Kansas State Board of Health.

Annual report of the State Board of Health of the State of Kansas online

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EIGHTH ANNUAL REPOBT. 173



is spent, without compensation. All, except four physicians, make very careless re-
ports; so mnch so, that it is nearly impossible to make out enough to get a fair idea,
and every month it is necessary to remind them of their dnty to send in their re-
ports. After receiving them, only one-half is of practical nse; the balance written
with lead pencil, carelessly and illegibly. Have, so far, only made enemies among
the physicians and illegal midwives; bnt shall do my dnty, whether or no. Some one
may reap the benefit of the Health Officer's labors.

Taking everything into consideration, the reports this year are more complete
than in former years, and I hope that this state of affairs will continue on the in-
crease.

Constant vigilance is the price of liberty. Constant reminders to our physicians
is our only hope for complete returns.

WALLACE COUNTY.

Dr. J. T. Newton, County Health Officer, Sharon Springs.

We have had but very little sickness here during the past six months; one death
from diphtheria, in August. There has been but little sickness since, and no deaths,
and no reports of any contagious diseases. During the earlier part of the year,
there were several cases of diphtheria, and a number of deaths from the same, but
fiince that time the health of the county has been remarkably good.

The report of births is very imperfect, as there are many who do not employ
any physician ox accoucheur; consequently, no report.

WASHINGTON COUNTY.
Dr. J. H. Qreen, Goonty Health Officer, Washington.

We have escaped epidemic diseases during the year. The diseas'es causing the
greatest mortality were p^neumonia, bronchitis, diseases of the heart and phthisis.
There were 10 deaths from the last named; also 10 deaths from typhoid fever. The
•cases were mostly in one neighborhood, and not being reported to this office until
most were convalescent or dead, no action was taken until late.

Eight deaths were due to diphtheria.

Of scarlet fever, only isolated oases have occurred.

Total number of deaths, 197; births, 417 — including 17 still-births.

The greatest number of deaths in one month was 47, in March, with 44 each in
April and December.

Number of marriages, 170. The oldest person married — groom — was 94 years
of age.

I have succeeded in having the County Board appropriate $15 with which to pur-
chase the ** Rules of the State Board of Health" for distribution in this county. I
suggest that a circular be issued to s^bf'etaries of local boards, urging similar action,
that we may, by this means, secure a sufficient appropriation to enable us to have a
large number of these rules printed for distribution throughout the several coun-
ties, thereby placing within reach the means of educating the people in sanitary
matters, in the most economical way.

WICHITA COUNTY,
s Dr. A. B. Knapp, Goonty Health Officer, Leoti.

It is with much satisfaction that I can report to you the fact that the sanitary
condition of this county could not well be improved on.

Our people seem to be in full accord with the work of the State Board of Health,
and our officials have given the County Health Officer all needed help and encour-
agement.

Our physicians make reports cheerfully.



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174 STATE BOABD OF HEALTH.



WILSON COUNTY.
Dr. F. M. Wiley, Ck>unty Health Officer, Fredonla.

By an arrangement with the probate judge, all marriages are reported. By the
most persistent effort, I have secHred reports of births and deaths from 18 of the 25
physicians in the county. Those who are delinquent are so from neglect, and not
from any active or decided opposition to the law. Some of the faithful ones ar©
wavering, because of the incompleteness of the statistics. I shall endeavor to sus-
tain their interest during the coming year, and use every possible means to secure
reports from those who have failed during 1892. If a copy of the annual report of
the State Board of Health could be presented to each physician, it would assist in
creating an interest in statistical reports. A number of our physicians have ex -
pressed a desire to have copies. Cannot this be done?

Wilson county has experienced no serious epidemics during the past year.
Scarlet fever has prevailed in various portions of the county, but in a very mild
form; physicians' reports for the last quarter show 42 cases, and no deaths. For
the same period, 61 cases of typhoid fever have been reported, with four deaths.
Pneumonia and pulmonary phthisis have each been the cause of seven deaths dur-
ing the year.

The sanitary condition of the county is generally good.

Fredonia. — ( Report of Dr. A. C. Flack, Secretary City Board of Health.) Fre-
donia, the county seat of Wilson county, is situated near the center of the county,
on a commanding plateau, at the base of the Twin Mounds, nearly 1,000 feet above
the level of the sea. On the south and west rise these two grand table mounds 160
feet above the city and valley. The city has a population of 2,000, whose chief oc-
cupation is trading and manufacturing.

The land in and around the city slopes to the west, apd is drained into a small
stream, which flows into Fall river li miles southwest of the city.

Just west of the city, on the east slope of the west mound, is a large park, the
property of the Wilson County Agricultural Association. It consists of a fine grove,
an excellent half-mile race track, a grand stand, and other buildings, all tending to
make it a favorite resort on summer evenings. The city is liberally supplied with
shade trees and beautiful blue-grass lawns.

The water supply comes from Fall river, an exceptionally pure stream. The
water seeps through the sand into a large well, from which it is pumped into a large
reservoir, on the west mound, 160 feet above the city. The reservoir is divided by
a solid brick wall, 12 inches thick, through which the water filters before being de-
livered into the city. There are still some wells in use, but the quality of water is
not good, and many cases of sickness have been traced to this source. There are no
ponds, dumps, slaughter-houses or other unhealthy localities near enough to the city
to be considered dangerous to the public health.

A fine quality of ice is gathered from Fall river and Clear creek, and when this
supply fails, artificial ice is manufactured by a home plant.

The City Board of Health serves without compensation, and consists of J. R.
Willits, M. D., president, F. M. Wiley, M. D., A. C. Flack, M. D., secretary.

There have been but two fatal accidents the past year. Two colored boys, twins,
were drowned, clasped in each others' arms, while swimming in a small pond near
the city.

The enumeration in our public schools is about 600, and the health of the pupils
exceptionally good.

In the winter of 1891-'92, the city was visited by an epidemic of scarlet fever,
and not until we had had about 75 cases did we succeed in arresting its course.
There were no new cases during the summer. A new epidemic broke out again this



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EIGHTH ANNUAL REPOBT. 175

fall, bnt strict qaarantine rednced the Domber of cases to 10 or 12. But few of the
cases were what might be termed severe, none proving fat|iL

The health of the city has been exceptionally good. There have been no cases of
small-pox, measles or diphtheria in the city the past year. There have been a num-
ber of cases of typhoid fever, most of which could be traced to bad well-water. The
cases were usually mild, none proving fatal.

Only a small per cent, of the children attending our public schools have been
vaccinated, and nothing but a threatened epidemic of small-pox will induce the
authorities to compel vaccination.

The citizens generally manifest considerable interest in subjects pertaining to
the public health, and the Health Board meet with very little opposition in having
their recommendations followed.

WOODSON COUNTY.
Dr. S. i. BacoD, County Health Officer, Yates Center.

There have been no vaccinations reported to me, some of the physicians paying
but very little attention to the law. My statistics are made up from the undertakers'
reports and such information as I could gather myself.

I applied to the County Commissioners for a reasonable compensation; but they,
being so penurious, and thinking the county so dreadfully poor, refused to pay for
even quarantines.

There have been seven or eight quarantines during the year, mostly of scarlet
fever and diphtheria. The former has been of a very mild form. It got so thor-
oughly scattered in Yates Center that the City Health Officer thought it impossible
to quari^tine it.

WYANDOTTE COUNTY.
Dr. Henry M. Downs, County Health Officer, Kansas City.

The inclosed returns show that a considerable degree of interest has been taken
in matters partaining to the public health in this county.

Until the year 1892, no records were kept, and there was no regularly-organized
Board of Health. What sanitary measures were in force were under the direction of
the county physician and the local government of the several cities within the
county.

Through the efforts of the State Board, the organization of a local board was
effected. The result has been most satisfactory. The public officials and the phy •
sicians in practice in this county have, with scarcely an exception, lent their aid to
the proper maintenance of sanitary regulations, and to the gathering uf statistical
returns.

Cases of infectious diseases have existed only in an endemic form, and, with
proper isolation, were promptly controlled and stamped out.

In the summer of 1891, small-pox prevailed here to an alarming extent. The
maintaince of rigid quarantine, with the hearty cooperation of county and city
officials, resulted in its complete eradication. No cases occi^rred in 1892.

Unusual energy has been displayed by the city authorities to maintain strict sani-
tary regulations, the police department having men constantly on detail for this
purpose. The small number of nuisances gives evidence of the effectiveness of their
work. Our sewerage system is an excellent one; and when insufficient protection
was complained of, old sewers were reconstructed, new ones quickly built, and the
latest and most approved devices adopted to make the system complete.

By an agreement between the two Kansas Cities, aided by that generous and
public-spirited citizen, Mr. Armour, a connecting sewer is being built, which will
effectually drain the localities adjacent to the large packing-houses. The adoption



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176 STATE BOABD OF HEALTH.



of this important measure was largely dae to the determined stand taken by the
members of the Boards of the two States, who met in joint session in 1892, and
personally itispeoted the localities referred to.

The schools, jails, prisons and institutions for the care of the insane and poor
are under able management, are frequently inspected, and no cause for complaint
has been found.



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Eights annual Bepobt. 177



Vital Statistics.

A considerable improyement has been made in the collection of vital statistics,
not only in the increased number of counties reporting, but in the fulness of the re-
ports. We present statistics, more or less complete, from 97 counties, as against
64 last year, and 46 in the year previous. They aggregate 18,655 births, 8,767
•deaths, and 10,145 marriages — the greatest number of each in the history of the
Board. The greatest number of births and deaths heretofore reported was in 1888,
Tiz., 7,595 and 4,208, respectively^ 58 counties contributing. The greatest number '
of marriages heretofore reported was 6,710, in 1891; 64 counties represented.

The counties delinquent are, Allen, Doniphan, Douglas, Haskell, Leavenworth,
liinn, Morris, Scott, Sumner, and Trego. Of these, all but Douglas and Scott were
without organized Health Boards at the close of the year, although Haskell, Linn
and Sumner have since organized their boards. Through the able efforts of the
Board of Health of Leavenworth city, we are enabled to present full and complete
reports of that city.

Judging from the reports submitted by several Health Officers, there exists
an imperfect conception of the true value of vital statistics. The simple fact of
ascertaining the number of births, deaths and marriages within a given period is of
isomparatively little importance. It is only through furnishing the bases of com-
parison — the ages, nationality, color, occupation, etc. — that such statistics become
T^alnable.

The study of vital statistics should enable us to discover the existence of exces-
sive mortality from any cause, and the unnecessary waste of life from preventable
caases. They also should furnish an official record from which the claims of the
ohild to paternity, legitimacy, etc., the mother's hereditary and marital rights and
the identification of the father may be conclusively established.

And, as our State advances in age, wealth, and population, every one of these
qaestions will become of vital interest. With the restless activity and energy of our
people, families will become more and more scattered, and in the disposal of trusts,
the inheritance of real estate, the settlement of the vexed questions of Identity, the
Tecords of the Health Office will become a constant necessity and of increasing im-
portance.

Instances of extraordinary longevity are reported from Anderson, Graham, La-
bette, Osage, Osborne, Rice and Wabaunsee counties, as follows: One of 95 years, 7
months; 2 of 94 years; 2 of 93 years; 2 of 92 years, and 1 of 91. Five were American,
1 English, 1 Irish, and 1 German; all white; 1 female and 7 males; 1 single, 3 married,
and 4 widowers; 1 tailoress, 4 farmers, 1 physician, and 1 druggist. The causes of
death, as stated, were as follows: Old age, 3; old age and heart failure, 1; old age
and congestion, 1; dysentery, 1, and bronchorroea, 1.

There have been reported from Marion county 8 cases in which the birth was the
twelfth child of the mother, 3 the thirteenth child, 1 the fourteenth child, 2 the
fifteenth child, and 1 the twentieth. From Saline county is reported 1 case of the
thirteenth child.

Many of the death returns have been made up, in whole or in part, from the re-
tarns made by undertakers; and several of the County Boards came into operation
after the first of the year — a few as late as July 1.

The following tabulated statements will show the registration of births, deaths,
and marriages, by counties. ,

—12

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EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.



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180



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EiQBTU Annual Report.



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184



STATE BOARD OF HEALTH.



County number .



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it



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SSI



Population of
county {esti-
mated )



§^S



rH IH rH MO



Per cent, of true
number {esti-
mated )



&8S;:!;^§SS : : :@^ :SS^^S^



g : • : :g : :g :g8 :§?SE2-



Total, 1892



OOS r-l r-i C^l ^ »H «



tH CO t- »0 "* W ^ T-l 0> d « e^ ?» OS rH 2>



Not stated



September.



August . . .



July.



June ....



May



ApHt...



March. ..



February.



January.



: -JS : : : :§



lO CT t-CT •««»



«O0O rH OCT •"♦••^



S^S^^



t-«OC0 t- -lO



»0 -iH-^JOi-lOO 'it>



■* t- <M 00 «0 «0 e^ 'COiHiH -iHkOOrHt-



t-OO-* CO



lOCOtoC^CO



lO -^OS •«



.^S c»e



eco-*t-'*ooo»>ooo



« W « t- M 00 O i-t ■«* r-l • ■* CO iH 00 rH CO.



C^OOCieOOOOOJC^rH



CO W 00 U5 iM CO CO 00 eg •IOC^OOC«JO> -Oi.



H00tHO» ■<* »o



55-^ ?§



»0 »0 rH 0> »0 ■*!< CO • «5rH«5iHe»«-*



C^»b-rHkOOCOO»



rHCOOOdOJ -rHt-O •<^^«■^OSt-



•««^OJOeOOrH«C^05C^rHO>



OS ClrHO tfjr
rH rH rH W



coost>eot- 'Cicoo so-^wgoco"



t-lOt-OSt-e^ • CO CO -^It M5 CO 00 00



00 OS oi ec (M o s



geocooo 'r-to •'^



JOC^rHrHt-O -COCT • CI « rH t- rH •*



5 TO 00 t- CO •^ rH rH rH rH CO • rH O Ol t—



<MC»«00»OC<IOrH00



COCOrHCO t- -ei



H CI CO Ifl OO lO CJ



C<ICI rH -



C^ei CT -



No. of still-births.



No. of illegiti-
mate children



No. of triplets.



No. of tuHns. ..






di




<<<



County number .



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saas;2is:s5Ss§ss5§5s5^^s§§siggg2S5S^S5g§g$



Digitized by. VjOOQ IC



Eighth Annual Report.



185



55!58^i8^5;585gSS2S!8S5S28SgS3S$SSSgS?2g2s*!ggE:?2?iS53SS8836S8l53BS2gS?



2S3



S222R '2



glgiSS^S



Online LibraryKansas State Board of HealthAnnual report of the State Board of Health of the State of Kansas → online text (page 26 of 40)