Joseph E. (Joseph Emerson) Worcester.

A primary pronouncing dictionary of the English language : with vocabularies of classical, Scripture, and modern geographical names online

. (page 54 of 61)
Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA primary pronouncing dictionary of the English language : with vocabularies of classical, Scripture, and modern geographical names → online text (page 54 of 61)
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Withe, 71. a band made of twigs.
With'er, v. n. to fade ; to dry up.
With'er, V. a. to make to fade or decay.
Witfi'erf, 71. pi. the joining of the

shoulder-bones of a horse.
With-hold', V. a. [i. & p. withheld ;] to

keep back ; to hinder ; to refuse.
With-in', prep, in ; not without.
With-in', ad. in the inner parts.
With-but', prep, out of; beyond.
With-out', ad. on the outside.
With-but', conj. unless ; if not ; except.



ajfijijOjiijJ, long; a,e,i,o,u,y jsAort; .>,e,j,9,iJi,y, (i6scttre.-fire,fir,fist, faj;^ h6Jr,lio*



woo



297



WOR



fVlth-stand', V. a. [L & p. withstood ;J

to oppose ; to resist.
With'y, a. made of witlis.
Wit less, a. wanting understanding.
Wlt'Iing, 71. a petty pretender to wit.
Wit'iiess, n. testimony ; one who bears

test(mo.iy. [witness.

Wit'ness, w. a. & 71. to attest ; to be a
Wit'tj^i§^, 71. witty remark ; low wit.
Wit'ty, a. having wit ; humorous.
Wive?, (wivz) 71. pi. of Wife.
Wiz'ard, n. a conjurer ; a sorcerer.
Wiz'en, (wiz'zn) v. n. to wither.
W5ad, 71. a plant, used in dyeing.
Woe, (w6) 71. grief; sorrow ; misery.
Wo'ful, a. sorrowful ; calamitous.
WS'ful-lj^atZ. sorrowfully, wretchedly.
Wolf, (wulf ) n. ; pi. wolvef, (wulvz ;)

a fierce, wild animal.
Wolfish, (wulf'ish) a. like a wolf.
WolPs'bane, (wulfs'ban) n. a plant.
Wol-ver-Sne', (wul-) 7i. a quadruped.
Wom'au, (wum'an) n. ; pi. wom'en,

(wim'en ;) an adult, human female.
Wom'an-ly, (wum'-) a. like a woman.
Womb, (wom) n. place of the foetus.
Wom'bat, n. a burrowing quadruped.
Wom'en, (wim'en) n. pi, of Woman.
Won, \. &c p. from Win.
Won'der, v. n. to be surprised.
Won'der, n. surprise ; amazement.
W6n'der-ful, a. surprising ; amazing.
W6n'der-fai-ly, ad. marvellously.
Won'drous, a. marvellous ; strange.
Wont'ed, p. a. accustomed ; used.
W66, V. a. to court ; to solicit in love.
Woo, V. n. to court ; to make love.
Wood, (wud) 71. a collection of trees ;

a forest : — timber ; fuel.
Wood'blne, (wud'-) n. honeysuckle.
Wood'chat, (wud'chat) n. a small bird.
Wood'chuck, (wud'chuk) n. a marmot.
Wood'cock, (wud'kok) n. a bird.
Wood'-cut, (wud'kut) n. an engraving

on wood ; a print of such engraving.
Wood'ed, (wud'ed) a. having wood.
Wood'en, (wud'dn) a. made of wood.
Wood'-hbuse, n. a house for wood.
Wood'land, (wud'land) n. a forest.
Wood'-louse, (wiid'lbus) 71. an insect.
Wood'-note, (wud'not) n. wild music.
Wood'-nymph,(wud'nImf ) n. a nymph

of the woods.
Wood'peck-er, (wud'pek-er) 71. a bird.
Wood'y, (wud'e) a. abounding with

wood ; consisting of wood ; wooden.
Woo'er, n. one who wooes ; a suitor.
Woof. n. threads that cross the warp.



Wool, (wGI) 71. the fleece of sheep.

Wool'ftel, (wul'fel) 71. a skin with the
wool on it.

Wool'len, (wul'len) a. made of wool.

Wool'ly, (wul'le) a. consisting of wool.

Wool'-sack, (wiil'sak) n. sack of wool.

Word, (wUrd) n. an oral expression;
an articulate sound ; a promise ; a
token : — tidings : — Scripture.

Word, (wiird) v. a. to express in words.

Word'i-ness, (wiird'e-nes) 71. verbosity.

Word'y, (wurd'e) a. full of words j

Wore, i. from Wear. [verbose.

Work, (wiirk) v. n. [i. & p. wrought or
worked ;] to labor, act: — to ferment.

Work, (wiirk) v. a. to form by labor.

Work, (wiirk) n. toil ; labor : — a book.

Work'hbuse, (wiirk'hbus) tj. a house
for work : — an almshouse.

Work'jng, (wiirk'-) 71. operation.

Work'man, (wiirk'man) n. an artificer.

Work'm^n-like, (wUrk'-) a. skilful.

Work'm^n-ship, (wiirk'-) n. skill 3 art

Work'shop, ti. a place for work.

World, (wiirld) n. the earth ; the globe ;
mankind ; the public.

World'lj-ness, (wiirld'le-nes) 71. state
of being worldly ; covetousness.

World'ljng, (wiirld'ling) 71. an idolizer
of wealth ; one devoted to the world.

World'ly, (wiirld'le) a. relating or de-
voted to this world; secular; earthly.

Worm, (wUrm) n. a small, creeping in-
sect ; a grub : — any thing spiral.

Worm, (wiirm) v. to work slowly, se-
cretly, and gradually, like a worm.

Worm'wood, (wiirm'wud) n. a plant.

Worm'y, (wiirm'e) a. full of worms.

Worn, p. from tfear. [fret.

Wor'ry, v a *o haras*; to tease ; to

Wor'ry, n. tretfulness. [bad.

Worse, (wiirs) a. comp. of Bad ; more

Worse, (wiirs) ad. in a worse manner

Wors'en, (wlir'sn) v. a. to make worse.

Wor'ship, (wlir'ship) n. a title of hon-
or ; adoration ; religious reverence.

Wor'ship, (wlir'ship) v.a. & 71. |o ador^.

Wor'ship- fu],(wiir'ship-ful)a.cra.iming
respect; entitled to respect; venerable.

Wor'ship-ful-ly,(wiir'-)a(/.respectfully.

Wor'ship-per, (wiir'-) ti. one who wor-
ships. ' [bad.

Worst, (wiirst) a. superl. of Bad; most

Worst, (wiirst) n. the most evil state.

Worst, (wiirst) v. n. to defeat ; to over-
throw, [woollen yarn.

Worst'ed, (wors'ted) 71. a hard-twisted.

Wort, (wurt) n. an herb : — new beer.



mien,sir;d6,nc;r,s6n,bu!i,bur,rule. ^\(^,(^,t,soft;£,)S,,c.,l,hard; ? asz; ^ as gz; this



XYL



298



XYL



Worth, (wiirth) n. the value of any

thing ; price ; merit ; importance.
Worth, (wUrth) a. equal in value to.
Wor'thj-ly, (wiir'the-le) ad. suitably.
Wor'tlii-ness, (wiir'the-nes) n. desert.
Worth'iess, (wUrth'les) a. of no value,
Wor'thy, (wur'tfie) a. having worth ;

deserving good or ill ; meritorious.
Wor'ifiy, (wur'tfie) 71. a man of merit.
Would, (wud) verb auxiliary ; i. of Will.
Wound, (wond or wound) n. a hurtj

a cut; an injury; laceration.
Wound, or Wound, v, a. to hurt.
Wound, (wound) i. &. p. from Wind.
Wove, i. from Weave.
Wo'ven, (wo'vn) p. from Weave.
Wran'gle, (rang'gl) v. n. to quarrel.
Wran'gle, (rang'gl) w. quarrel; dispute.
Wran'gler, (rang'gler) n. a disputant.
Wrap, (rap) v. a. [i. Sc p. wrapped or

wrapt ;] to roll together ; to cover.
WrSp'per, n. one who wraps ; a cover.
Wrap'pjng, n. a covering ; a wrapper.
IjWrath, (ratli or rSlth) n. anger; fury.
[iWrarh'ful, a. angry ; furious ; raging.
Wreak, (rek) v. a. to execute; to inflict.
Wreath, (reth) n. any thing twisted ; a

garland. [wreaths ; to twist.

Wreathe, (reth) v. a. to form into
Wreath'y, (re'the) a. spiral ; twisted.
Wreck, (rek) n. destruction by sea ;

ruin ; shipwreck ; a vessel wrecked.
Wreck, (rek) v. a. to destroy by dash-
ing on rocks or sands ; to strand.
Wreck'er, (rek'er)M. one who plunders

vessels that are wrecked.
Wren, (ren) n. a small, perching bird.
Wrench, (rench) v. a. to pull with a

twist or violence ; to sprain.
Wrench, (rench) n. a pull ; a sprains
Wrest, (rest) v. a. to extort ; to force.
Wrest, (rest) n. distortion ; violence.
/Vres'tle, (res'sl) v, n. to contend and

try to throw down ; to struggle.
Wrest'ler, (res'Ier)n.one who wrestles.
Wrest'lfng, (res'ling) 71. a struggle.



Wretch, (rech) n. a villain ; a knave.
Wretch'ed, (rech'ed) a.miserable; bad
WrStch'ed-ly, ad. miserably ; vilely.
Wretch'ed-ness, n. misery. [fro

Wrig'gle, (rlg'gl) v. n. to move to and
Wrig'gle, (rig'gl) v. a. to put in quick

motion. [gles

Wrig'gler, (rig'ler) 71. one who wrig-
Wright, (rit) n. a workman ; artificer.
Wring, (ring) v. a. [i. & p. wrung ;] to

twist ; to turn ; to extort j to harass ;

to distress.
Wring'er, (ring'er) n. one who wrings.
Wrin'kie, (ring'kl) n. a crease ; ridge.
Wrin'kle, (ring'kl) v. a. to contract

into wrinkles ; to make uneven.
Wrist, (rist) n. the joint uniting the

hand to the arm.
Wrist'band, (rist'band) n. a band or

fastening about the wrist.
Writ, (rit) n. a writing ; Scripture : —

a legal precept or instrument.
Write, (rit) v. a. [i. wrote ; p. written ;]

to express by letters ; to compose.
Writ'er, (rit'er) n. one who writes.
Writhe, (rith) v. a. to distort ; to twist.
Writhe, (rith) v. n. to be distorted.
Writ'ing, (rit'jng) n. act of forming let-
ters with a pen ; a manuscript.
Writ'ten, (rit'tn) p. from Write.
Wrong, (rong) n. an injury; injustice
Wrong, (rong) a. not right ; unjust.
Wrong, (rong) ad. not rightly ; amiss
Wrong, (rong) v. a. to use unjustly.
Wrong'ful, (rong'ful) a. unjust; wrong
Wrong'fai-ly, (rong'ful-e) ad. unjustly
Wrong'head-ed, (rong'-) a. perverse
Wrong'ly, (rong'le) ad.unjustly; amiss
Wrote, (rot) i. from Write.
Wroth, (rsLwth or roth) a. excited bj

wrath ; angry ; exasperated.
Wrought, (rawt) i. & p. from Work,

performed; labored; manufactured
Wrung, (riing) i. & p. from Wring:
Wry, (ri) a. crooked ; distorted.
Wry'neck, (ri'nek) n. a species of bird



X.



XE'BeC, (ze'bek) 71. a small, three-
masted vessel.
Xy log'ra-pher, (zi-log'ra-fer) n. an en-
graver on wood-



Xy-lo-graph'|c, ) a. relating to wood-
Xy-lo-graph'i-cal, ) engraving.
Xy-15g'ra-pby, (zi-log'r^-fe) n. the art
of engraving on wood.



tt,e,i,5,u,y, long; a,e,i,o,u,y, short; a,e,j,o,u,y, o6a'CMre.-ftire,far,fist,fi^ll; heir,her;



YEL



299



YUC



Y.



rACHT, (ybt) 7i. a vessel of state or
pleasure.
SSm, n. an esculent root or vegetable,
y&n'kee, (yang'ke) n. a cant term for

an inhabitant of New England.
Y&p, V. n. to bark ; to yelp ; to yaup.
Vard, n. an enclosure : — a measure of

three feet: — a timber to support a sail.
Yard 'stick, n. a stick a yard long.
Yard'wand, (-wond) n. measure of a

yard.
Yarn, n. spun wool, flax, cotton, Sec.
Yar'row, n. a plant ; the milfoil.
Yaup, V. n. to cry as a child or bird.
Yaw, n. an unsteady motion of a ship.
Yiw, V. n. to deviate from the right

course.
Yawl, n. a boat belonging to a ship.
Y^wl, V. n. to cry out. See YeU.
Yslwn, V. n. to gape ; to open the mouth.
Yawn, n. oscitation ; a gape ; a hiatus.
Yawn'ing, a. sleepy ; gaping.
Ye, pron. nominative plural of Thou.
Yea, (ya or ye) ad. yes ; truly.
Y6an, v. n. to bring young, as sheep.
Yean'ling, n. the young of sheep.
Year, n. the space of time occupied by

the revolution of th&earth in its orbit;

12 calendar months , 365 days.
Year'ling, n. an animal one year old.
Year'ly, a. happening every year.
Year'ly, ad. annually ; once a j'ear.
Yearn, B. n. to feel pain, pity, or desire.
Yearn'jng, n. the emotion of pity.
YeastjW.barm used for leavening bread;

spume ; foam. [yeast.

Yeas'ty, a. containing or resembling
Yelk, n. the yellow part of an egg: —

written also yolk.
Ygll, V. n. to cry out in pain ; to scream.
Yell, n. cry of horror ; hideous outcry.
Yel'low, (yel'lo) a.being of a gold color.
Yel'low, n. yellow color ; a golden hue.
Yel'low-fe'ver, n. a malignant, bilious

fever: — called also the black vomit.
Yel'low-hSLm-mer, n. a bird.
Yel'low-ish, a. approaching to yellow.
Yel'Iow-nSss,7i.quality of being yellow.
Yel'low^, n. pi. a disease in horses and

cattle: — a disease in trees and plants.



Yelp, t). n. to bark, as a dog.

YeS'man, (yo'man) n. ; pi. yeo'men
a farmer ; a freeholder.

Yeo'man-ry, n. the body of yeomen.

Yerk, v. a. to throw out ; to lash.

Yerk, n. a quick motion ; a jerk.

Yes, ad. noting assent ; yea ; truly.

Yest, n. barm. See Yeast.

Yes'ter, a. being next before the pres.
ent day. [day,

Yes'ter-day, n. the day next before to.

Yes'ter-day, ad. on the day last past,

Yes'ter-night, n. the last night.

Yet, conj. nevertheless ; however.

Yet, ad. besides ; still ; hitherto.

Yew, (yu) n. an evergreen tree.

Yield, (yeld) v. a. to produce ; to give ;
to afford ; to allow ; to concede.

Yield, V. n. to give up ; to submit.

Yield, n. return for culture ; produce.

Yield'er, (yeld'er) n. one who yields.

Yield'ing, p. a. complying ; flexible.

Yoke, n. a bandage for the neck ; a
chain ; a bond ; a couple ; a pair.

Yoke, V. a. to bind by a yoke ; to con-
fine,

Yoke'-f el-low, n. a companion; a mate

Yoke'mate, n. same as yoke-fellow.

Yolk, (yok) n. the yellow part of an
egg ; yelk. See Yelk.

Yon, a. & ad. at a distance ; yonder.

Yon'der, a. being at a distance, but
within view. [view.

Yon'der, ad. at a distance, but within

Yore, ad. of old time ; long ago.

You, (yu) personal pron. pi. Of Thou.

Young, (yung) a. not old ; youthful.

Young, n. the offspring of animals,

Young'ish, a. somewhat young.

Yoiing'iing, n. a young animal.

Yoiing'ster, n. a young person; a youth.

Your, pron. or a. belonging to you.

Your-self, pron. you ; even you.

Youth, (yuth) n. the early part of life;
a young man ; young persons.

Youth'ful, (yuth'ful) a. young; fresh.

Youth'ful-ly, ad. in a youthful manner.

Youth'ful-ness, n. state of being youth-
ful. ' [fruit.

Yuc'ca, n. an American tree and its



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ZIN



300



ZOO



z.



ZAF'FRE, (zaf'fur) n. an oxide of
cobalt.

Za'ny, n. a merry-andrew ; a buffoon.

Zeal, n. passionate ardor ; fervency.

Zeal'ot, (zel'ot) n, one full of zeal,

Zeal'ous, (zel'lus) a. full of zeal ; ar-
dent ; passionate in any cause.

Zeal'ous-ly, ad. in a zealous manner.

Ze'bra, n. an animal like an ass.

Zed'o-a-ry, n. a spicy plant, or root.

Ze'nith, n. the point overhead, oppo-
site to the nadir.

Zcph'yr, (zef'ir) n. the west wind : —
any mild, soft wind.

Ze'ro, n. the point from which a ther-
mometer is graduated; the cipher [0].

Zest, n. something added for a relish ;
a relish. [relish.

Zest, V. a. to heighten by additional

Zig'zag, n. a line with sharp turns.

Zig'zag, a. having short turns.

Zig'zag, V. a. to form with quick turns.

Zinc, n. a bluish-white metal.

Zinck'y, a. relating to, or like, zinc.



Zo'dj-ac, n. an imaginary belt in the
heavens, which contains the twelve
signs, and the sun's apparent path.

Zo-di'a-c5il, a. relating to the zodiac.

Zone, n. a girdle; a belt: — a division of
the eartli's surface by parallel lines.

Zone'Iess, a. having no zone.

Zo-og'ra-pher, n. one versed in zobgra-
phy. ■ ,

Zo-o-graph'i-c?l, a. relating to zoogra-
phy. jamais.

Zo-og'ra-phy, n. a description ot ani-

Zo-o-lo|'i-c?l, a. relating to zoology.

Zo-ol'9-^ist, n. one versed in zoology.

Z(?-ol'o-gyj «• the science of animals.

Zo-on'o-my, 71. animal physiology.

Z6'9-phJte, n, a body or substance sup-
posed to partake of the nature both
of vegetables and animals.

Zo-o-phyt'jc, a. relating to zoophytes.

Zo-ot'o-mist, n. one versed in zootomy.

Zo-6t'o-my, n. that branch of anatomy
which relates to the structure of the
lower animals



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GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES



KULES OF PRONUNCIATION.



Rule 1. — The consonants c, s, t,
and X, before ia, ie, it, io, iu, cu, and
7J0, preceded by the accent, in Latin
and Greek words, as in English, com-
monly take the sound of sh, as in the
following words : Por'li-a, (pbr'she-a,)
A4ex'i-a, (a-lck'she-a,)CZ7/'«8-e, (klish'-
e-S,) Hel-ve'ti-i, (hel-ve'slie-I,) Fho'ci-
on, (fo'she-on,) Ac'ci-us, (ak'she-Qs,)
Ca-du'ce-us, (ka-du'she-us,) Si"cy-on,
(sish'eon.) When s, preceded by the
accent, is followed by ia or io, it takes
the sound of z/i ; as, Md'si-a, (me'zhe-
a,) He'si-od, (he'zhe-od.) — According
to Walker, the words Asia, Sosia, and
T/icodosia, are the only exceptions.

Rule 2. — In some proper names, t
preserves its true sound ; as, ^tion,
Amphictyon, Androtion, Eurytion, Chra-
tion, Hai-pocration, Hippotion, Iphition,
Jiletion, Ornytion, Pallantion, Philistion,
Polytion, Sution, Stration, and a few
others ; but Hcpli<BsiioH and Tkeodotion
are Anglicized, the last syllables being
pronounced like the last syllables in
question and commotion. In the words
,SEsivn, Donysion, and lasion, the s
takes the sound of i, but not of ih.



Rule 3. — In words ending in da,
eii, eium, and eius, with the accent on
the e, the i following the accent is to
be understood as articulating the fol-
lowing vowel like y consonant; as,
Elege'ia, (el-e-je'ya,) Pompeii, (pom-
pe'yi,) Pompeiuni, (pom-pe'yum,) Pom-
pe'ius, (pom-pe'yus.) The same rule
also applies to words ending in ia, pre-
ceded by a or having the accent
upon it, as Acha'ia, (a-ka'ya,) Lato'ia,
(la-to'ya,) and likewise to words hav-
ing the accent on a vowel, followed
by ia, though they may not end the
word, as Pleiades, (ple'ya-dez.)

Rule 4. — The diphthongs m and m,
ending a syllable with the accent on
it, are pronounced like long e, as in
Cm'sar, (se'zar ;) but, when followed
by a consonant in the same syllable,
like short e, as in Dmd'alus, (ded'a-lus.

Rule 5. — In Greek and Latin
words which begin with uncombina-
ble consonants, the first letter is si-
lent ; thus C in Cneus and Ctesiphon,
M in Mneus, P in Psyche and Ptulcmy,
Ph in PhLhia, and T in Tmolus, are
not sounded.



AB'A-A

Ab'gi'-ba

Ab-a-ce'ne

Ab'a-gai

Ab'^ila

Ab'a-lus

A-ba'ngi

A-ban'ti-Ss

A-ban'ti-das

Ab'j-rl



Ab'a-rTa

Ab'a-sa

Ab'^-tos

Ab-de'r^i

Ab-de-ri'te§

Ab-de'rus

A-b5'lu3

Ab'e-liix

Ab'ga-rus

Ab'i-la



A-bis'9-r5§

Ab-le'rus

A-bo'lus

Ab-o-ra'ca

Ab'9-i^s

Ab'9-tis

A-bra'h?i-mus

A-broc'o-mas

Ab'ro-ta

A-brot'9-nuin



Ab-s5'us

Ab-sin'thj-i

Ab'so-rus

Ab'u-la

Ab-u-li'te§

Ab-y-de'ni

A-by'dos

Ab'y-1?

Ab-ys-si'nl

A-ca'ci-iis



Ac'9-cus

Ac-^i-de'mvis

Ac'a-le

Ac'51-mas

A-can'thj-nS

Ac'9-r?i

Ac-ar-na'ne^

Ac-jr-na'nj-^i

Ac'9-ton

Ac'cj-a



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802



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES.



Xc'ci-la

Ac'ci-us

A<j-e-dl'ci

A9'e-la

A-ceph'fi-li

A^-e-ri'nsi

A-ce'si-us

A-ces'ti-uni

A-ces-to-d5'rus

A^-es-tor'i-dSf

A-ce'te§

ACli-a-by't9S

A-chse'a

Agh-ffi-men'i-

A-^ha'i-a

A-gha'is

Acti'a-ra

Ach-e-lo'i-de§

Ach-e-lo'us

A-ghe'ias

A-cher'i-ml

Ach'e-ron "*

A-ghe'tus

Ach-il-)e'a

Ach-il-le'is

A-chil'le?

Ach-il-le'um

Ach-il-ll'de§

Ach'o-lfi

A-ch5're-us

Agh-ra-dl'na

Ach'ra-dos

A^-i-da'sa

A-c'i'la

A^-i-lig'e-nEi

Ac'o-nje

Ac gn-tob'o-li

A-con-to bu'-

lus
A-c5'ris
Ac'o-ru3
Ac-r^i-di'na
Ac-ra-gal-ll'-

dae
Ac'ra-g5s
A-cra'tus
A-crl'gn
Ac-ris-i-o-ne'-

us
Ac-ris-i-o-ni'-

51-def
A-crl'tas
Ac-ro-a'thon
A-cro'9-th5s



Ac-ro-ce-re'te^

A-crop'a-tos

Ac-io-re'?

Ac'ro-ta

A-crot'a-tus

Ac-ro-tlis'i

A-croth'o-os

Ac-tis'a-ne§

Ac'to-ris

A cu'phis

A-Cu-si-la'ys

A-cy'rus

A^'y-tus

Ad-a-man-

tae'a
Ad'a-mas
A-da'mus
Ad'a-na
Ad'^i-thfi
Ad'du-a
A-de'mon
Ad-i-a-b5'ne
A-di-at'o-rix
Ad-i-me'te
Ad-me'ta
A-dra'na
Ad-ras-ti'a -
Ad-ras-tT'ne
A-dre'ne
A'dri-a
A-dri-an-op'9-

lis '_
A-dri-a'num
Ad-ry-me'tum
Ad-u-at'i-cl
A-dii'la '
Ad-u-ll'ton
A-dyr-mach'j-

^-a-ce'si
^-a^'i-das
^-a-ci'um
^'a-cus
^'a-tus
^ch-mac'o-
Ta.s

JE-di'le^

^d'i-lus

A-e-do'nis

^-e'ta

iE-e'ti-as

^-ga'le-um

/E-|e'le-on



^-li-a'le-iis

^|i-a'li-si

^-gi'a-lus

^-gic'o-ref

^-gl'def

^I'i-lips

^-*im'o-rus

iE-^I'na

^*-i-ne'ta

^-|i'o-chug

^'gi-u'in
iEg-ie'tef

^-gjob'o-lus

^-go'ne

^g-o-ne'^

^-gos'the-tia

^'|y-la_ '

^-|y-pa'nes

^-nan'ti-on
iE-ne'a '
^-ne'a-dse
iE-ne'as
^-nes-i-de'-
mus

iE-nl'a-cus
^n'i-cus

iE-ni'o-chi
^n'o-cle§

-^-ny'ra
^-ol'i-def

JE-o'r^
M-pe'a.
^p'u-lo
^-qTiTc'9-li

^s'a-cus

-^-sa'^e-a

^s'chi-ne^

iEs'chy-lus

yE-se'pus

JE-§i'on

^s-o-pS'us

^s'trj-Ei '

^s'u-a

iEs'ti-lae

iE-sy'e-te?



^-sy'me

^s-ym-ne'tse

/Eth'He

^th-a-le'a

iE-thI'ce§

iE-thl'on

^'ti-on

iEt-j-o-ne'91

.^-ti'te§

A-ex-6'ne

Ag'a-bus

A-gac'ly-tiis

A-gal'la

Ag'a-me

Ag-a-me'de§

Ag-a-me'tor

A-gain'ma-tse

Ag'a-niiis

Ag-a-njp-pe'us

A-gan'z^-ga

Ag'a-pae

A-ga.s'i-cle§

A-ga'so

A-gas'the-ne§

Ag-a-thar'chj-

das
Ag-a-thl'fi
A-ga'thj-as
A-gath-o-cle'fi
Ag'a-thon
A-gath'o-pus
Ag-a-thbs'the-

A-ga've

Ag-bat'^-n§i

A|-e-e'n8i

Ag-e-Ia'das

Ag-e-la'us

A*'e-le§

A-^en'a-tha

A^-en-dl'cum

A-ge'nor

A*-e-ri'nus

A-|es-i-la'us

A|-e-sis'tra-

tus
A-ge'tor
Ag'i-dBB
A^-i-la'us
Ag-la'i-ft
Ag-Ia-o-ni'ce
Ag-la'o-pe
Ag-la'o-phon
Ag-la-os'the-

Ag'lfi-us

Ag-np-ni'^i

Ag-no'te^



Ag-noth'e-t£B

A-g6'n55

Ag'o-nus

Ag'o-ra

Ag-o-rac'ri-tys

Ag-o-ran'o-mi

Ag'ra-gas

Ag-rau-?-ni'-

_ tifi

A-gri-a'nef

A-gn'o-dos

A-grj-o'ni-a

A-gi'i'o-pas

A-gri-6ph'^-*I

Ag-rjp-pe'ura

A-gris'o-pe

Ag'ro-las

A-grot'e-r^

A-ly'i-eus

A-gy'rus

A-ha'la

A-i'la

A-Tm'y-lus

Al-a-b^n-den''

se§
Al'a-bus
A-la'la
Al-al-com'e-

nae
Al-a-ma'nef
A-la'ni

Al-a-ro'dj-l

A-las'to-re|

A-Ia'zon

Al-ba'ni

Al-bl'ci

Al-bi-e'tse

Al-b(-iio-va'-

nus
Al-hi'nus
Al-bi'o-nej
Al'bu-ia
Al-bu'nsi
Al-cfen'e tus
Al-cam'e-ne^
Al-ca'nor
Al-cath'g-e
Al'ce-tas
Al'chi-das
Al-ghTm'a-cua
Al-ci-d?-me'^
Al-ci-dam'j-

das
Al-ci'de?
Al-cim'e-de
Al-cini'9-5g
Al'cj-mus



tt,c,I,o,u,y, Zo7i^;a,e,i,o,u,y, s/tor<;?,e,i,o,u,y, oiscMre.-fAre,far,fSst,failjhfeir,he8



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES.



303



Al-cin'o-e

Xl'ci-nbr

(^l-cin'g-Ss

Al'ci-nus

&l-ci-6'ne-us

Al'ci-phron

Xlc-mae-on'i-

das
Alc-me'riji
?]'co-ne
Al-cy'o-na
^l-C}'-6'ne-us
\l-du'a-bis
V-l5'bas
\l-e-ma'nus
V-le'mon
^'le-on

\-le'§i-a

A.-15'sus

A-le'tgf

^-le'thi-a

A-let'i-das

A-lA-tri-na'te§

A.-15'tuni

A-leii'a-dae

A-le'us

A-lex-$i-me'-

nus
&l-ex-^n-dri'-

na
Al-ex-a'nor
A-lex'i-?i
&l-ex-ic'?-c3s
\-Iex'i-6
5.1-ex-ir'a-e?
Al-ex-ir'ho-e
\l-fe'nus
A.i'|i-dum
M-g5'num

i^-lim'e-nus

&.l-in-d6'i-a

\-li'phas

U-j-phe'ra

.V-II'sum

\l-li'fe

\l-lob'ro-*e5

A.I-lo-phy'lus

Al-lot'ri-|e5

Al-rae'ne

Al-mo'pgg

Al-my-ro'de

A-l6'a

Xl-o-i'dae

A-Jo'js

A-lo'iii3



Al'o-pe

A-lo'rus

Al-pe'nus

Al-phe'a

Al-phe'i-?i

Al-phe'nu3

Al'plie'us

Al-phi'on

Al'phi-us

^1-pI'nus

Al-the'pus

A-lv-at'tgs

Al'y-bfi

Al-y-bi'da

A-)y'mon

Al-yx-oth'o-e

Al-y-ze'9

A-mad'o-cI

Am'a-ge

Am-al-the'um

Am'fi-na

A-raan'i-cjB

Am-an-ti'nl

Am-a-sC'si

A-ma'sis

A-ma'ta

Am-a-the'a

Am'3-thus

A-max-arn-

pe'us
A-max-an-ti'^t
A-inax'i-ta
Am-51-ze'nef
A-maz'o-ne|
Am'a-zon^
Ara-bar-va'le^
Ain-ba'tae
Am'be-nus
Am-bi-a-li'te§
Am-bi-a'num
Ain-hi-51-ti'-

num
Am-bj-bar'e-tl
Am-bi'cus
Am-bj-ga'tus
Am-bi'o-rix
Am'bla-dsi
Am-br6'd?ix
Am-bry'on
Am by-ba'^ae
Am'bu-ll
Am'e-le?
Am-e-na'nus
Am-e-ni'de?
A-men'o-cle?
Am-e-no'phjs
Am-i-a'nus
Am-ic-tae'u3



A-ml'd?

Am'i-los

A-mln'j-as

i^-min'o-cle§

Am-i-se'na

A-nii'sum

Ain-ma'l5

Am-mo'the-a

Am-nem'o-ne|

Am'hi-as

Am-nl'sus

Am-nl'te?

Am-om-phar'-

e-tus
Am'pe-ISs
Am-phe'?
Am-phi-?-la'-

us
Am-phi'^-lus
Am-phj-ar-a-

e'um
Am-phj-^i-ra'-

us
Am-phic-le'a
Am-phic'ra-tef
Am-phic'ty-on
Am-phic-ty'o-

Am-phid'o-ll

Am-phiii'o-me

Am-plii'on

Am-phip'o-lis

Am-phi-re'tus

Am-phir'o-e

Am-phl's^

Am-phis-bae'-

ngi
Am-phis-se' ne
Am-phis'the-

Am-phjs-tT'def
Am-phis'tr?i-

tus
Am-phi'sus
Am-phj-the-a'-

truin
Am-'phi-trl'te
Am-phit'ry-on
Am'phi-tus
Am-phi'us
Amp'sa-ga
Am-pyc'j-def
A-mycHa
Am-y-cli'de§
Am'y-cus
Am-y-mo'ne
A-myn-ti-a'-

nus



A-myn'tor
Am'y-ru8
Am-y-tlia'on
Am-y-th^-o'nj

us
Am'y-tis
A-nab'a-tae
An'ji-ce^
An-9-ci'um
An-ac-to'ri-e
A-nac 'to-rum
An-a-gy-ron'-

tum
An-^-i'tis
An'a-phe
A-na'pus
A-nar'gy-rl
A-nat'o-le
A-ntlu'chi-das
An-ax-ag'o-i-as
An-ax-an'drl-

def
An-ax-ar'e-te
A-nax'i-as
An-5ix-ic'r£i-

A-nax'i-las

A-nax-i-la'us

An-a^-ira'e-

An-ax-ip'o-lis

An-ax-ir'rho-e

An-c£B'us

An-ca-li'tes

^n-gha're^

An-cha'te3

An-ghe-si'te^

An-£lii'Ha
An-£hi-a-li'si
An-£hl'9-lus
An-£hi-m5'li-

us
An-chTn'o-e
An-£hl'se§
An'gho-e
An'cho-r^
An-ci'le
An-cy'le
An-cy'ron
An-dab'a-tas
An-de-ca'o-ne|
An-de'rsi
An-do^'i-des
An-dras'mon
An-drag'a-

thus
An-dram'y-te§
An-dris'cus



An-drg-cle'?

Aii'dro-cle?

An-dro'clus

An-dro-cy'de|

An-drod'a-

mus
An-dro'dys
An-dro*'y-naB
An-drom'?-

che
An-drom'e-dft
An-dro-nl'ciis
An-droph'a-*i
An-dr6s'the-

An-dr5'ti-on

An-e-mo'li-a

An-e-i^s'tus

An-fin'o-mus

An'ga-rl

An'*e-Ius

■An-gi'te^

An-i-ce'tus

A-nl'gros

An-i-tor'^jS

An-ni-a'nus

Au'ni-bi

An-ni^'e-rls

An-nj-cho'rl

^-no'lus

An'o-nus

An-o-pae'si

An-tce'a

An-tae'us

An-tal'ci-das

An-te'i-us

An-te'nor

An'te-ros

An-the'a

An'the-as

An-the'don

An-the'la

An'ths-mis

An-the'ne

An-thes-pho'

ri->'
An'the-us
An-thI'?
An'thi-as
An'thj-nae
An'thj-us
An-thro-pl'-

nus
An-thrp-poph

An'ti-us
An-ti-bac-chi'

U3



■it<!n,s}Vid6,nbr,s6n3bull,bUr,rule. (^,,i},<^,^,sofi; e^GjCJ^jhard; § as Z3 1 <w gz; this



804



GREEK AND LATIN PEOPER NAMES



An-ti5h'th9-

An-ti^-i-no'ljs

An-ti-cle'51

An'tj-cles

An-ti-cll'de^

An-tTc'rj-gus

An-ti^'y-ra

Aii-ti-^e-nl'-

An-tig'o-n^i
Aii-til'c5
An-ti-Iib'a-nus
An-tTl'9-chus
An-tim'e^nef
Aii-tin-9-e'a



Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA primary pronouncing dictionary of the English language : with vocabularies of classical, Scripture, and modern geographical names → online text (page 54 of 61)