Joseph E. (Joseph Emerson) Worcester.

A pronouncing spelling-book of the English language online

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A paion at chess. The spawn of fish. An Indian woman or wife is
called a squaw. A yawl is a land of boat. An awkward gait. A
Moorish governor is called a bashaw. That wliich causes loathing is
mawkish. Haul down the flag. A vault, or arch.

Men applaud the orator. A hostile assault. Auburn hair. An
ofiicer to audit accounts. A gaudy dress. He received the plau-
dits of the crowd. We sometimes suffer from the default of another.
You cannot exhaust the air from an open vessel. Cork is the bark
of a tree. The poets use mom for morning. The sun is called the
orb of day. Scorn to do a mean act. The snort of a horse. The
stork is an emblem of affection. A torch to give Hght. Jewels to
adorn the person. Abhor that which is evil. A sponge will absorb
water. The cornet is a musical instrument like a horn. A pirate, or
corsair. Bears He dform<2/i^ during the winter. K forlorn look. The
sting of a hornet. A morbid, or unhealthy, appetite. A normal school
is designed for the education of teachers. The orbit of the moon.
Mean, or sordid, in disposition. One in a -state of torpor is imable
to move. A vortex, or whirlpo'ol. Who bought the house ? They
fought desperately. We ouglit to help one another. Have yofl found
what you sought ? They uttered what they thought. Tapestry, wrought
with the hand. A broad table. A groat M valued at four pence.



The Long Sound (yp e, as in mete. This sound, represented by e before
a single consonant and a silent e final, as in mete, is otherwise expressed
by ea, ee, ie, ei, i, ey, se, eo, and uay.

ea. 1



b^ad


beast


bleat


dean


ear


beak


bleach


cheap


dream


east


beam


bleak


cheat


drear


eat


beard


blear


deal


each


fear



84 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS.



feast


leap


peat


sheaf


tea


freak


leash


plea


shear


teach


gleam


least


plead


sheath


teal


glean


meal


preach


smear


treat


heap


neap


reach


sneak


veal


heat


near


ream


speak


wean


lieath


neat


reap


spear


wheat


lead


pea


rear


steam


year


leaf


peach


seal


streak


yeast


lean


peak


seat


stream


zeal


an-neal'


be-neath'


de-feat'


im-peach'


re-peat'


ap-peal'


be-speak'


de-mean'


mSl-treat


re-treat'


ap-peai/


bo-hea'


en-dear'


mis-lead'


re-veal'


ar-rear'


con-ceal'


en-treat'


re-peal'


sea'm^n


beef


feel


ee.
keep


seem


steep


bleed


flee


lee


sheep


steer


breed


fleece


leer


sheet


street


cheek


fleet


meek


sleek


sweep


cheer


free


peep


sleep


sweet


deed •


glee


reef


sleet


teeth


deem


green


reek


sneer


three


deep


greet


reel


speech


tree


eel


jeer


see


speed


veer


fee


keel


seed


spleen


weed


feed


keen


seek


steed


weep


a-gree'


ca-reer'


free'dom


les-see'


re-deem'


a-sleep'


de-cree'


free'man


Im'seed


set-tee'


be-seech'


de-gree'


gran-dee'


meet'ing


suc-ceed'


be-tween'


dis-creet'


grain-tee'


mis-deed'


trus-tee'


can-teen'


es-teem'


in-deed'


mo-reen'


tu-reen'


csrreen'


ex-ceed'


keep'sake


peev'ish


ve-neer'



lODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS. 85



l)rief
chief
fief



£end
fieroa



IrckieTe' be-lieve'



grief
niece
piee©

cash-ie/



priest
shield
shriek



re-lief'



7:Qt



wield
yield

s^^il'



seize

ceiling

con-ceit'



<Don-cei¥e^
de-ceit^



weird
de^eivef



re-ceive







<5|rprice' ma-rine'' po-lice' ra-vine^ tSn-tin©^

ey,
key

Remaek 1. Tli« ^j^&oiig ley wlieii usaacc^ited a^ the cad of words !ms
tli«», slight sound of e.



Iil'ley galley

barley kid^ney
chim'ney lam'prey



medley parley
motley parsley



se.



pae'an Cse^§ar



mon'ey f



eo.

peo^plej



tiir^key

valley

volley



uay.



(kg)



Exercises for- Writing. — The heak of a bird. The sun wiU
bleach clotJi. A hltak situation for a house, Blmr eyes. Deal fairly
with every body. A gleam of light. Oleanthe grain after the reapers.
A desolate heath. A leash of hounds, 2^eap tides. The peak of a



* When the sound of E long immediately follows C, it is represented by EI |b«!
Rot by IE, except in the word financier^
t See The Sound of v :ts in TUB, p. 46.
X 8ee Words containing Silent Letters, p. 76.



S6 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE YOWEL SOUNDS.

hill. Feat is a kind of turf. A ream of paper. A sheaf of whaaA
Do not smear your clothes. Steam is water in the form of vapor.
The guilty will sneak away. The teal is a kind of duck. The flesh of
a calf is called veal The way to anneal glass is to allow it to cool
slowly. Parties appeal from an inferior court to a higher one. Ar-
rears of debt. Bespeak his favor. Take care to demean yourself
■well. Do not impeach the motives of others. The legislature may
repeal the law. Reveal the secret.

The flesh of the ox or cow is called heef. Kind words cheer the
heart. Bestow confidence only on those whom yo« deem worthy of
it. The/eece of a sheep. A /ee^ of vessels. Do not ji'eer at serious
things. S«e how the rogues leer on us, as we go by. A reef of rocks.
A reel for yam^ The horses reek with perspii-ation. Sleek hau-.
The ground is covered with sleet. Spleen, or ili-humor. 1 think the
-^md will veer to the north. Do you agree with him in opinion ? A
canteen for liquor. It will be necessary to careen the ship in order to
repair ber. The career of Napoleon. A grandee of Spain. One to
whom any thing is gi-anted is called the grardee. A keepsake in token
of regard. One to whom a house is leased is the lessee. Linseed
is the seed of flax. Cm-tains made of moreen. I hope you will suc-
ceed. The trustee of an estate. A tureen for soup. Veneer for
fm-niture. * *

A brief time. A foul fend. K fierce animal. A shield for pro-
tection. A shriek from pain or fr-ight. A person fitted to widd
authority. Industry will achieve wonders. Christians believe in a
future life. Belief from pain. A sortie^ from a besieged city. The
cashier of a bank. The " weird sisters " of Shakspeare are women
skilled in witchcraft. The ceiling of a room. Be not wise in your
own conceit. Beware of those who practise deceit. To attempt to
deceive others is the first step in wickedness. It is more blesseel to
give than to receive.

His conduct seems to be governed by capHce. Marine, or nautical,
affairs. The police of a city. A deep ravine. Tontine is the name
of a kind of loan raised on life annuities. The key of a lock. A
narrow alley. A field of barley. A chimney for smoke. A print-
er's galley. The lamprey is a kind of eel. A confused medley. A
motley group of figures. Make a good use of money. A parley, or
conference. Parsley is an herb. A pulley to raise weights. The
soldiers fired a volley. A pcean for victory. A number of people,
A quayf or wharf.



MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS. 37

The Short Sound of e, as in met. This sound is otherwise expressed
by ea, ai, se, a, ei, eo, ie, u, and ue.







ea.






brSad


dead


dv^smt


rSalm


thread


breadth


dealt


head


spread


threat


breast


death


hefJth


stead


tread


breath


dread


meant


stealth


wealth



brSak'fast stSad'fast in-stSad'

ai.



weath'er zeaVot



said



saith



ses-thet'ics



a-gain' ^-gainst'



93*



di-asr'e-sis



an'yt



ei.



hSif'erJ nSn-pa-rSil'



le.



friend friSnd'sMp



a.



mau'yf

eo.

jSop'ard ISopV^



u.



bur'y t



bur'i-al



ue.



guess (gss) § guest (gest)

Exercises for Writing. — What is the breadth of this room ?
The breath contains vapor. Have you dealt fairly with your play-
mate ? The good need not fear death. Dread nothing so much aa

* The diphthong ^rwith this sound is substituted for Al in the word gAYS.
t See TTie Souiid of I, as in PINE, Remark 3, p. 39.
X See The Sound of V, as in FUR, p. 50.
$ See Worie containing Silent Letters, p. 76.



38 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS.

to do wrong. I dreamt that I was dreaming. Take care of your
Ji^aZih. I meant no harm. A realm, or kingdom. Who will go in
yom- stead ? Pope speaks of those who " do good by stealth, and
blush to find it fame." He will not dare to execute his threat. Come
to breakfast Be steadfast in duty. He is a zealot. Many have said
so. Do not bring charges against him. The science of cesthetics.
VThaX is the use of the diceresis ? Have you any horses ? How
many ? A heifer, or young cow. Nonpareil is a kind of type. You
will jeopartZ your Hfe to go so near the leopard. K friend in need is
a friend indeed. Ostriches hury their eggs in the sand. All nations
Bclemnize the burial of the dead.

Tm: Long St)UND of i, as in pine. This sound, represented by i be^
fore a single consonant and a silent e final, as in pine, is otherwise expresse4
by y, ie, ui, ei, ujr, ai, ye, and eye.

by fry shy spy try

cry lyre sky stylo type

dry ply spry thy why

al-ly' de-ny' hy'dra im-ply' re-ply'

de-fy' . es-py' hy'men re-ly' ty'ro

Remark 1. All verbs ending in fy have this syllable long, though no*
under the primary accent.

Sm'pli-fy fruc'ti-fy niirii-fy rar'e-fy sanc'ti-fy

crii'ci-fy f or'ti-fy no'ti-fy r^t'i-fy sat'is-fy

cl^r'i-fy grat'i-fy Ss'si-fy rec'ti-fy ter'ri-fy

^e'i-fy jus'ti-fy pag'i-fy spe§'i-fy tes'ti-fy

^d'i-fy mSd'i-fy pet'ri-fy sig'ni-fy viFi-fy

fM'si-fy raor'ti-fy pu'ri-fy stii'pe-fy vgr'i-fy

Remark 2. The final y is also long m the following verbs : —
murti-ply <5c'cu-py proph'e-sy *

* In regard to the digraph PH, see The Sound ofPtOainFAN, p. 63



MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS. 39

Bemakk 3. The words given under the last two remarks are exceptions
to the general rule in regard to the numerous class of words ending in y un-
accented, and preceded by a consonant. In such cases this vowel has usu-
ally the sound of indistinct e, as in the words a'6/y, ea'^y,J&m'i-l^,db'l9-quy.

ie.
die fie He pTe tie vie

Remark 4. Nouns of one syllable, ending in y long, have this sound
represented by ie in their plurals.

crie§* flie§ frie§ plie§ skie§ tie§

Remark 5. Verbs ending in y long have this*sound represented by io
in the third person singular of the present tense of the indicative mood.

de-fie§' es-pie§' de-nie§' im-plie§' re-plie§'
lim'pli-fie§ clSr'i-f ie§ grSt'i-fie§ no'ti-fie§ vSr'i-fie^

ui. ei.

guide guile guT§e height (hit) sleight (siit)f

uy. ai. 'ye. eye.

buy aisle (lof rye eye

Exercises for Writing, — A cry of distress. A lyre, or "harp.
Ply the oars vigorously, if you would stem the tide. A sly fox. An
author's style. The type for a letter. Many ties ally England and the
United States. They dare not defy his authority. Eagles espy their
prey afar oif. The hydra was a fabulous monster with many heads.
My men, the god of marriage. A tyro at school. Speak briefly,
rather than amplify your remarks. Ancient nations used to crucify
criminals. The poets have done much to (Zei/^/ ^6^*0^3. Batteries to
fortify a town. Rebels attempt to nullify the laws. A part of the
body is said to ossify when it becomes hard like a bone. A substance
is said to petrify when it grows hard like a stone. Heat will rarefy

* For the sound noted by y, see TU Sound of z, as in ZEAL, p. 55.
t [email protected] Words containing Silent Letters, p. 76.



40 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS.

air. FiecUfy the mistake. Opium will stupefy the senses. Bad men
care little whom they vilify. Examine authorities to verify the .state-
ment. Vices multiply like weeds, if not checked in season. Prophets
prophesy. Fie upon their pretences. The tie of kindred. They vie
with each other in acts of kindness. A guide to the traveller. One
who is innocent is without guile. An enemy may come in the guise
of a friend. The height of a mountain. Jugglers practise sleight of
hand. How much did you buy ? The aisle of a church. A field
of rye. The sight of the eye.

The Short Soiprn of i, as in pin. This soxmd is otherwise expressed
by y, ui, u, e, ee, ie, and o.

■ * y-

crypt cyst lynx* mytli

crys'tal lyr'ic myth'ic sym'bol syn't^x

cyn'ic mys'tic sylVan syn'od sys'tem

ui.
build guild guilt gum'ea (iin'e) f

u.

bu§'y (biz'e) bu§i'ness (biz'n?8) f

Eng'land (ing'gismd) * Eng'lislr pret'ty (pnt't?)

ee. ie. o.

been (Wn) sieve (siv) wom'en (wim'en)

Remark. In the unaccented syllables of some wordi, the slight soua^
of short i is represented by ie, ai, ui, ei, u, ia, and oi.

ie.

ar'mie§ c5p'ie§ coun'tie§ folliei^ ru^bie§

ba'bie^ clier'rie§ du'tie§ la'die§ stud'ie§

b(5d'ie§ cit'ie§ fSn'cie§ mer'cie§ &to'rie§

* See The Sound of NCf, as in siNG, p. 75.
■* See Words containing Silent Letters , p. 76.



MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS. 41

b^ii'die§ Sn'vie§ mSr'rie§ pit'ie§ stud'ie§

bSn'died SnVied m^r'ried pit'ied stud'ied

ai.

bar'gain ceVtain chieftain foun'tain plSn'tain
cSp'tain chSp'lain ciir'tain moun'tain viriain

ui.
bis'cuit (kit) cir'cuit (-kjt) con'duit (-djt)

ei.
fSi/eign (-jn)* forfeit (fjt) siir'feit (-f jt) mul'lein c-i<n)

u.

f Sr'rule (-rji) let'tuce (-tjs) min'ute (-jt)

ia. 01.

cSl/ria^e (kar'nj) mSr'ria^e (msir'rij) tor'toi§e (tor^tjz)

Exercises for Writing. — A crypt under a church. The lynx
is noted for quickness of sight. A myth, or fable. Clear as crystal.
A morose man is called a cynic. A lyric poem. A mystic is one
■who holds vague or obscure doctrines. A mythic, or fabulous, story.
Sylvan scenes. A symbol, or sign. An ecclesiastical synod. Syn-
tax teaches the grammatical construction of sentences. The solar
system.

He is going to huild a house. The guilt of a criminal. A guinea
is twenty-one shillings sterling. He is always busy about something.
His business occupies all his time. He has gone to England. The
English language. A pretty cluld. Where have you 6een? A
sieve is an instrument to separate bran from flour. A party of
women.

The armies of Napoleon. Toys for babies. Copies of a ■writing.
Ripe cherries. The cities of the "world. Attend to all your duties.
The fancies of a poet. The follies of youth. Wisdom is more
precious than rubies. Do not neglect yoiir studies. Stories for

♦ See Words containing Silent Letters, p. 76

4*



42 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS.

amusement. They bandied arguments. Kings are not to be enviedS,
She will be WKxrriii next week. They who have no home are to be
pitied. How long have you studied your lesson ? You have made a
good bargain. The captain of a ship. Are you certain of it ? The
chaplain of an army. A Scottish diieftain. A curtain for a window.
A. fountain of water. A high jnountain. The plantain grows in Cuba.
He is a great villain. A well-baked biscuit. A long circuit. A
conduit for water. Foreign comitries. Pay the forfeit. A surfeit
of food. The stalk of the mullein, A ferrule is a metal ling put on
the end of a piece of wood to keep it from splitting. Lettuce grows
rapidly. Wait a minute. He rode in a four-wheeled carnage. The
marriage will take place to-morrow. Combs are made from the shell
of the toHoise,

The Long Sound or o, as in note. This sound, represented by o
before a single consonant and a silent e final, as in note, is otherwiso
expressed by oa, ow, ou, oe, oo, eau, ew, eo, and au.







oa.






bloat


coast


groan


moat


roast


boar


coat


hoar


oak


shoal


board


coax


hoard


oar


soak


boast


croak


hoax


oats


soap


boat


float


load


oath


soar


broach


foam


loaf


roach


throat


cloak


goad


loam


road


toad


coach


goal


loan


roam


toast


coal


goat


moan


roar


woad


ap-proach'


char'coal


en-croach'


oak'um


tiirn'coj


be-moan'


co'coa


m'road


re-proach'


un-load


-




ow.






blow


bowl


flow


glow


growth


blown


€row


flown


grow


low


mow


row


slow


sown


throw


own


show


snow


stow


thrown



MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS. 43



Sr'row


fallow .


hmow


pillow


tallow


billow


fellow


mS^r'row


sallow


tow'ard


bSr'row


follow


mellow


shad'ow


wid'ow


bur'row


fur'row


min'now

4


shallow


willow


cSriow


hallow


mbr-row


sor'row


win'now


SFbow


hSr'row


nar'row
ou.


spar'row


yellow


course


four


mould


mourn


soul


court


gourd


moult


pour


source


poullice


poullry




shoulMer * smoul'der *






oe.






doe foe


hoe roe throe


toe woe SFoe




00.




eau.




door brooch floor


beau (b5) bu


-reau' (m-wy


ew.




eo.




an.


sew (s5)


yeo'man


haut'boy (ho'boi) f



Exercises for Writing. — Fishes can bloat their bodies at will.
SroacTi the cask. Havens croaJc. A goad to drive oxen with. The
goal of a race-course. Hoar frost. A soil consisting of loam. A
moat around a castle. The roach is a fresh-water fish. Shoal ground
in a harbor. Eagles soar to a great height. Wood is a plant
from which a blue dye is extracted. Do not approach too near the
precipice. The lower animals seem to bemoan the loss of their
young. Cocoa is the nut of the chocolate tree. Do not encroach
upon the rights of others. Oakum is used to fill the seams in ships.
A turncoat is one who forsakes his party.

The blow of a hammer. The bird has flown. The growth of
plants. It is time to mow the grass. Stow the package* closely,

* See The Sound of J7, as in FUR, p. 50.
t See Words containing Silent Letters, p. 76



44 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS.

A how and arrow. A billow, orjvsLve, Be careful to return what you
borrow. Rabbits burrow in the ground. Young and tallow birds.
Fallow land. Christians Jialloio the Sabbath day. The marrow of
bones. The minnow is a small fish. . A sallow complexion. The sun
appears to move toward the west./ Winnow the grain. The shell
of the gourd is used f®r a bottle. A mould for a casting. Birds
moult their feathers. The source of a river. A poultice for a
swelling. The poultry about a farm-yard. Charcoal is made of wood
by causmg it to smoulder. The hunter killed a doe. The roe of a
herring. A throe, or pang. The aloe is a tree, and aloes a medicine.
A brooch is an ornamental pin. A beau to attend ladies. A bureau
fbr clothes. Ghls should learn to sew. The yeomen of a country.
The hautboy is a wind instrument.



The Short Sound op o, as in not.
pressed by a, ou, and ow.



This sound is otherwise ex-



chaps

(chops)

quash
squab
squad



squash

(skwosh)

squat

swab

swamp



a.
swan

(swon)

swap

swash

swath



wad

(w5d)

wan

wand

wa§



quad'rant quat'rain squan'der f wal'let

(kwSd') * (kwW) * (skvvon') ' (wol')

quad'rate scal'lop swal'low wal'lop

quar'rel squad'ron swad'dle + wal'low

quar'ry squal'id wad' die wan'derf



wash

(wosli)

wasp
watch *
what

wan'ton

(won')

war'rant
war'ren
was'sail



OU.
cough (koO trough (trSf) §



OW.

knowl'edge (nsi'ej) J



Exercises for Writing. — The chaps of a beast. When courts
annul a charge or indictment, they are said to quash it. A young



* See The Sound of CH, as in CHEST, p. 59
t See TTie Sound of U, as in FUR, p. 50.
\ See Words containing Silent Letters, p. 76.
$ See The Sound of F, as in FAN, p. 53



MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS. 45

pigeon is called a squab. A squad of soldiers. A swab, or mop. A
swath made with a scythe. A wad for a gun. The wand of a conjm*er.
A gold watch. A quadrant is used in finding longitude. A quatrain
in poetry. A scallop on the edge of a ruffle. A squadron of ships.
A squalid wretch. A warrant from a judge to arrest a criminal.
Shakspeare uses wassail in the sense of revel. A troublesome cough,
A deep trough. Knowledge is obtained by observation and study.



The Long Sound of n, as in tnbe. This sound, represented by u
before a single consonant and a silent e final, is otherwise expressed by
ew, ue, ui, en, ieu, iew, eau, and ewe.



ew.




blew few Jew new


- slew


clew flew mew newt


; spew


dew hew mewl pew


stew


curlew mil'dew re-new'


skew'er*


ew'er* pew'ter* sin'ew


stew'aird


tie.




cue due glUe hue


sue



* en-sue' im-biie' in-due' pur-sue' sub-due'





m.




jiiice


sliiice


suit


Buit'or


nui'sance


pur-suit'



eu.
deuce feud feii'di,! neii'ter* neiVtrfkl

ieu.
lieu a-dieii' piir'lieu

♦ See The Sound of v, as in FUEt p. 50.



46 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS.

lew. eau. ewa

view (vfi) beau'ty ewe (yu)

' Exercises for Writing. — The •wind hlew. There is no clew to
the mystEr)\ Dew fells at night. The bird jlew away. An axe to
liew timber. The kittens mew. Infants mewl. A pew in a chvtrch.
Meat for a stew. A newtf or small lizard. The curlew is a water fowl.
A ewer for water. A spoon made of pewter. A sinew, or tendon.
A skewer for meat. The steward of a ship. One play-actor gives
another the cue when to speak. How much money is due ? Glv^
may be obtained from bones. The Jiue of a rose. The culprit will
sue for mercy. He is suffering from ague. Bad consequences will
ensue. Pursue your studies. The juice of the grape. A sluice in
a dam. A suit at law. Abate the nuisance. Be ardent in the pw-
suit of knowledge. The deuce in cards or dice, A feud, or quan-el.
A neuter verb. One in lieu of another. V^^e say adieu at parting.
A purlieu, or outer district, of a city. A clear view. The beauty of
a landscape. See the ewe with her lamb.

The Short Sottnd of u, as in tub. This sound is otherwise ex-
pressed by o, oil, oo, and oe.





0.




d6st


front sou


w6n


doth


month ton


wont



Rem AUK. 1. Some words of this class contain a silent e final following &
single consonant, and are, therefore, exceptions to the rule by which this
Vowel, so situated, lengthens the vowel that precedes it.

come d6ve love 6ne(w5n)

done glove none ' shove

8L~b6Te' broth'er* cov'et moth'er* pom'mel

g - m6ng' coFor Mon'day noticing smoth'er*

bom-bard' com'fit mon'ey Sth'er* w6n'der*

b6m-b^st' c6m'f9rt month'ly plov'er* w6r'ry

• 9w 2^e ^Quni of u, as in fVR, p. 50.



MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUI^S. 47



chough (cbSf) *

joiist



on.

rough (reo *
touch



tough (tuf) *
young



coun'trj couplet doublet flour'ish nour'ish



Heuark 2. The diphthong on, in the tmaccented syllable ous, lias ihis

Blight sound of short n in a numerous class of words.



mu'eous



pi'ous



Tis'cous
Yrnons



hiirbons fi'brous

caVlous griev'ons mon'strous po'rous

cum'brous jealous ner'vous p5m'pous won'drous

fa'mous lep'rous ni'trous spinous zSal'ous



00.

blood (blud) flood (fiSd)



oe. ^

doe§ (dttz)



Exercises for Writing . — Dost is the second person singular,
end doth the third person singular, of the present indicative of the
TerbUf to do." The front of a house. He stayed a month. Whose
-son is he ? A ton of coal. Who won the prize ? Wont is an old
-ward for custom. When will you come again ? The work is done.
None is literally " no one." The cooing of a dove. A kid fflove.
Shove the bed towards the waU. The enemy threatened to bombard
the city. Youthful writers are inclined to bombast. A kind brother.
A brilliant color. Champions in a combat. A conifit, or dry sweet-
meat. Home is the place for comfort. Do not covet what belongs to
another. A scarcity of money. A mongrel goose. A monthly pub-
lication. A mother^s love. The plover is a wading bnd. The pom-
mel of a saddle. Smother the flame. His countenance expressed
great wonder. Do not worry the cat.

The chough resembles the crow. A joust, or tournament. A
rough surface. Tough meat. A young child. One's native country.
A tovplet in poetry. A doublet, or waistcoat. Flowers j^owm/i aad



* S«9 7%c Siyand ef Ft as in FAN, f, 5^.



48 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS.

&de. Food to nourish the body. A hulhous plant. Callous skin.
A cumbrous load. Asbestos is a jibrous mineral. A grievous op-
presrfon. A jealous disposition. A leprous limb. The mucous mem-
brane. Nitrous acid. A porous substance. Pompous manners. A
sjnnous plant. Viscous, or glutinous, substances. A zealous advocate.

The Sound of u, as in rule. This sound is otherwise expressed by
oo, ou, o, ew, ue, ui, and ceu.







00.






bl6(5m


c36t


mp


r66m


sp66n


boom


doom


mood


roost


stool


boon


droop


moon


root


stoop


boor


food


moor


scoop


swoon


boot


fool


noon


shoot


too


booth


gloom


pool


sloop


tool


brood


groom


poor


smooth


tooth


broom


hoof


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Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA pronouncing spelling-book of the English language → online text (page 3 of 14)