Joseph E. (Joseph Emerson) Worcester.

A pronouncing spelling-book of the English language online

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soon


troop


coo


hoot


rood


sooth


woo


cool


loon


roof


spool


woof


a-166f


bas-s33n'


co-c63n'


lam-p66n'


pon-t36n'


ba-boon'


be-hoof


dra-goon'


mon-soon'


rac-coon'


bal-loon'


buf-foon'


fes-toon'


pla-toon'


re-proof


barn-boo'


car-toon'


har-poon'
OU.


pol-troon'


sa-loon'


cr6up


s6up




tSur


ySur


group


through (tiira) *


you


youth


cSn-t6ur' r6u-ttne'


sur-t3ut'


im-cSuth'




d6 m6ve t3


0.

tw3 (to) *


wh8§e (hoz)


lo§e pre


VQ tomb


(torn) * who (hS) *


whom (hSm)



/



* Bee Words containing Silent Letters, p. 76.



MODES OF EXPHESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS. 49





ew.




■r


brew


crew grew




shrewd


chew


drew shrew
lie.




threw


true


ac-crue' con^


stri&e


lTD-1


-


ui.






e bruit cruise


fruit


re-c



rlie



brM§e

ceu.

ma-noeu'vre (m?i-nu'vur)

Exercises for Writing. — The trees are in hloom.- A hoom, or
spar. A boon, or fayor. A rude boor. A booth for temporarjr
shelter. Doves coo. The doom of a criminal. Suitable food.
The groom of a stable. The hoof of an animal. The loon is a
water-fowl. A moor^ or barren plain. A rood of land. A scoopj
or ladle. She has fallen in a swoon. The looof crosses the warp.

The bamboo is a kind of large reed. He played on a bassoon.
For whose behoof are you doing this ? A cartoon is a pattern drawn
on strong paj)er. The cocoon of a silkworm, A dragoon is equij)ped
to serve on foot or on horseback. A festoon of flowers, A har;poon
to strike whales. A lampoon, or satuical attack. A monsoon in
the East Indies. A platoon of soldiers. K poltroon, or vile coward.
A pontoon, or floating bridge. A merited reproof. A saloon, or
a large and elegant apartment.

Croup is a dangerous disorder. A group of trees. I took the
liberty to pass through your yard. A tour to Canada. A youth of
great promise. The contour, or outline of a figm'e. The routine
of business. A surtout, or overcoat. TJncoutli manners. What will
ym do, if you lose the money? Strength to move a heavy body.
Arguments to prove a statement. To whom do you allude ? Brew
some beer. Animals that chew the cud. A ship's crew. A shrew,
or scolding woman. A shrewd politician. He threw a stone. Rue
is a bitter herb. Is the story true% Great benefits will accrue.
Construe the sentence. Those who kill their fellow-men are said
to imbrue their hands in blood. A severe bruise. A bruit, or
5



60 MODES OF EXPBESSmG THE TOWEL ^OUKD^.



report. The cruise of a pirate, A dish of ripe fruit. He need^
rest to recruit his wasted strength. A bold manmuvve.



The Obtuse Sound of u, as in 111111. This so^uid is otiierRise ex-
pressed by o©, on, and o.





00.




book erook


hood


shook wood


ferook foot


hook


stood "wool


cook gocwi


look
ou.


took


could (kud)


should (sbud>


"would (wM)


0,

wolf worn' an (wOie^)


ho§'"cm (Ms^



Th-s Short and Obtuse Sound of u, as. in fur. This sound of n
feefore r is otherwise expressed, \\-ith little variation, before the same conso
jiant by e, i, ea, o, ou, and y.*



fern


nerre


e.
serf


term


verse


her


perch


sperm


terse


were


jerk


pert


stern


verb


wert


adVerb


de-fer'


m-ert'


mer'maid


re-vert^


ad-vert'


di-vert'


in-fer'


o'vert


ser'vant


a-lert'


ex-pert'


in-sert'


per' feet


ser'pent


as-sert'


ferVent


in-ter'


per'son


• sterling


%-Yer'


f-ertiie


in-vert'


per-yert'


su-perb'


con-cern'


fer'yid


mer' chant


pre-fer'


ver'dict


con-fer'


her^mjt


mer^cy


re-fer'


ver'tex



* See Remarhs sn the TaUs of ElsmsTuksrf Senndsj p. 12w



MODES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS. 61







1.






birch


dirt


girl


shirk


third


bird


first


girt


shirt


thirst


birth


flirt •


kirk


quirk


twirl


chirp


gird


mirth
ea.


stir


whirl


dearth


earn


heard


learn


search


earl


earth


hearse


pearl


yearn


word


world


0.

worse


wort


wor'ship


work


worm


worst


worth


wor'thy



ou.



ad-joiirn' joiir'nal joiir'ney scoiirge



myrrh



myr'tle



Remark. In the unaccented syllables of many words there is a slight
•ound of short and obtuse u before r, represented by a, e, i, O, and y.



fri'ar
li'ar



brew'er
speak'er



na'dir
ac'tor



o'dor
mar'tyr



Exercises for Writing. — A good hooh. A shepherd's crook.
A woman's hood. The wool of a sheep. If you could, you sliould,
whether you would or not. The wolf frightened the woman. The
fern grows in wet places. The optic nerve. The lad is very pert.
The sperm whale. A ship's stern. A terse style. A verse in poetry.
Were and loert are parts of the verb " to be." An adverb qualifies
a verb. I will advert to the subject at another time. An alert sen-
tinel. Do not defer what ought to be done immediately. An expert



* See The Sound of J, aa in jest, p.



52 MOBES OF EXPRESSING THE VOWEL SOUNDS,

artist. A fertile soil. Fervid zeal. An overt act. Critics some
times pei'vert the sense of authors. The veHex of a pjTamid.

A biixJi tree. Crickets chirp, A JJirt, or coquette. A belt to
gird the waist. The church of Scotland is called the JcirJc. A
mean shirk. A quirk, or quibble. A sling is propelled with a twirl.
A whirl in running water. A dearth of provisions. An EngHsh earl.
A physician advised a dyspeptic patient to hve on sixpence a day
and earn it The best discourse I ever heard. A hearse for the
dead. A precious pearl. Search for truth. Grieved hearts yearn
for sympathy. A word to the wise is sufficient. A literary work.
Nothing can be worse than the loorst. The brewer's icort. A hous^
of worship. "When wiU the comt adjourn ? A daily journal. A
long journey. War is a scourge. Myrrh is a gum-resin obtaiijed
in Arabia. A sprig of myrtle.

The Sound of oi, as in boil. This sound is otherwise expressed
by oy.



al-lcy'
?,ii-iioy'



coy

con
de-coj'



coii'voy



cloy
de-strov'



W



en-joy'



joy

Sn'voy
em-ploy'



toy

* loy'al
roy'al



The Sound of ou, as in bound. This sound is otherwise expressed
by ow.







ow.






brow


crowd


frown


mow


row


brown


crown


gown


now


scow


clown


down


growl


owl


scowl


cow


drown


how


prow


town


cowl


fowl


howl


prowl


vow


al-low'


cow'er


fiow'er


pow'er


tow'el


a-vow'


dow'er


fowl'er


re-nown'


tow'er


bow'er


dow'ry


lo^'er .


row'el


trow'el


cbw'ard


en-dow'


po#'der


ghow'er


vow'el



MODES OF EXPRESSING THE CONSONANT SOUNDS. 53

Exercises for Writing. — A good hoy. A coy maiden. Sweet
food will soon cloy the appetite. A pretty toy. Brass is an alloy of
copper and zinc. Insects annoy us. A convoy of ships. A bait to
decoy the unwary. An envoy to a foreign country. A loyal subject.
A royal decree. A frown on the hrow. The tricks of a clown.
The cowl of a monk. A great crfiwd in the streets. The king's
crown. Bears growl. Wolves liowl.' The mow is fiUed with hay.
The owl can see best by night. The prow of a ship. Robbers prowl
about the city. A row, or riot. The scow is loaded with mud. Let
the scowl give place to a smile. A vow, or solemn promise.

The rules do not allow us to prompt one another. Let him avow
his sentiments. A hower m a garden. A base coward. A widow's
flower, or dowry. A fund to endow a college. A beautiful jiower,
The fowler is one who kills or ensnares birds. Powder is explosive.
The power of truth. The renown of a hero. The rowel of a spur.
A shower of rain. A lofty tower, A mason's trowel. The sound of
a vowd.

2. Consonant Sounds.

Kemark. Nine of the consonant sounds have uniformly the same siga,
namely, those noted by p, b, m, d, 1, r, n, g hard and h. ^^

The Sound op f, as in fan. This soimd is otherwise expressed by
ph and gh.







ph.






lymph


pha§e


-


phra§e


sphinx


nymph


phiz




sphere


sylph



ca'liph grSph'ic pha'ros sam'phire suVphur

cam'phor hy'phen phoe'nix sSr'aph tri'glyph

cfpher or'phan phga§'ant si'phon tri'iimph

dau'phin pSm'phlet phon'ics soph'ist tro'phy

dSFphin pha*18^nx phy§'ic sphe'roid ty'phus

Sph'od phSn'tom proph'et surphg-te zSph'yr

' gh, '

chottgh (chuf) draught (dr&ft) rough (riif) e-nough

cSiigh (ksf) laugh (lao trough (trso (?-nQO

5*



54 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE CONSONANT SOUNDS.

Exercises for Writing. — Lymph is a transparent fluid found \u
animal bodies. A nymph of the woods. A phase of the moon.
Fhiz is a contemptuous expression for the face. ^ A coimrnon phrase,
A sphere, or globe. The sphiiix of Egypt. A sylph is a fabled being
of the air. Caliph is a title formerly given to a successor or deputy
of Mahomet. Camphor is the concrete juice of a tree. The dauphin
of France. The ephod of a Jewish priest. A graphic description.
An orphan is a child who has lost either father or mother, or both.
The GxeddLU phalarix. A ^/mntow of the imagination. K pharos^
or lighthouse. The phoznix is a fabulous bird. The pheasant has
beautiful plumage. Phonics, or the doctrine of somids. Physic for
the sick. A false prophet. Samphire is a plant used for pickles.
A seraph among the angels. Gypsum is sulphate of lime. The
triglyph is an ornament in a Doric frieze. A trophy of victory. A
zephyr, or h'ght breeze. The chough resembles the crow. A draught
of water. A hearty laugh. A rough road. There is time enough.

The Sound of v, as in van. This sound is otherwise expressed in
only one word by f, and in a single proper name by ph.

•• f. ph.

of (8v) Ste'phen (sts'vn)

The Sound of w, as in wet. This sound, when it follows the con-
sonant q, is always expressed by u ; and, in a few words, the sound of w ii
represented by U after g and after s.*

u.

suite (swet)

Sn'guish iSn'gua^ef iSn'guor pen'guin sS^n'guin©
djLS-suade' lau'guid lin'guist per-suade' un'giient

Remark. In the words one (wun) and once (wuns), the sound of W
is heard at the beginning without being noted by that letter.

* For words in which r follows Q, see Section III., p. 23.

t See The Sound of J, as in JEST. The consonant If occurring in the first sylla-
ble of the worda in thia liat is equivalent to ive. See The Sound of Na, as in SJN&,
p. 75.



MODES OF EXPEESSING THE CONSONANT SOUNDS. 55

The Sound of t, as in tin. This sound is otherwise expressed by d ;
er rather the consonant d (flat) necessarily takes the sound of t (sharp)
wheneyer it is pronounced immediately after any sharp consonant or its
eqmvalent. This case occurs only when the vowel e of the syllable ed
terminating the imperfect tense or the past participle of a verb^ is sup-
pressed.* /



baked


dwarfed


laughed


(baJvt)


(dworfi)


(laft)


braced


faced


leased


(brasi)


(fast)


(lest)


chanced


hoofed


looked


(chSnst)


(hoft)


(lukt)


danced


forced


marched


<^ins£)


(ferst)


(mUrcht)



perched


toothed


(perclrt)


(totilt)


slaked


versed


{slaki)


(verst)


stamped


vexed


(stampt)


(vext)


steeped


washed


<stept)


{wsslit^



The Sound of s, as in seal. This sound is otherwise expressed by
c and js.

Remark. The consonant c has a soft sound, the same as that of s, in
many cases, before e, i, and y, as already explained in Section III. ; and
In the words chintz, qttarfz, and waMz, z has the sound of s.

••

The Sgund of z, as in seal. This [email protected] is otherwise expressed bj
s, c, and £.

S.
Remark. 1. Tlie consonant s is sounded like z in the following words,
contrary to t±ie general ruie by which it has its sharp or hissing sound when
It is immediately preceded by a vowel in the same syllable, as in uSg this^
bias, basis, &c.



af



h^



liif







wa^ (woz)



Remark 2. The consonant s takes the sound of z in the possessive
case, and the plural of nouns, and the third person singular (present tense)
of verbs, when it imjaediatdy f^Mows the sound of a fiat consonant or a
liquid.

DaVid'§ ban^dogf c8bVeb§ ^m^blemf reap'erf
aa'themf bee'hive^f crys^talf or^phan§ ta^'bief



?* ^66 Rem&riks mi tbs Ta^le •sf Elementary Sovjods, No, 4, p. 1^



56 MODES OF EXPRESSII^G THE CONSONANT SOUNDS.

be-queath^' de-claim§' for-give^' hm'der^ pro-long§'
com-pel§' ex-pand§' g6v'ern§ m-vade§' pro-pel§^

Remars 3. The consonant s, contrary to the mle mentioned in Remark 1,
takes the sound of z in the plural of nouns and in the third person singular
(present tense) of verbs, when it is preceded by a vowel sound in the samo
syllable.



bee§


cow§


fee§


glee§


tree§


boyi


day§


flea§


sea§


wayf


box'e^


chaii'ce§


feii'ce^


priii'ce§


tra'ce§


can'to§


com'ma§


for'ce§


pri'ze§


vi'ce§


c*ar'goe§


fa'ce§


pri'ce§


so'%


VQi'cef


cloy§


fiow§


sue§


throw^


Yiew§


die§


pray§


tliaw§


vie§


wave§


a-gree§'


ap-plTe§'


as-say^'


de-cay§'


fore-goe§'


an-noy^'


ar'gue§


be-tray§'


en-dow§'


mis-lay§'



Remark: 4. In most words in which s precedes a silent e final, it has its
sharp or hissing sound ; but there are some words, especially verbs, having
this termination, in which s is sounded like z.



cliee§e


lio§e


plira^e


ro§e


tiio§e


giii^e


noi§e


pro^e


the§e


wi§e


ap-plau§e'


de-mT§e'


fraii'clii§e


suii'ri§e


siir-prTfe^


bruise


c^ii§e


mii§e


p^ii§e


rT§e


cliSO^e


ease-


praife


plea§e


tea^e


ac-cu§e'


ca-roii§e'


dif-fd^e'


op-po§e'


re-fii§e'


ad-Yi§e'


com-pose'


es-pou^e'


pe-ru§e'


suf-fu§e'


a-mu§e'


con-tTi§e'


im-po§e'


re-po§e'


sur-mT§e'


ap-pea^e'


de-spi§e'


in-fufe'


re-vi§e'


sup-po§e'



MODES OF EXPRESSING THE CONSONANT SOUNDS. 5T

Remark 5. The consonant s is in most cases sounded like z when it
follows an accented syllable ending with a vowel sound or with a liquid.

cau'^ey dai'§y flim'^y p^l'§y ro'§y

chee'§y drow''§y ker'§ey pliren'§y tan'§y

clum'§y ea'§y noi'§y quin'§y whim'§ey

Remark 6. The consonant s, in the prefix dis, is sounded like z, when
the following syllable is accented and begins with a flat consonant, a liquid,
or the sound of a vowel.

di§-arm' di§-gorge' di§-gu^t' di§-like' di§-mount'
di§-band' di§-grace' di§-h(5ii'est di§-may' di§-owii'
di§-ea§e' di§-guT§e' di^-join' di§-miss' di§-robe'

Remark 7. The consonant s takes the sound of z when it follows
singly the syllable re, used as an inseparable prefix.

re-§ent' re-§Tde' re-§ist' re-§ort' re-§ult'
re-ferve' re-fTgii' re-§olve' re-§ound' re-§ume'

Remark 8. In the following words s is sounded as z, contrary to the
general rule by which the sharp sound is given to ss, as weU when
separated into different syllables as when joined in the same syllable.

de§-§ert' liu§-§ar' po§-§gss'

di§-§olYe' h^§'§y sci§'§9r§

Remark 9. Definite rules cannot be given for all the cases in which s
has the sound of z. In general, though with several exceptions, it takes
this sound when it is pronounced immediately before or after a flat con-
sonant or a liquid, or between two vowel sounds.

5ha§m (ksizm)* jhri^m (krizm) pri§m spa§m

bSp'ti^m di§'mal na'fal pre^'ent Tlmr§'day

de-§ert' hu^'band ob-§erve' pre§'ence Tue§'day

de-§erve' mi'a^m phSa^'ant pre-§ume' tru'i§m

de-§ire' mu^'liix plSa^'ant thou'^and yi§'it

♦ See The Sound of K, as in KID, p. 71.



58 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE CONSONANT SOUNDS.

C.

Buf-f ice' (-fiz') di§-cern' (djz-zemo sSc'ri-fice (-f&)

X.

Kemahe. T]ie consonant x takes the sound of z at the beginning of
words.

XSn'thus (zanO XSn'o-phSn (zgno Xerx'e§ (zerks'ei)

Exercises for Writing. — Anguish of mind. Tiy to dissuade
him from such a course. The English language. A languid man-
ner. A great linguist. The penguin has short wings. We may
pei'suade others by argument. A sanguine temperament. An un-
guent, or ointment. What is the first sound in the words one and
once ? Timbers well braced. Dwarfed in stature. The house is
leased. The army marched forty miles. A toothed wheel. Thor-
oughly versed in a subject. Soil washed from the mountains. Chintz
is a kind of colored cotton cloth. It makes one dizzy to waltz,
David's harp. Anthems are sung. The beehives are full of honey,
Crystals of quartz. An asylum for orphans. The reapers are at
work. A guest at the tables of the rich. A man bequeaths prop-
erty by a document called a will. Air expands by heat. Tem-
perance prolongs life. They are as busy as bees. There are often
many ways of doing the same thing. Oranges packed in boxes.
The cantos of a poem. The ships and their cargoes. A quoted
sentence is put between inverted commas. A concert of many voices.
When a great man dies, one eulogist vies with another in sounding
his praise. The verb agrees with its nominative case. He argues
logically. The chemist assays ores. Vegetable as well as animal
matter decays.

Cheese is made of milk. An enemy in the guise of a friend.
ffose for the feet. A common phrase. A wise man. Fond of ap-
plause. The demise of a king. A franchise, or privilege. FiUed
with surprise. You will bruise your finger. A' plaster to ease pain.
On what subject does he muse so long ? Pause a while. Do not
tease him. Accuse no man without evidence. How shall we amuse
ourselves ? That must have been a heavy blow to contuse a limb
so severely. Which side will he espouse ? Penise the book. Be-
vise the manuscript. A sense of shame will suffuse the cheek with



MODES OF EXPRESSINa THE CONSONANT SOUNDS. 59

a blush. Suppase a case. A causey^ or causeway, A clumsy tooL
A beautifai dazsy^ Fatigue has made him drowsy. Flimsy cloth.
Kersey is a kind of coarse cloth. A iwisy multitude. Numb with
palsy. The pkrensy of a madman, A rosy complexion. The odor
of tansy. The ivhimsty of a foolish mgn.

Kindness will disarm anger. An order' to disband an army. A
painful disease. Misfortunes are sometimes blessings in disguise.
He coul4 not conceal his disgust Dishonest dealings are a great
disgrace. A strong dislike. They felt great dismay. Dismiss your
fear. Some authors would be glad to dis<}wn their earliest pro-
ductions. Do not resent an injury. He maintained a studied reserve.
Where does he reside'} He proposes to resign his office, Resist
evil, Eesolve to do well. The resort of multitudes. An unfortur-
&ate result. Resume your task, A dessert of fruit. The hussar is
a kind of mounted soldier. Cut' it with scissors. A fi-ightful chasm.
A triangular prism. The rite cf baptisni. A dismal tale, A
miasm, or noxious vapor. A nasal sound. A pleasoM day. In.
the presence cf others d© not presume on any superiority. A visi£
to friends. One will suffice. Ability to discern the truth. A great
sacrifice The river XoQiMue, The historian Xenophoii. The con-
queror Xerxes.



The Soun.


D OF Ch, AS


IN chest. This sound is


otherwise expressed


by tch.




tch.






batch


ditch


ttch


pitch


switch


blotch


gtch


ketch


scratch


thatch


botch


fetch


latch


sketeh


twitch


catch


flitch


match


snatch


vetch


clutch


hatch


notch


stitch


watch (wociij


crotch


hitch


patch


stretch


witch



The Sound op j, as in jest. This somid is otherwise expressed
feef©re e, i, aad y, aad by dg before e.



|gm



cerm



^ibe



mi



an



60 MODES OF EXPEESSING THE CONSONANT SOUNDS.



^en'der
cen-teeF



^er'und



^ib'bet ^iii'^^r iyp'sy

^iin'bal§ ^yp^^V^ ^y'rate



E-EMAEK 1. The following words are exceptions to the general rule by
which g has its soft sound, the same as that of j before e, i, and y. It is
hard before e in anger, cmger, cragged, dagger, dogged, dogger, ecoger, finger,
gear, .gearing, geese, geld, gelding, gelt, get, geiogaio, linger, longer, longest,
pettifogger, ragged, rugged, scragged, shagged, snagged, stagger, stronger,
strongest, stoagger, tiger, younger, youngest; before i in hegin, biggin,
digging, druggist, forgive, gibber, gibberish, gibbous, gibcat, giddy, gift, gig,
giggle, giggler, gild, gills, gilt, gimlet, gimp, gingham, gird, girdle, girl, gvrthy
give, gizzard; before y in boggy, buggy, cloggy, craggy, dreggy, fogg^y
jaggy, knaggy, miujgy, quaggy, scraggy, shaggy, snaggy, spriggy, sicaggy,
ttcigfy.

Remark 2. In many words a silent e final gives to g the sound of j.



age

bar^e

bil^e

bul^e

ca^e

change

ad'a^e

ar-ran^e'

a-veii^e'

cab'ba^e

col'le^e



charge

cringe

do^e

flange

for^e

iring-e



del'u^e

dis-cliar^e'

di-vul^-e'

en-ga^e'

en-liir^e'



grange

hin^e

hu^e

lar^e

lie^e

pa^e



im-merge

iii-frm^e'

iiiaii'a^e

mes'sa^e

o-blT^e'



couT'd.^Q ex-clian^e' pas'sa^e



plunge

piir^e

ra^e

range

sa^e

scoiir^e

pil'la^e

rav'a^-e

ref'u^e

re-ven^e'

saFva^e

sau'sa^e



siege

oLajTO

strange
siir^e
ver^e
wako



sav'a^e

spm'a^e

stop'pa^e

suffrage

ves'ti^e_

Yil'la^e -



Remauk 3. In most words in which the digraph dg has the sound of
j, it precedes a silent e final.



bM^e
bridge
bud^e
dod^e



dredge
drudge
ed^e
fledge



fud^e
grudge
hed^e
jud^e



ledge
lodge
midge
pledge



ridgo
sedge
sledge
wedge



MODES OF EXPRESSING THE CONSONANT SOUNDS, 61

car'trid^e par'trid^e por'rid^e

Ebmabk. 4. There are a few words in wMch a silent e when not
final, or a silent i placed after dg, gives to these consonants the
sound of j.

^b^'^-eon dun'^eon gud'^eon pi^'eon stiir'^eon
dud^^eon gor'^eous le'^ioii re'^ipn siir'^eoii

al-le'^iance '^ con-ta'^ious cur-mud'^eon pro-di^'ious
gliT-riir'^eon* cour-a'^eous li-tT^'ious re-li^'ion

con-ta'^ion re-li^-'ious

Exercises for Writing. — A batcJi of bread. A blotcTi upon the
skin. The tailor will botch the garment. Cats catch mice. The
crotch of a tree. A deep ditch. Artists etch copper with nitric
acid. A Jlitch of bacon. SitcJi the horse to a post. A Jcetch for
carrying bombs. The latch of a door, or gate. A patch on a
garment. Fitch, or boiled tar. A sketch, or outline. A switch
on the track of a railway. The roof was covered with thatch. A
vetch, or leguminous plant. A gold watch. The finest gem is
the diamond. A gihe, or sneer. A gill of milk. A gerund, or
verbal noun. A gibbet, or gallows. Gimbals are rings to suspend
a sea-compass. Gypsum is sulphate of lime. Any thing that whirls
round is said to gyrate. Cleopatra's barge. The ship will bilge.
A mean man will cringe for favors. The doge of Venice. A fiange
«n the tire of a raiboad wheel. A sage, or wise man. A scourge,
or whip. The city suffered the horrors of a siege. The verge of a
precipice.

A wise adage. One may avenge an injmy, or demand proper satis-
faction for it ; but to reoenge it, or to return evil for evil, is.unchristian.
A college for students. Courage to meet danger. Do not divulge
a secret. To immerge is the same as to immerse. By such conduct
you infringe the law. The bearer of a message. The soldiers will
pillage the city and ravage the country. He took refuge in the
church. Those who save an abandoned vessel or other property are
entitled to salvage. A stoppage of water in a pipe. The right of

• ♦ See The Sound of K^ as in KID, p. 71.

6



62 MODES OF EXPRESSING THE CONSONANT SOUNDS. ■

suffrage. A pleasant village. A badge of office. He will dodgii
tbe blow. A dredge for cltaring a river or a harbor. One who works
hard is a drudge. Fudge is an expression of contempt. A ledge
of rocks. A Tfiidge, or gnat. Sedge grows in marshes. Drive the
wedge.

A cartridge for a musket. The partridge resembles the quail.
Porridge, a kind of broth. The bludgeon of an assassin. Do not
take in dudgeon what was not meant to give offence. The dmngeon
of a prison. Gorgeous apparel. The gudgeoti of a shaft. A legion
of soldiers. The flight of a pigeon. A fertile region. The roe of
the sturgeon. The skill of a surgeon. Citizens owe allegiance to
the government. The contagion will spread. A contagious disease.
Chirurgeon is an old word for surgeon. Courageous conduct. A
curmudgeon, or miser. A litigious disposition. A prodigious feat.
True religion. Religious ceremonies.



The Sound op sh, as in shall. This sound is otherwise express&d by
ti, si, ci, ch, s, ce, sch, and se.



4ic'tion(-shijin) fiic'tioii
cSp'tioii fac'tious
cSp'tious fic'tioii
c^u'tion frac'tioii
cau'tious frac^tious
dic^tioii fric'tion



ti.

lo'tion

mar'tial

men'tioii


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Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA pronouncing spelling-book of the English language → online text (page 4 of 14)