : — asterisk [*] . — 2, v. a. To deck
with stars. — 3, v. n. To appear as chief
actor.

Star' board, n. Right - hand side of a
ship.'

Starch, n. Substance to stiffen cloth with.
— 2, V. a. To stiffen with starch.

Starch'y;, a. Partaking of, or like, starch.

Stare, v. n. To look with fixed eyes ; to
gaze. — 2, V. a. To affect or influence by
stares. — 3, n. Fixed look.

Star'fish, n. Star-shaped marine animal.

Stir'ing, a. Gazing fixedly.

Stark, a. Mere ; gross : — powerful : — rigid.
— 2, ad. Wholly ; entirely.

Star'ling, w. European song-bird.

Star'rx, «■ Consisting of, or like, stars.

Star'-span-gled (-spang-gld), a. Spotted
with stars.

Start, V. n. To move suddenly : — to begin ;
to set out : — to shrink back slightly. — 2,
V. a. To startle : — to rouse ; to put in
motion : — to call forth. — 3, «. Motion of
terror : — spring : — beginning.

Star'tle, v, n. To start with fear. — 2, v. a.
To frighten ; to shock. — 3, n. Alarm ;
shock.

Star'tling, p. a. That startles ; astonishing.

Star-va'tion, n. Act of starving ; state of
being starved.

Starve, v. n. To suffer or die from cold or
hunger. — 2, v. a. To cause to starve.



STATE



291



STENT



State, n. Condition : — crisis : — rank ; pomp :
— estate : — government : — commonwealth
of the American republic : — pi. nobility :
— legislative body. — 2, ;;. a. To specify ;
to tell.

State' -craft, n. Statesmanship.

Stat'edv^i?. a. Regular ; fixed ; established.

State'lj:, a. Grand ; lofty ; majestic.

State'ment, n. Act of stating ; recital.

State'-room, «. Magnificent apartment : —
sleeping-room in a ship or railway-car.

States'man, n. One versed in, or employed
in, aiTairs of state.

States'man-ship, n. Qualities or function
of a statesman.



Stat'ic, \ ^
tat'i-cal, J



Stat'



Relating to statics.



Stat'ics, n. Science of forces at rest, or in
equilibrium.

Sta'tion, n. Fixed place : — place of stop-
ping, as on a railroad : — condition of life ;
office ; rank. — 2, v. a. To place ; to estab-
lish.

Sta'tion-a-rjr, a. Fixed ; not progressive ;
permanent.

Sta'tion-er, n. Dealer in books, writing-
materials, &c.

Sta'tion-er-3j, n. Wares of a stationer.

Sta'tist, n. Statistician : — statesman.

Sta-tis'tic, 1 a. Relating to statistics, or

Sta-tis'ti-cal, J to the population, resources,
commerce, industries, &c., of a coun-
try.

Stat-is-ti"cian (stat-is-tish'an), n. One
versed in statistics.

Sta-tis'tics, n. Science which treats of the
population and resources of nations ; col-
lection of statistical facts.

Stat'ii-a-rx, n. Art of carving or casting
statues : — statue, or statues : — sculptor.

Stat'6e (stat'yu), n. Image of a living
being, in marble, bronze, &c.

Stat-ii-esque' (stat-yu-esk'), a. Like a
statue.

Stat-A-ette', n. Small statue.

Stat'Are (stat'yur), n. Height of any ani-
mal.

Sta'tus, n. Standing ; situation ; rank.

Stat'iite (stat'yut), n. Law enacted by a
legislative body ; edict.

Stat'ii-to-rx, a. Enacted by statute

Staunch (stanch), v. & a. Same as stanch.

Stave, V. a. [i. & p. stove or staved.] To
break a hole in : — to push : — to delay : —
to furnish with staves: — to make solid. —
2, n. Thin timber of a cask, &c.: — musi-
cal staff: — stanza.

Stay, V. [i. & p. staid or stayed.] To con-
tinue in a place ; to wait : — to hinder ; to
restrain : — to support. — 2, n. Continu-
ance : — "jtop ; delay : — support ; guy.

Stay§, n. pi. Underwaist stiffened with
whalebone : — large ropes to support a
mast : — fixed anchorage.

Stead, n. Room ; place : — service.

St§ad'f%3t, a. Steady ; firm ; constant.



Stead' jr, a. Stable ; regular ; constant. — 2,
V. To make, become, or keep steady.

Steak, n. Slice of meat for broiling.

Steal, V. [i. stole; p. stolen.] To take by
theft : — to withdraw privily : — to gain or
win by stealth.

Stealth, n. Secrecy ; slyness.

Stealth'x, «• Performed by stealth ; sly.

Steam, n. Elastic vapor produced by boil-
ing water : — mist from condensed vapor.
— 2, V. n. To send up vapors : — to move by
steam. — 3, v. a. To apply steam to.

Steam'-boat, n. Boat propelled by steam.

Steam'-boil'er, n. Boiler for generating
steam.

Steam' -en-i'ine, n. Engine operated by
steam.

Steam' er, n. Ship propelled by steam : —
steam fire-engine : — vessel for steaming
food.

Steam'-ship, n. Ship propelled by steam.

Steam' -tiig', n- Tow-boat propelled by steam.

Steam' -ves-sel, n. Vessel propelled by
steam.

Steam'-whis-tle (-hwis-sl), n. Whistle
sounded by steam.

Ste'a-rme, n. Solid animal or vegetable fat.

Ste'a-tite, n. Soapstone.

Steed, n. Spirited horse ; war-horse.

Steel, n. Iron combined with carbon : — any
thing made of steel, as weapons : — armor :
— extreme hardness. — 2, a. Made of steel.
— 3, V. a. To edge with steel : — to harden.

Steel'yard, n. Kind of balance.

Steep, a. With great inclination ; precipi-
tous : — difficult : — exorbitant. — 2, v. a. To
soak ; to imbue. — 3, n. Precipice ; steep
elope: — thing steeped, or used in steep-
ing.

Stee'ple, n. Tall, pointed tower, as of a
church.

Stee' pie-chase, n. Horse-race across
country.

Steer, n. Young bullock or ox. — 2, v. To
direct ; to guide.

Steer' af^e, n. Act or effect of steering : —
place in a ship for poorer passengers.

Steer'er, ) n. One who steers a ship ;

Steer§^man, j pilot.

Stel'lar, ) a. Relating to the stars ;

Stel'la-rj:, J starry.

Stel'late. Stel'lat-ed, or Stel'li-fdrm, a.
Starred ; star-shaped.

Stel'16-lar, a. Shaped like a little star.

Stem, n. Main body or axis of a plant ;
twig : — family ; race : — prow of a ship. —
2, V. a. To oppose ; to stop ; to check.

Stench, n. Fetid or bad smell.

StSn'cil, n. Sheet of leather, metal, &c.,
perforated into a pattern, for marking or
decorating. — 2, v. a. To mark by a sten-
cil.

Ste-nog'ra-phjr, n. Art of writing in char-
acters or symbols, to increase speed ; eJiort-
hand.

Stent, n. & v. a. Same as sthU.



STENTOEIAN



292



STOAT



Sten-to'ri-an, a. Loud ; vociferous.

Step, V. To move with the feet ; to go : —
to set, as the foot, or a mast. — 2, n. Ad-
vance made by one movement of the foot :
— footstep : — stair ; round of a ladder : —
degree : — action ; course.

Step-, Anglo-Saxon prefix, denoting rela-
tionship by marriage of a parent — as step-
son, s^ep-father, step-mother.

Steppe, n. Vast uncultivated plain or
prairie.

Step'ping-stone, n. Stone to step on in
crossing mud or water : — means to ad-
vancement.

Stere, n. Metric unit of cubic measure ;
kilolitre.

Ster-e-op'ti-con, n. Optical instrument
which throws pictures upon a screen.

Ster'e-o-scope, v. Optical instrument for
producing an image by refraction.

Ster-e-o-sc6p'ic, ) a. Relating to the

Ster-e-o-scop'i-cal, J stereoscope.

Ster'e-o-type, n. Plate of fixed metallic
type for printing : — art of forming stereo-
types. — 2, V. a. To form, or print from,
stereotypes : — to fix permanently. — 3, a.
Pertaining to, or done with, stereotypes.

Ster'ile, a. Barren ; unfruitful ; unpro-
ductive. — Ste-ril'i-tjr, "•

Ster'il-ize, v. a. To make sterile : — to de-
stroy germs in.

Ster'lingr, a. Genuine ; real ; pure : —
standard applied to English money.

Stern, a. Severe ; harsh. — 2, n. Hind part
of a ship, &c.

Stem-sheets', n. pi. Part of a boat near
the stern.

Ster'num^ n. Breastbone.

Stem' -way, n. Movement backward.

Ster'to-rous, a. Respiring deeply ; snoring.

Ste've'-dore, n. Man who loads and unloads
vessels.

Stew (stii), V. To simmer. — 2, n. Food
prepared by stewing : — confusion.

Stew'ard, ?(. Superintendent : — officer of a
ship, club, &c., in charge of provisions : —
treasurer.

Stew'ard-ess, n. Woman who attends to
ladies on shipboard.

Stew'ard-ship, n. Office of a steward.

Stew'pan, n. Pan used for stewing.

Stieh (stik), n. Verse or line in poetry.

Stick, n. Small piece of wood ; club ; cane ;
staff: — stab; thrust. — 2, v. a. [i. & p.
stuck.] To fasten on ; to affix : — to stab ;
to pierce : — to puzzle. — 3, v. n. To adhere :
— to be constant : — to hesitate.

Stic'kle (stlk'kl), v. n. To contend for
trifles.

Stic'kle-back, n. Fish with a spiny back.

Stic'kl^r, n. Contender for tritJes.

Stick'x, a. Viscous ; adhesive ; glutinous.

Stiff, a. Rigid; inflexible: — stubborn: —
formal.

Stiffen (stlf'fn), v. To make or become
stiff.



Stiff'-necked (stif'nekt), a. Stubborn ;
headstrong.

Sti'fie (sti'fl), V. To suffocate : — to suppress :
— to quench ; to deaden.

Stig^'ma, n. Brand; disgrace: — wound;
scar : — top of the pistil in a plant.

Stigr-mat'ic, ) a. Relating to, or having,

Stig-mat'i-cal, J a stigma.

Stig'ma-tize, v. a. To brand ; to disgrace.

Stile, n. Steps to pass over a fence. [kin.

Sti-let'to, n. Small round dagger : — bod-
Still, V. a. To calm ; to silence. — 2, a.
Without sound or motion ; calm. — 3, ad.
Till now : — always : — nevertheless. — 4, n.
Vessel for distillation.

Stil'lx, ad. Silently.— 2, a. Still ; quiet.

Stilt'ed, a. Elevated and artificial ; pomp-
ous.

Stilts, n. pi. Walking supports used by
boys.

Stim'u-lant, a. Stimulating. — 2, n. Stim-
ulating medicine : — excitement ; stimu-
lus.

Stim'i-late, v. a. To goad ; to excite.

Stim-u-la'tion, n. Excitement : — incite-
ment.

Stim'u-la-tive, a. Stimulating. — 2, n. That
which stimulates.

Stim'u-lus, n. Incentive ; stimulant : —
agent producing an impression.

Sting, V. a. [i. & p. stung.] To pierce or
wound with a sting : — to pain : — to goad. —
2, n. Sharp point : — ^pain ; cause of pain :
—remorse. [sharp ; severe.

Sting' ing, p. a. Piercing with a sting : —

Stin'gx, a. Niggardly ; avaricious.

Stink, v. n. [i. stunk or stank ; p. stunk.]
To emit an offensive smell. — 2, n. Offensive
smell.

Stint, V. a. To limit ; to confine : — to as-
sign a task or quantity to. — 2, ?». Limit :
— quantity or task assigned.

Sti'pend, n. Settled pay ; salary.

Sti-pin'di-a-ry, a. Relating to, or receiv-
ing, a stipend. — 2, n. One who receives a
stipend.

Stip'ple (stip'pl), V. a. To engrave or paint
by dots or small strokes.

Stip'ii-late, v. n. To contract ; to bargain.

Stip-u-la'tion, n. Contract ; bargain ; terms.

Stip'iale, n.' Lobe at the base of a leaf-
stalk.

Stir, ?'. To move ; to agitate : — to incite. —
2, n. Tumult ; commotion.

Stir'rup (stir'rup or star'rup),
n. Loop or sling for a horse-
man's foot.

Stitch, V. To sew ; to join with
stitches. — 2, n. Pass of a nee-
dle, and the loop of thread
left behind : — sharp pain, as
in the side.

Stith'x, n. Anvil ; smithy.

Sti'ver, n. Dutch copper coin, worth two
cents.

Stoat, w. Ermine in its summer fur.




Stirnip.



STOCK



293



STEANGLB



Stock, w. Stem ; trunk : — post : — ^handle :
— frame of a gun : — tie or cravat for the
neck : — flowering garden-plant : — dullard:
— lineage : — supply : — capital invested : —
cattle. — 2, V. a. To supply with a stock.

Stock-ade', n. Enclosure of pointed stakes.
— 2^v. a. To fortify with pointed stakes.

Stock' -bro-ker, w. One who deals in stocks.

Stock'f ish, n. Codfish dried hard, without
salt : — dried salt fish. [company.

Stock' hold-er, w. Owner of stock in a

Stock-i-net', n. Elastic knit fabric.

Stock'ingr, n. Covering for the leg and foot.

Stocks', n. pi. Structure for confining the
legs of offenders : — public or other funds.

Stock'-still, a. Motionless ; quite still.

Stock';:, a. Stout ; short and thick.

Sto'ic, n. Person indifferent to plea.sure or
pain.

Sto'ic, \a. Of, or like, a stoic ; unfeeling ;

Sto'i-cal, J insensible. [pain.

Sto'i-cigjn, n. Indifference to pleasure or

Stok'er, n. One who tends a fire.

Stole, M. Vestment of a priest. — 2, i. from
steal.

StSl'id, a. Dull ; stupid ; apathetic. —
Sto-lid'i-ty, n.

St3m'aph, n. Organ in which food is di
gested : — appetite : — temper : — pride. — 2,
V. a. To resent : — to put up with.

Stom'a-cher, n. Ornament for the breast.

Sto-maj!h'ic, n. Medicine for the stomach.

Sto-maph'ic, \ a. Relating to, or good

Sto-maph'i-cal, J for, the stomach.

Stone, n. Concretion of earthy or mineral
matter : — gem : — concretion in the kidneys
or bladder :— weight of fourteen pounds :
— monument: — stony case containing a
kernel or seed. — 2, a. Made of, or consist-
ing of, stone. — 3, v. a. To beat or kill
with stones.

Stone' -blind, a. Completely blind.

Stone' -ciit-ter, n. One who hews stones.

Stone' -fruit, n. Fruit with a stony seed-
case, as peaches, plums, cherries, &c.

Stone-ma'son (-ma'sn), n. Mason who
works in stone.

Stone' -wire, «. Coarse glazed pottery.

Stone'-work (-wiirk), n. Work or masonry
of stone. [less ; hard.

Ston'y, a. Made of, or full of, stones : — piti-

Stood (stud), i. &p. from stand.

Stock (stflk), n. Shock of twelve corn-
sheaves. — 2, V. a. To set up in stooks.



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