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California]

gional

cility




THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES




' Classical Scries.



THE



SATIRES OF JUVENAL



EDITED BY

THOMAS B. LINDSAY, PH.D.



BOSTON UNIVERSITY



NEW YORK : CINCINNATI : CHICAGO
AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY



COPYRIGHT. 1890, BY
AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY,

w. p. 6



1*10



PREFACE.



THE text of this edition agrees in the main with
that of Biicheler's edition of Jahn. A list of passages
where I have thought best to make use of other read-
ings or other orthography will be found at the end of
the volume ; differences in punctuation are marked only
where the meaning is materially affected. I have com-
pared most of the important editions, and used Ilosiutf
Apparatus Oriticus ad luvenalem (1888), and Beer's
Spicilegium luvenalianum (1885), as well as such spe-
cial articles as were at my command.

Thirteen of the sixteen satires usually attributed to
Juvenal are here given. Those omitted are the second,
the sixth, and the ninth. These are rarely read in col-
y % e classes. Where si ngle lines or longer passages have
been omitted, the fact is indicated by the numbering.

The notes are the result of several years' experience,
careful study, and a comparison of the views of the
best editors, especially Ruperti, Heinrich, Jahn, Mac-
leane, Mayor, Weidrier, and Biicheler. I have also



1181002



iv PREFACE.

had the benefit of my own MS. copy of Bibbeck's
lectures on Juvenal.

No index, except the index of proper names, is
given, because an incomplete one seems of little value,
and the complete index in Jahn's edition of 1851 is
easily accessible to scholars.

I wish to express my thanks to several friends and
former pupils for valuable aid in connection with both
the MS. and the proof-sheets.

T. B. LINDSAY.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY, May, 1890.



CONTENTS.



PAOE

PREFACE . iii

LIST or ILLUSTRATIONS vi

INTRODUCTION ..ix

DATES OF ROMAN EMPERORS xiv

DATES OF ROMAN WRITERS ......... xv

DESIGNATIONS OF AISS xvi

SATIRE

I. THE STATE OF THE TIMES . ....... 1

III. THE DISADVANTAGES OF LIFE AT ROME 7

IV. THE DEGRADATION or THE SENATE ...... 19

V. CLIENT AND PATRON 24

VII. THE TRIALS OF LITERATURE ....... 31

VIII. FALSE PRIDE OF ANCESTRY ........ 40

X. THE VANITY OF HUMAN WISHES 50

XI. LUXURY AND POVERTY 62

XII. THE RETURN OF CATULLUS . . . .... 69

XIII. THE POWER OF CONSCIENCE 75

XIV. RESPECT FOR YOUTH 84

XV. AN EGYPTIAN BATTLE 96

XVI. MILITARY LIFE 103

NOTES 107

LIST OF DIFFERENCES FROM BUCHELER'S TEXT 212

INDEX OF PROPER NAMES . 214

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF OBJECTS ILLUSTRATED ...... 228



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE

-luvenal Frontispiece

Appian Way 1

Nereids and Tritons 6

Campagna 7

Orpheus 17

Domitian (full page) 18

Domitian (coin) 19

Triumphal arch (coin of Augustus) ....'.. 23

Triclinium 24

Table delicacies ,.30

Roman reading . . . 31

Atrium 40

Ancilia 49

Circus 50

Auriga (full page) 54

Chariot with the body of Antilochos . 61

Reading from Homer 62

Greeks feasting 68

Ba.*-relief : rowers in an Attic trireme ....... 69

Greek vessel 73

Jupiter Olympius (full page) 74

Jupiter Ammon (coin) . . .75

Medusa 83

Emperor Claudius .....84

Sacrificial scene 95

View on the Nile 96

Nile as river-god . 102

Ruins of Roman camp 103

Tomb of Scipio 105



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. Vlj

no. PAOE

1. Roman reading 110

2. Lcctica 112

3. Stylus 113

4. Writing tablets 114

5. Bronze jugs 115

6. Toga with sinus 116

7. Taberna 117

8. Torus 118

9. Tomb of Caecilia Metella 119

10. Restoration of tombs on the Appian Way 120

11. Raeda. ' 122

12. Sambuca 124

13. Tympanum 124

14. Funambulus 125

15. Abolla .126

16. Pinnirapus 127

17. Retiarius, secutor, and lanista 127

18. Theatre at Aspendos 128

19. Abacus 129

20. Oil-flask and strigils . .131

21. Vomer 133

22. Figure with the rota 136

23. Triclinium . .138

24. Dinner-scene, showing the culcitiie . . . . . . . 138

25. Loaves of bread fouml at Pompeii . ... . . . 140

26. Artoptae (bread -molds) . . . .140

27. Table delicacies, from Pompeiian frescoes 140

28. Mouth of the Cloaca Maxima 141

29. Culina 142

30. Boy wearing the bulla 143

31. Writing materials 145

32. Figure bearing the thyrsus 146

33. Actors wearing the cothurnus 146

34. Ancestor-mask (cera) 152

35. Plan of the house of Pansa 152

36. Atrium 158

37. Hermes 154

38. Roman mill 155

39. Phokion wearing the chlamys 156

40. View of the Parthenon 157

41. Figure bearing the scutum 158

42. Various forms of the cithara ........ 160

43. Mimus . 160



v iii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

FIG. PAGB

44. Gladiator's armor 161

45. Galerus 161

46. Dolabra 162

47. Diadema 162

48. Plan of the Forum Koinanum 165

49. Rostra (?) 168

50. Tropaeum 169

51. Currus, showing the temo . . . 169

52. Trireme, showing the three banks of oars . t 169

53. Position of the rowers in a trireme . 169

54. Ship, showing the aplustre 170

55. Bridge of boats 171

56. Theatre of Herod at Athens 172

57. Sacrificial scene, showing the tuba ....... 173

58. Rogus 173

59. Funeral urn 173

60. Couch, showing the fulcrum ........ 178

61. Horse adorned with phalerae 179

62. Figure bearing the clipeus 179

63. Orbis 179

64. Orbis 180

65. Artificial harbor at Ostia 184

66. Pharos 185

67. Inner harbor at Ostia 185

68. Sacrifice of Iphigcnia 186

69. Nassa 187

10. Pyxis 188

71. Vulcan's workshop 189

72. Figure hurling the framea 190

73. Isis with the sistrum 191

74. Pygmies and cranes 192

75. Flagellum 193

76. Dice-box (fritillus) 195

77. Cucurbita 196

78. Plan of the so-called villa suburbana of DSomedes . . . .197

79. Roman standards 200

80. Circus Maximus at Rome 201

81. Tibicen 205

82. Phaselus 207

83. Egyptian phaselus 207

84. Plan of Roman camp 209

85. Ruins of Roman camp 210

86. Soldier wearing the baltcus 211

(Cf. alphabetical list o/t j.-mje 223.)



INTRODUCTION.



WE know very little of the life of Juvenal. He rarely
speaks of himself, and is seldom mentioned by other
Latin writers. The sources of our information are

1. Thirteen versions of a Life of Juvenal which have
come down to us from an unknown source, in connection
with various MSS. of his works. No one of these is ac-
curate or trustworthy. Seven are given at the end of
Jahn's edition.

2. Scattered references in his own writings serving
to fix dates and places. Many of these references, how-
ever, occur in passages the authenticity of which is dis-
puted.

3. The following inscription, discovered at Aquinum :

C[ere]ri sacrum [D. Iu]nius luvenalis
trib. coh[ortis I] Dalmatarum, II vir quin-
q[uennalis] flamen divi Vespasiani
vovit dedicav[it q]ue sua pec[unia]

4. Passages in Martial (VII, 24; 91; XII, 18), in
Sidonius Apollinaris (Carm. IX, 270), in Johannes Malala



X INTRODUCTION.

(Chron. X, p. 341, Chilm.), and in Rutilius Namatianus
(I, 603).

From these sources we gather the following probable
account :

DECIMUS IUNIUS IUVENALIS, the son or foster-son of
a rich freedman, was born at Aquinum, about 54 A. D. He
attended school, probably at Rome, studied rhetoric and
practiced declamation, without, however, any view to either
teaching or law, as a profession. He wrote some satirical
verses on the actor Paris, the favorite of Domitian, possi-
bly the lines (87-96) which were afterward inserted in the
seventh satire. From Martial's statements, as well as from
his own works, we conclude that he lived for some time in
Rome. He served in the army as tribunus cohortis, and
was at one time banished, probably to Egypt. He lived
to the age of eighty.

Satire was a distinctively Roman literary produc-
tion. The name was given by Ennius (239 B. c.) to a
collection of poems in various metres, dealing with vari-
ous subjects. Lucilius (ca 148 B. c.) gave to satire the
character that it afterward retained ; a rambling account
of matters and things, half philosophy, half ridicule.
Horace (65 B. c.) polished and refined this form of com-
position, and gave it more of the genial spirit of the
later essay. Following Horace came Persius (34 A. D.),
whose style is rough and at times obscure, and whose
treatment is more directly philosophical than that of his
predecessors.



INTRODUCTION. x j

Sixteen satires have come down to us as the writings
of Juvenal ; the genuineness of several, and of parts of
others, has been questioned, particularly by Otto Ribbeck
in his Der echte und der unechte Juvenal, Berlin, 1865.
Most editors, while admitting Ribbeck's clear insight and
critical ability, and conceding that each of the two sections
into which he divides the works attributed to Juvenal has
marked characteristics, hesitate to adopt the theory as a
whole, and the text stands in the main as given in the
MSS. The division into five books seems to have been
an arbitrary arrangement made by the early commenta-
tors.

The MSS. of Juvenal are divided into two classes. To
the first class belongs the Montepessulanus 125, or Pithoea-
nus (-P.), & MS. of the ninth century, which contains cor-
rections made by a later hand (p.). Here belonged too
the now lost MS. used by G. Valla in his edition of I486,
and another lost MS. formerly in the monastery of St.
Gall, the scholia of which are still accessible. The second
class contains a large number of later and less trust-
worthy MSS., among which must be reckoned the cor-
rections in P.

The classification of the scholia follows that of
the MSS.

Horace lived when the Roman state, emerging from
the horrors of civil war, seemed about to enter upon :i
new life under the wise leadership of Augustus ; his satire,
sympathizing with the time, strikes only at those lesser



xii INTRODUCTION.

follies that might be reached by a laugh. In fact, the
satires of Horace have very little of the bitter irony and
the scathing criticism which we connect with the word
satire, but contain a pleasant, rather loquacious, discussion
of matters of general interest, with side blows at an un-
happy miser, a foolish scribbler, a conceited dandy, or a
rich glutton ; a general contempt for the folly of men that
refuse to enjoy their present happiness in their impatient
struggles for something more. In fact, Horace treats vice
as folly, not so much a thing to be harshly censured as one
to be sharply ridiculed.

Juvenal lived about a century later, when the seeds of
moral degradation, sown long ago, had produced their
fruit, when the glory of the empire had faded into a
despotic, self-glorifying rule, when the practically un-
limited power which, in the hands of Augustus, had been
bounded by his own self-respect and the self-respect of
the nation, had crossed or leveled all such bounds, and
was used for the gratification of the worst passions of its
possessors. Rome was full of adventurers from all lands,
anxious to acquire wealth and power by any arts; the spirit
of earnest devotion to the state and to personal duty, which
had marked the earlier Romans, had given place to self-
seeking ; pride had become vanity, frugality had become
avarice ; the curse that attends unearned wealth had fallen
upon the great city. It was to reprove the sins of such
an age that Juvenal wrote. Here was no time for pretty
philosophic generalities ; here was no time to compose



INTRODUCTION. xiii

poems on the beauty of content, lying beside some gently
murmuring stream, or, crowned with roses, sipping Faler-
nian wine amid a company of pleasant friends ; here was
no time to laugh at vice, to say what foolish fellows bad
men were. No ; here was a time for fierce invective, for
denunciation like that of the Hebrew prophets ; here was
a time to cry out that sin was the death of all that was
good and fair in family and state. Here was room for
contempt indeed, but a contempt too deep and bitter for
a laugh. And Juvenal has this contempt, a contempt
tinged with despair, for he loved Rome, the ideal Rome,
the Rome of the republic, when patriotism ruled in the
Forum and family affection in the home ; and it was a
sense of this terrible change, the sure sign of approaching
dissolution, that gave to the lash of Juvenal its severest
sting. "Facit indignatio versum"



DATES OF THE ROMAN EMPERORS.



Augustus .
Tiberius .
Caligula .
Claudius .
Nero .
Galba
Otho.

Vitellius . .
Vespasian .
Titus.
Domitian .
Nerva .
Trajan
Hadrian .
Antoninus Pins
Marcus Aurelius



. 27 B. C.-14 A. D.

14-37 A. D.

37-41 A. D.

41-54 A. D.

54-68 A. D.

68-69 A. D.

69 A. D.

69 A. D.

69-79 A. D.

79-81 A. D.

81-96 A. D.

96-98 A. D.

98-117 A. D.

. 117-138 A. D.

. 138-161 A. D.

161-180 A. D.






DATES OF ROMAN WRITERS.



Plautus .

Ennius .

Terence .

Lucilius .

Varro

Cicero .

Lucretius

Catullus

Vergil .

Horace .

Livy

Ovid

Persius .

Petronius

Quintilian

Martial .

Tacitus .

Juvenal .

Statius .

Pliny the Younger.

Suetonius

Apuleius . .



254-184 B. c.

239-169 B. c.

185-159 B. c.

148-103 B. c.

116-28 B. c.

106-43 B. c.

98-55 B. c.

. 87(?)-54B. c.

70-19 B. c.

65-8 B. c.

. 59 B. G.-17 A. D.

. 43 B. C.-17 A. D.

34-62 A. D.

(?)-66A. D.

35-95 A. D.

43-103 A. D.

54-118 A. D.

54(?)-134 (?) A. D.

61-98 A. D.
62-113 A. D.
75-160 A. D.

114-(?) A. D.



P, codex Montepcssulanus 125 olim Pithoeanus.
J9, codicis Pithoeani manus emendatrix.
S, scholiorum lectio aut ex scholiis ducta.
o>, codices reliqui omnes aut multi.
s, codicum reliquoruin pars.




The Appian Way.
\

SATURA I.

SEMPER ego auditor tantum ? nuraquarane reponam,
Vexatus totiens rauci Theseide Cordi ?
Inpune ergo mihi recitaverit ille togatas,
Hie elegos ? inpune diem consumpserit ingens
Telephus aut summi plena iam margine libri 5

Scriptus et in tergo necdum finitus Orestes ?
Nota magis nulli domus est sua, quam mihi lucus
Martis et Aeoliis vicinum rupibus antrum
Vulcani. Quid agant venti, quas torqueat umbras
Aeacus, unde alius furtivae devehat aurum 10

Pelliculae, quantus iaculetur Monychus ornos,
Frontonis platani convulsaque marmora clamant

2. Cordi PS, Codri pt.



2 D. IUN. IUVENALIS

Semper et adsiduo ruptae lectore columnae.

Expectes eadem a summo minimoque poeta.

Et nos ergo manum ferulae subduximus, et nos 15

Consilium dedimus Sullae, privatus ut altum

Dormiret. Stulta est dementia, cum tot ubique

Vatibus occurras, periturae parcere chartae.

Cur tamen hoc potius libeat decurrere campo,

Per quern magnus equos Auruncae flexit alumnus, 20

Si vacat ac placidi rationem admittitis, edam. 21

Patricios omnis opibus cum provocet unus, w

Quo tondente gravis iuveni mihi barba sonabat ; 25

Cum pars Niliacae plebis, cum verna Canopi

Crispinus, Tyrias umero revocante lacernas,

Ventilet aestivum digitis sudantibus aurum,

Nee sufferre queat maioris pondera gemmae :

Difficile est saturam non scribere. Nam quis iniquae 30

Tarn patiens urbis, tarn ferreus, ut teneat se,

Causidici nova cum veniat lectica Mathonis

Plena ipso, post hunc magni delator amici

Et cito rapturus de nobilitate comesa

Quod superest, quern Massa timet, quern munere palpat 35

Cams et a trepido Thymele summissa Latino ? 35

Quid referam, quanta siccum iecur ardeat ira, 45

Cum populum gregibus comitum premit hie spoliator

Pupilli prostantis, et hie damnatus inani

Indicio quid enim salvis infamia nummis?

Exul ab octava Marius bibit et fruitur dis

Iratis ; at tu victrix provincia ploras ! 50

Haec ego non credam Venusina digna lucerna?

Haec ego non agitem ? sed quid magis ? Heracleas,

Aut Diomedeas, aut mugitum labyrinth!

46. premat j. 47. at pu>.



SATURA 1. 3

Et mare percussum puero fabrumque volantem, 54

Cum fas esse putet curam sperare cohortis, ts

Qui bona donavit praesepibus et caret omni

Maiorum ceusu, dum pervolat axe citato 60

Flaminiam puer Automedon? nam lora tenebat

Ipse, lacernatae cum se iactaret amicae.

Nonne Ijbet medio ceras implere ciipaces

X IT

Quadruyip, cum iam sexta cervice feratur,

Hinc atque inde) patens ac nuda paene cathedra 65

Et multum referens de Maecenate supino,

Signator falso, qui se lautum atque beatum

Exiguis tabulis et gemma fecerit uda ?

Occurrit matrona potens, quae molle Calenum

Porrectura viro miscet sitienlte rubetam, 70

.
Instituitque rudes nielior Lucusta propinquas

Per famam et populum nigros efferre maritos.
Aude aliquid brevibus Gyaris et carcere dignum,
Si vis esse aliquid. Propiiaa luudatur et alget,
Criminibus debent hortos, praetoria, mensas, 75

Argentum vetiis et stantem extra pocula caprum. 7

Si natura negat, facit indignatio versum, 7

Qualemoumque potest, quales ego vel Cluvienus. 80

Ex quo Deucalion nimbis tollentibus aequor
Navigio rnontem ascendit sortesque poposcit,
Paulatimque anima caluerunt mollia saxa, ss

Quidquid agunt homines, votum, timor, ira, voluptas, 85
Gaudia, discursus, nostri farrago libelli est.
Et quando uberior vitiorum copia? quando
Maior avaritiae patuit sinus ? alea quando
Hos animos? neque enim loculis comitantibus itur

67. signato falso ffadmg. 68. fecerit SW, fecerat P. 69. occurrat
Heinrich. 70. rubeta P. 74. aliquis i. 86. timor add. p.



4 D. IUN. IUVENALIS

Ad casum tabulae, posita srd luditur area. 90

Proelia quanta illic disprnsatnre videbis
Armigero! siinplexne furor sestertia centum
Perdere et liorrenti tunicam non reddere servo ?
Quis totidem erexit villas, quis fercula septem
Secreto cenavit avus ? nunc sportula primo 95

Limine parva sedet, turbae rapienda togatae.
Ille tamen faciem pr^iuSj inspicit et trepidat, ne
Suppositus venias ac fajso nomine poscas.
Agnitus accipies ; iubet a praecone vocari
Ipsos Troiugenas nam vexant limen et ipsi 100

Nobiscum " Da praetori, da deinde tribune ! "
Sed libertinus .prior est : " Prior," inquit, " ego adsum ;
Cur timeam dubitemve locum defendere, quamvis
Natus ad Euphraten, molles quod in aure fenestrae
Arguerint, licet ipse negem ? sed quinque tabernae 105
Quadringenta parant ; quid confert purpura maior
Optandum, si Laurenti custodit in agro
Conductas Corvinus oves, ego possideo plus
Pallante et Licinis ? " Expectent ergo tribuni,
Vincant divitiae, sacro ne cedat honori, 110

Nuper in hanc urbem pedibus qui venerat albis,
Quandoquidem inter nos sanctissima divitiarum
Maiestas, etsi funesta Pecunia templo
Nondum habitat, nullas nummorum ereximus aras,
Ut colitur Pax atque Fides, Victoria, Virtus, 115

Quaeque salutato crepitat Concordia nido.

Sed cum summits honor finite computet anno
Sportula quid referat, quantum rationibus addat,
Quid facient comites, quibus hinc toga, calceus hinc est
Et panis f umusque domi ? Densissima centum 120

106. purpura Sp<*, purpurae P. 114. habitas p.



SATUKA L 5

Quadrantes lectica petit, sequiturque maritum "

Languida vel praegnans et circumducitur uxor.

Hie petit absenti, nota iam callidus arte,

Ostendens vacuam et clausam pro coniuge sellam.

" Galla mea est," inquit, " citius dimitte ; moraris ? 125

Prefer, Galla, caput! noli vexare, quiescet." ~

Ipse dies pulchro distinguitur ordine rerum :

Sportula, deinde forum iurisque peritus Apollo

Atque triumphales, inter quas ausus habere

Nescio quis titulos Aegyptius atque Arabarches. 130

Vestibulis abeunt veteres lassique clientes 132

Votaque deponunt, quamquam longissima cenae

Spes homini ; caulis miseris atque ignis emendus.

Optima silvarum interea pelagique vorabit 135

Rex horum, vacuisque toris tantum ipse iacebit.

Nam de tot pulchris et latis orbibus et tam

Antiquis una comedunt patrinionia mensa.

Nullus iam parasitus erit. Sed quis ferat istas

Luxuriae sordes ? quanta est gula, quae sibi totos 140

Ponit apros, animal propter convivia natum !

Poena tamen praesens, cum tu deponis amictus

Turgidus et crudum pavonem in balnea portas.

Hinc subitae mortes atque intestata senectus ;

Et nova, nee tristis, per cunctas fabula cenas ; 145

Ducitur iratis plaudendum funus amicis.

Nil erit ulterius quod nostris moribus addat
Posteritas ; eadem facient cupientque minores.
Omne in praecipiti vitium stetit ; utere velis,
Totos pande sinus ! Dices hie forsitan : " Unde 150

Ingenium par materiae? unde ilia priorum

126. quiescet F, quiescit pw. 143. crudum p, crudus P. 144. in-
festata Madviy. 150. dices P, dicas/>o>.



6 D. IUN. IUVENALIS

Scribendi quodcumque unimo flagrante liberet

Simplicitas, ' cuius nou audeo dicere nomen ?

Quid refert, dictis ignoscat Mucius an non?'

Pone Tigellinum : taeda lucebis in ilia, 155

Qua stantes ardent, qui fixo pectore fumant,

Et latum media sulcum deducis harena."

Qui dedit ergo tribus patruis aconita, vehatur

Pensilibus plumis atque illinc despiciet nos ?

" Cum veniet contra, digito compesce labellum : 160

Accusator erit qui verbum dixerit : ' hie est.'

Securus licet Aenean Rutulumque ferocem

Committas, nulli gravis est percussus Achilles

Aut multum quaesitus Hylas urnamque secutus;

Ense velut stricto quotiens Lucilius ardens 165

Iniremuit, rubet auditor, cui frigida mens est

Criminibus, tacita sudant praecordia culpa.

Inde irae et lacrimae. Tecum_prius ergo voluta

Haec animo ante tubas ; galeatum sero duelli

Paenitet." Experiar quid'concedatur in illos, 170

Quorum Flaminia tegitur cinis atque Latina.

166. pectore P, gutture pv. 157. deducis pu>, deducit P. 169.
despiciaet P, despiciat j. 161. versum P, verum pte. 169. animo ante
tubas codd. Prise., animante tuba p, anime ante tubas Valla. 171.
legitur P.





The Campagna.



SATURA III.



QUAMVIS digressu veteris confusus amici,

Laudo tamen, vacuis quod sedem figere Cumis

Destinet atque

lanua Baiarum

Secessiis. Ego vel Prochytarn praepono Suburae ; 5

Nam quid tarn miserum, tarn solum vidimus, ut non



unum civem clonare Sihyllac.

i est et'gratum litus amoi-ni
&



Deterius credas horrere incendia, lapsus
Tectorum adsiduos ac mille pericula saevae
Urbis et Augusto recitantes mouse poctas?
Sed dum tota domus raeda compouitur una,
Substitit ad veteres arcus madidmnque Capenam.
Hie, ubi nocturnae Numa consntuebat amicae,
Nuno sacri fontis nemus et delubra locantur
ludaeis, ((iiorum eophiuus facnuiii(|uc snpollex;
Omnis enim populo mcrccdom ^u-ndcrc. iussa est
Arbor, et eiectis mondicat silva Caincnis ;
In vallem Egeriae descendimus ct spcluncas
Dissimiles veris : quanto praeaentius esset






10



15



8 D. IUN. 1UVENALIS

i

Numen aquis, viridi si margine cluderet undas
Herba nee in'genuum violarent marmora tofum ! 20

Hie tune Umbricius : " Quando artibus," inquit, "hohestis
Nullus in urbe locus, nulla emolumenta laborum,
Res hodie minor est, here quam fuit, atque eadem eras
Deteret exiguis uliquid ; proponimus illuc
Ire, fatigatas ubi Daedalus exuit alas. 25

Dum nova'canities, dum prima et recta senectus,
Dum superest Lachesi quod torqueat, et pedibus me
Porto meis, nullo dextram subeunte bacillo ;

IfTi

Cedamus patria: vivant Artonus istic

Et Catulus ; maneant, qui nigrum in Candida vertunt, 30

Quis facile est aedem conducere, flumina, portus,

Siccandam eluviem, portandum ad busta cadaver,

Et praebere caput domina venale sub hasta.

Quondam hi cornicines et municipalis harenae

Perpetui comites notaeque per oppida buccae 35

Munera iiunc edunt, et versso pollice vulgus

Quern iubet occidunt populariter ; inde reversi

Conducunt foricas ; et cur non omnia? cum sint,

Quales ex humili magna ad fastigia rerum

Extollit, quotiens voluit Fortuna iocari. 40

Quid Romae faciam ? mentiri nescio ;" librum,

Si mains est, nequeo laudare et poscere ; motus

Astrorum ignore ; f unus promittere patris

Nee volo nee possum ; ranarum viscera numquam

Inspexi ; 45

me nemo ministro

Fur erit, atque ideo nulli comes exeo, tamquam
Mancus et exstinctae, corpus non utile, dextrae.

19. aque pa>. 37. quern p<a, qum P, cum j. 48 exstinctae dextrae
Pa, exstincta dcxtra Eremita.



SATURA III. 9

Quis nunc diligitur, nisi conscius, et cui fervens

Aestuat occultis 'animus semperque tacendis? 50

Nil tibi se debere putat, nil cohferet umquara,

Participem qui te secreti fecit honesti ;

Carus erit Verri, rnii Verrem tempore quo vult

Accusare potest. (Tanti tibi non sit opaci

Omnis harena Tagi quodque in mare volvitur aurum, 55

Ut somno careas ponendaque praemia sumas

Tristis et a magno semper timearis amico.

Quae nunc divitibus gens acceptissima nostris,
Et quos pfaecipue fugiam, properabo fateri,
Nee pudor opstabit. Non possum ferre, Quirites, 60

Graecam urbem ; quamvis quota portio faecis Acbaei !
lam pridem Syrus in Tiberim defluxit Orontes,
Et linguam et mores et cum tibioine chordas
Obliquas nee non gentilia tympana secum


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