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Joseph Simms.

Physiognomy illustrated; or, nature's revelations of character. A description of the mental, moral, and volitive dispositions of mankind, as manifested in the human form and countenance online

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—The Apple— The Dog, Horse, Ox 482-484

Activity.
Plan for Speed is Length — For Strength is Breadth— Examples of Men —

Animals, 485-489

Relative Proportions op Width to Height in Mankind.
Principles of Proportion in Animals and Trees — Windship and

Weston, 490-494

Penetration of Mind.
Definition of Penetrate — Part of Speech — Perception of Character — Sharp-
ness of Features denote Astuteness of Intellect— Crow — Greyhound —

Sharp Noses, Eye-bones, Chins, 495-496

Pathognomonic Signs.
Eavages of Disease — Its Causes and Seasons — Signs of Corsumption,
Dyspepsia, Scrofula, Liver Disease, Chronic Rheumatism, Kidney
Disease, Love Sickness — Anecdote — Private Diseases— Medical Practi-
tioners, 497-504

Fashion; or Man Deformed by Artificial Means.
Beautiful Human Forms — Various Disfigurements, their motives— Heads
how Disfigured — Noses — Ear-rings and Nose-rings — Mouths — Teeth —
Tongues — Hands and Feet — Nails— Tight-lacing — Long Feet — Pointed
Shoes— Stocks and Collars— Hair — Tattooing — Widow's Disfigurement —
Face-patching — Freckles and Pimples — Tobacco and Alcohol — Tea and

Coffee-drinking, 505-536

Signs of Intelligence in Men and Animals.
Rules for Discerning Intelligence — The Pointer and the Bear — The Hog,
Opossum, Rhinoceros, compared with the Ox— Human Intelligence

how Evinced, . 537-539

Originality of Mind.
Only a Few Predominant Men — Shakespeare— Napoleon — Outward Marks —
Examples — Children not Originators, but Imitators — Monkeys and
Sheep — Politics and Religion produce few Originators, many Followers,

why ?— Despotic Governments, 540-545

Mental Labour.
Savages Averse to all Labour — Machinery versus Hand Labour— Mental
Labour Exhausting — Slow Development of some Minds— A European
House and a Pyramid contrasted — Mental Industry in Races— Signs

ofit 546-550

The Love of Mental Pleasures.
Every Faculty has its Object and Enjoyment in it — Mental Faculties may
be Used to Excess — In Moderation, Intellectual Pleasures are Superior,
Lasting, and Cheap — Physical Signs, 551-553



xviii CONTENTS.

Force of Character.
Some Born to Govern— Signs of Leading Men — Men Distinguished foi
Vigorous Writing, ......... 554-556

Decision of Character.
Importance of Character — Reading to Employers— Wavering Characters —
Rousseau and Hume— Scotch and English — Gladstone — Anecdote of
Scotch Decision — Principles underlying Decision — Demosthenes-
Caesar — Napoleon I. — Franklin — Lincoln — Wellington — French and
Germans — Physical Signs— Causes— Strong Bone— Influence of Food —
Jackson— a Thief— Decision, not Dependent on Bulk — Mechanics
seldom Thieves— Dr. Pritchard- Dr. Beecher— John Locke — Work,
the Foundation of Noble Character, ..... 557-567

Humility.

Humility towards God, Wise — Towards Men, indicates Want of True Dignity

— Few People Love to be Humble to All— Many Bow to some One

Master — Sign in the Carriage of the Head — Moderate Humility gives

Engaging Manners — Affectation of Humility, . . . 568-571

The Origin of Physical, Mental, and Soul Life.

Nature Teems with Life— First Men were Coarse and Dark— Whiter Races
Produced when the Earth became Cooler — Still Superior may Yet
Come Forth— First Men had Little Mind— Affliction Refines Mind-
Butterfly — Human Species might be Improved by More Careful
Breeding — Signs of a Large Soul— Future Life will be a Development of

Mind and Soul, 672-577

Perfection of Character.

Dependent on Parentage — Influence of Consanguinity on Offspiing —
Harmony rather than Beauty, Desirable — Importance of Suitable Mating
— How to Ensure it— Fair-haired People should Marry Black -haired
— a Large Mouth, a Small One, &c. — We cannot Destroy any Faculty,
but Restrain or Cultivate — By Food, Study, Self-control, and Well-
directed Love, 678-586

-^stheticalness, or Love of the Beautiful.
Symmetry and Proportion contrasted — Beauty in Sentiment and Love —
Edmund Burke's Analysis of— Beauty in Form and Colour— Sign—

Manner of Culture 687-591

Attentiveness.
The Father of Sir Robert Peel— Culture of Sir Robert— Advantages of—
Sign— Success somewhat Dependent upon Attention, . . 592-594

Proofs of a Future Life Founded on Nature.
Falsity of Ideas based on Fashion — AU Life tends to Reproduction — Sight
more likely to Deceive than Reason — Examples — Nothing in Nature
is Annihilated— Change is the Law of Nature — The Desire of Future
Life an Evidence that there will be One — Use of us here as Bricks in a
Building — Will be similarly Wanted for a Future Life, . . 595-600



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.







Frontispiece.


The Abdominal Form Large— The Claimant for the T


PAM

ichbome


Estate, ......


46


The Abdominal Form Small— Wallace of Kelly,






46


The Thoracic Form Large — William III., .






55


„ ,, Small, ,






56


The Muscular Form Large — S. Judas Thadeus,






61


„ ,, Small — Princess Anne,






62


The Osseous or Bony Form Large — Lowrie Coultei






76


„ Small-G. W. M. Nutt,






77


The Brain and Nerve Form Large— John Price,






83


„ „ ,, —Dr. Spraker,






84


„ „ ,, Small— George IIL,






84


„ Large-Rev. S.H.Ty


ng.




85


,, „ „ Small— Thomas Cribb






86


Welsh Woman, . . .






124


Mrs. Bachus, . . ,








124


A Fort Eupert Indian, . •








126


Horace Greeley, • • •








126


George Morland, . . >








127


Nicholas Copernicng, <> .








127


Eobert Gregson, . , .








129


Nana Narian, . • •








129


Samuel E. Ward, .








130


David Duncan, a Hermit of Micliigaa,








130


David Hume, . . .








131


Gustavus IIL, • « •








131


Thomas Becon, . • .








135


Thomas Molineaux, . . • <








135


Lavater, . . ' , , .








137


Chinese Woman, . , , ,








137


Owl,








140


Crow, . . . . t








140


Beau Brummel, a noted Pop of England, .








144


Immanuel Kant, . . • ■








144


Bach, . . . • 1








146


An Indian of Callam Bay, . . „








146


John Broughton, . . • •








148


Joseph Justus Scalliger, . » <








148



XX



ILLUSTRATIONS.









PAoa


A Lion, . . • . • . . . 148


A Giraffe, . . . <




148


A Squirrel, . « • i




150


J. H. Newman, D.D., . «




152


Tamberlik, . . • i




152


The Unmusical Ear, . ,




153


The Ear of Adeline Patti, .


. . . .


153


Mr. E. F. Simms, .


1 • • •


155


Miss Stuart, . . .






155


Miss Harriet C. Hosmer, .






156


Jim, a Piute Indian, .






156


Commodore Vanderbilt,






157


A Squanderer, .






157


Mrs. Margaret Fuller Osoli,






158


Brigham Young,






158


A Chinese Woman, .






159


George III., .






159


Thomas C. Haliburton (Sam Slick),






161


Charles T., . . • .






161


Napoleon I., .






* 162


The Eye of Mrs. Margaret F. Osoli,






163


The Eye of Brigham Young,






163


The Head of a Hog, .






163


The Head of a Turtle-Dove (Turtur Auritus),


163


William Ross, employed in Chambers's Publishing House ii




Edinburgh, ......


165


Antonio AUegri, or Corregio,






165


B. Gosse, Esq.,






166


John R. Webster, . .






166


The Head of a Hare, .






167


The Head of a Tiger,






167


A Loving Italian Mother, .






168


John B. Gough,






170


Deaf and Dumb Girl of Illinoie,






170


A Parrot,






170


Marchioness of Hertford,






171


Henry VIII.,






171


An Irish woman of Edinburgh,






174


Mary F. Scott Siddons,






174


Cyrus W. Field,






175


A Selfish Cat,






175


An Irish Peasant, . .






176


Parepa Rosa, . .






176


A Duck, . . .






177


A Canary,






177


A Digger, an Indian of California,






178


The Chetah, or Hunting Leopard,






179


Thomas Parr,






180



ILLUSTRATIONS, 3cxl

PAOII

A Chimpanzee, taken from life, in the Zoological Gardens of London, 181

An Ostrich, ........ 181

An Asiatic Elephant, ...... 181

Jacob Strawn, an extensive farmer and cattle dealer of Illinois, . 182

Mr. T. Glover, a Dry Goods merchant of Quebec, . . . 183

Thomas Cook and Wife {Avarice), ..... 184

Linnffius, ....•••• 186

A Chinese Woman, ....••. 186

James Watt, ...••••• 186

P. T. Bamum, ....... 186

Edwin Booth, ....... 188

A Disorderly Flat-head Indian, • • • • . 188

Edward v., 189

An Old Cardinal, . ... . . . 189

Peter Cooper, ....... 190

An Australian Man, ...... 190

Montesquieu, ....... 191

Louis W. Jackson, ....... 191

Charles Darwin, ....... 192

Persistenacity very Large, ...... 193

Johnny, Persistenacity very Small, ..... 193

A Prairie Wolf, or Coyote, ...... 193

A Bull-dog, 193

John Tetzel, the dishonest face, ..... 194

Andrew Jackson, the honest face, ..... 194

Lizzie Smith, a pickpocket, ...... 196

William Tyndale, a martyr, ..... 195

Lord George Lyttleton, who was unahle to learn the common

rules of Arithmetic, ...... 196

Thos. Allen, the first Mathematician of his day, . . . 196

Mr. Holcraft, of California— Suggestiveness Large, . . 198

J. B. Porta, the Inventor of the Camera Obscura and Physiognomist, 199

Rev. J. G. Lavater, Poet and Physiognomist, ... 199

Mrs. Lydia H. Sigourney, . . . . . . 200

Catharine IL, ....... 200

Prof. S. F. B. Morse, 201

Geo. IV 202

J. Q. A. Ward, Sculptor, ...... 203

Charles XIL, of Sweden, 204

Histori, Actress, ....... 204

The Head of a Hunting Horse, ..... 205

The Head of an Ass, ...... 205

A Chinese Girl, ....... 205

The Duke of Wellington, ...... 205

Thomas D'Urfey, an impractical English Poet, . . . 206

C. M. Wieland, a practical Poet of Germany, . . . 206

Ambrose Pare, a distinguished French Surgeon, . . . 209

Batasse, Prince of Madagascar, : , . . . 209



xxu



ILLUSTRATIONS.



Charles James Fox, . . . . . .

John Elwes, a noted Miser of London,

Elizabeth Canning — Mentimitativeness Large,

Mary Squires, the Gipsy, .....

Eulof, a murderer, ......

Mrs. Josephine A. Prosch, of New York, .

Ute Indian, of Salt Lake, .....

Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain), Author oi Innocents Abroad,

Kettle, a Selfish Indian Chief, of Washington Territory, .

Charlemagne — ^stheticalness Large, . . .

Flavins Josephus — Carefulness Large,

Thomas Hudson, notoriously Unfortunate,

James Fisk, jr., of Erie Railroad notoriety,

John Milton — Spementality Large, ....

A Patagonian — P'oritativeness Small, . .

Lucretia Mott, a Quakeress Preacher,

Simon Fraser Lovit — Intuitiveness Small, .

Giuseppe Mazzini, a talented Italian Patriot,

Mr. Thos. Eogerson — Literativeness Small,

John Buskin, a brilliant Author and Art Critic, .

The Duchess of Kent, the Mother of Her Majesty, Queen Victoria,

Nathaniel Bently, the dirtest Man in England,

Nero — Pitifulness very Small, ....

Baroness Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts,

Lamartine —Imaginativeness Large,

A Babbler — Imaginativeness Small,

Frederick H. A. Baron von Humboldt,

Miss Catharine Dunn, whose weight is 425 Pounds,

A Saucy Boy, of Jacksonville, Illinois,

John Sherman, U.S., a Senator from Illinois,

Voltaire— Credulousness Small, ....

Wm. Harvey, M.D., who discovered the Circulation of the Blood
D. Fernando VII., a Tyrant, ....

Count D'Orsay — Courteousness Large,

Abbey Kelley Foster — Attentiveness Large,

His Majesty Pomarre, King of Taheite,

Robespierre, a Bloody Tyrant, ....

Eustache — Sympatheticalness Large,

A Swan — Gracefulness Large, ....

A Male Hippopotamus, taken from life, in the Zoological Gardens
in London, . . . . .

Cains Julius Caesar, the Dictator, ....

A Kyast Banian Man, of Surat, in India, .

Out Nose, an Indian, .....

G. F. Handel— Physioharmonitiveness Large,

Sarah and John Eovin, aged 164 and 172 respectively,

Petrarch Zortan, 185 years of age, ....

A Flat Head Indian, .....



PAoa
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212
212
213
213
215
215
217
217
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220
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221
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222
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223
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241
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245



ILLUSTRATIONS.

A Quatsino Indian, , , . ,

Dr. John Hunter, , . - ■.

Foolish Sam — Deductiveness Small,

John Locke— Deductiveness Large, . .

King William, of Prussia, .

A Flat -head Indian, Front and Profile,

A Quatsino, of the N. W. Coast of Vancouver Island,

A murderous Indian of Minnesota, .

A Digger Indian, of California (full length),

Orison J. Stone, of Boston, . . .

Negro Boy, . . . . ,

John Wyckliffe, ....

John Broughton, a bloodthirsty Pugilist, .

Love and Obedience, . . .

Hate and Disobedience, . , •

David Hume, ....

Gustavus III., . . . ,

Vitellius, a good Digestion, . . .;

Charles VI., Emperor of West Aastria, .

Aulus Vitellius, Emperor of Rouie, .

Foolish Sam, . . . ,

Major, a Lunatic of Glasgow, . .

Curly Face, . . .

Straight Face, ....

Systematic and Straightforward Gentleman,

Surly and Deceptive Scamp, . .

A Curly, Ambitious, and Jealous Dog,

Foolish Mary, , . . ,

Bob Dreghorn — The Striding Gait, . .

Blind Alick — The Sweeping Gait, . ' .

Captain Paton, of Glasgow, . . .

David Dale, a Good Man, . .

Filament of Wool, ....

Negro Hair, .....

Love, Faith, Intuition, and Innocence^ .

Miss Margaret Clephne,

John Elwes, . . . . .

Daniel Dancer, a Miser and Hermit, .

David Duncan, Hermit of Michigan,

Washington Irving, . . . ,

Rev. John Summerfield, . . .

Miss Pvosa Bouheur, .

Egbert, K'.r.f' ^f the West Saxons, .

Diogenes, ■ Jynic Philosopher,

Lucius .\.nn«eus Seneca, a celebrated Boman Philosopher,

A Scotchman, of Edinburgh,

Greyfriar's Bobby, ....

A Macrone, .....



XXlll
pAan
245
245
245
246
24S
249
2.0
250
251
282
282
290
291
292
292
296
296
297
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311
348
349
359
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360
360
363
368
370
374
380
384
403
403
409
417
419
420
426
426
435
436
439
457
453
459
481
507



XXIV



iLLUSTRATIONa.



A Quatsiuo, Indian Girl,

A Oumana Woman,

A Welsh Woman,

An Egyptian Man,

A Muscovite Man,

A Flat-head Indian,

A West India Man,

A Greek Man,

A Scythian Man,

A Belini Man,

A Woman of Zanzibar,

A Woman of Scatia,

A Peruvian Man,

A Persian Man,

A Kyast Banian Woman, of Surat, in Western India,

A Flat-head Indian,

A Cornori Woman, .

A Cochi Woman, .

A Woman of Turkey,

An Ethiopian, .

A Parie Man, ,

A Macus Man,

A Tanibalian,

A Portuguese Woman,

A Chinese Man,

Miss Tight-laced,

Natural Waist,

A Chinese Woman, .

A Sciopede Man,

A China Man,

Captain Staddon, of San Francisco,

Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, .

Fashionable Head-dress of U. S. A. in 1860,

A Digger Indian, attired for an annual War Dance,

An Indian of Arizona,

A Samian Man,

A Digger Indian, of Califiraia,

Hon. Daniel Webster,

An Irish Peasant, .



rxoB

508
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521
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523
524
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628
629
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530
5,1
532
533



Upwards of 40 portraits have been added to this book since this list
of illustrations was compiled.



TEH NAME, PRONUNCIATION, SYLLABICATION,
AND ACCENTUATION OF E ACS FACULTY,



The pronunciation is given immediately after each word in the following

list, by the word being spelt anew phonetically. The number of the page
where the literal meaning of the word may be found is given opposite each
word respectively.

Acquiesciveness, ak'-kwi-8s"-siv-nSs .. .. •• „ ,, 123

Animalimitationality, an'-i-mal-irai-ta'-shiin-al'-i-ty ,« ,, ,, 126

Aquasorbitiveness, ak'-kwa-sor'-bit-iv-nSa ,. ., ,« ,, ,, 127

Physioelpidicity, fiz'-i-6-ei'-pi-dis"-i-ty ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, 128

Graspativeness, gras'-pat-iv-nes ., ,, ,, ,, ,, ..129

Associativeness, as-s6-see-a'-tiv-nes .. ., ., ., .. 130

Appetitiveness, ap'-pe-ti'-tiv-nes .. ., ,, ,, .. ,, 131

Eetaliativeness, re-tal-i-a'-tiv-nes .. , 132

Sentinelitiveness, sen'-ti-nel"-i-tiv-ne3 ,. .. ,, ,, ,,134

Morivalorosity, m6'ri-val-5-ros"-i-ty .. .. .. .. ,,135

Elevativeness, ^l-e-va'-tiv-nes 136

Olfactiveness, ol-fak'-tiv-nes ., ., ,. ,, ,, ., 137

Resistativeness, re-zis'-ta-tiv-nSs .. ,, ,, .. ., ,, 138

Assaultativeness, as-sault'-ta-tiv-nes .. ,. ,. ,, ,,139

Watchfulness, watch'ful-nea .. .. ,. .. .. ,, 139

Suspiciousness, sus-pish'-iis-nes .. ., ,. ,, ., ,. 140

Locomotivity, l6'-k6-m6-tiv'-i-ty ., ,, ., .. ,, ,. 141

Inquisitiveness, iQ-kwiz'-it-iv-nes .. ,, ,. ,, ., ,. 142

Ambitiousness, am-bish'-us-nes .. ,, .. ,, ., ,, 142

Autohegemony, aw'-t6-he-gem"-6-ny .. .. ,, ,, ,. 143

Teinporinaturalitiveness, tem'-po-ri-nat'-u-ral'.i-tiv-nes .. ,. .. 146

Physiovalorosity, fiz'-i-6-val'-o-r6s"-i-ty . . . . , . , , , . 147

Sophisticalness, so-fis'-ti-kal-nes .. .. .. ,, ,, ,, 149

Playfulness, pla'-ful-nes .. .. .. .. ,, .,,, 150

Intermutativeness, in-ter-mu'-ta-tiv-nSs .. ., ,, ,, ,, 151

Philomonotopicalness, fi'-lo-mon'-o-top-i-kal-nes ., .. ,, ,. 151

Tonireceptionality, ton'-i-re-sep'-shun-al'-i-ty ,, .. ,, ,. 152

Coacealativeness, kon-see'-la-tiv-nes .. ., ,, ,, ,, 154

Economosity, e-kon'-6-mos"-sity .. ,. ,, ,, ,, ,, 155

Curativeness, ku'ra-tiv-nes .. .. ,, ,. ,, ,. ,, 155

Accumulativeness, ak'-ku-mu-la"-tiv-nes ., ., ,, ,, .. 157

Monoeroticity, mon'-6-&'-6-tis"-i-ty ., ,, ,, ,, ,, 158

Voluntativeness, v6'-lun-ta"-tiv-ne3 ,, .. ,. ., ,, 159

Merriness, mer'-i nes .. .. ., ,, ,, ,, ., ,, 160

Providentness, prSv'-i-dent-nSs ., ,, ,, ,. ,, ,, 161

Contrativeness, kon'-tra-tiv-nes .. .. .. ,, .. ,, 162

Polyeroticity, pol'-i-er-6-tis"-i-ty .. .. .. ,. ,, ,. 163

Mnemoniconominality, ne-mon'-i-kon-om-i-nal"-i-ty ,, ,, ,, 164

Chromaticalness, kro-mat'-i-kal-nSs .. ., .. ,, .. ,, 164

Demolitiousness, de-mo-lish'-iis-nes .. .. ,, .. ,, 166

Philonepionality, fi'-l6-ne'-pe-o-nal"-i-ty .. .. ,, ., ,,168

Linguistiveness, ling-gwist'-iv-nes .. .. .. ,, ,, ,, 169

Physiodelectatiousness, fiz'-i-6-de-lek-ta"-shus-nes . ,, ,, 171

Curativeness, ku'-ra-tiv-nes .. .. .. .. ,, ., ,,172

Solicitireputativeness, so-lis'-i-ti-rep-u-ta"- tiv-nes ., ,, ,. 173

Inexorableness, in-egz'-6-rab-^l-nes .. ., ,, ,, ,, 173

Consecutiveness kon-sek'-u-tiv-nes .. .. .. ,, ,, ,,174

SonidiflFusitiveness, so-ni-dif-fu'-si-tiv-nes .. ,, ,. ,, ,,176

Dbcorativeness, dek-6-ra'-tiv-nes .. ., ,, ., ,, ,, 177



11 NAME, PRONUNCIATION, ETC., OP EACH rACTJLTT.

FAOa

Huntativeness, hiint'-^-tiv-nes ., ,, I ,, ., .. 179

Sagacitiveness, sa-gas-i-tiv-nSs .. .. ., ,. c* •• 180

Tradativeness, trad'-a-tiv-nes .. ,, ,, ,, ., ,,182

Adaptativeness, a-dap'-tS-tiv-nSs .. ,, ,» ,« •• ,,183

Discriminativeness, dis'krim-i-na"-tiv-iiS3 .. ,« ,, ., ,. 185

Structurodesterity, 8triik'-tu-r6-dex-ter"-i-ty ,. ,. ,, ,,186

Ordiniphysicality, 6r'-diii-i-tiz-i-kal"-i-ty .. ,. ., ., •• 187

Angularitiveiiess, arg-gu-lar'-i-tiv-nes ,. ,. ., *• •• 188

Beneficentness, be-nef'-i-seat-nes ., ,. ,« ,, ., •• 189

Decisiveness, desi'-siv-nes .. ., ,, ,, ., •• •• 190

Observativeness, ob-zer'-va-tiv-nes .. ,. .« ,« •• •• 191

Persistenacity, per-zis-ten-a'-si-ty .. ., ,, .* *• •• 192

Eectituditiveness, rek-ti-tu'-di-tiv-n^3 .. .. ,. •• •■ 194

Computationumericality, kom-pu-ta'-sho-nu-mer-i-kal-i-ty ,. •, 196

Solidativeness, s61-i-da'-tiv-nes .. .. .. ,• •• •• 197

Suggestiveness, siij-jes'-iiv-nes .. .. .. •• ,, •• 197

Characterioscopicity, kar-ak-ter'-i-6-sk6-piss"-i-ty •• .# •• 198

Amicitiveness, am-i-si'-tiv-nes .. .. ,* •• •• •• 200

Originativeness, o-rij-in-a'-tiv-nSs .. ,, .« •• •• •• 201

Mensurativeness, m^-su-ra'-tiv-nes . . ,, .« •• •• ..203

Pertinaciousness, per-ti-na'-shiis-nes , . .. ., »» •• •• 204

Temporimecbanicality, tem'-po-ri-mS-kan-i-kal'-i-ty •• .. •• 205

Practicalitiveness, prak-ti-kal'-i-tiv-nes ., ,. •• •• •• 206

Eeverentialaess, rev'-er-en"-sbal-nes ., ,. •• •• •• 207

Ordinimentality, 6r'-dia-i-men-tal"-i-ty ,, .• •• •• •• 209

Prescience, pre'-shens .. .. .. •• •• •• •• •• 21C

Susceptibleness, sus-sep'-tible-nes .. ,, ,, ,, ,, ., 211

Mentimitativeness, mcnt-im-i-ta-tiv-nSs ,. ., .. •• •• 212

Aifableness, af-able-Des .. .. • «• 213

Salitiveness, sal'-i-tiv-nes .. .. .. ,. *• •• •• 2H

Sublimitasity, sub lim-i-ias'-i-ty 215

Futuritiveness, fu-ture'-i-tiv-nes .. ., ,• .« .. •• 216

^stbeticalness, ace-thet'-i-kal-nes .. ,. ,, •• ,• •• 217

Carefulness, kair'-ffil-nes .. .. .. •• •• ,. .. 218

Spementality, spe-men-tal'-i-ty 2ir

Puritativeness, pu-ii-ta'-tiv-ngs ., .. •• •• •. ,,221

Intuitiveness, in-tii'-it-iv-nes ,, ,, .. ., •• •• 22?

Literativeness, lit'-ter-a-tiv-nes .. ,■ .. •• .. i> 223

Cleanness, kleen'-nes .. .. ,, .. .. •• •• •• 224

Pitifulness, pit'-i-ful-nes 225

Imaginativeness, im-maj'-in-a-tiv-nSs .. .. ,. •• •• 226

Factimenioriativenes?, fak'-ti-n)eni-6"-ri-a-tiv-iie3.. ., ., .. 228

Prudentiality, pru-den-sbe-al'-li-ty • 23{

Credulousness, kred'-u-liis-nes .. •• ,• •• •• •• 23i

Courteousness, kort'-yus-nes .. .» ., •• •• •• •• 236

Attentiveness, St-ten'-tiv-nes .. .. .. .• ■• •• •• 237

Sympatheticalness, sim-pa-tbet'-i-kSl-nSs ., .« •• •• •• 238

Gracefulness, graiss'-ful-nes .. .. ., ,• •• .. •• 240

Prosperativeness, pros-sper'-a-tiv-nea .. .• •• .. .. 242

Physioharmonitiveness, liz-a-o-har-mon'-i-tiv-nSs., .. ., ,. 243

Proportionativen'^ss, propor'-sbiin-ate-iv-nes ., ,« ., •• 244

Peductiveness, de-diik'-tiv-nSs .. .. .• •• •• •• 84fl



Note. — Pronounce a as a in fate ; a as in fat; a as in father.
„ e as e in me ; S as in met.
^ i as i in fine ; i as in f m.
„ 6 as o in no ; o as in not.
„ u as u in pure ; ii as in biit ; u as u in rule.




INTRODUCTION,



For the science upon which we propose to treat, a science
so comprehensive in its grasp, and embracing, as it does,
those mysterious principles of nature itself, which are so
apparent in their manifestations, and yet, in the eternal
conditions of their origin, so impervious hitherto to the most
indefatigable and unwearied researches of master minds, we
have no more fitting a term than that of " Physiognomy;"
a designation all too inadequate in the poverty and con-
tractedness of its literal significance, to draw together, and
fully to shadow forth in one word, the infinity of meaning
which has its abode within the range of the subject.
Adopted at an epoch when little more than the merest
outline of facial peculiarity was wanted to be expressed,
when comparatively little importance was attached to these
peculiarities, and when, it need scarcely be said, the subse-
quent importance to which this department of Nature's
mystic operations was destined to attain, was never so
much as thought or dreamed of, the term " Physiognomy "
performed its indicative functions passably well. As, how-
ever, through the slow course of centuries, the importance of
the science became better appreciated, and its ultimate com-
prehensiveness began to be faintly shadowed forth, the
poverty of the term fell further and further short of the
widened signification which it was called upcn to do duty



4) INTRODUCTION.

for ; and but for this slow and almost imperceptible ripening
into maturity to which we have alluded, the term would
have been left far astern and become disused, as all too
insufficient for its purpose. Had the science, for instance
through some intellect far in advance of its times during the
middle ages, advanced with giant strides into broad day, and
made as much progress in ten years as hardly ten long
centuries have sufficed to achieve, then would the terra
" Physiognomy " have been doomed ; but, until very recently,
no such sudden advance has been made, and the word has
been retained with a gradually increasing significance to
keep pace with the duties which it has to perform, until
now it may be said truly the widening of its meaning has
been co-eval and co-extensive with the evolution of the



Online LibraryJoseph SimmsPhysiognomy illustrated; or, nature's revelations of character. A description of the mental, moral, and volitive dispositions of mankind, as manifested in the human form and countenance → online text (page 2 of 44)