Joseph E. (Joseph Emerson) Worcester.

A pronouncing spelling-book of the English language online

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JjRYfS, does lap. ' lAnks, the plural of link.

Lapse, course, flow. Lynx, an animal of the cat
Leech, a small bloodsucker. kind.

Leach, to cause zdater to Load, a burden, a freight,

pass through ashes. Lode, a mineral vein.

Led, did lead. Loch, a lake, (in Scotland),

Lead, a heavy metal. Lock, /or doors, Sfc.

Leaf, of a plant. Lore, learning, erudition.

Lief, willingly, gladly. Lower, more lovj.



Exercises for Writing. — Varnish is made of lac. There is no
lack «f applicants for office. He that lacks good principle will b©



120 WORDS LIABLE TO BE CONFOUNDED.

lax in his morals. The verb lude is chiefly used in the partiaipial form
" laden." They have laid upon him a heavy burden. At the head of
the lane, the cattle have lain down to rest. In steam-boilers, one
sheet of iron laps over another. One who is very busy does not
notice the lapse of time. Soap-makers leach wood-ashes to procure
the potash which it contains. The leecli is a kind of worm found in
fresh water. Lead is heavier than iron. The groom led the horses
into the stable. The shape of the leaf is one of the characteristics
of a tree. I would as lief go as stay. A vessel may leak. The
flavor of the leek resembles that of the onion. The city of New
Orleans is protected from inundation by a Zet;ee. It wiD. be necessary
to levy a large force for this expedition. One lie is generally a pre-
lude to another. The lye is dense enough to bear an q^%. The limb
of a tree. To limn is an old term signifying to paint. The links of
a chain. The lynx is noted for sharpness of sight. The horse cannot
draw so heavy a load. The miner has discovered a rich lode of
tin. Locli Lomond in Scotland. Hardly any lock is secure against
an adroit thief A man versed in ancient lore. The picture would
look better if it were placed lower.

M.

Made, did make. Mete, a limits a hound,

Maid,a/i unmarried woman. Meat, flesh for food.

Male, not female. Meet, fit, proper.

Mail, a bag for letters, Sf^c. Meeting, an assembly.

Mane, hair on the neck of Meting, measuring.

a horse. Meter, a measure.

"Kolw, principal, chief . MetYGjthe measure of verse.

Marshal, a high military or Mite, a small insect.

civil officer. Might, power, strength.

Martial, warlike. Moan, to lament, to grieve.

Maze , confusion, perplexity. Mown , participle of mow.

Maize, Indian corn. Mote, a small particle.

Meed, a reward. Moat, a ditch or trench.

Mead, a meadow. More, the comparative of
Mean, base, contemptible. much.

Mien, air, look, manner. Mower, one who mows.



i



WOEDS LIABLE TO BE CONFOUNDED. 121

Mlicous, slimp. Mule, an animal.

Mucus, a slimy fluid. Mewl, to cry as a child,

Exercises for Writing. — He made an excuse for his absence.
Maid is used adjectively for " female," as, maicZ-servant. The
mali sheep has horns, A package to go by mail. The mane is an
ornament id the horse. The aorta is the main artery of the body.
Marshal is a high military title. Maiiial music. Great quantities
of maize are raised in the United States. To be in a maze is to
be greatly perplexed. Mead is a poetical term for a meadow. The
meed of thanks. He was never guilty of a mean act. He is of a
dignified mien. Meet, or proper, conduct. Salted TneaL Mete, a
boundary, A gSiS-meter is an instrument for measuring gas. The
poem is wiitten in the heroic metre. It is an unchristian sentiment
that " might makes right." A mite in cheese, or in com. Some
brutes seem to inean fcr what they miss, like intelligent creatures.
This grass should be moion. The moat was twenty feet wide. A
mote may cause great pain to the eye* What 7)VQre rural sound
than to hear the mower whet his scythe ? Mucous membranes are
membranes that secrete mucus. The infant mewls. Males are much
employed in the Southern States for drawing cotton,

N.

Nay, wo7 . l^\^\t, the time after sunseL

Neigh, to cry as a horse. Knight, a title of honor.

Need, necessity., womt. None, no one, not any.

Knead, to j^ress, as dough. Nun, a female devotee.

Exercises for Writing. — Do not hesitate to say nojy, when duty
requires k. A horse will often neigh at the sight of his master,
"We have need of food. It is necessary to hnead dough in order tc
make good bread. Night is the time for rest. Knighi is an honor-
ary title in England, indicated by prefixing " Sir " to the name. He
went in search of game, but there was none to be found. She has
taken the vows of a nwn.

o.

Oar,/or rowing a boat. One, single ; any.

O'er, over. Won, did win.

Ore, metal in mineral,
11



122



WORDS LIABLE TO BE CONFOoNDEO.



Exercises foi Writing, — An oar is often made of ash. Camp'
bell says of England, *' Her mai-ch is o'ct' the mountain -wayes.'^
Cinnabar is an ore of mercury. One who has to&n such honors must
have industry as weU as talent.



Pale, ivmi, pallid.
Pail, a vessel for wafer.

Pane, a square of glass.
Pain, distress, suffering'.

Pair, tivo of a kind.
Pare, to peeL
Pear, a fruit.

Pause, a stop.
Yaws, feet of a beast.

Peace, tranquillity/, rest.
Piece, a portion.

Peel, the rind of any thing.
Peal, a loud noise.

Pearl, a zvhitish substance.
Purl, to floio geyithj.

Peer^ a nobleman.
Pier, a mole.

Pendant, jeivelfor the ear.
Pendent, hanging.

Place, situation.
Plaice, a sort offish.



Plane, level, even.
Plain, clear, evident^

Plate, aflat dish, «

Plait, a fold.

Plum, a fruit.
Plumb, perpendicular.

Pole, a long st.aff or stak^
Poll, the head.

Pore, as of the skin.
Ponr, to let out.

Port, a harbor, ,

Porte, the Turkish court.

Practice, the habit of doing
Practise, to do habitualhj.

Vvaj, to mtike a petition,
Prej, to feed by violence.

Praise , commendoMon.
Prays, beseeches, entreats\
Preys, seizes, plunders.

Prize, G reward.
Pries, docs pry.



Exercises for Wriiiag. — A -pail of mile. PaJe with frighu
A jyane of glass. A iiain in the hmbs. Kpair of gloves. Par^
the pear. After a short pause, he proceeded. The paws of a lion.
After a struggle comes a season of peace. A piece is broken off. A
peal of bells. The ptel of an orange. A fearl of great price.
The brooks pwrl OTcr their stony beds. Every peer in England is
entitled to a seat in the House of Lords. The harbor is protected by
a, pier. A pendant for the ear, A pendent lamp, 'This is a good



• WORDS LIABLE TO BE CONFOUNDED. 123

place for fishing. The plaice resembles the floimder. A plane sur-
fece. It is plain that he has made a mistake. The plaits of the
collar. There are not plates enough on the table. The plum is not
BO easily raised as the pear. The line does not hang plumb. They
erected a. pole for the flag. A poll-tax is a tax for each poll, or head.
The pores of the skin. He pours the water into a goblet. The ship
left the port of Southampton, having on board the Enghsh ambassa-
dor to the Porte. No art can be well learned without long practice.
They who practise any art become expert in it. We should pray
for what may be best for us. The larger fishes prey upon the smaller
ones. Well-merited praise. He who prays for a temporal blessing,
may be asking for that which will do him harm. The Vi'olf preys
upon the sheep. The prize of wealth is what most are struggling
for. He is contemptible who pi'ies into the afiau's of others.

Q.

Quarts, plural of quart. Quartz, rock-crystal.

Exercises for Writing. — Four quarts make a gallon. Quaiiz
is pure silex. -

R.

Rain, ivaterfrom the clouds. Rheum, a thin, serous fluid,

^ein, part of a bridle. Room, an apartment. '

Reign, royal authority. Rhyme, correspondence of
Rap, to strike quickly. sound in verse.

Wrap, to fold up. Rime, hoar-frost.

Raise, to lift, to erect. Rice, a kind of grain.

Raze, to demolish. Rise, ascent.

^SiYs, plural of rsLj- -r>- i,j. ^

•^ ' ^ ./ ./ Right, not wrong.

Red, of the color of blood. Rite, external observance.

Read, did read. Wright, a workman. .

Reed, a plant. Write, to express by letters.

Read, to peruse. Ring, a circular figure.

Reek, to smoke, to steam. Wring, to twist.

Wreak, to inflict violence. Ro(je, did ride.

Rest, cessation of labor. Road, a public highiuay.

Wrest, to take by force. Rowed, did row.



124 WORDS LIABLE TO BE COKFOUNDED.

Hoar, a loud noise. Rough, not smooth.

Rower, one who roivs. Ruff, a plaited ornament
Roe, the spawn of fishes. f^^' ^'^^ neck.

Row, to impel by oars. B.\\ng, participle of ring.

Rood, the fourth of an acre. ^'rm'ig,participle 0/ wring.

Rude, coarse in manners. Rje, a species of grain.

VioiQ, repetition by heart. ^^^T. crooked, distorted,
AYrote, did write. wrested.

Exercises for Writing. — Plants would not grow without rain.
To give the rein to a horse is to allow him to go at will. The reign
of Elizabeth. Hap at the door. Wrap it with paper. To raise a
building is to set up its frame ; to raze it is to destroy it. The rays
of light proceed in a straight hne. He read the Bible daily. The
curtains are red. It is a waste of time to read wortliless books. The
reed grows to a gi*eat height. The horses reek with sweat. The
malignant man longs to wreak vengeance on his adversary. Those
only who labor can enjoy rest. He attempted to icrest it from him.
Rheum is always an attendant symptom of catarrh. The room is very
spacious. Blank verse is verse without rhyme. Wliite frost is called
rime by the old writers. Rice is an abundant product in tropical
countries. Sea-weed is thrown upon the beach at every rise of the
tide. It is not right to ridicule any rite which others may consider
sacred. The term loright is now seldom applied to a workman ex-
cept in compounds, as " wheel- wright." He cannot write his name.
A ring of gold. To luring the hands is a sign of giief. The 7'oad
over which they rode was shaded with trees. They rowed lustily.
The roar of the alligator. The rower of a boat. The roe of the
sturgeon. It is hard work to row a boat against a current. A rood
of land. He is rude in his behavior. He learnt his lesson by rote.
He wi'ote rapidly. A journey over a rough road. The ruff was a
conspicuous ornament in the days of Queen EKzabeth. The bell was
rung. She wrung her hands. Rye is a valuable grain. A wry face.

s.

Sale, act of selling-. Scene, a place; a view.

Sail, to pass, or be moved, Seen, past participle of see.
^ sails. Seine, a net used in fishing.



WORDS LIABLE TO BE CONFOUNDED.



125



Skull, the case, of the brain.
Scull, to impel a boat,

S«e, to perceive by the
» eye.
Sea, the ocean.

Seam, a suture^ a juncture.
Seem, to appear.

Sees, does see.
Seize, to lay hold on.

Seignior, a title.
Senior, one older than an-
other.

Serf, a slave.

Surf, the swell of the sea.

Surge, a great wave.
Serge, a tvoollen stuff.

Sheer, to turn aside.
Shear, to cut with shears.
Shire, a county.

Shock, concussion.
Shough, a shaggy dog.

Sine, a geometrical line.
Sign, a symbol, an omen.

Slay, to kill, to butcher.
Sleigh, a vehicle.

Slight, inconsiderable.
Sleight, cunning artifice.

Slow, not quick.
Sloe, a small plum.



Slue, to turn.
Slew, did slay.

So, in such a manner.
Sow, to scatter, as seed.
Sew, to join by the needle.

Soar, to ascend.

Sore, tender or painful.

Sole, single, only.
Soul, the spirit.

Some, apart.
Sum, the aggregate.

Son, a male child.
Sun, the source of light.

Stair, a step.
Stare, to gaze.

Stake, a stick ; a wager.
Steak, a slice of meat.

Steel, hardened iron.
Steal, to take unlawfully.

Step, one move of the foot.
Steppe, a vast plain.

Stile, steps over a fence.
Style, manner of writing.

Strait, a narrow channel.
Straight, not crooked.

Straiten, to distress.
Strsaghten^tomake straights

Suite, a train of followers.
Sweet, tasting like sugar.



Exercises for Writing. — The sale of the estate will take place
to-morrow. A ship with a fair wind will sail twelve nules an hour.
The scene of the story is laid in England. Have you ever seeji a
aei7i€ filled with fish ? Her could neither row nor scull the boat
Different races are characterized by the shape of the sJrnU. Ths
11*



126 WORDS LIABLE TO BE CONFOUNDED.

river Volga flows into the Caspian Sea, as you may see on the map^
The seam does not seem water-tight. When a cat sees a mouse, sht*
does not wait long to 'seize it. " ]SIost potent, grave, and reverend
seigniors." We should always give place to om* seniors. The serf in
Russia is bought and sold with the soil. I hear the roar of the surf
upon the beach. Her dress was made of serge. A surge broke upon
the deck. It is time to shear the sheep. Some horses are apt to
sheer. A shire-iovm. is a to^vn in which a court holds its sessions.
The shock was so great as to prostrate all who were standing.
Shakspeare uses the word shough for a kind of dog. A circle of
vapor about the moon is a sign of an approaching storm. The sine
of an arc is half of the chord of the double arc. The cannibals were
preparing to slay then* victims. The vehicle called a sleigh in the
United States is called a " sledge " in England. Jugglers perform their
wonders by sleight of hand. He tvas lucky to escape with so slight
a wound. The juice of the sloe is acid and astringent, and is used
for adulterating port-wine. The slow motions of the sloth account
for its name. To slue a thing is a seaman's phrase for turning it one
way or the other. Samson, it is said in Judges, slew a thousand men.
See in that man what a youth of idleness has laid up for old age ; so
true is it, that we shall reap what we sow. Guis should be taught to
sew. Eagles soar to a great height. The wound is very sore. He
escaped, the sole survivor. The immortahty of the soul. He did
not dispute the separate charges in the . account, but expressed some
surprise at their sum. " A wise son maketh a glad father." The sun
is the fountain of light. Standing on a stair they impudently stare at
every person who enters the door. The surveyor drives a stake at
every station of his instrument. The steak is tender. " Thou shalt
not steal." L'on is converted into steel by being heated with charcoal.
Step after step brings us to our journey's end. A steppe in Russia is
like a prairie in North America. We can pass from one enclosure to
another over a stile. A popular writer has a good style. The strait
0f Gibraltar is a straight channel. He is straitened for want of means.
So crooked a street should be straightened. An ambassador's suite
All sweet fruits contain a portion of sugar.

T.

Tacks, plural o/ tack. Tare, allowance in weight.

Tax, an impost. Tear, to pull in pieces.



WORDS LIABLE TO BE CONFOUNDED. 127

Teem, to be full. Time, measure of duration.

Team, of horses or oxen. Thyme, an aromatic plant.

Tear, water from the eye. Tire, the iron of a wheel.

Tier, a row. Tier, om who ties.

Their, belonging to them. ^oo notiMg excess

There, in that place. ^^ (preposition), towards.

' ^ Iwo, twice one.

Threw, did throw. t^^^ ^^ ^^^^ J.^^^^ [water.

Through, /rom end to end. rj.^^^ ^^ ^.^^^ through tU

Throe, great pain ^ agony. Tole, to draw or allure.

Throw, to fling, to toss. Toll, to cause to sound.

Throne, a chair of state. Ton, 20 hundred iv eight.

Thrown, cast, projected. TuUj a large cask.

Exercises for Writing. — TacJcs are sold in small paper packages.
Custom-house duties are a species of indirect tax upon the people.
The weight, after deducting the fare, was one thousand pounds. Do
not pull the cloth so hard as to tear it. He has a team of four horseso
The earth and the sea teem with animated beings. Those who suffer
most from grief, often do not shed a tear. In the cabin there is a tier
of berths on each side, Tlieir influence is greater there than here.
The careless boy tJireio a stone through a pane of glass. Every
throe seemed to be more severe than the last. Throw it out of
the window. Victoria sits upon the throne of England. The mam
was thrown from his horse and killed. It is time to gather the
thyme. The tier of such a hard knot should be reqmred to untie it.
The wheel has lost its tire. Be careful not to labor too hard. " Two
lieads are better than one." He escaped with a slight bruise on
the toe. Horses are employed to toio canal-boats. The smell of
cheese will tole a mouse into a trap. Toll the bell. The long
ton is two thousand two hundred and forty pounds, the short ton is
two thousand pounds. A tun is larger than a hogshead.

-4

V.

Vain, fruitless y ineffectual ; Yale, a space between hills,

conceited. Yeil, a cover for the face.

Vane, a weather-cock. Yidl, a small bottle.

Vein, a blood-vessel. Viol, a stringed instriirnenf.



128 WORDS LIABLE TO BE COI^OUNDBD. -~

Exercises for Writing. — Their vain attempts discouraged oth-
ers. According to the vane, the wind is changing. The vein of the
neck is called the jugular vein. The vale of Tempe was celebrated
among the ancients for its beauty. She wears a veil. Put the med-
icine in a vial. The bass-rio? is a well-known instrument.

w.

Wale, a ridg-e, a streak. Wave, a billow, a surge.
Wail, to grieve audibly. Waive, to put off, to defer.

Wane, to groiv less. Way, a road, a passage.

Wain, a carriage, a loagon. Weigh, to balance.

Waist, of the body. Week, seven days.

Waste, to spend wantonly. Weak, not strong, feeble.

Wait, to stay, to remain. Wood, a forest.

Weight, heaviness. Would, a verb from " will."

Exercises for Writing. — Eyery blow of the whip made a wale
on his flesh. The expressions " weep "and ^^wail " are often coupled.
Wain is a word sometimes used in poetrj^ The moc«i is said to wax
and icane. It is injurious to health to contract the waist. Do not
hoard money like a miser, nor icasteit like a spendthiift. Be goocl
enough to wait for me. A heavy weight. Every wave drove the
wreck higher uppn the beach. It is sometimes expedient to waive a
claim. The Appian Way was the most celebrated of the roads lead-
ing fixDm ancient Rome. Platform-scales are constructed to weigh the
heaviest loads. She is too weak to bear the journey. They stayed a
weeJc.

Y.

Yoke, as for oxen. {jsgg. Your, belonging to you.
Yolk,^/ie yellow part of an Ewer, a vessel for water.

Exercises for Writing. — The pressure of the yohe on draught-
oxen is principally upon the shoulders. The yolk of an e^^ is sur-
rounded with album^i. Tour basin and my ewer would match weU,



i^ORDS OF LIKE SPELLING, BUT OF XmUKE SOUND. 129



MK.. Words spelled and accented alike, but differently

pronounced.



A-buse', ill use.
A-bu§e', to use ill.

Bow, an inclination; also,
the front of a skip.

Bow, an instrument to shoot
arrows with.

Cleanly, neat.

Cleanly, in a clean inanner.

Q\osQ,fast.
Clo§e, to shut.

Coiir'te-sy, civility.



Low'er, to let doivn.
Low'er, to look dark.

Mouse, an animal.
Mou§e, to catch mice.

Mouth, the opening" in the

head.
Mouth, to utter affectedly.

Mow, to cut down, as grass.
Mow, a mass of hay.

Pol'isli, a glossy surface.
Po'lish, of or belonging
to Poland.



Coiirte'sy, an act of civility.

Cruise, a small cup. [der. Ra'ven, a bird.
Crui§e, a voyage for plun- Rav'en, to devour.



Dif-fuse', verbose.
Dif-fu§e', to spread.

Ex"Cuse', an apology,
Ex-cu§e', to pardon.

-G1II5 of a fish.

^^ill, Q' measure,

Grense. fat.

Grease, to smear loithfat. ;k,ow a riot.

Hm'der, to delay. Bow, a rank.



Read, to peruse.
Read, perused.

Re-f or-ma'tion, a forming
anew.



Ref-or-ma'tion, amendmenU

Rise, ascent.
Ri§e, to ascend.



Hind'er, in the rear,

ITouse, a dioelling,
Hou§e, to shelter,

I-ron-y, ridicule.

I'ron-y (I'urn-e), like iron.

Lead, a mineral.
Lead, to conduct.

Live, to exist.
LiTe, having life.



Sla'ver, a slave ship,
Slav'er, spittle.

Slough (slou) , a miry place,
Slough (sluf), the cast skin
of a snake.

Sow, a female swine.
Sow, to scatter seed.

TSr'ry, to delay,
Tar'ry, like tar.



130 WORDS OF LIKE SPELLING, BUT OF UNLIKE SOUNa

Teeth, of the mouth. Wind, air in motion,

Teetfi, to breed teeth. Wind, to turn round.

Tear, a drop from the Wors'ted, a kind of yarn.

eye. Worsted (wiirst'ed), deK

Tear, to rend. feated.

Use, employment. W6und, an injury.

U§e, to employ. Wound, tivined round.

Remark. A class of words with the termination ate have the distinct
sound of long a, when used as verbs, and the indistinct or obsciu'e soiind
of a when used as nouns or adjectives : of this class are deliberate, inti-
tnate, inediate, moderate, &c. The words interest and compliment, also,
when used as verbs, are pronounced with a more distinct sound of short e,
in the last syllable, than when used as norms.

Exercises for Writing. — An abuse of power. Do not abuse your
privileges. Make a low bow. A bended bow. Be cleanly in your hab-
its. Sweep the room cleanly. Close confinement. Close the book.
Treat every one with courtesy. She made a low courtesy. A cruise
of oil. A cruise in the Pacific. A diffuse writer. The flowers diffuse
a pleasant odor. A sufficient excuse. Excuse my tardiness. A fish's
gill. A gill of wine. A spot of grease. Grease the wheels. Hinder
me not. The liinder part of the carriage. An old hov^e. House the
cattle. His writings are full of irony. The water has an irony taste.
The pipe was ' made of lead. Lead me by the shortest way. May
you live long and happily. A live coal. Lower the boat. The
clouds lower. A white mouse. Does the cat mov^e well ? A
large mouth. Do not r)iouth your words. Mow the grass. Come
ofi" the mow. Steel takes a high polish. A Polish officer. Black
as a raven. To raven is to devour voraciously. Read your book.
The book is read. Reformation of character. The reformation of
an army. A sudden rise of water. The dead shall rise again. A
disgraceful row. A row of houses. The capture of a slaver. The
slaver of a dog. The serpent's slough is in the slough. The sov)
is in the sty. A sower went forth to soio^ Tarry tiU I come. A
tarry smell. Keep clean teeth. The child has begun to teeth. A
flood of tears. He tears the cloth. Of what use is '\t^ Use your
time wisely. A gust of loind. Wind the sillc. They were worsted
in the encounter. A worsted shawl. A dangerous loound. Have
you wound the clock ?



WOEDS DIFFICULT TO SPELL.



131



X, Words difficult to spell,

1, Words in the spelling of which it may he doubtful
whether a, consonant sound between two vowels is represented
hy a single or hy a douUe letter.



Im^-fantli


c5d^i-cii


mer'it


sen^ate


um'e-tliyst


col'o-ny


mod'el


sol'e-ci§m


Sn'o-clyne


com'ic


mm'is-ter


spig'ot


^p'a-thj


cor'al


moii'o-dy


spir'it


bSl'us-ter


dil'a-to-ry


nom'i-nal


ster'ile


hig'qi


ere-gant


ob'e-lisk


taFi§-maii


bod'ice


en^e-my


, pan'ic


ten' ant


bot'a-ny


flag'oii


par'a-sTte


ten'or


^al'eii-dar


for'est


par'o-dy


ton'ic


cal'i-co


frig' ate


pel'i-caii


trbp'ic


caVum-ny


id'i-ot


per'il


ty/an-ny


cat'e-^hi^e


lat'i-tude


pit'y


vap'id


ceii'o-taph


mel'o-dy


reb'el


ver'y


clioc'o-l^'te


mem'o-ry


rerish


vig'or


a-biri-ty


com-mbd'i-ty


e-lab'o-rate


ge-bl'o-gy


a-cS^d'e-my


com-par'i-son


en-am'el


im-pan'el


ac-a-dSm'ic


con-sid'er


ep-i-dem'ic


mo-nop'o-ly


ap-par'el


con-tam'i-iiate


e-vap'o-rate


mo-not'o-ny


ba-rom^e-ter


cor-rob'o-rate


ex-per'i-ment


pi-rat'i-cal


ca-non^i-cal


de-vel'op


fa-nat'i-ci§m


re-tal'i-ate ^


ag'gre-gate


bat'ter-y


c5f'fee


dm'ner ■


an'no-tate


bit'ter *


cbm'ment


dis'si-pate


ap'pe-tite


bot'tom


cop'per


dis's(>-n§,nt


ap'po-§ite


, brag'gart


crab'bed


dit'ty


bag-'ga^e


buf'fa-io


cun'ning


Sr'ror


ballad


but'ter


cur'reiit


fril'ii-ble


bar'ri-cade


car'ry


dYf'fi-ciilt


fer'ret


bar'row


cm'na-moii


dif'fi-deiit


flan'nel



132



WOEBS DIFFICULT TO SPELL.



flip'pant


mSn'ner


pillar


suf'fo-cate


fop'pish


mar'ry


pitlance


syllo-^i§m


galley


moFlusk


pollen


taifnin


gliVter


mot'to


rab'bit


ten'nis


gos'sa-mer


mum'my


rus'set


traffic


hS^m'mer


nun'iier-y


senlia


tram'mel


liur'ry


pariid


shiid'der


tunliel


in'no-ceiit


par'ri-cide


skit'tish


war'rant (wsr'j


las'si-tude


peiVnant


stellar


witli-ci§ni


ac-cSm'mo-date co-lSs'sus


mo-ias'^se^


am-bas'sa-dor


com-mit'tee


per-^iilii-al


ap-pella-tive


- di-lgm'


ma


pi-az'za


ban-dit'ti


em-ba]


?l'ass


si-roc' CO


bri-tSnlii-a


ex-a^'l


^er-ate


tp-bac'co


ce-diria


in-flS^m'ma-to-ry


ty-raiilii-cal



Exercises for Writing. — The amarantTi retains its color a
long time. The ametJiyst is one of the most beautiful of precious


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Online LibraryJoseph E. (Joseph Emerson) WorcesterA pronouncing spelling-book of the English language → online text (page 9 of 14)