Joseph E. (Joseph Emerson) Worcester.

A primary pronouncing dictionary of the English language : with vocabularies of classical, Scripture, and modern geographical names online

. (page 28 of 61)
Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA primary pronouncing dictionary of the English language : with vocabularies of classical, Scripture, and modern geographical names → online text (page 28 of 61)
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Ir'on-sid-ed, (i'urn-) a. strong; rough.

I'ron-y, n. a mode of speech in which
the meaning is contrary to the words.

Ir-ra'di-ance, n. beams of light.

ir-ra'di-ate, v. a. &c n. to adorn with
light; to brighten ; to illuminate.

Ir-ra-di-a'tion, n. illumination ; light.

ir-ra"tion-al, (ir-rash'un-al) a. not ra-
tional ; contrary to reason j absurd.

Ir-ra"tlon-al-ly, (ir-rash'-) a^Z.absurdly.

Ir-re-claim'^-ble, a. that cannot be re-
claimed, [reconciled.

Ir-rec-on-cil'a-ble, a. that cannot bo

ir-re-cbv'er-a-ble, (ir-re-kuv'er-a-bl) a.
that cannot be recovered. [ery.

ir-re-c6v'er-a-bly, ad. beyond recov-

ir-re-dCem'a-ble, a. not to bfe redeemed.

ir-re-dii'ci-ble, a. not to be reduced.



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JAC



155



JAD



Yr-ref ra-ga-ble, a. not to be confuted.

ir-ref'ra-ga-bly, ad. above confutation.

Ir-re-fut'a-ble, or Ir-refij-tai-ble, a. that
cannot be refuted.

Jr-reg'u-lar, a. not regular ; disorderly.

Ir-reg-u-lar'i-ty, 71. want of regularity.

Ir-reg'u-lar-ly, ad. without rule.

Ir-rel'si-tive, a. not relative. [evant.

Ir-rel'e-van-cy, n. state of being irrel-

Ir-rel'e-vant, a. not relevant.

Ir-re-liev'a-ble, a. not admitting relief.

Jr-ie-li*'ion, (ir-re-lTd'jun) n. impiety.

Ir-re-li*'ious, (ir-re-lid'jus) a. impious.

Ir-re-me'dj-a-ble, a. that cannot be
remedied.

Tr-re-me'di-a-bly, ad. without remedy.

Ir-re-mis'si-ble, a. not to be pardoned.

li-rep'9-ra-ble, a. that cannot be re-
paired.

Ir-rep'a-ra-bly, ad. without recovery.

Ir-re-peal'^-ble, a. that cannot be re-
pealed, [ble.

Ir-rep-re-hen'si-ble, a. not reprehensi-

Ir-re-press'i-ble, a. not to be repressed.

Ir-re-proacli'a-ble, a. not reproachable ;
free from blame or reproach.

ir-re-prov'a-ble, a. not reprovable.

I^re-^ist'i-ble, a. that cannot be re-
sisted ; superior to opposition.

Ir-re-§ist'i-bly, ad. above opposition.

Ir-re§'o-lute, a. not resolute ; not firm.

ir-res-o-lQ'tign, n. want of resolution.

Ir-re-spec'tjve, a. not respective.

Sr-re-spon'si-ble, a. not responsible.

ir-re-triev'9-ble, a. irrecoverable.

Ir-re-triev'a-bly, ad. irrecoverably.

Ir-rev'er-ence, n. want of reverence.

Ir-rev'er-ent, a. wanting in reverence.

Ir-rev'er-ent-ly, ad. without reverence.

Ir-re-vers'i-ble, a. that cannot be re-
versed, [voked.

Ir-rev'o-ca-ble, a. that cannot be re-

Ir-rev'o-ca-bly, ad. without recall.

tr'rj-gate, v. a. to wet ; to water.



Ir-ri-ga'tlon, n. act of irrigating.

Ir-rlg'u-ous, a. watery ; watered, [ble
ir-ri-l.>bil'i-t}-, n. state of being irrita^
lr'ri-ta-ble,a. easily irritated ; irascible,
ir'ri-tate, v. a. to provoke ; to fret,
ir-ri-ta'tion, n. a provocation, [road.
Ir-rup'tion, 71. an entrance by force ; in-
ir-rup'tive, a. bursting forth ; rushing
i§, (iz) 3d person singular of Be. [in.
I'§in-glass, n. a substance prepared

from tlie intestines of fish, [water
Isl'and, (I'land) n. land surrounded by
Isle, (il) n. an island.
Isl'et, (I'let) n. a little island.
I§'o-la.te, V. a. to detach ; to separate.
Ii^-o-la'tion, 71. detached state.
T-so-ther'mal, a. having equal heat,
is'su-a-ble, (ish'shu-j-bl) O" that may

be issued,
is'sue, (ish'shu) n. act of passing out ;

exit ; event : — a vent : — ofl^^pring.
Is'sue, (ish'shu) v. n. to come out.
Is'sue, (isli'shu) v. a. to send out.
Isth'mus, (ist'mus) n. a neck of land

joining a peninsula to a continent.
It, pron. used for a thing.
I-tal'ian, (it-tal'yan) a. relating to

Italy.
I-tal'ic, a. denoting a kind of letter,
j-tal'i-cize, v. a. to represent in Italics.
I-tal'jcs, 71. pi. inclining letters.
Itch, ?i. a cutaneous disease ; a desire.
Itch, V. n. to feel irritation in the skin.
I'tem, 71. a new article ; a single entry.
It'er-ate, v. a. to repeat ; to do again.
It-er-a'tion, n. act of iterating.
I-tin'er-ant, a. travelling ; wandering
T-tin'er-a-ry, n. a book of travels.
T-tin'er-a-ry, a. travelling 5 done on a

journey.
I-tin'er-ate, v. n. to travel about.
It-self', pron. a reciprocal pronoun.
I'vo-ry, n. the tusk of the elephant,
i'vy, (I've) n. a parasitical plant.



J.



TaB'B?R, v. n.-to talk idly; to chat-
*) ter.

Jab'ber, n. idle talk ; prate ; chat.
Jab'ber-er, n. one who jabbers. [lin.
Jac'co-net, n. a slight species of mus-
Jack, n. an engine ; a flag ; a support.
Jack'al, 71. a species of wild dog.
Jack'an-apes, n. a monkey ; an ape.



Jack'Sss, n. the male of the ass. [mor.
Jack'-boots, n. pi. large boots fur ar-
Jack'daw, n. a species of the crow.
Jack'et,7J.ashort coat ; close waistcoat.
Jack'knit'e, (jak'nlf) n. a pocket knife
Jack'-pud'diiig, n. a zany ; a buffoon.
Jade, 11. a worthless horse or woman.
Jade, V. a. to tire ; to weary.



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JES



156



JOI



I&g, or JS.gg, n. a notch : — a small

load.
Jagg, V. a. to cut into indentures or
Jag'gy, a. uneven ; notched. [teeth.
Jail, 71. a prison ; a gaol.
Jail'er, n. a keeper of a jail ; gaoler.
Jakes, n. a privy.
Jal'aip, 71. a purgative root or drug.
Jam, 71. a conserve : — bed of stone.
Jam, V. a. to squeeze closely ; to press.
Jamb,-(jam) n. a side piece of a fire-
Jane, 71. a twilled cotton cloth, [place.
Jan'gle, v. n. to prate ; to quarrel.
Jan'gle, n. noise ; prate •, dispute. [low.
Jan'gler, n. a wrangling, noisy fel-
JSn'j-tor, 71. a door-keeper ; a porter.
Jant, n. a ramble. -See Jaunt.
Jant'i-ness, n. airiness ; fickleness.
Jan'ty, a. showy ; airy ; fluttering.
Jan'u-a-ry, n. first month of the year.
Ja-pan', n. a varnish ; work varnished.
Ja-pan', v. a. to varnish and embellish.
Jar, V. n. to clash ; to interfere, quarrel.
Jar, V. a. to shake ; to agitate. [sel.
Jar, 7t. a vibration ; discord: — a ves-
Jar'gon,??. unintelligible talk; glbber-
Jar-go-nelle', n. a species of pear. [ish.
Ja^'mine, or J'as'mjne, n. a plant.
Jas'per,7i,a hard stone used in jewelry.
Jaun'dice, (jan'dis) n. a disease wl)ich

gives the skin a yellow color.
Jaunt, (jant) v. n. to ramble, wander.
Jaunt, (jant) n. a ramble ; a walk.
Jave'ljn, (jav'lin) ?;. a kind of spear.
Jiw, 71. the bone of the mouth in which

the teeth are fixed ; the mouth.
JsLw, V. to abuse ; to scold. (Vulgar.)
Jay, n. a bird with gaudy plumage.
Jeal'ous, (jel'us) a. suspicious in love ;

suspiciously cautious. [love.

Jeal'ous-y, (jel'us-e) n. suspicion in
Jeer, V. to scoff; to flout ; to mock.
Jeer, h. a scolT; taunt ; biting jest.
Je-ho'vah, 7t. the Hebrew proper name

'of God.
Je-june', a. vacant ; barren ; bare.
Je-june'ness, n. penury ; barrenness.
Jel'ly, 71. a gelatinous substance; a

kind of sweetmeat.
Jen'ny, n. a machine for spinning.
Jeop'ard, (jep'ard) v. a. to hazard.
_ Jeop'ar-dy, n. hazard ; danger.
Jerk, V. a. to strilce ; to throw ; to lash.
Jerk, 71. a sudden spring ; a throw.
Jer'kin, n. a jacket ; a short coat.
Jer'^ey, n. fine wool, or yarn of wool.
Jes'sa-mlne, n. a fragrant flower.
Jest, V. 71. to make sport ; to joke.



Jest, n. any thing ludicrous ; a joke.
Jest'er, ?i. one given to jesting or sport
Je§'u-it, 71. one of a religious order oi

the Catholic church.
Je^-u-it'i-cal, a. belonging to a Jesuit.
Jet, 71. a black fossil : — spout of water
Jet, V. 71. to shoot forward; to jut.
Jew, 71. a Hebrew ; an Israelite.
Jew'el, 71. a precious stone ; a gem.
Jew'el, V. a. to adorn with jewels.
Jew'el-ler, n. a dealer in jewels.
Jew'el-ry, n. jewels or the wares c

jewellers : — written also jewellery
Jew'ess, (ju'es) ti. a Hebrew woman
Jew'ish, (ju'jsh) a. relatingtothe Jev
Jew^'-harp, ti. a musical instrumen
Jib, 71. the foremost sail of a ship.
Jig, n. a light, careless dance or tune.
Jill'-flirt, 71. a giddy woman ; a flirt.
Jilt,7i.a woman who deceives her lover.
Jilt, V. to trick or deceive in love.
Jin'gle, V. 71. & a. to sound with a

sharp rattle ; to tinkle.
Jin'gle, 71. a rattling or clinking sound.
Job, n. a piece of chance work. [jobs.
Job, i\ n. to deal as a broker ; to do
Jock'ey, ti. one who deals in horses.
Jock'ey, (jok'e) v. a. to cheat ; to trick.
Jo-c5se', a. merry ; waggish ; jocular.
Jo-cose'ly, ad. waggishly; in jest; ia

game.
Joc'u-lar, a. sportive ; merry ; jocose.
Joc-u-lar'j-ty, 7i. merriment; sport.
Joc'ii-!ar-ly, ad. iu a jocose or joculal

manner.
Joc'und, a. merry ; gay ; airy ; lively.
Jo-ciind'i-ty, n. gayety ; mirth.
Jog, V. a. to push gently ; to shake.
Jog, V. 71. to move slowly or by jogs.
Jog, 71. a push ; a hint : — a gentle trot.
Jog'g'le, V. to push ; to shake, jostle.
Jog'gle, 7!. a shake : a jostle ; a push.
Join, V. to couple ; to combine, unite.
Jbin'er,7i. one who joins ; a mechanic.
Jbin'er-y, 7i. work of a joiner.
Joint, 71. a union of bones ; a juncture.
JbTnt, a. shared by »wo or more ; united.
Joint,?;, a. to unite : — to divide a joint.
Jbint'ed, a. having joints or knots.
Jbint'er, 7i. a sort of long plane
Jbint'ly, ad. together.-
Jbint'ress, ti. a woman who has a

jointure. [ny

Jbint'-stock, 71. stock held in compa-
Jbint-ten'ant, ?;. one who holds an

estate by joint tenancy.
Jbint'ure, (jolnt'yur) 7i. an estate set-
tled on a wife at marriage.



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JUG



157



JUS



/■Upt, n. a secondary beam of a floor.

JOKe, 7^. a jest ; raillery ; sport. [at.

J5ke, V. n. to jest. — v. a. to cast jokes

Jole, n. the face or cheek ; jowl.

Jol'lj-ty, n. gayety ; merriment.

Jol'ly, a. gay ; merry; airy; cheerful.

Jolt, V. n. & a. to shake, as a carriage
on an uneven or rough road.

Jolt, n. a shock ; a violent agitation.

Jon-quille', n. a species of daffodil.

Jos'tle, (jos'sl) V. a. to rush against.

Jot, 71. a tittle ; iota ; the least quantity.

Joiir'nal, (jiir'nal) «. an account of
daily transactions ; a diary.

Joiir'nal-ist, n. a writer of journals.

Jolir'ney, (jUr'ne) n- ; pi. joiir'ney^j
travel by land ; a passage.

Joiir'ney, (jUr'ne) v. n. to travel.

JoUr'ney-man, n. a hired workman.

Jove, n. Jupiter, a heathen deity.

Jo'vi-al, a. gay ; merry ; cheerful^

Jowi, (jol) n. the cheek. See Jole.

Jowl'er, or Jbwl'er, n. a hunting dog.

Joy, n. gladness ; gayety ; exultation.

Joy, V. n. to rejoice ; to be glad.

Jby'ful, a. full of joy ; glad ; exulting.

Joy'ful-ly, ad. in a joyful manner.

Jby'ful-ness, n. gladness ; joy.

Joy 'less, a. void of joy ; sad.

Jijy'ous, a. glad ; merry ; joyful, [ity.

Ju'bj-lee, n. a season of joy and festiv-

Ju-ciin'di-ty, n. pleasantness.

Ju-da'i-cjl, a. belonging to Jews. [Jews.

Ju'da-i§m, n. the religious rites of the

Ju'da-ize, v. n. to conform to the Jew-
ish rites.

Jiidge, n. one who judges ; an officer
who decides cases in court.

Jud^e, V. to pass sentence ; to decide.

Jiidge'ship, n. the office of a judge.

Judg'ment, n. act or power of judg-
ing ; decision ; opinion ; sentence.

Ju'di-ca-to-ry, n. a court of justice.

Ju'di-ca-to-ry, a. dispensing justice.

Ju'di-c^i-ture, n. the power of dispens-
ing justice.

Ju-di"cial, (ju-dish'al) a. relating to
public justice or a court of law.

Ju-di"cial-ly, ad. in a judicial manner.

Ju-di"ci-a-ry, (ju-dlsh'e-a-re) a. relat-
ing to courts of judicature.

Ju di"cious, (ju-dish'us) a. directed by
judgment ; prudent; wise ; discreet.

Ju-di"cious-ly, (ju-dlsh'-) ad. wisely.

Jug, n. a vessel with a gibbous belly.

Jug'gle, V. n. to play tricks.

Jug'gle, n. a trick of legerdemain.

liig'gler, n. one who plays tricks.



Ju'gii-l?r, a. belonging to the throat-
Juice, (jus) n. the sap of vegetables.
Juice'less, a. diy ; without moisture.
Jui'ci-ness, ti. state of being juicy.
Jui'cy, (jii'se) a. full of sap or juice.
Jii'Iep, n. a drink or liquid medicine.
Ju-ly', 71. the 7th month of the year.
Jum'ble, r, a. & w. to mix confusedly.
Jiim'ble, ti. a confused mixture.
Jiimp, V. n. to leap ; to skip ; to bound.
Jump, V. a leap ; a skip ; a bound.
Junc'tion, 71. a union ; a joining.
Jiinct'ure, (jungkt'yiir) n. a joint j

union : — a critical point of time.
June, n. the 6th month of the year.
Jun'eat-ing, 71. an early apple.
Jun'gle, 71. a thick cluster of shrubs.
JQn'gly, a. relating to or full of jungle
Jiin'ior, (jun'yur) a. younger; later.
Jun'ior, (jun'yur) n, a person j^oungel

than another. [being junior.

Jun-ior'i-tyj (jiin-yor'e-te) 72. state of
Jii'ni-per, n. a plant or shrub.
Junk, 71. old ropes: — a Chinese ship.
Jiink'et, n. a stolen entertainment.
Jun'to, n. a cabal ; a faction.
JQ'pi-ter, n, Jove, the supreme deity

of the ancients ; a planet.
Ju-rld'i-c?l, a. used in courts of justice.
Ju-rid'i-cal-ly, ad. with legal authority.
Jii-ris-dic'tion, ti. authority ; extent of

legal power.
Jii-ris-dic'tion-^1, a. relating to legal

authority.
Jii-r}S-pru'dence, n. the science of law.
Jii'rist, n. one versed in the civil law.
Ju'ror, n. one who serves on a jury.
Jii'ry, n. a number of men impanelled

to try some case in law.
Ju'ry-man,7z.one impanelled on a jury.
Jiist, a. upright ; honest; exact; true.
Just, ad. exactly ; barely ; almost.
Just, ji. a mock fight on horseback.
Jiist, V. n. to engage in a mock fight.
Jiis'tice, n. equity ; right ; law : — a

judge : — a peace officer.
Jus'tice-ship, 71. the office of a justice.
Jus-ti"ci-a-iy, (jus-tish'e-a-re) n. ad-
ministrator of justice ; a high judge.
Jus'ti-f I-a-ble, a. that can be justified.
Jus'ti-f i-a-bly, ad. so as to be justified.
Jus-ti-fi-ca'tion, n. a vindication.
Jiis-tlf'i-cj-to-r}', a. vindicator}'.
JQs'ti-f i-er, n. one who justifies.
Jiis'ti-fy, V. a. to prove to be just; to

absolve ; to defend : — to adjust.
Jus'tle, (jiis'sl) v. to push ; to Josile.
Jus'tle, (jus'sl) n. a shouk ; a jostle.



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158



KNA



Just'ly, ad. uprightly ; honestly.
Just'ness, ra. justice ; accuracy.
Jut, v.n. to push or shoot out ; to butt.
Jut'ty, n. a projection 5 a pier ; jetty.



Ju've-nile, a. young ; youthfhi.
Ju-ve-nil'i-ty, n. youthfuJness.
Jux-ta-P9-5i"tion, (-zish'un) n. neat
ness in place ; contiguity.



K.



KALE, n. a kind of cabbage ; cole-
wort.
K?-Iei'do-scope, n. an optical instru-
ment or toy exhibiting line forms

and colors.
Kal'mi-5i,n. an evergreen shrub; laurel.
Kiw, V. n. to cry as a crow. See Caw.
Kedge, n. a small anchor.
Keel, n. the lowest timber in a ship.
Keel'haul, v. a. to punish by dragging

the offender under the keel.
Keen, a. sharp; piercing; eager.
Keen'ly, ad. sharply; eagerly; bitterly.
Keen'ness, n. sharpness ; eagerness.
Keep, V. a. [i. & p. kept ;] to retain ; to

preserve ; to guard ; to hold.
Keep, V. n. to remain ; to stay ; to last.
Keep, n. a stronghold ; guard ; care.
Keep'er, n. one who keeps or holds.
Keep'ing, n. charge ; custody ; support.
Keep'sake, n. a gift in token of regard.
Keg, n. a small cask ; a cag. [weed.
Kelp, n. sea-weed ; a salt from sea-
Ken, V. to see at a distance ; to know.
Ken, n. sight ; reach of the sight.
Ken'nel, to. a cot or place for dogs ; a

number of dogs : — a watercourse.
Ken'nel, v. a. & n. to lodge in a kennel.
KSpt, i. & p. from Keep.
Ker'chief, (ker'chif ) n. a head-dress.
Ker'nei, n. a seed in a shell ; grain.
Ker'^ey, n. a kind of coarse cloth.
Ker'^ey-mere, n. a fine woollen cloth.
Ker'§ey-nette, re. a thin woollen stuff,
Ket'tle, TO. a vessel for boiling liquor.
Key, (ke) to. an instrument to fasten

and open a lock, &c. : — an index.
Key'hole, re. a hole to put a key in.
Key'stone, n. middle stone of an arch.
Kibe, TO. chilblain ; chap in the heel.
Kick, V. a. & TO. to strike with the foot.
Kick, TO. a blow with the foot.
Kid, TO. the young of a goat.
Kid'nap, v. a. to steal a human being.
Kid'nap-per, ?i. one who kidnaps.
Kid'ney, (kid'ne) n. one of the two

glands which secrete the urine.
Kil'der-kin, to. a small barrel.



Kill, V. a. to deprive of life ; to destroy

Kiln, (kil) to. a stove or furnace.

Kiln'dry, (kil'drl) v. a. to dry bv a kiln.

Kilt, TO. a kind of short petticoat.

Kim'b5, a. crooked ; bent ; arched.

Kin, TO. a relation ; kindred ; relatives.

Kin, a. of the same nature ; kindred.

Kind, a. benevolent ; good ; tender.

Kind, 71. race ; genus ; class ; sort.

Kin'dle, v. a. to set on fire ; to inflame

Kin 'die, v. to. to catch fire ; to burn.

Kind'li-ness, n. favor ; affection ; good-
will, [mild

Kind'ly, a. congenial ; proper ; bland ;

Kind'ly, ad. benevolently ; favorably.

Kind'ness, to. benevolence ; favor ; be-
neficence ; humanity ; love.

Kin'dred, n. relation : relatives.

Kin'dred, a. congenial ; related.

Kine, n. pi. of Cow ; cows. [ Obsolete,]

King, re. a monarch ; a sovereign.

King' cup, TO. a flower ; crowsfoot.

King'dom, re. the dominion of a king;
reign; government: — a class.

King'f Ish-er, re. a species of bird.

King'ly, a. royal ; monarchical ; noble.

King'§'-e-vil, (kingz'e-vl) re. scrofula.

Kink, re. a twist ; an entanglement.

Kink, V. re. to become entangled.

Kinf 'folk, (kinz'fSk) n. pi. kindred.

Kin^'man, n. a man of the same race.

Kirk, TO. the church, (as in Scotland.)

Kir'tle, re. a gown ; petticoat ; cloak.

Kiss, V. a. to salute with the lips.

Kiss, re. a salute given by joining lips.

Kit, re. a small fiddle ; a fish-tub ; a
milk-pail : — a kitten : — the tools of
a shoemaker.

Kitch'en, re. a room for cookery.

Kite, TO. a bird of prey : — a paper toy ,

Kit'ten, (kit'tn) re. a young cat.

KlickjW.w. to maKg a small, sharp noise,

Klick, re. a small, sharp noise.

Knab, (nab) v. a. to bite ; to nab.

Knack, (nak) re. a toy : — dexterity.

Knag, (nag) n. a knot in wood ; a peg.

Knag'gy, (nag'ge) a. knotty : — rough

lOiap'isack, (nap'sak)TO. a soldier's bag.



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LAC



159



LAD



tCn^r, (nftr) ) n. a knot in wood ; a

Knirl, (narl) \ knurl.

Knarled, (narld) a. knotted ; knotty.

Knave, (nav) n. a rascal ; a scoundrel.

Knav'er-y, (nav'er-e) n. dishonesty.

Knav'jsh, (nav'jsh) a. dishonest.

Knav'jsh-ly, (nav'-) ad. dishonestly.

Knead, (ned) v. a. to work into a mass.

Knee, (ne) n the joint between the
leg and the thigh.

Kneel, (nel) ». n. [i. & p. knelt or
kneeled;] to bend or rest on the knee.

Knee'pan, n. a round bone on the knee.

Knell, (nel) n. sound of a funeral bell.

Knelt, (nelt) p. from Kneel.

Knew, (nu) L from Know. [toy.

Knlck'kn3.ck, (nik'nak) n. a trifle or

Knife, (nif ) n. ; pi. knivef ; an instru-
ment with a sharp edge for cutting.

Knight, (nit) n. a title ; a military at-
tendant ; a champion.

Knight, (nit) v. a. to create as knight.

Knlght-er'r^nt, (nit-) n. ; pi. knights-
er'mnt ; a wandering knight.

Knight'hood, (nit'hud) n. the dignity
of a knight. [knight.

Knight'ly, (nit'le) a. pertaining to a

Knit, (nit) V. a, &. n. [i. &c p. knit or
knitted ;] to weave with needles ;
to tie J to unite.



Knit'tjng-neS'dle, (nit'ting-n5'dl) n. q

wire used in knitting.
Knive?, (nivz) n. plural of Knife.
Knob, (nob) ?t. a protuberance ; bunch.
Knob'by, (nob'be) a. full of knobs.
Knock, (nok) v. a. & n. to beat, strike-
Knock, (nok) n. a stroke ; a blow.
Knock'er, (nok'er) n. a door-hammer.
Knoll, (nol) «. a little round hill.
Knot, (not) n. a part which is tied;

a tie : — a knurl in wood ; a joint.
Knot, (not) v. to form knots ; to unite.
Knot'ted, (not'ted) ) a. full of knots ;
Knot'ty, (not'tej \ difficult.
Knout, (nout) n. a Russian instrument

of punishment.
Know, (no)u. a. [i. knew ; p. known ;]

to have knowledge of; to perceive ;

to recognize.
Knowl'edge, (nol'ej) n. certain percep-
tion ; learning ; information.
Known, (non) p. from Know.
Knuc'kle, (niik'kl) n. a joint of the

finger.
Kniic'kle, (niik'kl) v. n. to submit.
Kniirl, (niirl) n. a knot ; knarl.
Kniirl'ed, Knlirl'y, a. full of knots.
K5'peck, n. a Russian copper coin.
Ko'ran, n. the Mahometan bible. See

jilcoraiu



L.



L3L, (ISlw) interj. see ! look ! be-
hold ! ''
USl, n. a note in music.
La'bel, n. a name or title affixed to

any thing; a small slip of writing.
La'bel, v. a. to affix a label on, mark.
La'bj-sil, a. uttered by or relating to

the lips. [lips.

I^'bi-^l, n. a letter pronounced by the
La'bor, n. toil; work; exercise; travail.
La'bor, v. n. & a. to toil, work ; to beat.
Lab'o-r^-to-ry, n. a chemist's work-
La'bor-er, n. one who labors, [room.
La-bo'ri-oiis, a. diligent ; assiduous.
La-bo'rj-ous-ly, ad. with labor, [ings.
L^b'y-rinth, n. a place full of wind-
Lace, n. plaited cord; texture of thread.
Lace, V. a. to bind, as with a cord.
La^'er-ate, v. a. to tear ; to rend.
La^-er-a'tion, n. the act of tearing.
La^'er-a-tive, a. having power to tear.
Lagli'ry-mal, a. generating tears.



Lach'ry-m^-to-ry, n. a vessel for tears.
La^'ing, n. a bimiing, decoration.
Lack, u. to want; to need, be without.
Lack, n. want ; need ; failure.
Lack'ey, n. a servant ; a foot-boy.
La-con'jc, ) a. concise in style; pithy;
La-con'i-caj, I short; brief.
L^-con'i-cal-ly, ad. briefly ; concisely.
La-c5n'i-ci^ni, n. laconism.
Lac'o-nifm, n. a pithy or brief phrase
Ijac'quer, (lak'er) ?i. a yellow varnish.
Lac'quer. (lak'er) v. a. to varnish.
Lac'ta-ry, a. milky ; like milk.
Lac'te-al, a. milky ; conveying chyle.
Lac'te-al, n. vessel that conveys chyle.
Lac'te-oiis, a. milky ; conveying chyle,
Lac-tif'er-oiis, a. that conveys milk.
Lad, n. a boy ; a stripling ; a youth.
Lad'der, n. a movable frame witk

steps for climbing.
Lade, v. a. [i. laded; p. laden or laded ;]

to load ; to freight : — to heave out.



ii)ien,sir3dd,nor,s6n;bull,biir,rulc. Q,§r,9,|,-o/i; je,j&,c,g,Aa7-fZ; ? asz; 5 as gz; this



LAN



160



LAS



La'den, (-dn) p. from iMdc and Load.
Lad'jng, n. freight; weight; burden.
La'die, n. a vessel with a handle.
La'dy, n. a well-bred woman ; a title

of respect.
La'dy-ship, n. the title of a lady.
Lag, V. n. to loiter ; to stay behind.
La-g66n', 71. a large pond or lake.
La'ic, ) a. belonging to the laity or
La'j-cal, ) people, not the clergy; lay.
Laid, i. & p. from Lay.
Lain, p. from Lie.
LAir, n. the couch of a wild beast.
Ldird, n. the lord of a manor. (Scottish.)
La'i-ty, n. the people, not the clergy.
Lake, n. a large extent of water.
Lamb, (lam) n. the young of a sheep.
Lamb, (lam) v. a. to bring forth lambs.
Lam'ba-tive, a. taken by licking.
Larn'bent, a. gliding lightly over.
Lamb'kin, (lam'kin) n. a little lamb.
Lamb'llke, (lam'lik) a. like a lamb.
Lame, a. crippled; disabled; imperfect.
Lame, v. a. to make lame ; to cripple.
La-mel'la, n. a thin plate ; a scale.
Lam'el-lar, a. composed of thin scales.
Lam'el*lat-ed, a. covered with films.
Lame'ness, n. state of being lame.
L^t-ment', v. to mourn ; to grieve.
La-ment', n. lamentation. [ed.

Lam'ent-a-ble, a. that is to be lament-
Lam'ent-a-bly, ad. with sorrow.
Lam-en-ta'tion,w. expression of sorrow.
Lam'i-na, n. a thin plate.
Lam'i-nar, a. plated ; laminated.
Lam'j-nat-ed, a. consisting of plates.
Lam'mas, n. the first day of August.
Lamp, n. a light maae with oil and a

wick. ring pitch.

Lamp'black, n. a fine soot from burn-
Lam-p6on', n. a personal satire ; abuse.
Lam-p66n', v. a. to abuse with satire.
Lam-p6on'er, n. one who lampoons.
Lam'prey, 7i. a fish like the eel.
Lance, n. a spear ; a weapon of war.
Lance, v. a. to pierce ; to cut ; to open.
Lan'cet, n. a small pointed instrument.
LSnch, v. a. to dart. See Launch.
Land, n. a countiy ; a region ; earth.
Land, v. a. to set on shore, disembark.
Land, v. n. to come or go on shore.
Lan-dau', n. a coach which opens and

closes at the top. [riage.

Lan-dau-let', n. a four-wheeled car-
Land'ed, a. consisting of land.
Land'hold-er, n. one who holds lands.
Land'iiig, n. a place to land at.
Land'ia-dy, n. the mistress of an inn.



LSnd'less, a. destitute of land. [lan^.

Land'lScked, (-lokt) a. enclosed with

Land'lbrd, n. master of an inn ; a host.

Land'man, n. one who lives on land.

Land'marit, ji. a mark of boundaries.

Land'-of-f ice, n. an office for the sale
of land. [a tract of a country.

Land'scape, n. the prospect or view of

Land'sllde, ) n. a portion of a raoun-

Land'sllp, \ tain that slides down.

Land§'man, n. same as landman.

Lane, n. a narrow street ; an alley.

Lan'gu^ge, (lang'gwaj) n. tongue ; hu-
man speech ; dialect ; style, [feeble.

Lan'guid, (lang'gwjd) a. faint ; weak ;

Lan'guid-ly, (lang'gwid-le) ad. feebly.

Lan'guish, v. n. to grow feeble.



Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA primary pronouncing dictionary of the English language : with vocabularies of classical, Scripture, and modern geographical names → online text (page 28 of 61)