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UNIVERSITY LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

SAN DIEGO
Donated in memory of

John W. Snvder
by

His Son and Daught er



LIBRARY

UNIVERSITY 01!
CAUFOOMA

SAN DIEGO



'



JOHN W.'SNYDEK




LIVINGSTONE

LOST AND FOUND,

OR

AFRICA AND ITS EXPLORERS.-



A COMri.ETE ACCOUNT OF THE COUNTRY AND ITS INHABITANTS, TKEIR CUSTOMS, MAN-
NEKS, 4C., OF THE PROMINENT MISSIONARY STATIONS, OF THE DIAMOND
AND GOLD FIELDS, AND OF EXPLORATIONS MADE J



WITH A COMPREHENSIVE BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF
DR. DAVID LIVINGSTONE,

HIS TRAVELS, ADVENTURES, EXPERIENCES AND DISAPPEARANCE,

AND A MOST INTERESTING ACCOUNT OF HIS DISCOVERT BY
THE AMERICAN EXPEDITION, IN COMMAND OF

HENRY M. STANLEY.



WITH OVER ONE HUNDRED ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAPS.



COMPILED AND ARRANGED WITH GREAT CARE, FROM THE MOST AUTHENTIC

SOURCES, WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND CHAPTER ON NATAL,

BY

REV. JOSIAH TYLER,

MISSIONARY OF THK A. B. C. F. M., IN AFRICA FOB TWENTY-TWO YEARS.



PUBLISHED BY SUBSCRIPTION ONLY.



HARTFORD, CONN. :

MUTUAL PUBLISHING COMPANY.

D. ASHMEAD, PHILADELPHIA, PKNN ; W. E. BLISS, TOLEDO, OHIO.;

NETTLETON & CO., CINCINNATI. OHIO. F G. OILMAN & CO.. CHICAGO, ILL.:

FRANCIS DEWING & CO., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.

1873.



I

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1872, by the

MUTUAL PUBLISHING COMPANY,
In the o.T:ce of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



mTRODUCTIOK



THAJSTC GOD that Africa, long-neglected and down-trodden,
is "looming up" in the estimation of the civilized and Christian
"world. In my boyhood I used to sing of " Af ric's sunny
fountains," and in visions of the night beheld men rushing
to that country for its "golden sands ;" but little did I antici-
pate that I should ever handle its precious stones, breathe its
balmy air, drink of its waters, bathe in its rivers, eat its lus-
cious fruits, and labor many years in the evangelization of its
inhabitants.

But it has been even so. And now, Header, do not be
surprised if you perceive in this Introduction some glow of
enthusiasm. I cannot write otherwise. Africa is my adopted
country, the birth-place of my children, my past and future
residence. The clear and lovely skies, bright and abundant
flowers, beautifully plumed songsters of the grove, graceful
antelopes bounding from cliff to cliff, the king of beasts walk-
ing about in his majesty these and a hundred reminiscences
rush into my mind as I think of my African home. Africa !
dark though thou hast been for centuries, thy history obscure,
thy condition gloomy, thy people degraded, thy coasts abound-
ing in malignant fevers thou hast a history which was once
bright, and is destined, we believe, to become still brighter.



IV INTRODUCTION.

"What associations spring up in our minds, as we contciri-
platc the past of this continent ! We will not forget that
though for nearly two thousand years overshadowed with
ignorance and barbarism, it was once the home of science and
literature. We have been accustomed to regard it as a barren
waste, " full of the habitations of cruelty," only fit for wild
beasts and wild men. Let us remember that Moses, the
greatest hero and law-giver the world has ever seen, was born
and educated here ; that the Pharaohs here once reigned in all
the pomp and magnificence of oriental splendor; that the
grandest ruins of all antiquity arc found "here ; that architec-
ture has here been carried to a perfection which has baffled
the skill of all modern artisans; that here once flourished large
and beautiful cities, filled with literary, military, and commer-
cial men ; that Europe is indebted to Africa for letters and
arts; that Greece even traces her civilization to Egypt, and
that while all Europe was covered with gross darkness, Africa
was radiant with science and literature. Astronomy was
taught in African schools before Germany had ever heard of
a school -house. Africans were clothed in purple and dwelt
in palaces, when Englishmen covered themselves with skins
of wild beasts, and crawled into low mud huts nothing supe-
rior to those now occupied by Kaffirs and Hottentots. Christ,
though not born in Africa, was cradled here, and some of the
most distinguished fathers of the Christian church have here
resided.

What a change centuries have wrought in this continent !
Carthage, once the rival of Rome, is such a perfect waste that
scarcely a vestige of her former greatness remains. Thebes,
of which Homer sang as " the glory of the whole earth," is
now a perfect desolation, though the city was so substan-
tially built that the remains of her temples, porticoes, galle-



INTKODUCTIOX. V

ries, and statuary, still testify to her former magnificence.
The desolation of her people is as great as that of the cities.
Where the Ptolemies once reigned for long generations over
wise, rich, and proud men, there now resides a race so poor
and abject, that none are willing to do them reverence. Where
Osymandyas built his literary hall, stored with all the valuable
writings of his time, and significantly styled " The Dispensary
of the mind," there is now gross ignorance. Africa, once
the home of freedom, has been for a long time the store house
of slaves. Men have captured and sold their fellow-men like
cattle.

We rejoice in the dawn of another era. The cloud is being
lifted from Africa, revealing a country desolate, but still rich
in all the elements of her former glory. The soil is fertile,
beyond the calculations of those who have never resided in
tropical climates. Here grow luxuriantly cotton, tobacco,
rice, coft'ee, sugar-cane, indigo, arrow-root, ginger, flax, the
various grains, and all manner of fruits. Here are large lakes,
and numerous rivers, diamond fields, and mines of iron, lead,
copper, gold and other metals.

The climate on the table lands is delightful. What is better,
the native inhabitants are susceptible of civilization and Chris-

A

tianization. The African is not like the Indian, doggedly
persistent in his barbarism, and therefore apparently destined'
to extermination ; but under the crushing circumstances which
have held him to the earth for successive generations, he is
still a man. In our observations of him we agree with Dr.
Livingstone, who thiirks the native African has that inherent
manhood, the traces of which no unfavorable circumstances-
will complctelyvobliterate.

The progress already ma^e in the elevation of Africa is
wonderful. Schools and churches have been established at



VI INTRODUCTION.

numerous mission stations. Agricultural implements have
been imported in large numbers to aid the cause of civiliza-
tion. The Missionary, Dr. Moffat, reported :

" There goes through our station now, no less than 70,000
worth of British manufactures to the tribes round about.
" What a contrast between this, and the time when a trader
would stop a week or two without being able to sell a single
handkerchief. There was a time when there was but a soli-
tary plow, and that was the missionary plow, a Dutch one,
and a very clumsy thing to boot. Now the natives have their
plows by hundreds.

" There was a time when the man, the lord of creation, would
select for himself such a choice work as sitting under the
shadow of a tree, while his wife worked in a field from morn-
ing to night, with a heavy pick. Now she has the comfort
of seeing him plough his garden her garden ; she has no
objection to harvesting, and to scuffle a little to take away
the weeds."

Naked Africans are being clothed, and their empty minds
filled with thought. Superstition is fast yielding to the
Christian religion. True " there remaineth much land to be
possessed " but enough has been accomplished to promise a
more glorious future for this continent than was ever recorded
of her in the past.

From the "singular indestructibility" of her races, their pecu-
liar genius, their " strong affections, unspeakable long-suffer-
ing under injuries, great endurance, perceptiveness and recep-
tiveness, the marvelous Providence which has brought them
into our land to be educated in bitter bondage by Anglo
Saxon task-masters," we infer that Africa has a glorious part
yet to play in the great drama of history.

What if she should prove to be the heart of the world,



IXTRODUCTIOJ?'. Vli

as the Caucasian race has already shown itself to be the
brains \ We are observing constantly, illustrations of the remark
once made by the late Hon. Edward Everett, " All doubts
of the capacity of the African race for self government, of
their improvability under favorable circumstances, seem .to be
removed by what we witness at the present day, both in our
own country and on the coast of that continent."

Notwithstanding all the explorations of Africa which have
been made and published during the nineteenth century, there
is still a lamentable ignorance of this part of the world. Com-
paratively few are aware what a rich field for commercial
and benevolent enterprises it presents. Many still regard its
interior as a vast waste, un watered and uninhabitable, and the
native African as devoid of all the finer feelings of humanity.
Campbell, Livingstone, Speke, Burton, Grant and Stanley tell
a different story. So do MofFat, Shaw, Grout, Lindley and
other missionary laborers.

The design of this book is to dispel the prevailing ignor-
ance of her geography, productions and people. Most heart-
ily do we recommend it to all who wish for information up
'to the period of the latest discoveries. Viewing Africa
from a philanthropic and Christian stand-point, what a grand
theatre for benevolent operations 1 Here is a whole continent
to be redeemed from barbarism. "Will not America, from
whom Africa has suffered so much, do her part in its evan-
gelization?

J. T.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

THE CONTINENT OF AFRICA.

As known to the Ancients Isthmus of Suez The Suez Canal Attempt to
build by Pharaoh Ancient Commerce Desert of Sahara Mountains
Rivers Area Climate Geology of the Country Agricultural re-
sources Population Products Exports If

CHAPTER II.

AFRICA AND ITS INHABITANTS.

People of the Barbary States Of the Great Desert Sahara Goblins of the
Desert Tibboos and Turicks Bedouins Arab Maids Hamran Sword
Hunters Nubians A Land of Mystery Fire Worshippers Abyssinian
Wedding The Story of Kassai Theodore and his Lions Native
Tribes 23

CHAPTER III.

AFRICA AND ITS INHABITANTS. (CONTINUED).

Bornu A caged Sultan Effects of a royal Drink The Shooas The
Mandingoes Liberia The Krumen The Gold Coast The Fanti and
Ashanti Gold Coast Free Love King restricted to 3,333 Wives A
New Theory of Man's Origin Dahomey An Amazon Review The
King of Dahomey A Public Celebration The Evil Night Five-
Hundred Lives Sacrificed The Egbas The Alake on his Throne A
Native Bishop The King of Benin and his White Wife The King of
Bonny and his English Dupes Lower Guinea New Method of Choos-
ing a Ruler Curious customs relating to Twins Mumbo Jumbo
Congo Crowning the King The Ovambos A Queen's Dance
"That's the trick boys" The Damara Marriage between a
Native Woman and aBaboon Natal and Cape Colonies The Bcchuanas
Koranna aud other Tribes Woman turned into a Lion The Hotten-
tots Their Kraals Why they Move their Houses The Bushman
Central African Tribes 46

CHAPTER IV.

AFRICAN EXPLORATIONS.

Ancient attempts to explore Africa Phoenician Settlement three-thousand
years ago Invasion by the Arabs in the Seventh Century Modern
Explorations The Portuguese in Fifteenth Century Discoveiie^ of



X CONTENTS.

Vasco Da Gama Opening of the Slave Trade English Explorations
in Africa Mungo Park His Death Routes from Tripoli through the
Great Desert sought by Major Denham and others Captain Clapper-
ton's Expedition from Guinea Lander's Attempts Discovery of the
Mouth of the Niger Steam Navigation of the Niger M. Du. Chaillu
His wild adventures with Gorillas and Natives Among the Ashiras
Winwood Reade with the Fans and Gammas Talk with a Cannibal
Earth's Travels with Richardson and Overweg Cape Town Founded
Campbell's Travels Rev. Robert Moffatt's Explorations The Great
King Claiming Rain Anderssen's Travels Among The Ovambo'a
Captain Messum's Experiences Ladislaus Magyar's Journies Mar-
ries A Native Princess Explorations in Eastern Africa Dr. Krapf s
Missionary Labors And Travels Burton and Speke's Expedition 1857
Discovery of Lake Victoria N'yanza Speke's and Grant's Expedition
I860 Meeting with Mr. Baker at Gondokoro Journies of Sir Samuel
Baker and Wife on the Blue and White Nile David Livingstone and
Henry M. Stanley 91

CHAPTER V.

LIFE AND TRAVELS OF DAVID LIVINGSTONE. (EARLY LIFE).

Birth-place Ancestors Dr. Livingstone's Youth At work in a Factory
Taste for Study Desire to Travel Prepares for a Missionary Life
Embarks for Africa 1 28

CHAPTER VI.

LIVINGSTONE'S VISIT TO THE BACKWAIN COUNTRY.

Arrival at Kuruman Dr. Moffatt Meets His Future Wife Into the Interior
The Backwain Chief Sechele Sechele becmes a Convert and is Bap-
tized .- 131

CHAPTER VII.

LIVINGSTONE AT KOLOBENG.

Settles Among The Natives Another Exploit A Journey On Ox-Back
Narrow Escape From A Lion Terrible Drought Rain Makers
The Boers Missionary Life 138

CHAPTER Vni.

DISCOVERY OF LAKE NGAMI.

The Bushman Country Expedition with Messrs. Oswell and Murray Across
the Kalahari Desert Digging for Water A Hyena Panic A Bush-
woman Mirage The Bakobas Discovery of Lake Ngami Unex-
pected Obstacles Death of a Native Chief The Zambesi in Central
Africa An Explanation with Why's and Wherefore's 15

CHAPTER IX.

JOURNEY FROM CAPE TOWN TO LINYANTI.

Schele's Childen The Lion as He is Hunting Ostriches Ceremony with
the Boys The Girls Ordeal Rhinoceros Elephants A Bushman's
Test The Makololo 166



CONTENTS. X J

CHAPTER X.

LIFE IN THE MAKALOLO CAPITAL.

The Court Herald Sekeletu The King Makololo Ladies Human Nature
the Same Every Where Bad Intentions Frustrated A Fancy-dress
Parade Makololo Huts An excursion with Sekeletu Hunting Hippo-
potamus A Nine Week's Tour Trip to Loanda decided on 17Y

CHAPTER XI.

FROM LINYANTI TO SHINTE

Up the Leeambye Alligator Hunting Captives Return to their Homes
A Palaver with Mamoana Female Chiefs Conquered by a Woman
Manenko on the March The Balondas Reception by Shinte
African Prisons An Exhibition Abraham alarms the Ladies .... 190

CHAPTER XII.

FROM SHINTE TO CASSANGE

Dress of the Balonda's A Stomach Complaint Curious Customs Inter-
view with the Great Katema Fugitive sent back Traditions of
Lake Dilolo A Beautiful River Tribute of an old Shirt Paid A
Swim for Life Trouble with the Chiboque A Mutiny Quelled Trouble
and Mishaps Way to save Oxen Hostile Natives African Sophistry 209>
CHAPTER XIII.

THROUGH ANGOLA TO ST. PAUL DE LOANDA.

Among the Portuguese Their Curiosity Who they Married A Black Guide
and his Slaves High Mountains and fertile Valleys The Ox Sinbad

First view of the Atlantic St. Paul De Loanda 22fl

CHAPTER XIV.

ACROSS THE CONTINENT.

The return journey Pungo Andongo Angola Recreations of the Natives
Attacked in the Forest Old Faces and old Friends Sekeletu at

Church A Love Affair Livingstone's Observations 238

CHAPTER XV.

ACROSS THE CONTINENT. (LINYANTI TO TETE.)

Memorable Night The Victoria Falls A Native Fanti Botaka Salu-
tation Hunting Buffaloes and Elephants Elephant protecting her
young Women's mouths like a Duck's Caught in a trap A Caffre
War Preparations for Battle A Parley A model Husband and

Father Rhinoceros Hunting The Witch Ordeal-Arrival at Tete 262

CHAPTER XVI.

FROM TETE TO THE EAST COAST.

A Jesuit Mission Down the Zambesi Rivers Mutu and Kilimane On the

Coast On the "Frolic" Fate of an Attendant Once more in England 278
CHAPTER XVII.

SECOND EXPEDITION TO AFRICA.

Sixteen Months at Home Old Ideas of Africa pass away Object of another
Expedition The "Ma Robert" Steaming up the Zambesi Discovery
of Lake Shima The Menganja Upper Lip Ornaments Ideas of



XU CONTENTS.

Beauty Hippopotamus Trap Discovery of Lake Xyassa The Jlako-
lolo Tribe Building Houses Cooking Elephants Feet AVreck of
the "Ma Robert" A new Steamer, the "Pioneer' 1 Arrival of Mrs.
Livingstone Death of Mrs. Livingstone The Universities' Missions

The "Lady of the Lake" Return to the Coast England 289

CHAPTER XVIII.
LIVINGSTONE'S Tiiini) EXPEDITION.

At Zanzibar Up the Rovnmr, Reported Killed Letter from Dr. Seward
Moosa's Story English Relief Expedition Mr. Young at Lake
Nyassa The grave of Mrs. Livingstone Return of the Expedition
Letter from Dr. Livingstone Rumors from the Interior Lost Dis-
patches Xo News Livingstone Last 312

CHAPTER XIX.

THE HERALD LIVINGSTONE EXPEDITION.

James Gordon Bennett Henry M. Stanley Call to Paris Interview with

Bennett Ordered to Start At Zanzibar C'23

CHAPTER XX.

ZANZIBAR AND THE MIUMA.

Island and Town of Zanzibar Terrific Hurricane The Steamer Slien-

andoah The Mrima Arrival of Caravans Mode of Life 332

CHAPTER XXI.

BURTON AND SPEKE's JOURNEY TO U.TIJI.

The Caravan Departure Uproar in the Van A Wild Day Murder of an
Explorer The Wazaramo The Guard Desert They Repent and
Return An Afternoon's March The Usagara Mountains Ugogo An
Arab Caravan Black Mail The Fiery Field Arrival at Unyanyembe 844:
CHAPTER XXII.

BURTON AND SPEKE's EXPEDITION.(CONTINUED).

The "\Vanyamwezi Porters On the march again Arrival at Ujiji
Tanganyika Lake Life at Ujiji Discovery cf the Victoria X'yanza

Homeward Bound Arrival at Zanzibar 366

CHAPTER XXIII.

STANLEY'S JOURNEY FROM ZANZIBAR TO UNYANYEMBI-:.

Distance from Zanzibar to Unyanyembe Preparations for the Trip Buy-
ing Beads and Cloth Speke's Faithfuls Making Saddles Donkeys
Departure from Zanzibar At Bagamoyo A Young Rascal On the
March Xaked People The Wasungu An African Sultana Tribute
Paid The Makata Swamp In Distress Tribes Found and Rivers
crossed Ugogo and its People Heavy Tribute The Irish of Africa

Arrival atUuyanyembe News from Livingstone 385

CHAPTER XXIV.

THE WAR AT UNYANYEMBE.

The Arabs and Mirambo Cause of the War Stanley joins the Arabs
Battle with Mirambo An Ambuscade A Panic and Retreat Plun-
der and Burning of Tabora , . 409



CONTEXTS. Xlll

CHAPTER XXV.

LIFE AT UNYANYEMBE.

The "Land of the Moon" Stanley Fever Stanley's Quarters The Arabs

Shaw and his Impending Fate 418

CHAPTER XXYI.

PERPLEXITIES AND RESOLVES.

Stanley advised to go back Ignorance in High Places Arraignment of

Dr. Kirk The Livingstone Caravan Summing Up 432

CHAPTER XXVII.

FROM KWIHARA TO UVINZA.

The route to Ujiji The Start Deserters Punishments Shaw Sent Back
The Wilderness Stanley Astonishes the Natives Pombe Hunting
Adventures A Mutiny Almost a Tragedy In Chains An Ominous
Sight Attack of a Leopard Caravan in Distress Paying Tribute 444
CHAPTER XXVIII.

FROM CVIXZA TO UJIJI.

Do, Dare, and Endure A Crocodile Dines on a Donkey Slight to a King
Caravans Homeward Bound On the Verge of Ruin A Night March
A Woman's Freak An Alarm Lake Tanganyika Ujiji Dr. Living-
stone Found 472

CHAPTER XXIX.

INTERCOURSE WITH LIVINGSTONE.

Stanley's Welcome to Ujiji - Livingstone at Homo Talks on the Verandah

Livingstone's Life and Religion 490

CHAPTER XXX.

AN EXCURSION ON LAKE TANGANYIKA

Dangers of the Trip Head of the Lake Mouth of the Rusiza Adventures

and Escapes Return to Ujiji Livingstone's Coolness in Danger 505

CHAPTER XXXI.
PR. LIVINGSTONE'S STORY.

Up the Rovuma The Big Brother The Arabs Story Homesick Men In
Trouble The Queen's Guard Water on the Brain A Discovery Lake
Lincoln The True Nile The Old Mystery Unsolved Among the
Manyemas Perils of the Road Compelled to Return Sick and

Worn at Ujiji 515

CHAPTER XXXII.

THE RETURN TO ZANZIBAR.

Celebrating Christmas at Ujiji Homeward Bound Pictures of Travel At
Unyanyembe News from Home Farewell to Livingstone Baga-
moyo The English Expedition Stanley's Reception Stanley leaves

Zanzibar 533

CHAPTER XXXIII.

THE ENGLISH-LIVINGSTONE RELIEF EXPEDITION.

Who composed it Reception by the Sultan of Zanzibar Preparations for
the Journey Its Death Blow Livingstone Found and Relieved Its
Members Demoralized The Expedition Ended . 553



Xiv CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXXIV.

DR. LIVINGSTONE'S LETTER TO MR. BENNETT.
Frank Acknowledgements of Stanley's Services His own position at Ujiji

Thrilling News Slavery Four Fountains Comments of the Press. . . . 56$

CHAPTER XXXV.

ANOTHER LETTER TO MR. BENNETT.

The Slave Trade in Eastern Africa Adventures of the Explorers
Hardships The Queen of Cazembe African Beauties A Tragedy
Captives Broken Hearted Among the Cannibals Unknown Lake
Treachery and Plunder Abundance of Ivory Scenes in the Manyema
Markets Horrors of the Slave Trade 563

CHAPTER XXXVI.

LIVINGSTONE'S STORY.
Letter to Lord Clarendon Sources of the Nile Mistakes of Speke and

Baker Results of Four Journeys 586

CHAPTER XXXVII.

EXPERIENCES WITH THE BANIANS.

Banians and Arabs Swindled Livingstone's Goods Sold He Slandered
Terrible Scenes Tramp to Ujiji Manyema Revenge Three Narrow
Escapes 59$

CHAPTER XXXVIII.

STANLEY IN FRANCE.

At Marseilles Lion of the Day Kalulu in Paris Breakfast with Minister

Washburn General Sherman Grand Banquet Speeches and Toasts. 607

CHAPTER XXXIX.

STANLEY IN ENGLAND.

Doubts and Suspicions Snuff Box from the Queen At Brighton Stanley's
Speech Stay at Home Travelers Discussion with the Geographers
An Unpleasant Occurrence Reception Mark Twain on Stanley 618

CHAPTER XL.

STANLEY IN SCOTLAND.

Geographers Reviewed at Glasgow Citizenship Conferred on Stanley

Speech at Hamilton Banquet At Edinburgh 643

CHAPTER XLI.

STANLEY AT HOME.

Arrival at New York Kalulu Interviewed Reception by the Lotos Club
Speeches of Distinguished Men 'Visit from Dr. Livingstone's Brother
In Mourning for the Doctor Reception by the Geographical Society
Letter from Livingstone to Mr. Stearns Contract to Lecture Success
ta a Lecturer. ., 654



CONTENTS. XV.

CHAPTER XLII.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF STANLEY.

Who is he ? His Age Where was he born ? The Matter Fully Discussed
Claims and Counter Claims His Life What a Mr. Noe Claims to
Know Letters from Stanley The Point Still Unsettled Mark Twain's

Hotten-tot Appears Again ; 679

CHAPTER XLIII.
SPEKE AND GRANT'S EXPEDITION.

Departure from Zanzibar At Kaze At Ukulima's Village Dance with the
Queen Disasters Uzinza Retreat to Kaze Once Again A Lost
Bride At Karague A Noble King On to Uganda Victoria N'yanza
King Mtesa Flirtations with the Queen The Harem Filled and
Depleted The Queen's Court The Nile at Last Kamrasi the " Father
of Kings" A Royal Beggar Down the Nile Among the Gani

At Gondokoro Twenty-Eight Months Among the Savages 683

CHAPTER XLIV.
BAKER'S EXPLORATIONS.

Up the Nile The Desert Journey Hunting Adventures in the Abyssinian
Mountains Chased by a Rhinoceros The Sword Hunters Mutiny
Quelled The Lion at Close Quarters At Khartoum and Gondokoro
A Belligerent Caravan At Latooka Detained at Obbo Arrival at
Unyoro A Modest Demand Discovery of Lake Albert Homeward
Bound The Egyptian Expedition led by Pasha Baker Disastrous
Results Dissatisfaction of the Viceroy Latest News of the Ex-
pedition 700

CHAPTER XLV.

NATAL AND THE KAFFIRS.

Location of the Colony Size Harbor Products Durban Commerce
Capital Governor's Wife Bishop Colenso Missionaries The Zulus
Houses Women Mode of Life Marriage Customs Salutations
Dress and Ornaments Witchcraft Mania for Wives Missionary

Labors A Native Pastor A Missionary's Testimony 720

CHAPTER XLVI.

THE SOUTH AFRICAN DIAMOND FIELDS.

Where Located The Orange and Vaal Rivers Climate The Orange River
Free State The Transvaal Republic Their Capitals Surrounding
Tribes Routes to the Diamond Fields Cape Town Port Elizabeth
Port Natal Discovery of Diamonds Rare Specimens Government
of the Mines Pnicl the Great Centre Gold Lands of the Limpopo. . 755
CHAPTER XL VII.

EAST AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE.

The Zanzibar Slave Market Shipment of Negroes Treaty between Muscat
and other Countries, allowing It Features of the Arab Slave Trade
Contented Slaves Dr. Livingstone's Dispatches His plans for Stop-
ping the Slave Trade The Plea of the Sultan Sir Bartle Frere His
History Full Powers to Act 764



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE.

1 THE FINDTXG OF DTI. LIVINGSTONE (Frontispiece)

2 TBAVELEUS AND THE MIRAGE 26

3 HEAD OF BLACK RHINOCEROS 30

4 NATIVES ATTACKING- ELEPHANTS SO

5 WASHING DAY 35

fi THE BATTLE FIELD 35

7 KA^TKUN BANQUET 40

8 THEODORE AND TIIE LIONS 43

' ABY SSIN i AN FACES 43

10 BUFF ALO H UNTING 50

1 1 SHOOA WOMEN 50

12 K RUM EN AND THEIR CANOES 53

13 FISHING SCENE ; So

It THE BELL COMES 62

15 AMAZON- REVIEW 62

16 THE BASKET SACRIFICE 67

17 THE ALAK E'S Cou RT 72



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