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Jules Gabriel Janin.

The American in Paris during the summer being a companion to the Winter in Paris; or, Heath's picturesque annual for 1844 online

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THE

AMERICAN IN PARIS

DURING THE SUMMER,

BEING- A COMPANION TO THE " WINTER IN PARIS ; "
OR

HEATH'S PICTURESQUE ANNUAL

FOR

1844.
BY M, JULES JANIN,

ILLUSTRATED BY EIGHTEEN ENGRAVINGS,

FROM DESIUNS

BY M. EUGENE LAML



LONDON:

LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, AND LONGMANS.

PARIS: L. CURMER, AND AUBERT AND co. LEIPSIC: T. o. WEIGEL. NEW YORK

APPI.ETON AND SON.

1844.



LONDON :
J. HADDON, PRINTER, CASTLE STREET, FINSBURY.



Stack
Annex



ISO



ENGLISH TRANSLATOR'S
PREFACE.



THE English translator, in presenting another volume
of the American in Paris to the public, has but a slight
task imposed, in writing a preface. That of the French
translator will fully explain the circumstances, which
have enabled the publishers to avail themselves of the
hint given by two or three reviews last year, that there
were objects of interest, in and near the French capital,
necessarily left undescribed, which would amply suffice
to fill another volume.

One very pleasant task remains, and that is, to thank
the gentlemen of the press, for the unanimous kindness

1C '5



vi ENGLISH TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.

with which they received the American in Paris, and
the public, for the patronage extended to that book.
The translator trusts that the present volume will be
found at least equally interesting, and will therefore be
received with equal favor. Indulgence must again be
claimed for expressions which may be considered awk-
ward or inelegant, but which were unavoidable, without
committing a far worse fault that of sacrificing the
peculiarities, and in some instances, the beauties, of
the author, to the mere style of the translator.



FRENCH TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.



OUR American appears before you once more. Last year, at
the same period, he described to you in the best way he could,
Parisian life, during the brilliant months of winter. He
had then arrived in the great city, at the very moment when
the closing days of autumn were disappearing beneath the
yellow leaves. A traveller without affectation, he asked no-
thing more than to take his part in the sweet joys, lively
emotions, and noisy pleasures of this world of the powerful
and the rich ; he endured as well as he could, the intoxications
and the delirium of the masked ball, the thousand cross fires
of Parisian conversation ; the paradoxes, the slanders, and even
the innocent calumnies that he saw around him ; he entered
into all, he wished to see every thing, and he fulfilled his wish.
Not that he advanced very far into the mysteries of the good
city; but he stood, as one may say, on the edge of the wood,
and thence, he threw his curious and attentive look upon these
gay and quickly changing lights and shades. For a fellow-
countryman of Franklin's, our Yankee is certainly somewhat
of an acute observer; what he did not see he guessed, not



viii FRENCH TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.

sometimes without a certain discrimination and pertinence.
That which we especially admire in him, and which will not
displease the reader, is a great fund of benevolence, a happy
good humor which has nothing affected about it, and an inde-
scribable entrain and rapture, which the greater part of the
time keeps the reader awake. This is all that we can say in
his favor, for we are not of the number of those tiresome
editors, who are always saying, " Come and see a masterpiece,
come and salute a great man; the great man and the master-
piece were both invented by me !" We hope never to fall into
this enthusiasm, which is very unbecoming to him who is its
object. All our duty as editor, we have faithfully fulfilled, and
now it is for the book to defend itself. If by chance it is a
good book, depend upon it, the public will receive it with favor.
And why then say so much ? All our ambition, and you will
see that it is easily satisfied, is, that with an absent look, after
having thoroughly admired the new chefs d'oeuvre of M. Eugene
Lami and of Mr. Heath his worthy interpreter, you will read
a few of these pages, in which the translator has endeavoured to
reproduce somewhat of the grace, the vivacity, and the interest
of the original book.

What we have now said of the Winter in Paris,* a book
which has been received with more literary eagerness than could
have been expected ; so much so, that it has been found neces-
sary to print two editions, we can especially repeat of the
present volume, the Summer in Paris, which appeared to us the
necessary consequence of the other. Besides, the subject
is not less beautiful nor less vast. If the Parisian winter is,
par excellence, the season for brilliant fetes, on the other hand, a

* The French work of last year was called Un hiver a Paris, and that of this
vear is denominated JSEte d Paris.



FRENCII TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE. ix

summer in Paris, one single summer, will acquaint you, better
than ten winters, with the hundred thousand little revolutions
which the city undergoes, on certain days of the year. Paris
in the summer is the city in repose ; she forgets the labors of
her coquetry and her ambition that she may afterwards remem-
ber them with more joy ; she yields herself happy creature !
to a calmer existence, to less ardent passions. The most un-
tamed go to a distance, to the Pyrenees, to the Alps, or to
the borders of the sea, to seek in the chances of travelling, in
the virulent emotions of the trente et quarante, through the
burning accidents of the month of August, something which
resembles the winter in Paris. But the Parisian, who is wise
and worthy of being a Parisian, remains quietly in Paris ; there
he profits by the space which is left him, he possesses himself
of all these noises, of all this silence, for his single use. To him
alone, now that the rest of the city has set out to him alone
belongs this rich capital of the world, from the palace of the
king to the royal library; to him belong all the paintings, all
the books, all which constitutes art and poetry. He reigns in
interregnum. For him alone, the Opera sings and dances ; for
him alone, the Theatre Frangais invents its comedies ; for him
the street music fills the air with its rustic melodies ; for him
the railroads are filled each morning with their powerful flame.
The jets d'eau of Versailles, and the fountains of Saint Cloud,
and the rural fetes beneath the old village elm, are all for him.
There is not a flower which he may not pluck, not a piece of ice
from last winter which has not been preserved for his use, not
a scarf, not a straw hat from Italy, not a pretty, ingenuous
countenance of which the model-Parisian does not have the
first sight; not a little love song or drinking song which the
poet and the musician have not composed for this pacha of



x FRENCH TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.

the beautiful days of June, July, and September. Travellers
from all countries, travellers from the depth of Russia with
its brilliant fetes, Englishmen who have quitted your green
meadows, Scotchmen from the banks of the Tweed, our Irish
brothers, who abandon, at its most exciting moment, your
Emerald Isle ; and you the lovely black-eyed Italians, Italians
from Naples; you the fair Italians, from Milan or from Flo-
rence ; you also, the daughters of Germany, the dreamers, the
imaginative beings who seek the ideal upon the earth . . . and
in the sky; what do you intend to do in Paris these sunny
days? what do you come to seek in these profound solitudes?
" We come," say they, " when all the false Parisians are absent,
that we may observe and admire more closely the true Parisian
of Paris."

Thus has our American La Bruyere done; he also wished
to know what kind of life is led in the deserted city, what
philosophers walk under the flowering chesnut trees, and what
songs of thanksgiving are uttered by the wave of the Seine,
from the moment when it escapes an unknown source across
the fertile country, to the solemn hour when it loses itself in
the sea. This is the way in which this second volume has been
composed, filled with the most beautiful passages, the finest
fetes, the Parisian elegancies ; and which, in short, is a true
epitome of a Parisian summer.

THE EDITOR.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

Page

Leaving Paris Peculiarities of Paris Retrospection Wads worth Longfellow Paris
the centre of France The celebrated men of the Provinces Brittany Provence
Burgundy Normandy The Seine Celebrated men of Paris Moliere and Vol-
taire A great mistake Journey of Lord S to Rome Forgets to visit St.

Peter's Similar predicament of the Author in Paris Victor Hugo His love of
the horrible His idea of the picturesque, and partiality for ancient Paris . . 1

CHAPTER II.

The eighteenth century State of Paris at that time Power of the French fashions
Present improvements Fortune-hunters Their habits The old nobility An
old sportsman Forest of Compiegne The Royal Almanac M. Chrin The old
miser her valuable hoards Her death The Opera i 19

CHAPTER III.

Parisian Churches An anecdote Associations of Paris The Val de Grace The
Jardin des Plantes Santeul Paris white and Paris black The Sorbonne M.
Saint Marc Girardin The Sorbonne and the Bastille Revolutionaries The
Orators of the Sorbonne M. Guizot M. Villemain M. Cousin M. Laromi-
guiere Fete at the Sorbonne Cathedrals of Saint Denis Tombs of Saint Denis-
Island of Saint Denis . .38



Xll CONTENTS.

CHAPTER IV.

Page

The Cafe Procope Island of Saint Louis Hotel Lambert Antiquarians M. Lenoir
M. du Sommerard A French bishop A lucky escape The Hotel de Cluny Its
chapel Chamber of Francis I. Longchamps ....... 70

CHAPTER V.

Paris a coquette The year 2440 Mercier's dreams Voltaire out of fashion
Allegory Definition of a gentleman Various improvements M. Gannal Palace
of the quai d'Orsay Hotel of a Minister Country excursions Saint Germain
The Country Ball 84

CHAPTER VI.

The Royal Stables at Chantilly The Chantilly Races The Race for the Gold Cup
An unexpected ball Strange mistakes Return to the city Toilette of Paris
Effect of Revolutions Respect of the French for unfinished Monuments The
unfinished Louvre .... 105

CHAPTER VII.

The Postman A welcome Messenger An invitation The Croix de Berny The
High Road The Steeple Chase Enthusiasm of the French 114

CHAPTER VIII.

The Circus in the Champs Elys^es The Green room of the Actors Their freedom
from affectation M. Baucher Partisan The Champs Elysees The Alice des
Veuves The Comet of 1843 120

CHAPTER IX.

A sudden recollection Reasons for returning to Paris Powerful attractions Rouen
A happy circumstance Opening of the Railroad Cordiality of the French and
English workmen Liberality of feeling The Exposition at the Louvre Discus-
sion about the Paintings Eagerness of the Artists at the opening of the Exposition
The Portraits M. Ingres His portrait of M. Berlin His portrait of Count
Mote M. Champmartin M. Winterhalter Likenesses of the Duchess de Nemours
M. Dubufe His impartiality as a painter His admiration of the ladies M.
Guizot Death of Madame Guizot Isabey Vandalism of the French . . . 126

CHAPTER X.

A visit Delicate health of the Parisian ladies Convalescence Parisian Causerie
Europe a vast saloon 145



CONTENTS. Xlll

CHAPTER XI.

p. ge

Versailles The Railroad The Windmill at Versailles Louis XIV. at Versailles
His chamber The (Eil-de-Beeuf the Chapel Louis XIV. the real King of Ver-
sailles Louis Philippe at Versailles Fete of June 10, 1839 Versailles now a
Museum Statue of Joan of Arc The old Marshals recognising themselves in
the Paintings Varied Tastes The Petit Trianon Marie Antoinette A vision
The Railroad The Arc-de-Triomphe 149

CHAPTER XII.

Fontainebleau The Gardens Historical Associations Napoleon taking leave of
the Imperial Guard The Chateau Abdication of Napoleon Great changes
Francis I. and Napoleon Ambition of Louis Philippe Forest of Fontainebleau
The Roche-qui-pleure Other celebrated rocks 163

CHAPTER XIII.

Saint Cloud Passy Franklin Anecdote of M. de Richelieu La Muette M.
Erard Mount VaKjrien Madame de Genlis Terrace of Saint Cloud Interview
between Marie Antoinette and Mirabeau Ville d'Avray Lantern of Diogenes
Park of Saint Cloud A Ball Fireworks Forgetfulness of the French . . 175

CHAPTER XIV.

The July fetes The M&t de Cocagne The Parisian on the Seine His awkwardness
Various Amusements The Place de la Bastille Beaumarchais Destruction of
the Bastille Monument of July History of an old Man Phantoms of the
Bastille The Colossal Elephant The Revolution of July 182

CHAPTER XV.

Mineral waters the bike d'Enghien The family of Montmorenci The village of
Montmorenci Rousseau Gretry Saint Gratien The Marshal de Catinat
Eaubonne Sannois Epinay Rousseau The forest of Montmorenci Imagina-
tion and reality 192

CHAPTER XVI.

A horticultural fete Ennui of the flowers The dahlias Useful flowers Barbarous
Latin Nomenclature of the Roses Vexatious ignorance Tulips Daisies Pan-
sies Flora and Pomona Vegetables Fruit Flowers Talent of the Parisian
ladies The carnations Favorite names . 200



XIV CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XVII.

Page
Music Friendly Reunions Madame Damoreau Nourrit Madame Nathan

Treilhet Countess de Mont6ngro Madame de Sparre Madame Lafarge
French hospitality to foreigners Burlesque on the Italian Operas A beautiful
audience Extraordinary actors Beautiful singing Discovery of Rossini A
mistake Burning of Babylon Clorinda's madness Clorinda recovers her senses
Reconciliation Call for the Author and the Actors The Author of Esmeralda
M. Monpou Mademoiselle Pujet Celebrated Pianists A family concert Love
of the French for old music Wilhem Kindness of the Parisian ladies Schlesinger
His first evening in New York His misfortunes His death An elegy written
upon him by an American girl 211

CHAPTER XVIII.

Thoughts of Home Impossibility of describing Paris Parisian urbanity to
strangers Paris deserted in the month of August The Etoiles Banks of the
Seine Arrival at Rouen Dieppe The Duchess de Berri Visit of Queen Vic-
toria to the chateau d'Eu Mademoiselle Narrow escape of the French royal
family Arrival of the Queen Enthusiastic reception Fte at the Mount d'
Orleans Intended paintings illustrating the royal visit The Concert Excite-
ment in Paris whether Queen Victoria would honor that city with her presence
The Queen's decision Her departure Parisian Society A puzzling question
Departure from France Death of Victor Hugo's daughter Sentiment and
business . . ... .... 231



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS.



1. GRAND FETE AT THE PALACE OF VERSAILLES (Frontispiece).

2. MEETING OF THE HOUNDS . ... .26

3. INTERIOR OF AN OPERA Box ..... 37

4. CHURCH OF SAINT DENIS . . . . . . .65

5. LONGCHAMI'S ........ 82

6. ARRIVAL AT THE CHATEAU . . . . . .98

7. SAINT GERMAINE ....... 103

8. PEASANT'S BALL . . . . . . . .104

9. CHANTILLY RACES . . . . . . .108

10. STEEPLE CHASE . . . . . . . 118

11. FRANCONI ........ 121

12. THE GALLERY OF THE LOUVRE ...... 144

13. CONVALESCENCE . . . . . . .146

14. THE GRAND WATERWORKS AT VERSAILLES . . . .154

15. INTERIOR OF THE PALACE OF FONTAINBLEAU . . . 170

16. THE LANTERN OF DIOGENES (Si. CLOUD) . . . .180

17. TOURNEY ON THE WATER (FETE OF JULY) . . . . 183

18. THE FAMILY CONCERT , 223



THE AMERICAN IN PARIS,

DURING THE SUMMER,



CHAPTER I.



LEAVING PARIS.

I WAS preparing to leave Paris ; it was the month of April ;
welcome, thou lovely month of April, which restores to us the
spring, and takes me back to my native land ! Farewell,
winter ! farewell, Paris ! Paris is the city of gloomy months,
of gardens without flowers, of trees without verdure, of skies
without sun. To enjoy Paris, you must have splendid fetes by
the light of wax candles; balls, concerts, plays, love, intrigues.
Paris must have the angry murmur of politics, and the buzz of
witty conversation. Paris exists especially upon little calum-
nies, private slanders, projects, romances, vaudevilles, jests ;
all of them, things which belong to the winter. Take from this
city, the fine arts, the geniuses, the popular beauties, the names
of the generals who have gained such famous battles, the



2 RETROSPECTION.

nothings of winter, the large fires on the spacious hearths, the
drawing-rooms filled with chatting and wit, the brilliant re-
unions, the diamonds and the floating dresses, the flowers and
the pearls, and you will see what remains of this immense city,
so populous, and so well filled ! Nothing, but those institu-
tions which are common to all the nations of the world ; for
instance, the Bourse, the Palais-de-Justice, the Chamber of
Deputies, the schools, the restaurateurs, the lawyers, and the
manufacturers of newspapers; all, things of the rarest and most
exquisite interest; all, things which I shall find again in New
York. We must return home ; only we will take as a re-
membrance of this delightful visit, the journal which we have
written with so much joy ; an incomplete book, no doubt, but
one which abounds with true sentiments, tried passions, and
deeply felt emotions. A book written with the pen, and at the
same time with the graver. A simple tale, without pretension,
without malice, without any thing which contributes to the
success of those pages, upon which the crowd seize, that they
may find food for their wicked propensities. Indeed, it was
our wish that the four months of the last Parisian winter,
should be reproduced in all their native elegance. You re-
member that long succession of chapters, in which Eugene
Lami, the incomparable draughtsman, had difficulty in fol-
lowing us, while Mr. Heath, the eminent English engraver,
could scarcely keep pace with Eugene Lami ? Each of us
walked with a joyous step, through the various smiling aspects
of the Parisian world, and the struggle was, which should un-
derstand them the best. What happy descriptions we unitedly
supplied ; the Arc de Triomphe, the Champs Elysees, the Cafe
Tortoni, the Soiree at the Duke of Orleans', the Pantheon !
And the beautiful children in the Tuileries gardens, the future
generation; and the dances in the brilliant saloons, the varied
apparitions so dazzling and so beloved, but all vanished so
quickly! But what does it signify? I have for my conso-



THE CENTRE OF FRANCE. 3

lation, the lines of my countryman, Wadsworth Longfellow, the
poet:

" Sweet April ! Many a thought

Is wedded unto thee, as hearts are wed ;
Nor shall they fail, till to its autumn brought,

Life's golden fruit is shed."

So saying, I prepared to leave. Not that, if I honestly con-
fessed the truth, my resolution was immoveable ; on the con-
trary, the nearer the hour of departure approached, the more
sad and undecided I felt.

Paris may well be called the good city, for however little
a traveller may be prepossessed in its favor, yet when
once he has penetrated some of these elegant mysteries, it
is not without a certain anguish of heart, that he resolves
to leave it. In this vast world of Paris, there is every
thing to know, every thing to learn, every thing to guess.
The whole history of France and its different provinces is
enclosed within these formidable walls. He who was tho-
roughly acquainted with the great city of Charlemagne and
of Napoleon, would be, at the same time, the wisest antiquarian,
the greatest politician, and the best poet in the universe. His
book would be at once, a poem equal to the Iliad of Homer,
a comedy worthy of the master-pieces of Moliere, and a
romance so wonderful, that even the Gil Bias of Lesage could
not be compared to it. Imagine yourself placed upon some
high mountain, whence the whole of France displays itself before
you. At first your dazzled eyes perceive only, an assemblage
of confused and boundless grandeur; the Alps, the mountains
of Auvergne, the gloomy forests, the Cevennes, the Pyrenees,
are only the ramparts of this kingdom, of which Paris is the
centre. Rivers descend from these well loved mountains ;
the Loire and the Garonne, the Saone, and the Rhone; and
they flow here and there, spreading around them fertility and
abundance. By degrees, this confused mass of inestimable

B 2



BRITTANY. PROVERB.

wonders assumes a certain form ; by degrees, each province
detaches itself from this vast whole, and turns towards Paris,
from which it waits, not without a secret trembling, the mighty
impulse. First, we see Brittany, a country entirely Gallic,
which has given to France, many a bold and brave defender,
many a celebrated philosopher ; Duguesclin, Latour d'Au-
vergne, Abeilard, her greatest poet Chateaubriand, and her
most terrible revolutionary M. de Lamennais. You recognise
the rude province by her rude language, her old names of
the ancient nobility, her faithfulness to the creeds of former
days, the austerity of her manners, her indigent pride. She
remembers her battles, she recalls all her griefs. She has
taken centuries, to learn the little of modern language which
she has consented to speak. At the same time impelled
towards Paris, by that immense power which urges every thing
to the centre, present themselves in succession, Anjou, the
country of the Plantagenets, who have given so many kings to
England ; Poitou, the vast field of battle, traversed by Clovis,
by Charles Martel, and the Black Prince : Champagne, the
country of Turenne; Auvergne, which gave birth to the two
Arnauds, and the lofty mountains of which, still remember
Pascal. In its turn, comes the South, to salute the great
capital ; and you should see how prostrate Toulouse and Bor-
deaux fall, before Paris. You recognise Provence by its festive
appearance, the flowers which compose its garland, the wit and
poetry by which it is surrounded. It is in fact the cradle of all
the poetry of the French nation. From the twelfth century,
the Provencal troubadours have been celebrated throughout
Europe; they remodelled the language which they found;
rebellious as it was, they forced it to obey certain laws, certain
harmonious rules, which practical good sense dictated to them.
There also, more than one great orator has commenced his career.
Massillon was a Proven9al ; Cardinal Maury was a Provencal;
and Mirabeau, the great leveller, whence did he appear, armed



BURGUNDY. NORMANDY. 5

with such passions and such vengeance ? He sprang, as did M.
Thiers, from the depths of Provence ! Such are the men sent
to Paris, by the rest of France, as soon as their genius has
developed itself. Of such choice minds, gathered from all
parts of the kingdom, is the Parisian city composed. The city
belongs to each and to all ; few are born there, all pass
through it, not one remains in it. Thus Dauphiny has sent
to Paris, Condillac, and Admiral Lalande. You may think
these taxes and tributes difficult to pay, and yet they are
paid, by every part of France. Next you behold Lyons, re-
membering the Romans ; and Burgundy, the country of Saint
Bernard, of Bossuet, of Buffon, of Bichat the physiologist, of
M. de Lamartine ; and Champagne, the home of the Villehar-
douins, of the sires de Joinville, of Cardinal de Retz. And that
province worthy of being a kingdom, the subject of such inex-
haustible history, Normandy, the country of so many wise
legislators, so many brave soldiers, so many husbandmen. To
grateful France, Normandy has given the great Corneille,
Flanders has given her Froissart and Philippe de Commines !
Where will you find a more extensive prospect ! Where a
more beautiful sight ! The Seine, that river celebrated among
all the rivers of the world, would, of itself, suffice for contem-
plation during a whole year. Who can tell all the activity, all
the labor, all the poetry of this great river; all the land that
this water fertilizes; all the flocks that it nourishes; all the
fruits and the flowers : all the old castles and modern houses,
which it gently lulls by the sound of its undulating wave ?
Who can tell the thousand arms that it puts in motion, all the
wheat that it crushes under the mill-stone, the wool which it
converts into cloth, the iron of which it makes ploughs and
swords, and the trades which are incessantly pursued in its
industrious billows ? On its passage, and in proportion as it
needs more strength, the noble river summons to its aid, other
powerful rivers, the Marne and the Oise, and thus it reaches



6 THE SEINE.

Paris triumphantly, like those great men of whom we have


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Online LibraryJules Gabriel JaninThe American in Paris during the summer being a companion to the Winter in Paris; or, Heath's picturesque annual for 1844 → online text (page 1 of 21)