Copyright
Jules Gabriel Janin.

The American in Paris online

. (page 1 of 21)
Online LibraryJules Gabriel JaninThe American in Paris → online text (page 1 of 21)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Y OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA




LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

/TO



|gE3>5|||||t i





Aj&fckfckH




Y OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA



LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
/ft)




Y OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA



LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

I



/




3 i?l



THE



AMERICAN IN PARIS

OR

HEATH'S
PICTURESQUE ANNUAL

FOR

18 4 3.
BY M. JULES JANIN.

ILLUSTRATED BY EIGHTEEN ENGRAVINGS,

FROM DESIGNS

BY M. EUGENE LAM I.



LONDON :
LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, AND LONGMANS.

NI'.U YORK: APPLKTON AN!> SON. PARIS: AUBERT AND CO.
LEIPSIC : T. o. WE1GEL.

1843.



LONDON :
PRINTED l'.V J. II.WMioN, CASTLE STREET, I'INSBURY.



vJ^S



ENGLISH TRANSLATOR'S
INTRODUCTION.



In presenting this volume to the public, the English
translator feels that some explanation is necessary ; —
inasmuch as the obvious course would have been, to
use the American manuscript referred to, in the French
translators introduction, instead of re-translating the
work. This manuscript, however, the publishers could
not obtain, and they were therefore compelled either
to have a re-translation, or to look elsewhere for a
description of Paris, — but the merit of this account
was such, that they determined, at once, to adopt
the former alternative.

In this opinion they think the public will acquiesce,
after perusing the following pages; which contain a
lively sketch of French manners and society, French
politics, and French character, in every grade, from



iv ENGLISH TRANSLATORS INTRODUCTION.

the king to the peasant ; — with an explanation of the
principal occurrences, connected with the different
monuments of art in Paris; — and all this given with
a playfulness, impartiality, and keen satire, that is
seldom equalled.

In order to give full effect, to the very clever and
amusing, but, at the same time, very peculiar style,
of M. Jules Janin, the English translator has some-
times been compelled to use expressions, which may
be considered foreign to the genius of the language,
and to employ terms, which would not have been
chosen in an original work, but which were necessary
to convey the full meaning of this very talented writer,
who disdains to think by rule.



CONTENTS.



Page.

Introduction 1

CHAPTER I.

Entrance into Paris, through the barrier de l'Etoile — Neuilly — A Royal Omnibus —

Louis Philippe— Fieschi— July 13th, 1842 3

CHAPTER II.
A Parisian's Love for Country Pleasures— The Bois de Boulogne — A Fortunate
Accident — The Fashionable World— The Fortifications — The Octroi — The Arc

de Triomphe de l'Etoile 6

CHAPTER III.
The Arc de Triomphe de l'Etoile — Its Progress Arrested — The Emperor's Statue in
the Place Vendome thrown down— Its re-appearance with the Tricolored Flag —
Funeral of Napoleon — Contrast between the Funerals of Napoleon and Charles X.

—The Arc de l'Etoile Completed 10

CHAPTER IV.
The Champs Elys6es— The Luxor— The Hotel des Princes— The Table d'Hote—

First Night in Paris , .... 20

CHAPTER V.

The Vision — Beautiful Music — Le Prophete 28

CHAPTER VI.
Morning — The Milkwoman — The Grisette — The Bonne — The Portress — Parisian

Scandal — Cafe" au Lait 31

CHAPTER VII.

The Cafe de Tortoni— Stock Brokers— Breakfast— The Hour for the Bourse . . 39

CHAPTER VIII.

Cafe de Tortoni — Advertisements — A Profitable Bargain 43

CHAPTER IX.
The Chateau des Tuileries and its Inhabitants — Louis XVI.— The Duchess d'An-
gouleme— Madame Elizabeth— The Dauphin— The Directory- The Evil Genius
of the Tuileries — Napoleon— Louis XVIII.— Flight of Marie Louise— of Charles X.

—The Revolution of July— Reohid Pacha 46

CHAPTER X.
The Louvre in an Unfinished State — Victims of July, L830 — Proposed Union of the
Louvre and the Tuileries — Louis Philippe's Love of Comfort — His Disregard of the

Parisians' Clamour 60

CHAPTER XI.
Garden of the Tuileries— Parisian Ladies— Young Men — Philosophers — The Lover —
Parisian Children— La Petite Provence— Review at the Carrousel— Duke de
Nemours — Duke d'Aiimale 69



VI CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XII.

The Chamber of Deputies— Mirabeau — His Eloquence — Napoleon an Enemy to
Eloquence— M. Sauzet— French Orators— M. Thiers — M. Guizot . . . .78

[By an error of the Press the ordinal number of Chapter XIII. was omitted.]

CHAPTER XIV.
The Chamber of Deputies— M. Berryer— His Eloquence— M. de Fitz- James— M.
Dupin— Ptre La Chaise— M. Dulong— M. Sauzet— M. Mauguin— M. Odillon
Barret — M. de Cormenin — M. Royer Collard — M. Arago — M. de Lamartine —

Various Politicians — M. Rothschild— M. Lafitte 86

CHAPTER XV.
The Chamber of Deputies— Its Power— The Revolution of July . . . .106

CHAPTER XVI.
The King of the French — When Duke of Orleans — His Accession to the Throne —
His Mode of Life — His Accessibility — Louis Philippe the Restorer of Palaces— The
Reunions at the Tuileries— Louis Philippe as a Father — The Queen — The Royal

Family 109

CHAPTER XVII.
The Prince Royal — His Acquirements— His Private Character — The Prince as a
Soldier — His Love for Antiquities — Contrast between the King and the Prince —
The Prince at College — In 1830— At Antwerp — At Lyons — In the Hospitals — In

Africa— His Death 120

CHAPTER XVIII.
The Princess Marie — As an Artist — Her Love for Novelty — M. Edgar Quinet — His
Prometheus — His Interview with the Princess— His Legend of Ahasuerus — Present
of the Princess to M. Quinet— Statue of Joan of Arc on Horseback— The Statue at

Versailles — Marriage of the Princess — Her Death 129

CHAPTER XIX.
The Opera— The Singers -A Difficult Task— The Green Room— The Danseuses . 139

CHAPTER XX.
The Newspaper — The two great Parisian Games — Lundi Gras — Fancy Ball at the
Opera — Its Absurdities — Its Characters — A Stranger's Amazement — The first

masked ball under Louis XV. 144

CHAPTER XXI.
Religious Ceremonies — Roman Catholic Service— The Singers — Fanny Ellsler —
Thoughts of Reform — Parisian Marriage — Pope Pius VII. in Paris . . . 151
CHAPTER XXII.
The Church of France — Its Pulpit — M. de Lamennais — His Zeal — His Reception at

Rome 157

CHAPTER XXIII.
The Lounger — Paris the Lounger's City — The Lounger a Busy Man — His Resolution
— The Way he Keeps it— His Saloon — His Opinion of the Railroad — His Dinner

—His Evening— Paris at Night 162

CHAPTER XXIV.
A Yankee's Opinion of the Book — The Author's Defence — The French Institute —
Buonaparte's Love for it — M. de Chateaubriand— M Victor Hugo — M. Yillcmain —
M. Scribe — M. de Tocqucvillc— M. Charles Nodicr — M. Vienuet — Speech of the
New Member . . . . . . . . . . . .171



CONTENTS. Vll

CHAPTER XXV.

The Pont Xeuf— Former Times— The Flower- Market— The Old Lady's Last Love—

The Young Girl's First Love — The Failure of her Hopes 178

CHAPTER XXVI.
Paris Under a Grave Aspect — Pupil of the Polytechnic School — Students of Medicine
and Law — Palace of the Luxembourg — Its Garden — Only Old Authors admitted
— The Bowl Players — M. de Turenne — Anecdotes of him — Henry IV. — Death

of Marshal Ney 184

CHAPTER XXVII.
Reminiscences — The Observatory — M. Arago — M. de Chateaubriand — Yankee Re-
spect for Genius — Jardin desPlantes— Its First Commencement — Gobelin Tapestry
— Sevres China — The Antiquarian — Association of Ideas . . . .191

CHAPTER XXVIII.
The Champ de Mars — The Pantheon — Its Desecration — Voltaire and Rousseau —
Changes in France— Hotel des Invalides— The Invalid Soldier— The Emperor's

Return 198

CHAPTER XXIX.
The Madeleine — The Boulevards— The Gymnase Dramatique — The Duchess de Berri

— M. Scribe— Modern Comedies— The Porte St. Martin 205

CHAPTER XXX.
Different Appearance of the Boulevards — Prison of La Force— Juvenile Delinquents

— A New Language — Bad Effects of Modern Plays 210

CHAPTER XXXI.
New Wonders in Paris— The Regratteur— The Commissioner of the Quarter — Vari-

ous Little Trades — Love Letters , . .215

CHAPTER XXXII.
The Place Royale and its Former Inhabitants — M. de Turin — Bois Robert — Mar-
chioness de Rambouillet — Madame de Montausier — Voiture — Madame de Longue-
ville — New Houses in Paris — M. Beaumarchais and the Bastille .... 220
CHAPTER XXXIII.
The Englishman's Visit to Paris— The Englishman in a Dilemma — He Finds a Friend
— Grecian Temples — At the Jardin des Plantes — In Pere la Chaise — Columns in
the Palais Royal— William's Opinion of Paris — The Column of July — The Fau-
bourg St. Antoine 229

CHAPTER XXXIV.
Environs of Paris — St. Cloud — Marie Antoinette and Mirabeau— Chateau de Bellevue
— St. Germain — Montmorency — Is'and of St Denis — Vallee aux Loups — Valine
de Chevreuse — Pavilion de Lucienncs — Malmaison — Chateau de Rosny . . . 239
CHAPTER XXXV.
Departure from Paris— The Parisian Citizen — His Character — His Marriage — His
Children — His Idea of Order — His Love for Liberty — His Vote at the Election —
His Rank in the National Guard — His Love of Pleasure — His Amusements — His
Morals — His Religion — Conclusion. ......... 246



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS.



P»ge.

1. Bal d'Enfants (Frontispiece.)

2. The Funeral of Napoleon . . . . . .14

3. The Champs Elysees ...... 20

4. Hotel des Princes . . . . . . .26

5. An Ambassador's Entrance into Paris .... .59

6. A Review at the Tuii.eries . . . • . .7.5

7. A Funeral Oration ...... 9.5

8. Hotel de Ville . . . • . . .113

9. A Soiree at the Duke of Orleans' . . . . 121

10. A Parisian Family . • . . . . .132

11. The Green-Room of the Opera . . . . . 142

12. Bal Masque a l'Opera . . . . . . .148

1.°.. A French Marriage . . ... 1.5.5

14. St. Etienne du Mont ....... 1.58

1.5. Sortie he l'Opera . . . . . . • 169

16. The Italian Bottlevabbs . ... 206

17. Interieur d'un Restaurant ...... 23.5

18. Interior of the Italian Theatre ..... 254



THE



AMERICAN IN PARIS.



INTRODUCTION.



I have translated the present work, from a very accurate and
faithful account, which we have received from the country of
Cooper and Washington Irving. Paris is the subject; a theme
of endless variety; and if you ask me, what is the use of such
a book, I will ask the beauty who reads these pages, What is
the use of a mirror? This book is written, that Paris may recog-
nize in it, as she puts on the merry smile with which she looks
at every thing, her most beautiful monuments, her richest
dwellings, her daily pleasures, her evening fetes. And besides
this, the original author of this account, a man well versed
in the fine arts, a benevolent and yet acute observer, and
myself, his very humble translator, as I was formerly the
translator of Sterne, are not left to ourselves in this hastily
written sketch, this attempt to seize the ever -changing and
moveable image of the Parisian world. More able describers
than we, more faithful historians, the most eminent London
engravers, and a very ingenious Parisian draughtsman, are

B



Z INTRODUCTION.

assisting us to give the faithful reflection that we seek. Look,
then, favourably upon this book, written beyond the seas,
engraved in London, translated and drawn in Paris.

Perhaps it would be well to tell you something of the
original writer, who has thrown into his travels much of his
mirth, wit, and natural benevolence. In his youth he came
to Paris, for the purpose of leaving there, something of his
impetuosity. It was not so easy as he had imagined ; but at
last, by dint of zeal and perseverance, nights passed at the
opera balls, and days given up to the never-ending Parisian
fetes, by dint of money lavished at random, as money must
be lavished, to return you some little variety of interest and
pleasure, our young man speedily became an old one. He
arrived in Paris, as giddy-brained as a Parisian, ready for the
most lively follies ; he left it a grave American, prepared for
the calm and tranquil honors, which his mother country
holds in reserve for her favored sons. Besides this, we can
assure you, that our traveller was a person of calm observation,
strong will, and good sense, and had a decided talent for the
French language, even in its most beautiful idiom. He left at
the gate of the Parisian city, his national coldness and disdain,
that he might obey the passionate enthusiasm, for lofty things
and the fine arts, with which he was inspired. But why
should I lose myself in these preliminaries, as though, after
reading the following pages, your acquaintance with our
author would not equal my own ?



CHAPTER I.



ENTRANCE INTO PARIS.



If on some beautiful evening in spring or winter, you
approach the immense city of Paris, — that glittering abyss, —
and above all, if you enter by the grand gate, — for we do not
reckon a number of back entrances, which seem rather as if
they would precipitate you into a ditch, than introduce you into
the queen of European capitals, — you will find yourself enter-
taining expectations, which, unknown to you, seem to take
possession of your whole mind. A gravel walk gently conducts
you, by an easy descent, from the village of Neuilly, the royal
residence, to the Bois de Boulogne, the rendezvous of the
wealthy; from thence to the Arc de Triomphe de l'Etoile, a
mass of stone, laden with glory ; and still farther on, to
the Place de la Concorde, where, calm and majestic, stands
the Obelisk, between two fountains. Never will sufficient
water flow from them, to efface the blood shed in this fatal
spot. This square, which has borne so many different names,
—Place Louis XV., Place de la Revolution, Place de la Con-
corde,— presents itself to you, loaded with gilt, bronze, and
colossal statues, resounding with noise, and sparkling with
b 2



4 LOUIS PHILIPPE.

brilliancy ; strictly speaking, it is here, in this dazzling spot,
between the Garde Meuble of the crown and the Chambre de
Deputes, that the vast city of Paris begins. Advance, then,
with a slow step — behold, admire, meditate. But we will not
remain on the Place de la Concorde ; let us retrace our steps
up the long avenue of the Champs Elysees, and return to the
palace of Neuilly. Here you may see Paris in all its glory!
Yonder house standing on the shore between two islands, is
the country residence of the King of the French. Within
those modest walls, in those concealed and quiet gardens, you
would in vain look for his Majesty the king; you will only
find the father of a family, who has come to repose after the
fatigue of the day, and to prepare himself for the labours of
the next. Before regicide had become in France a species
of motiveless monomania, you might often see passing through
the Champs Elysees, a large royal omnibus, exactly similar to
the popular vehicles, in which all the French are equal, as in the
presence of the law. In this long and citizen-like carriage
were stowed, at random, the king, his wife, sister, four sons,
three beautiful daughters, son-in-law, and some friends : it
was a royal and a happy crowd. The carriage went at a
gentle trot, from the palace of the Tuileries to the house at
Neuilly. No guards, no escort ; whoever would, might salute
the fortune of France. You could see from the mirth of the
king, from his open and smiling countenance, how much he
enjoyed it, and how proud he was of his humble incognito.

At other times, by the side of the road which leads to
Neuilly, an elegant boat, dressed with flags, and full of chil-
dren and young women, was rowed up the Seine; whence
proceeded a thousand joyous cries and hurrahs : the stranger
who saw the water ripple, as the boat passed, would never have
suspected that this bank, more fragile than that of Cresar,
contained the whole royal family. Thou carriest Ccesar and
his fortune.



LOUIS PHILIPPE.



Another day, in the midst of the masons and plasterers,
so often in requisition at the royal dwellings, you would
meet a stout man, with a fine intelligent countenance, active
and busy, going from place to place, rule in hand, con-
sulting and correcting plans, and sometimes nimbly mounting
ladders. If you inquired whether this was not M. Fontaine,
the king's architect, you would be told it was the king him-
self, the most enterprising architect in his kingdom. These
were the peaceful hours of Louis Philippe, if he ever had any.
He was evidently well suited for the twofold life which he
adopted — the life of the king and that of the citizen — the
court and the house. These were his pleasures. The bullets
of the abominable Fieschi and others have altered this state
of things ; if they have not killed the king, they have wounded
royalty : they have saddened even before the terrible accident
of July 13, 1842, the formerly pleasant route from the Tuileries
to Neuilly, and have encumbered it with soldiers and guards.
Poor madmen ! not to see that the very worst hour in which
to attack a king, is that in which he is only the father of
his children.



CHAPTER II.



With your permission, in this pleasant, and somewhat fan-
ciful, journey that we are taking together, we will go a little at
random. We are travelling in a country too well known, to
make it necessary, for us to be governed by any very strict
rules. Our good fathers, the English, have in this style a
chef d'ceuvre, which I shall take good care not to imitate — the
Sentimental Journey. Never was the Paris of last century better
or more completely studied, than by that rascal, Sterne. Honest
rogue that he was ! He preached the virtues that he did not
possess, and all this in such an easy, tranquil way. He looked
demure, as they say in France, but nevertheless, we will neither
trust to his contrition, his lowered eyes, and his modest blushes,
nor yet imitate him. No, no; we will not follow the steps of
this hypocrite, who knew Paris much better than all the
Parisians of his time. Instead of this we will take our own
course, — stopping occasionally to see and hear every thing,
that we may repeat it to you. Besides, we are not alone in
this journey ; we have with us a painter, a draughtsman, an



THE BOIS DE BOULOGNE.



engraver, and a translator, who knows but little of the lan-
guage that we speak, and for whom we ask every indulgence.
Perhaps you fancied that we had already reached the palace of
the Tuileries; your pardon, we were only upon the bridge of
Neuilly, at farthest. This is a bridge boldly thrown across
the Seine, between the islands which surround the king's gar-
dens. After crossing the bridge, you will find that the villas
already begin to lessen. Then commence large parks of half
an acre, and spacious gardens composed of four or five pots
of flowers ; he who only possesses a single vine, says proudly
as he leaves Paris on Saturday evening, — / am going to my
vineyard. The Parisian is a great lover of country pleasures,
in all their variety, provided only that they are near. Since
he has seen so many revolutions accomplished in twenty-four
hours, he does not like to be long absent from his city, so much
does he fear that he shall not find, on his return, the same
government there was when he left. Proceed a little farther,
and you will reach the gate of the Bois de Boulogne. There,
by an accident which I considered fortunate, my carriage broke
down, just like a vessel which loses its mast in entering the
harbour. I was soon disengaged from it, and whilst the pos-
tilion and my servant repaired it, I watched the fashionables
of Paris, who had come in their elegant equipages, to see, and
to exhibit themselves. What an infinite variety of carriages,
horses, equipages, dresses, and above all, countenances. All
the women, young and old, of the Parisian world, were upon
this occasion at the evening promenade; all the men; young
people, the victims of usury ; would-be ministers, the victims of
politics; specimens of every class, were at the Bois de Boulogne.
They passed and repassed before me, galloping, on horseback,
in carriages, or on foot; they seemed almost to fly as they
passed. And I, the new comer into this fashionable world,
was already striving to guess its concealed passions, and its
mysterious desires. I would willingly have followed these



8



THE FORTIFICATIONS.



bus) idlers, these vain aspirants; I would willingly have
mounted behind them, or clung to their carriages, and there,
concealed under the livery, have heard them joking or laugh-
ing, hoping or fearing, blessing or cursing. But this was
impossible.

However, the slight accident, that had thus detained me,
while the great ones of the world were galloping by, was
quickly repaired. No one honored me with a single glance;
the men being too much occupied with their horses, and the
women with the effect of their toilets and their smiles. It is in
this way that they pass their lives, exhibiting and admiring
themselves, and whispering all sorts of mysterious things, which
the first comer can explain aloud, after a month's sojourn in
this noisy city. From this spot it is but a short distance to the
Arc de Triomphe, the largest triumphal arch in the world ; —
we must remember however, that it is placed there to celebrate
the greatest victories ; it raises its head yet in the freshness of
youth as high as the oldest mountain which is crowned with
tempests and storms. All round the vast monument ramparts
rise from the earth, ditches are dug, towers are built, but the
Parisian knows nothing of this yet,— he will not think of the
ditches until he has jumped across them, or the towers until
he hears them groaning as they cast forth fire ^and flame ;
then, only, will he be alarmed at this formidable noise.

The entry is easy, the gate of the city being open night and
day. The assassin, the forger, the criminal, may enter proudly,
provided they have nothing prohibited, in. their carriages or
their pockets. The great crime in this city, which is so poor, is
to smoke tobacco which has not passed through the hands of
the administration, or to drink wine which has not paid the
entrance duty to the municipal officer. This officer is at the
gate night and day ; he is armed with an equivocal sword, one
without sheath or point, but which is sure to discover the most
artfully concealed things. No vehicle is exempted from this



THE ENTRANCE DUTY. V

visit ; the gay carriage which contains the opera dancer, the
chariot of the broker, the berlin of the French peer, who is
perhaps half asleep, all owe obedience and respect to the
municipal officer. They can trust a peer of France to make
the laws of the kingdom, but they cannot trust him not to put
butcher's meat into his carriage. What a lesson of equality !

Whilst I was waiting for the officer to visit me in my turn,
I had time to admire the Arc de Triomphe de l'Etoile, from its
base which descends into the earth, to its summit which is lost
in the skies.



CHAPTER III.



TRIUMPHAL ARCHES.



Generally speaking, the principal inhabitants of this beau-
tiful country, who, as Marie Stuart said, have long been Greeks
and Romans, and would have much trouble in again becoming-
simple Frenchmen, profess great love for triumphal arches.
Trajan's triumphal arch, and the monuments of the same sort,
with which Italy still abounds, have prevented the French
from sleeping. We Americans, people of yesterday, as these
frivolous old men call us, have not yet learned to value these
great masses of stone, vain ornaments of a useless grandeur.
In France it is quite the reverse. The more useless a monu-
ment appears, the better are they pleased with it. The French-
man loves glitter, noise, and glory ; his greatest pleasure, in
the public fetes, is to see some magnificent firework bursting in
the air, the light of a few minutes, of which the slightest spark
would save a miserable family. But no ! the poorest, who have
not even a piece of bread for their evening meal, run to see this
blazing gunpowder, without thinking of all the money that is
wasted in ephemeral stars. On the contrary, the more majestic
the fireworks, and the more money they have cost, the better
are the French satisfied. There is certainly much more of
Francis I. than of Franklin in this people.



THE ARC DE TR10MPHE DE l'eTOILE. 11

The Arc de Triomphe de l'Etoile has been, for the few years


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Online LibraryJules Gabriel JaninThe American in Paris → online text (page 1 of 21)