Justin H. (Justin Hartley) Moore.

The world beyond, passages from oriental and primitive religions online

. (page 1 of 5)
Online LibraryJustin H. (Justin Hartley) MooreThe world beyond, passages from oriental and primitive religions → online text (page 1 of 5)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES



3 3433 06824588 9



OR!
B EYO N D






EDITED BY

JUSTIN H.MOORE



/,



3




^e../.

Z^-



,?ji>'



%







THE WORLD BEYOND



THE
WORLD BEYOND

Passages from Oriental
and Primitive Religions



COMPILED AND ARRANGED
BY

JUSTIN HARTLEY MOORE



NEW YORK
THOMAS Y. CROWELL COMPANY

PUBLISHERS



THE iii.'.i YOUX
PUBUC LIBRARY

ASTOR, LENOX AND
TI-LDEN FCauOATiONl



COPYKIGHT, 1920

By THOMAS Y. CROWELL CX)MPANY



To

JOHN HERMAN RANDALL

Prophet

Sage

and

Friend



t



EDITOR'S NOTE

Sincere acknowledgment and thanks are made to
many publishers for kind permission to use in this boot
extracts from copyright publications. The selections
have been adapted and in part rewritten for the sake
of clarity and conciseness. A tribute is due also to
the patient toil of a host of scholars, most of whom
have now passed away, whose painstaking researches
have revealed an underlying unity in all the religious
aspiration of humanity throughout the world.



FOREWORD

Science only serves to widen the horizon of religious
wonder, and in viewing the records which are pre-
served of man's religious thought, present even in the
most primitive tribes, we find traces of mystic aware-
ness of the spirit of God always near at hand. Thus
the sayings of the greatest of the mystics, Jesus of
Nazareth, take on an added significance when they are
found to accord with the aspirations of many who
lived before His time and many who followed Him.
In such unity of purpose in reaching out toward the
Unseen is the best proof of the brotherhood of man,
the essential oneness of humanity throughout the ages.
We hope in subsequent volumes to cull other living
pages on different religious themes from the mass of
material now available.



New York City^ ig20.



Justin H. Moore.



CONTENTS

THE WORLD BEYOND

PAGE

Death a Process of Adaptation and the Price of Sex 15

The Land of the Dead 18

Death is Near 20

Prayer to Osiris for Everlasting Life .... 22

Wek-Wek Returns from the Underworld ... 24

None Shall Abide 27

When First Separated from the Body .... 31

The Various Hells 34

Ministers of Evil 38

Karma, the Law of Consequences 41

When the Body Dies 43

Hell a State of Mind 45

Sin Not Fully Realized Until After Death . . 47

Life Stained by Sin 49

Not Everyone Shall Have Eternal Life . . ' $1
Love the Condition of Immortality . . . .53

The Old Persian Worship 54

The Buddha's Rest 57

Survival of Consciousness 59

There is no Soul 64

What the Senses do not Reveal Cannot Exist . . 66

The Soul Liveth 6S

Faith as a Faculty 70

The Unseen Bond 72

The Grave is the Curtain op Paradise .... 74

Omnipresent Yet Elusive 76

Beyond the Veil 77

II



12 CONTENTS

THE HIGHEE KNOWLEDGE

Genius and Inspiration 83

Escape from the Lesser Self 87

The Mystery of Sleep . 89

Sleep 91

The Source of Life 93

The Sacredness of Memory 97

The Atomic Size of the Soul .100

What is the Soul ? 102

The Keys of the Unseen 104

The Immanent God 107

Voices 109

Love TO One's Neighbor, a Jew 112

The Spiritual Body . .115

The Holy Spirit 117

Cosmic Consciousness 120

LIFE

Conscious Life 125

What is Your Life ? It is Even as a Vapor . . .128

Life AND Death 131

A Mohammedan Legend 132

Nearer to the Source of Life 134

The Stuff of the World and the Fountain of Cre-
ation 137

Omnipresence 139

The Pulse of Life 142



The World Beyond



WHOEVER WOULD SAVE HIS LIFE SHALL
LOSE IT

Death is a Process of Adaptation
and is the Price of Sex

Creatures composed of a single cell, protoph3rtes and
protozoa, algae and unicellular mushrooms, with a
minimum of differentiation, escape the necessity of
death, . . . They are infinitely vulnerable, fragile
and perishable; myriads die at every instant. But
their death is not ordained by fate. They may suc-
cumb to accidents, but never to old age.

Imagine one of these creatures placed in a culture-
medium favorable to the full exercise of his activities,
and of large enough extent so as not to be affected by
the tiny quantities of materials v^hich the animal may
draw from it or excrete into it. Let it be, for example,
an infusoria in the ocean. In these invariable sur-
roundings the creature lives, grows and enlarges in-
cessantly. When he has attained the limits of size
fixed by his own specific laws, he divides in two parts
equal in all respects to each other. He allows one of
these halves to colonize in his vicinity and himself

15



i6 THE WORLD BEYOND

begins again the same evolution all over. There is no
reason why the transaction should not be indefinitely
repeated, since nothing has changed either in the sur-
rounding nor in the animal himself* . • .

Thus immortality belongs in principle to all the
protista whose reproduction takes place by means of
simple and equal division. If we note that these rudi-
mentary organisms, endowed with perennial existence,
must be the first living forms that appeared on the
surface of the globe, and that they doubtless long
preceded other creatures, the polycellular organisms
which, on the contrary, had to undergo decay, the
conclusion to be drawn is very apparent: nanvely, that
life long existed without death. Death has been a
phenomenon of adaptation appearing in the course of
the ages as a consequence of the evolution of species.

It may be asked at what moment of the history of
our globe, at what period in the evolution of fauna,
this novelty, death, made its appearance. The famous
experiments of Maupas upon the senescence of in-
fusoria seems to permit of a precise answer to this
question. Relying upon these experiments, we may
say that death must have appeared as a kind of convoy
along with sexual reproduction. Death became possi-
ble when this process of generation was established.



THE WORLD BEYOND 17

not in all its fullness, but in its humblest beginnings,
under the rudimentary forms of unequal division and
conjugation. And this came when the infusoria began
to people the waters.

A. Dastre, " La Vie et la Mort," p. S36, Paris, 1916.



BUT I WILL SEE YOU AGAIN AND YOUR
HEART SHALL REJOICE

The Land of the Dead

The Aztecs of Mexico belong to the great Nihautl stock of
Western North America, whose institutions, language and
aristocracy were well-nigh exterminated by the Spanish con-
quistadores. Only a few songs and legends have been saved
from oblivion.

Weeping, I, the singer, weave my song of flowers,
of sadness; I call to memory the youths, the shards,
the fragments, gone to the land of the dead ; once noble
and powerful here on earth, the youths were dried up
like feathers, were split into fragments like an emerald,
before the face and in the sight of those who saw them
on earth, and with the knowledge of the Cause of All.

Alas ! alas ! I sing in grief as I recall the children.

Would that I could turn back again; would that I

could grasp their hands once more ; would that I could

call them forth from the land of the dead; would that

we could bring them again on earth, that they m^ight

rejoice and we rejoice, and that they might rejoice and

delight the Giver of Life; is it possible that we His

i8



THE WORLD BEYOND 19

servants should reject Him or should be ungrateful?
Thus I weep in my heart as I, the singer, review my
memories, recalling things sad and grievous.

Would only that I knew they could hear me, there in
the land of the dead, were I to sing some worthy song.
Would that I could gladden them, that I could console
the suffering and the torment of the children. How
can it be learned? Whence can I draw the inspira-
tion ? They are not where I may follow them ; neither
can I reach them with my calling as one here on earth.

D. G. Brinton, "Ancient Nihuatl Poetry," p. 73.



THE NIGHT COMETH WHEN NO MAN CAN
WORK

Death is Near

Every Egyptian mummy-case has a pair of eyes painted on
the exterior so that the wandering ka or soul may return and
find its previous body. A curious dialogue is extant of a
misanthrope talking with his soul, some fifteen centuries
before Job.

Death is before me today

Like the recovery of a sick man,

Like going forth into a garden after sickness.

Death is before me today
Like the odor of myrrh,
Like sitting under the sail on a windy day.

Death is before me today

Like the odor of lotus flowers,

Like sitting on the shore of drunkenness.

Death is before me today

Like the course of the freshet,

Like the return of a man from the war-galley to

his house.

20



THE WORLD BEYOND



21



Death is before me today
Like the clearing of the sky,
Like a man fowHng therein toward that which
he knew not.

Death is before me today

As a man longs to see his house

When he has spent years in captivity.

J. H. Breasted, "Development of Religion and Thought in
Ancient Egypt," p. 195, Charles Scribner's Sons, N. y!.



AND IN THE WORLD TO COME, LIFE
EVERLASTING

Prayer to Osiris for Everlasting Life

At an early date in Egypt, the god Osiris became the friend
and comforter who would sustain the wraith-like souls in
the underworld and keep guard over them until the resurrec-
tion.

Homage to thee, O my divine father Osiris, thou
livest with thy members. Thou didst not decay.
Thou didst not turn into worms. Thou didst not
waste away. Thou didst not suffer corruption. Thou
didst not putrefy. I am the god Khepera, and my
members shall have an everlasting existence. I shall
not decay. I shall not rot. I shall not putrefy. I
shall not turn into worms. I shall not see corruption
before the eye of the god Shu. I shall have my being,
I shall have being. I shall live, I shall live. I shall
flourish, I shall flourish. I shall wake up in peace.
I shall not putrefy. My inward parts shall not perish.
I shall not suffer injury. Mine eye shall not decay.
The form of my visage shall not disappear. Mine ear
shall not become deaf. My head shall not be sepa-

22



THE WORLD BEYOND 23

rated from my neck. My tongue shall not be carried
away. My hair shall not be cut off. Mine eyebrows
shall not be shaved off. No baleful injury shall come
upon me. My body shall be established, and it shall
neither crumble away nor be destroyed on this earth.

E. A. Wallis Budge, "The Literature of the
Ancient Egyptians," p. 55.



HE ASKED THEM: DO YE NOW BELIEVE?

Wek-Wek Returns from the Underworld

Fifty-four different American Indian languages are known,
with various dialects thereof in addition. In civilization the
American Indians belonged to the Stone Age. The Mewan
tribe live to-day on government reservations in California.

After Wek-wek had sent his sister home he stayed
near the caves below Koo-loo-te and dug holes in the
sand and found roots and seeds that were good to eat.
In digging he came to a very deep hole which led down
under the world ; he went down this hole and when he
reached the underworld found other people there,
and got a wife with a little boy. Besides his wife
there were To-to-kon the Sandhill Crane, Wah-ah the
Heron, Cha-poo-kah-Iah the Blackbird, and others.

To-to-kon the Sandhill Crane was chief. When he
saw Wek-wek he said, '' What shall we do with this
man? he is lost; we had better kill him."

Wek-wek saw a man made ready with his bow and

arrow, and invited him to come and eat. The man

came and ate, and when his belly was full went back.

Captain To-to-kon said, " I didn't send you to eat,
24



THE WORLD BEYOND 25

but to kill him." Then he sent another, and Wek-wek
asked him also to come and eat, and he did as the other
had done. Then Captain To-to-kon sent two men to-
gether to kill him, but Wek-wek called them both to
come and eat, and they did so. Then To-to-kon was
angry ; he sent no more men but went himself and took
his bow and arrow.

Wek-wek said to him, " Come in," whereupon To-
to-kon shot his arrow but missed.

Then Wek-wek came out and faced the people.
They fired all their arrows but could not kill him.
Wek-wek said, " You can't kill me with arrows.
Have you a pot big enough to hold me ? "

" Yes," they answered.

" Then set it up and put me in it," he said.

And they did as they were told and put Wek-wek in
the hot pot and put the cover on. When he was
burned they took out the burnt bones and buried them
in the ground.

Ah-ut the Crow missed his uncle and went to his
uncle's partner, Hoo-loo-e, who was in the hole crying,
and asked where Wek-wek was. Hoo-loo-e pointed
down the hole. Ah-ut went down and found the
rancheria of the underworld people and killed them all.
He then asked Wek-wek's wife where Wek-wek was.



26 THE WORLD BEYOND

She answered that the people had burned and buried
him.

Wek-wek stayed in the ground five days and then
came to Hfe; he came out and asked his wife where the
people were. She told him that Ah-ut had come and
killed them all. '' That is too bad," he exclaimed, " I
wanted to show them what kind of man I am." Then
he said she should stay there and he would take the
boy and go home.

She answered, "All right"

Then he shot his arrow up through the hole and
caught hold of it, and held the boy also, and the arrow
carried them both up to the upper world.

C. Hart Merriam, "Dawn of the World," p. 197, Cleve-
land, 1910. (Copyright: The Arthur H. Clark Co., by
Permission.)



BE IT UNTO THEE EVEN AS THOU WILT
None Shall Abide

In Southern India live the Tamil people who probably are
descended from an aboriginal race native to that country at
the time of the great Aryan Invasion from the Northwest (in
the second millennium B, C.)- Current to-day are many
quatrains of great literary beauty, although filled with resig-
nation and despair.

The things of which you said, " they stand, they
stand,'* stand not ; mark this, and perform what befits,
yea ! what befits, with all your power ! Your days are
gone, are gone! and death close pressing on is come,
is come !

When you have gained and hold in hand any single
thing, retain it not with the thought, " This will serve
some other day ! '* Those who have given betimes
shall escape the desert road along which death, an un-
yielding foe, drags his captives away.

Severed are the ties of friendship; love's bonds are

loosened too ; then look within and say, what profit is

there in this joyous life of thine? The cry comes up

as from a sinking ship ! .

27



28 THE WORLD BEYOND

My mother bare me, left me here, and went to seek
her mother, who in the selfsame manner has gone in
search ; and thus in ceaseless round goes on the mother-
quest. Such is the grace this world affords!

As the measure of your days the shining orb each
day unfailing rises; so before your joyous days have
passed away, perform ye fitting deeds of grace; for
none abide on earth.

To him, who, although he sees them bear the corpse
to the burning ground, while friends in troops loudly
lament, boldly asserts that wedded life is bliss on
earth, the funeral drum speaks out, and mocks his
vain utterance.

When the soul that, taking its stand in this skin-
clad frame, has fully wrought its works and partaken
of life's experiences, has gone forth, what matters it
whether you attach ropes to the body and drag it away,
or carefully bury it, or throw it aside in any place you
light upon, or if many revile the departed?

Like a bubble, that in pelting rain appears full oft,
and disappears, is this our frame. So sages have
judged, steadfast in wisdom, and have decided to end
this dubious strife. On this wide earth who equal
these ?

Those who've gained and held fast by this well-



THE WORLD BEYOND 29

knit frame should take the gain the body they have
gained is intended to yield. Like a cloud that wr^n-
ders over the hills, the body here appears, and abiding
not, departs leaving no trace behind.

Considering that all things are transient as the dew-
drop on the tip of a blade of grass, now, now at once,
do virtuous deeds! " Even now he stood, he sat, he
fell, — while his kindred cried aloud, he died ; " such is
man's history !

Unasked men come, appear in the home as kinsmen,
and then silently go. As the bird silently deserts the
tree where its nest yet remains, and goes far off, so
these leave but their body to their friends.

Though worthless men untaught should fret my soul
and rave of teeth like jasmine buds and pearls, shall I
forego my fixed resolve, who have seen in the burning
ground those bones — the fallen teeth — strewn round
for all to see?

The skulls of the dead, at the sight of which the
gazer fears, with deep cavernous eyes appear, and
grinning say to those who still survive, " Guard well !
In virtue's path stand fast. This is the body's grace
and worth."

The skulls of the dead, grinning so as to excite dis-
gust, cure the vain lovers of life of their folly. Those



30 THE WORLD BEYOND

who are cured of this folly, seeing the skulls in the
burning ground, say " such is this body," and so value
themselves as nothing.

G. V. Pope, Naladiyar, " Quatrains in Tamil."



BECAUSE I LIVE, YE SHALL LIVE ALSO
When First Separated from the Body

Zoroastrians believe that fire, earth, water and air are
sacred and therefore not to be polluted by dead bodies. To
dispose of them, recourse is had to the "Towers of Silence"
in Bombay, where the bodies are exposed to birds of prey.
The bones are later collected and restored to the relatives.

When the dogs and birds tear the corpse does the
soul know it, and does it occur uncomfortably for it,
or how is it ?

The reply is this, that the pain occasioned by the
tearing and gnawing so galls the body of men that,
though the soul were abiding with the body, such soul,
which one knows is happy and immortal, would then
depart from the body, along with the animating life,
the informing consciousness, and the remaining re-
sources of life.

The body is inert, unmoving, and not to be galled;
and at last no pain whatever galls it, nor is it perceived ;
and the soul, with the life, is outside of the body, and
is not unsafe as regards its gnawing, but through the
spiritual perception it sees and knows it.

31



32 THE WORLD BEYOND

That which is wicked is then again desirous of its
bodily existence, and saith: "In my bodily existence
and worldly progress there was no atonement for sin
and no accumulation of righteousness and in the pros-
perity which this body of mine had, it would have been
possible for me to atone for sin and to save the soul,
but now I am separated from every one and from the
joy of the world, which is great hope of spiritual life;
and I have attained to the perplexing account and more
serious danger." And the gnawing becomes as griev-
ous to it, on account of that body, as a closely-shut
arsenal and a concealed innermost garment are useless
among those with limbs provided with weapons and
accoutrements, and are destroyed.

And the consciousness of men, as it sits three nights
outside of the body, in the vicinity of the body, has to
remember and expect that which is truly fear and
trouble unto the demons, and reward, peace, and glad
tidings unto the spirits of the good; and, on account
of the dispersion and injuring of the body, it utters a
cry spiritually thus: " Why do the dogs and birds gnaw
this organized body, when still at last the body and
life unite together at the raising of the dead? " And
this is the reminding of the resurrection and liberation,
and it becomes the happiness and hope of the spirit of



THE WORLD BEYOND 33

the body and the other good spiiits, and the fear and
vexation of the demons and fiends.

The spirit of the body, on account of being the spiri-
tual life for the heart in the body, is indestructible; so
is the will which resided therein, even when they shall
release it from its abode.

E. W. Wcit, " Dadlstani-Dinik," p. 86.



THERE SHALL BE WEEPING AND GNASH-
ING OF TEETH

The Various Hells

Hell is a familiar conception to most of the world's relig-
ious systems. It is found in all possible classifications of
dreadfulness and generally resembles the Christian hell, save
that the latter is everlasting and, on the whole, hotter. Fol-
lowing is a typical Hindu passage:

Now follow the hells. They are called: darkness;
complete darkness; a place of howling; a place of much
howling ; a thread of time or death ; great hell ; a re-
storing to life; waveless; burning; parching; pressing
together; ravens; bud; stinking clay; iron-spiked; a
frying-pan; rough or uneven roads; thorny Salmali
trees ; a flame river ; a sword-leaved forest ; iron fetters.

In each of those hells successively criminals in the
highest degree, who have not performed the penance
prescribed for their crime, are tormented for an seon
of time.

There they are devoured by dogs and jackals, by
hawks, crows, herons, cranes, and other carnivorous

34



THE WORLD BEYOND 35

animals, by bears and other animals having fire in their
mouth, and by serpents and scorpions.

They are scorched by blazing fire, pierced by thorns,
divided into parts by saws, and tormented by thirst.
They are agitated by hunger and by fearful troops of
tigers, and faint away at every step on account of the
foul stenches proceeding from pus and from blood.
Here they are boiled in oil, and there pounded with
pestles, or ground in iron or stone vessels. Enveloped
in terrible darkness, they are devoured by worms and
jackals and other horrible animals having flames in
their mouth.

Again they are tormented by frost, or Have to step
through unclean things such as excrements, or the de-
parted spirits eat one another, driven to distraction by
hunger.

In another place, walking upon thorns, and their
bodies being encircled by snakes, they are tormented
with grinding machines, and dragged on by their knees.

Their backs, heads, and shoulders are fractured, the
necks of these poor beings are not stouter than a needle,
and their bodies, of a size fit for a hut only, are unable
to bear torments.

Having thus been tormented in the hells and suf-
fered most acute pain, the sinners have to endure fur-



36 THE WORLD BEYOND

ther pangs in their migration through animal bodies.
Now after having suffered the torments inflicted in the
hells, the evil-doers pass into animal bodies. Crim-
inals in the highest degree enter the bodies of all plants
successively. Mortal sinners enter the bodies of
worms or insects. Minor offenders enter the bodies
of birds.

Criminals in the fourth degree enter the bodies of
aquatic animals.

Those who have committed a crime effecting loss of
caste, enter the bodies of amphibious animals. Those
who have committed a crime degrading to a mixed
caste, enter the bodies of deer. Those who have com-
mitted a crime rendering them unworthy to receive
alms, enter the bodies of cattle. Those who have com-
mitted a crime causing defilement, enter the bodies of
low-caste men such as Kandalas, who may not be
touched.

One who has eaten the food of one whose food may
not be eaten, or forbidden food, becomes a worm or
insect. A thief of other property than gold, becomes
a falcon. One who has appropriated a broad passage,
becomes a serpent or other animal living in holes.

One who has stolen grain, becomes a rat.

One who has stolen water, becomes a water- fowl.



THE WORLD BEYOND 37

One who has stolen honey, becomes a gad-fly.

One who has stolen milk, becomes a crow.

One who has stolen juice of the sugar-cane or other
plants, becomes a dog.

One who has stolen clarified butter, becomes an
ichneumon.

One who has stolen meat, becomes a vulture.

One who has stolen fat, becomes a cormorant.

One who has stolen oil, becomes a cockroach.

(Follows a long list of other thefts and punish-
ments. )

Women, who have committed similar thefts, receive
the same ignominious punishment ; they become females
to those male animals.

J- Jolly, " Institutes of Vishnu," p. 140.



AND IF SATAN RISE UP AGAINST HIMSELF,

AND BE DIVIDED, HE CANNOT STAND,

BUT HATH AN END

Ministers of Evil

The following legendary account of the Master's tempta-
tion just before his enlightenment under the Bodhi tree is
taken from the life of Buddha by Asvagosha (first century
A. D.). Asvagosha was the St. Paul of the Mahayana school
in which form Buddhism, greatly modified since its founder's
time, was adopted by China, Korea and Japan, lasting to this
day.

" Now must I assemble my army-host, and press
him sore by force." Having thought thus awhile. The
Tempter's army suddenly assembled round;

Each severally assumed his own peculiar form ; some
were holding spears, others grasping swords, others


1 3 4 5

Online LibraryJustin H. (Justin Hartley) MooreThe world beyond, passages from oriental and primitive religions → online text (page 1 of 5)