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Joseph Laurie.

The parent's guide : containing the diseases of infancy and childhood, and their homoeopathic treatment. To which is added, a treatise on the method of rearing children from their earliest infancy online

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LIBRARY

OF THK

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

OIF T OR



Sfe^. , i8gQ.

Accession No. 7^ 7 <O 2- . Class No.




THE

PARENT S GUIDE:



PHILADELPHIA:

PUBLISHED BY RADEMACHER & SHEER, 239 ARCH ST.

J NEW YORK: WM. RADDE. BOSTON : OTIS CLAPP. ST. LOUIS: J. G.

WESSELH<EFT. PITTSBURGH : J. G. BACKOFEN. CHICAGO : D. S.

SMITH, M.D. NEW ORLEANS: D. R. LUYTIES, M.D.

1854.



CONTAINING THE

DISEASES OF INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD

AND THEIR

HOMOEOPATHIC TREATMENT.

TO WHICH IS ADDED A TREATISE ON

THE METHOD OF REARING CHILDREN FROM THEIR
EARLIEST INFANCY;

COMPRISING THE ESSENTIAL BRANCHES OP

MORAL AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION,



BY J. LAURIE, M.P.,

LICENTIATE OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS, EDINBURGH; GRADUATE OF TUB >
HOM<EOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA, ETC.

EDITED, WITH ADDITIONS,
BY WALTER WILLIAMSON, M. D.,

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS IN THE HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL
COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA.







Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1S63, by

R A D E M A C II E R & S H E E K,

In the Clerk s Office of the District Court for the Eastern District
of Pennsylvania.



Stereotyped by G. CHARLES. Printed by KINO & BAIRD.



PREFACE.



THIS work has been suggested, firstly, by the ac
knowledged assistance which may be rendered in the
domestic management of young families, by simple di
rections as to general treatment in all ordinary forms
of the more common diseases of childhood ; and, se
condly, by the peculiar applicability of the medicines
administered according to the Homoeopathic rule to the :
cases of young children. The reasons of this special j
aptitude are obvious, and have been too frequently \
commented upon elsewhere, by the Author, to require
recapitulation. There were already other works in cir
culation, embracing the same sphere, and emanating
from disciples of the old school of medicine, but there
was, hitherto, no Homoeopathic publication which was
confined exclusively to the treatment of infancy, and in
which the medical directions had been combined with
those relating to moral and physical education.

It is the opinion of the author that these departments
in the rearing of children should be sedulously united,
in order that they may, invariably, be conducted in con
formity to each other, for reasons which he has taken
the liberty of explaining in the body of this work.
And, prompted by this persuasion, he has essayed to



r

4 PREFACE.

produce a treatise containing regulations by which all
the branches of regimen and tutelage are made con
formable. The author feels, likewise, that while great
service may be rendered by works of this kind, some
mischief may also be imputed to them, unless care be
taken to warn parents against the error of trusting too
much to their own judgment in the treatment of dan
gerous diseases, lest serious complications be induced,
which, by timely professional advice, might, possibly,
have easily been averted. He has, accordingly, been
careful to announce this caution, and to repeat it con
stantly, in speaking of particular symptoms and mor
bid manifestations which are ever to be looked upon
with suspicion.

Lastly, whilst he has, in some few instances, entered
somewhat minutely into the treatment of the various
phases of the malady under consideration, he has, at
the same time, been at great pains to avoid anything
approaching to intricacy and difficulty, by striving to
reduce every suggestion and regulation to the simplest
form, in so far as it was practicable to do so in confor
mity with the Homoeopathic principle.

The author, therefore, trusts that the work may ap
pear to the public as intelligible and rudimental as he
sincerely desired and endeavored to render it.

J. LAURIE.



CONTENTS.

PART I.

CHAPTER I.

OF THE NURSING OF INFANTS.

PAGE

Treatment of Children at a Birth, 16

Precautions to be taken by the Mother, 21

; Tight Lacing injurious to the Nursing Breast, 26

, Of Wet Nurses, 29

CHAPTER II.

OF ARTIFICIAL FEEDING AND WEANING.

I Of Weaning, 45

CHAPTER III.

OF THE GENERAL TREATMENT OF CHILDREN FROM THE PERIOD OF
WEANING TO THAT OF EDUCATION, PROPERLY SO CALLED.

\ Of Rest, 47

Of Cleanliness, 51

Of Air and Exercise, 56

Of Occupation, 59

Of Diet, 65

Manners at Table, 71

Of Clothing, 74

PART II.

OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AS TENDING TO THE MENTAL AND MORAL
DEVELOPMENT.

Of Spoiled Children, 87

Over-severity Alienated Children, 89

The Duties, and their Inculcation, 95

The Six Social Duties, 98

Duty toward the Parent, 99

Of Obedience, 100

Of Love, 101

1* <



6 CONTENTS.

PAGE

Honor and Reverence, 1U3

The Duties of Consanguinity, 104 jj

The Duties of the Younger toward the Elder, 104 *

The Duties of the Master toward the Servant the Superior

towards the Inferior, etc., 105 $

The Duties of Wealth towards Poverty, etc., 109 j>

The Duties towards one s Country, 110 f

PART III.

CHAPTER I.

OF MENTAL AND MORAL EDUCATION.

Tutelage of Occupation, 113

Stages of Youth, 115

Arithmetic, History, and Natural History, 123

Grammar, 124

Languages, 128 ^

Mathematics, 131 ,

Geography, 132 jj

CHAPTER II.

OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF EMPLOYMENT DURING THE COURSE OF
< EDUCATION, AND ADMONITORY REGIMEN.

Admonitory Regimen, 145

i Corporal Punishment, 146

\ Close Confinement, 146

\ Rewards, 148

PART IV.

/ OF TEMPERAMENTS THE MOST COMMON COMPLAINTS OF CHILDREN

AND THEIR TREATMENT IN ORDINARY CASES.

i Characteristics of Constitutional Tendencies and Temperament, 150 $

Lymphatic Temperament, 154 <

I Sanguine Temperament, 155

? Bilious Temperament, 155 >

Melancholy Temperament, 156 I

I Nervous Temperament, 156

5 Choleric Temperament, 156 <

Phlegmatic Temperament, 157 >

Adynamic Temperament, 157 ?

CASUALTIES AND DISORDERS CONCOMITANT WITH BIRTH, OR SHORTLY <
SUCCEEDING IT.

> Tumors and Contusions, 159 \

Swelling of the Head, 160

1 I



PAOB

Ruptures, 161

Jaundice, 162

Inflammation of the Eyes, 165

Bed Gum, 167

Swelling of the Breasts iu Infants, 168

DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE ORGANS.

Inflammation of the Mouth, 169

Ulcerative Inflammation of the Mouth, 171

Aphthous Ulceration, 174

White Thrush 179

Diphtheritic Inflammation, 180

Mumps, 184

Vomiting of Milk, Intolerance of Milk, 186

Infantile Dyspepsia, or Indigestion. Weaning Brash, or Scour, 188

Colic Griping, 195

Weaning, 197

Bowel Complaints. Diarrhoea, 198

Cholera of Infants, 208

Inflammation of the Stomach and Bowels, 212

Invermination. Worms, 216

j Mesenteric Disease, 224

Derangement of the Stomach, 228

Vomiting, 235

Constipation, 240

Infantile Remittent Fever, 246

DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY ORGANS.

, Cold in the Head, or Common Catarrh, 258

Cold in the Chest. Pulmonary Catarrh. Bronchial Catarrh,.... 263
Inflammation of the Lungs, 268

Croup, 269

Accidental Obstructions in the Windpipe, etc., 279

Spasm of the Opening of the Windpipe, 283

Hooping-Cough. First, or Febrile Stage, 288

" Second, or Convulsive Stage, 296

" Third, or Nervous Stage, 299

Convulsions, 301

Teething, 312

( Indispositions during Teething, 313

DISEASES OF THE BRAIN, ETC.

Irritation of the Brain, 319

Determination of Blood to the Head. Congestion, 324

Inflammation of the Brain. Brain Fuvor, 327

Water in the Brain. Dropsy of the Brain, 329

Chronic Water, or Dropsy of the Brain, 333



8 CONTENTS.

FEVER, ERUPTIVE FEVERS, FAQ*

Diet in Fevers,..,., 341

Simple Fever,,^ 343

Scarlet Fever, 344

Measles, 358

Roseola. False Measles, , , 370

SmalLpox. Variola, 371

" Confluent,., 373

Modified, , 385

Chicken-pox, , , ,,, , 386

CONSTITUTIONAL AFFECTIONS.

fccrofula affecting the Glands of the Neck, 388

Scrofulous Inflammation of the Eyes, , 395

" Ear,.,, 400

Rickets, , 406

CUTANEOUS DISEASES.

Ringworm, (Herpetic or Vesicular,) , 410

Scald-Head. Ringworm of the Scalp. Pustular Ringworm,..,. 413

Milk-Crust, 421

APPENDIX.

Chafing. Scalding. Excoriations, 425

Hordeolum, or Stye,,,..., , , 427

Bold Hives, Nettle Rash, or Urticaria, 428

Prickly Heat, or Heat Spots, 432

Vaccination, , , , , , 433

Asphyxia, or Apparent Death of New-born Infants, 435

Lock-jaw of Infants, ,, , 436

Hiccough, or Singultus, , 438

Sniffles, 438

Retention of Urine, 439

Profuse Urinati9n, , 439

Nocturnal Urination, 440

Crying of Infants, 441

Atrophy,...,, , ,,, ,,...,, 443

Prolapsus Ani, 445

Leucorrhoea of Children, , ., 446



THE PARENT S GUIDE.



PKELIMINAEY KEMARKS.

INASMUCH as infancy, with its helplessness and
delicacy, must necessarily be the first stage of
existence, and as the first fostering of a child is
that which requires the greatest care and atten
tion, I am led to believe that a work of the
nature which I now offer for the direction and
assistance of parents may not be found super
fluous. It is not but there have been many very
useful publications of the kind produced under
the auspices of able members of the Faculty, but
that I differ most essentially in many important
points from the Allopaths,* in our treatment of
infants and children, as well as of adults.

I have, therefore, determined to divide my stric-

* A term employed to designate the practitioners of the old
system of medicine.




10 EEMARKS.

tares on the subject into four branches, and to
classify my advice to young mothers in particular,
as follows.

FIRST I would treat of the infant from its birth
to the period of consciousness, or rather
of perception, including nursing and its at
tendants.

SECONDLY The development of the physical
faculties and functions of the body should be
suggested for the careful consideration of
my readers.

THIRDLY I should have to detain them a con
siderable time on the moral tutelage and men
tal development of infancy, premising that
these should be simultaneous and similar.
Thus the second and third portions of my trea
tise would, in fact, include education and training,
properly so called, in all their departments.

FOURTHLY I shall have to dwell upon tempera
ments ; the susceptibility of children to cer
tain maladies, and the manner in which these
maladies should be dealt with.



J



REMARKS.

Thus the fourth portion of my work will be
more essentially hygienic than any of the others.

It may be urged, that it is no part of a medical
man s science to enter into a dissertation on moral
or mental training; but, as I must be my own
apologist for the present, I must beg to assert that
it is so, and upon this ground, amongst others :
The animal or physical portion of human nature
being generally the most dominant, especially in
infancy, it is only by the anatomical study of the
human frame that the organic construction can be
justly comprehended or appreciated, and the
whole moral and mental superstructure being de
pendent upon this organic construction, it is most
important that no mistake should be made during
infancy as to its capabilities and aptitudes. It is
in this, indeed, that the fatal errors which, in after
life, appear in the character of maturity, are made;
for, paradoxical as it may seem, there is barely a
human organization which, by proper treatment
during the progress of its formation, may not be
fashioned to good, as well as left to run to seed
for evil.

There is another great question in the treatment
j



1



REMARKS.

\ of infancy which, in my opinion, is not allowed to

\ have sufficient weight, or is overbalanced by cus-

j torn or fashion. It is, that the artificial state of

J society is allowed to distort even the cradle of in-

j fancies. A great deal less of Art and a great deal

j more Nature might vastly assist the embryo com-

\ position which is made a toy of, and, like most

< toys, spoilt in the playing with.

At the same time, it should be remarked that
f

< the affectation of letting Nature provide her own
appliances may be carried to as pernicious an ex
tent ,in the other direction.



PART I.



CHAPTER I.

OF THE NURSING OF INFANTS.

THE foregoing preliminary remarks have brought
me to the first stage of my subject, and I will at
once proceed to deal with it methodically.

At the birth, and for a very considerable period
afterwards, it is palpable that the infant is
| thoroughly helpless, and entirely at the mercy of
| those in whose charge it remains. It is obvious
also that it has barely any means of making its
I want or its sufferings understood. It is therefore
\ of paramount importance that at this stage it
$ should be submitted to a regular and methodical
$ course of treatment, and that every precaution
\ should be suggested and taken to prevent pre
judice.

During the period of suckling, which averages
at from nine to twelve months, but which sometimes
extends injuriously to eighteen and twenty-four,
there are double precautions to be adopted : first,
precautions to guard against a scanty, unwhole^
2 (13)

i



14: NUKSING.

ome, or insufficient supply of milk ; and, secondly,
with the child, as to the frequency of suckling at
various stages of growth.

Be it understood, however, that the period of

uckling must, in all instances, be regulated by

he casual circumstances of the case, under many
of which the advice and direction of a medical
man will indicate the judicious term.

Almost every case has, in truth, its identical
circumstances of constitution, of accident, or of

ituation.
But for the more exact and explicit direction of

>arents, I will divide the care of an infant into two

ections, those of external and internal attention.

"n treating of external precautions, it were impos-

ible to lay too much stress upon the observance of

xroper ventilation and the structure of the apart
ments destined for the purposes of a Nursery, and
most especially in towns; for, be it observed, that

oo little importance has hitherto been attached to

his most essential of requisites.

Houses are constructed for what is termed con
venience and accommodation, that is, for the
apportionment of as many rooms as possible in the

mallest conceivable space; but, whereas appear- (
ances must ever be maintained, there is not com
monly any such stint of pitch and space in the :

eceiving portions of the establishment ; thus, \



NURSING. 15

whilst the drawing-room must be some fourteen
feet in height, the nursery, on the second or third
floor, is allowed a scanty eight or nine feet, and
often less.

Added to this, the too solicitous mother or
nurse, over careful of herself or her charge, is ever
loath to afford a free access of fresh air into the
apartment.

To avoid the chance, of some phantom cold or
cough, a fever is sedulously cultivated.

Why is there less casualty amongst the brutes
in their earliest stage of life than amongst human
beings ?

If a farmer were to raise his cattle as some
matrons do their children, he would have but few
to bring to market.

The most important of necessaries is air, whose
pure chemical properties are essential to sustain
vitality, and if that air be foul, or re-inspired after
its rejection from the lungs, it does not possess
those properties so necessary to life, but others
which are more or less fatal to it. This brings me
to another portion of the same question, which,
after centuries counted by Epidemic and Endemic
diseases, is at last beginning to dawn upon the
world as something that should be. I allude to
proper draining, and the careful prevention or re-
l moval of fetid odours and rank miasma. These two :



16 NURSING.

questions are of almost as much importance to
humanity in all its other stages as in infancy.
Half a century ago it might have been a matter of
great difficulty to provide for the constant cleanli
ness of a house in London. But since the facilities
for drainage have been so vastly multiplied, and
the constant s apply of water, great or small, has
been rendered so much a part of every house, it is
a mere act of wanton carelessness, or perhaps
worse, to allow of anything like a cesspool, or
foul pipe, uncleansed by a current of water, in or
about any house. It is not unworthy of notice
and censure, however, that the humane measure
recently proposed for the better removal of all
such pollutions of a healthy atmosphere should
have met with such chicanery of opposition at
every turn.

During the period of suckling there is a double
evil inflicted upon the infant by mischiefs of this
kind, inasmuch as it must not be forgotten that,
first of all, the infant is individually affected by
them ; and, secondly, it is again affected by the
prejudice suffered by the mother.

Treatment of Children at a Birth.

Immediately upon the delivery, every child
should be carefully washed with tepid
wrapped in its linen, and laid to sleep.



NURSING. 17

In the dressing, some care should be taken not
to confine the limbs too much, as the old prejudice
still prevails in some places that infants cannot be
too closely swaddled. This is a very grievous
error, as it is one which directly insults at Na
ture.

The free action of the limbs is indispensable to
the free circulation of the blood, and, by a parity
of reasoning and of reasons, to the free operation
of the lungs and of all the vital organs.

No sleep can be genuine and really invigorating
unless the body be relieved of everything that can
oppress and bind it. Why otherwise should not
persons of maturer years find as much refreshment
from sleeping dressed as undressed ? This allusion
will be felt ; it is commonplace, but it is apposite,
and there are few who will not have had some
occasion to experience its point.

The infant then should be left asleep for some
hours, from three to five, according to circum
stances, and if the mother be competent to suckle
it herself, should then be put to the breast.

In the generality of cases there will not be
a sufficiency of breast milk for several days, to
afford the infant sustenance, and the want must
be supplied by having recourse to the "bottle" as
hereinafter described. There are some cases in
which women are competent, from the moment of

i



18 NURSING.

delivery, to afford an ample supply of milk, but
,hey are the minority, and in first confinements they
are very rare indeed. Circumstances, and the appe
tite of the child, must indicate its requirements for
the period of ten or fifteen days after birth, and
rom that period general directions will be found
elsewhere in this chapter.

And it should be remarked generally, that pe
culiar circumstances, showing that the course of
treatment did not positively agree with the infant,
should be the guide of the mother as to any alte
ration in the frequency of feeding.

One thing I would very strongly urge upon the
attention of every young mother, which is, not to
allow her child (unless coerced to do so by ne
cessity) to suckle more from one nipple than from
the other. As the being more frequently held in
one position when the frame is so easily moulded
and fashioned may induce a variety of distortions.

I would also entreat mothers generally to hold
their children well up to the breast, and not to
bend the body down to the mouth of the child,
and, for the more natural observance of this rule,
I would recommend the breast to be offered always
either in an erect or recumbent position, as in the
former in particular it will be more convenient to
raise the child.

It is the habit, which, if it be not indolent, is



NURSING.



CX/WNJV/V/VAA

19 I



careless, of feeding the infant from the ]ap, which
induces the method of bending over it.

With respect to the method of affording the
proper rest to an infant newly born, it should be
remarked, that after the first sleep the inclination
of the child will indicate its necessities. For some
weeks, at least, it will sleep continually, only
waking to be nursed. Although the earlier it
is broken of seeking the breast in the night the
better.

After the lapse of the first few weeks, there will
be longer intervals of wakefulness, and less fre
quent but longer durations of sleep. After the
first two months it will become imperative to in
duce, if possible, regular periods of sleeping ; at
night, in the middle of the day, and, if needful,
early in the evening, but for not more than three
hours in the course of the day, as a greater indul
gence at that time may be apt to render the nights
more restless. The apartment should be dark
ened during the sleep, and a little time allowed to
elapse between feeding and sleeping. The mo
ther s observation will become the best index of
the proportion of sleep which her child requires,
for as with the nursing, &c., this will vary accord
ing to constitution and state of body.

A newly -born child has not sufficient power of
generating heat, especially during sleep, to be con-



20 NURSING.

signed to a separate resting-place, and as this
deficiency of indigenous caloric must for a certain
period be conveyed to it from some other body in
order to maintain a sufficient activity of circu-
ation, and, by a complication and combination of
Dulmonary and hydraulic action, a sufficient oxyge-
nation of the blood, it is needful that for a month
or six weeks after birth every child should either
sleep in the same bed with its mother, or with its
nurse, or lie in the arms, or in close contiguity to
the one or the other. No heat can be imparted to
it which will have as beneficial an effect as the
animal heat of its species.

After the expiration of the term prescribed,
lowever, or otherwise according to peculiar cir
cumstances, the child may be left to sleep in its t
ittle bed or cradle separately, provided care be
taken that the temperature of the apartment be
not too much lowered, (say about what is called
temperate,) and that the bed itself be not exposed
to a direct current of air of another temperature.

I must not be understood to recommend cod
dling, over-covering, and close apartments ; be
cause, as may have been gathered from my fore
going remarks, I am beyond measure averse to
them, and look upon them as the bane and destruc
tion of infancy. I would have a curent of air con
stantly passing freshly through the room, if pos-






NURSING. 21

sible, by means of ventilators, open doors, &c., when
the weather is too cold to admit of a window con
tinually unclosed ; but I would not have the body
of the child exposed to the direct action of any
such draughts as might be thus occasioned. Above
all things, the head and face should be constantly
uncovered, in order that the breathing may be free
and fresh, and the coverlets should be in plenty to
encourage proper warmth without being of suffi
cient weight to oppress or confine the limbs, or so
closely fastened as to bind them down.

I cannot say I agree at all in the common notion
that a feather bed is necessary to young children,
nor do I imagine anything of the kind to be as
wholesome as a good sound French wool mattress.
It is far more essential to attend to the thorough
sweetness and cleanliness of the bedding, which
can be attained by repeated exposure to the air,
and being kept very dry, than to its excessive
softness. As regards the warmth induced and
sustained by a feather bed, I am very much in
clined to the notion that there is something in it
which does not thoroughly contribute to whole
some rest.

Precautions to le taken ly the Mother.

There are many personal precautions to be taken
by the mother to secure a plentiful and wholesome



NURSING.

supply of milk, and amongst these, perhaps the
first is to partake of regular exercise as soon as
she is able to do so. Never omitting the daily
walk, still careful not to exceed her strength and
expose herself to suffer from fatigue.

The free use of water, also, is amongst the
essentials for a nursing mother. The skin cannot
be kept too clean and pure.

The diet should be as plain as may be, partaking
of mixed kinds, but very generally nothing in the
shape of made dishes, or, more particularly, highly-
seasoned viands. She should sedulously avoid
fermented liquors, unless deficient in vigour, and
even then they should be of as little stimulating a
nature as possible, and not taken in greater quan
tities than had been her custom before confine
ment.

All surprise or excitement, whether for good or
evil, should be avoided.

By observing these rules, and paying great at
tention to the general bodily health, a mother of
capable constitution (for there are many who should



Online LibraryJoseph LaurieThe parent's guide : containing the diseases of infancy and childhood, and their homoeopathic treatment. To which is added, a treatise on the method of rearing children from their earliest infancy → online text (page 1 of 25)