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61FT OP
ROBEPH"
BELPHBR




THE BIRD-WOMAN OF THE
LEWIS AND CLARK EXPEDITION

A SUPPLEMENTARY READER FOR
FIRST AND SECOND GRADES



BY KATHERINE CHANDLER

Author of
" Habits of California Plants " and " In the. Reign of Coyote : Folk-Lore from the Pacific "




FV

OF THE

I UNIVERSITY

OF



SILVER, BURDETT AND COMPANY
NEW YORK BOSTON CHICAGO



BELCHEK



Copyright, 1905,

BY
SILVER, BURDETT AND COMPANY



To my friend
GENEVRA SISSON SNEDDEN

whose interest in this little book
has encouraged its completion



PREFACE.

QECAUSE children invariably ask for "more" of the
stories they find interesting, this little book of
continuous narrative has been written. Every incident
is found in the Lewis and Clark Journals, so that the
child's frequent question, " Is it true?" can be answered
in the affirmative.

The vocabulary consists of fewer than 700 words.
Over half of these are found in popular primers. There-
fore, the child should have no difficulty in reading this
historical story after completing a first reader.

The illustrations on pages 13, 15, 29, 64, and the last
one on page 79, are redrawn from Catlin's " Letters and
Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Conditions of the
North-American Indians."

My acknowledgments are due Miss Lilian Bridgman,
of San Francisco, for help in arranging the vocabulary.



KATHERINE CHANDLER.



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA.
July i, 1905.



CONTENTS



PAGE

THE BIRD- WOMAN . . , . . 9

WHO THE WHITE MEN WERE . 10
WHO THE WHITE MEN WERE

Continued 12

WHY SACAJAWEA WENT WEST . 14

AT FORT MANDAN 16

AT FORT MANDAN Continued . 18

THE BLACK MAN 20

SACAJAWEA'S BABY 22

SACAJAWEA'S BABY Continued . 24
MAKING FRIENDS WITH THE IN-
DIANS 25

MAKING FRIENDS WITH THE IN-
DIANS Continued 27

SACAJAWEA SAVES THE CAPTAINS'

GOODS 30

SACAJAWEA'S RIVER 31

THE FIRST SIGHT OF THE ROCKY

MOUNTAINS 33

SACAJAWEA is ILL 35

How THE INDIANS HUNTED BUF-
FALO 36

THE FALLS OF THE MISSOURI . 38
THE CACHE NEAR THE FALLS

OF THE MISSOURI 40

How SACAJAWEA CURED RAT-
TLESNAKE BITES 41

GOING AROUND THE FALLS . . 43

GRIZZLY BEARS 45

GRIZZLY BEARS Continued . . 47

GRIZZLY BEARS Continued . . 49

AT THE TOP OF THE FALLS . . 51

THE CLOUD-BURST 52

AT THE SOURCE OF THE MIS-
SOURI 54

SACAJAWEA FINDS ROOTS AND

SEEDS 57



PAGE

SACAJAWEA'S PEOPLE .... 60

SACAJAWEA'S BROTHER .... 62
SACAJAWEA'S BROTHER

Continued 64

SACAJAWEA'S PEOPLE WILL

. SHOW THE WAY 66

THE INDIANS TRY TO LEAVE THE

WHITES 68

THE INDIANS TRY TO LEAVE THE

WHITES Continued .... 70
CROSSING THE ROCKY MOUN-
TAINS 72

AT THE COLUMBIA RIVER. . . 74
How THE INDIANS DRIED

SALMON 76

THE WAPPATOO 78

To THE PACIFIC OCEAN ... 80

THE PACIFIC OCEAN 81

SACAJAWEA ON THE OCEAN

BEACH 83

THE WHALE 86

SACAJAWEA'S BELT 88

AT FORT CLATSOP 90

AT FORT CLATSOP Continued . 92

THE START HOME 94

AT CAMP CHOPUNNISH .... 96
AT CAMP CHOPUNNISH

Continued 98

OVER THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS

GOING HOME 100

EAST OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS"

AGAIN 102

EAST OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS

AGAIN Continued 104

SACAJAWEA SAYS GOOD-BYE TO

THE SOLDIERS 106

THE CENTENNIAL 107




THE STATUE OF SACAJAWEA, THE BIRD-WOMAN, UNVEILED AT THE

LEWIS AND CLARK CENTENNIAL, IN PORTLAND,

OREGON, IN 1905




THE BIRD -WOMAN

OF THE
LEWIS AND CLARK EXPEDITION.



a



go hun .dred Sa ca ja we a years



THE BIRD-WOMAN.

The Bird-Woman was an Indian.

She showed the white men the way into

the West.

There were no roads to the West then.
That was one hundred years ago.
This Indian woman took the white men

across streams.
She took them over hills.
She took them through bushes.



JO The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

She seemed to find her way as a bird

does.
The white men said, "She goes like a

bird.

"We will call her the Bird-Woman/'
Her Indian name was Sacajawea.



Clark A mer i can Lew is

met cap tains part

sol diers twen ty nine peo pie
Mis sou ri Riv er

WHO THE WHITE MEN WERE.

The white men Sacajawea went with

were soldiers.

There were twenty-nine soldiers.
There were two captains.
The name of one captain was Lewis.
The name of the other captain was Clark.
They were American soldiers.



The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition \ \





CAPTAIN CLARK. CAPTAIN LEWIS.

They carried the American flag into

the West.
No white men knew about that part of

the West then.
The captains wished to learn all about

the West.
They wished to tell the people in the

East about it.
They had been going West a long time

before they met Sacajawea.
They had rowed up the Missouri River.
They had come to many little streams.



J2 The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

They did not know what the Indians

called these streams.
So they gave them new names for the

white men.

camp Fourth of Ju ly Man dan

cheered French man rest ed

ice In de pend ence creek

hus band Kan sas snow

WHO THE WHITE MEN WERE O>ntinued.

On Fourth of July they named one
stream Fourth of July Creek.

They named another Independence
Creek.

We still call this stream by that name.

You can find it on the map of Kansas.

On Fourth of July the men rested.

The soldier who woke first fired a gun.

Then they all woke up and cheered for
the Fourth of July.



The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition J3



At night they fired another gun.

Then the soldiers danced around the

camp fire.
After a time the ice and snow would not

let them go on.
They made a winter camp

near the Mandan In-
dians.
Here they met Sacaja-

wea and her husband.
Her husband was a

Frenchman who knew

a little about the West.
Sacajawea was the only one there who

had been to the far West.
Lewis and Clark told the Frenchman

they would pay him to go with them.
He said he would go.
Then he and Sacajawea came to live at

the soldiers' camp.




A MANDAN CHIEF



J4 The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

be longed roots tribe

mar ried Snake twelve

Rock y Moun tains thought war

WHY SACAJAWEA WENT WEST.



Sacajawea belonged in the
West.

Her tribe was called the Snake
Indians.

They lived in the Rocky Moun-
tains.

Sacajawea lived in the Moun-
tains until she was twelve
years old.

Then her tribe went to war
with the Mandans from the
East.



The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition J5




MANDAN DRAWING ON A
BUFFALO ROBE



One day Sacajawea and some other girls

were getting roots.
They were down by

a stream.
Some M andans came

upon them.
The girls ran fast to

get away.
Sacajawea ran into the stream.
An Indian caught her.
He took her up on his horse.
He carried her away to the East, to the

country of the Mandans.
There she married the Frenchman.
There the Americans found her.
She was glad when her husband said

he would go West with Lewis and

Clark.
She thought she would see her own tribe

again.



\6 The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition



an i mals


coun try


friends


med i cine


read y


chiefs


froz en


plants


wrote


fort


sweat


house



AT FORT MANDAN-

The soldiers called their winter camp
Fort Mandan. They had a hard

winter there.
It was so cold
that many men
were ill.
They had no time

to be ill.
They had to work to be ready to go

West when Spring opened.
The captains wrote in their books about
the Indians and animals and plants
they had seen.

They made maps of the country they
had come through.




The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition M

They had long talks with the Indian

chiefs.
They made friends with the Indians by

giving them medicine.
An Indian boy had his feet frozen near

the soldiers' camp. ^

The captains kept him



', -\
until his feet were well

again.

His people all came and ^4 A.
thanked the captains.

AN INDIAN SWEAT-

The Indians told each

other about the white men's medi-
cine.

They said, ''The white men's medicine
is better than our sweat-house."

So they came for miles to the white
camp to get the medicine.

They gave the captains food.

They wanted to be friends with them.



The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition



ar rows


din ner


hunt ed


mon ey


beads


fiddle


knives


pie ces


blan kets


gal Ions


med als


stove



AT FORT MANDAN-Continued.

The soldiers hunted animals for food

and for their skins.

One soldier cut an old stove into -pieces.
The Indians wanted these pieces to

make arrows and knives.
They would give eight gallons of corn

for one piece.
The Indians did not know what money

was.
The captains did not carry money with

them.
They took flags and medals, knives and

blankets, looking-glasses and beads,

and many other things.



The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition f 9



With these they could get food from

the Indians.
On Christmas Day,

1804, the soldiers

put the American

flag up over the fort.
They told the Indians

not to come to see

them on that day.
They said it was the

best day of their year.
It was a cold day, with

much ice and snow.
They had a good din-
ner and after dinner the soldiers

danced.
On New Year's Day, 1805, they fired

off all their guns.
The captains let the soldiers go to the

Mandan camp.




20 The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition




They took their fiddle and

danced for the Indians.
One soldier danced on

his hands with his

head down.
The Indians liked this

dancing very much.
They gave the soldiers

some corn and some

skins.



sur prised hair paint ed stran ger
fin ger wa ter helped York

THE BLACK MAN.

Captain Clark had his black man, York,

with him.
The Indians were always surprised to

see the black man.



The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 21

They thought he was stranger than the

white men.
One Mandan chief said, "This is a

white man painted black/'
He wet his finger and tried to wash the

black off York's skin.
The black would not come off.
Then York took off his hat.
The chief had not seen such hair before.
Then the chief said, "You are not like

a white man.
"You are a black man."
The Indians told each other of this

black man.

They came from far to see him.
York helped make them friends with

the whites.

The captains named a river for York.
The river had only a little water in it.
They named it York's Dry River.



22 The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

bas ket laugh weeks

born su gar

SACAJAWEA'S BABY.

At Fort Mandan, Sacajawea's baby boy

was born.
He was only eight weeks old when the

white men began to go to the far

West.
Sacajawea made a basket of skins for

her baby.

She put it on her back.
The baby could sleep in the basket as

Sacajawea walked.
The soldiers liked the baby.
They gave it sugar.
They made it playthings of wood.
They danced to make it laugh.
Indian babies do not laugh much and

they do not cry much.



The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 23

Once in the West the baby was ill.

Then the soldiers camped for some days.

They were very still.

Captain Lewis gave the baby medicine.

This made the baby well again.

Then the men laughed.

They said, "Let us sing and dance for

the baby/'
The baby laughed as it looked at the

men.





24 The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition



A pril
broke



par ty

shoot



shot
warm



SACAJAWEA'S BABY Continued.

The warm April sun broke up the ice

in the Missouri River.
Then the party got into their boats and

rowed on up the river.
From this time on, Sacajawea and her
baby were a help to the soldiers.

When the Indians saw
a woman and a baby
with the men, they
knew it was not a
war party.

Indians would not take
a woman and baby
to war.
Only men go to war.




Tnc Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 25

The Indians did not shoot at the men.
They came up to see what they wanted.
If Sacajawea had not been there, they

would have shot the white men.
The Indians thought that all strangers

wanted war.
They thought this until the strangers

showed that they were friends.



bare foot ed cov ered prick ly

threw cor ners pears

same moc ca sins true

MAKING FRIENDS WITH THE INDIANS*

Sacajawea showed the captains how to
make friends with the Indians.

The Indians on the upper Missouri
River and in the Rocky Mountains
showed that they wanted to be friends
in the same way.



26 The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

When they saw

strangers, they

stood still and

talked to each other.
If they wished to befriends,

the chief walked out ahead

of his people.
He took off his blanket.
He took hold of it by two

corners.
He threw it up high.
Then he put it on the ground.
This showed that he was putting down

a skin for a friend to sit on.

He did this three

times.
Then the strangers

came up to him.
They sat down together. ,
They took off their moccasins.





The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 27

This showed that they wished to be

true friends.
If they were not true friends, they would

go barefooted all their

days.
They thought it hard to

go barefooted.
The ground was covered

with prickly pears.
The prickly pears would hurt their feet.




great pres ents smoked

pipes send Wash ing ton

MAKING FRIENDS WITH THE INDIANS-Continued.

When the strangers had their moccasins
off, they smoked some pipes together.

Then they gave each other presents.

Then they told each other why they had
come together.



28 The Bird -Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition





Captain Lewis and Captain Clark always

told the Indians:
"We have come from the Great Father

in Washington.
" He sends you these presents.
"He wants you to be friends with the

white men.
"He wants you to be friends with the

other Indians.
"When you all are friends, the men can

get many animals and the women can

get many roots.



The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 29

"The Great Father will send you out

the white men's goods when you are

all friends/'
The Indians always said to Lewis and

Clark :
"We are glad to hear from the Great

Father in Washington.
"We like his presents.
"We shall be glad to get the white

men's goods.
"We will be friends with all men, with

Indians and with white men/




30 The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition



a fraid com pass

straight ened turned

rud der



canoe
hit



SACAJAWEA SAVES THE CAPTAINS' GOODS.

Going up the Missouri, the compass,
the books, and the maps were in one
canoe.
The captains had the compass to find

the West.

One day a big wind hit this
canoe and turned it nearly
over.
Sacajawea's husband was at

the rudder.

He was afraid and let go.
The water came into the

canoe.

The maps and books came
up to the top of the water.




The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 3J

Sacajawea saw them going out into the

river.

She took the compass into her lap.
She caught the books.
She called to her husband.
He took the rudder again.
He straightened the boat again.
Then Sacajawea caught the maps that

were on top of the river.



Crook ed Mon ta na wide

hand some saved yards

SACAJAWEA'S RIVER.

As the maps and books were wet, the

soldiers had to

camp two days.
They put the

maps and the

books and the compass in the sun.
When these were dry, they went on again.




32 The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Ten days after, they came to a river that

no white man had seen before.
Captain Lewis wrote in his book, "It is

a handsome river about 50 yards

wide/'
They did not know the Indian name

for it.
The captains were so glad Sacajawea

had saved their things that they

named it for her.
They said, "We will call it the Sacajawea

or Bird-Woman's River/
This river is still running.
Look on a map of Montana.
Do you see a stream named "Crooked

Creek ?"
That is the stream Lewis and Clark

named Sacajawea's River.
Which do you think is the prettier name?
Which do you think we should call it?



The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 33

blew elk pleas ure

cross plains steep

buf fa lo mos qui tees sight



THE FIRST SIGHT OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS.

Going up the Missouri, the party had to

drink the river water.
It was not good and it made them ill.
The sand blew in their eyes.
The mosquitoes bit them all the time.
But still the soldiers were happy.
They carried their goods in boats.
They walked when they wished to.
They hunted buffalo and elk on the

plains near the river.
They had all they wanted to eat.
One day in May, Captain Lewis was

out hunting.
He went up a little hill



34: The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition







Then far off to the West he saw the

Rocky Mountains high and steep.
Captain Lewis was the first white man

to see these mountains.
He wrote in his book that he felt a great

pleasure on first seeing them.
He knew they would be very hard to cross.
They were all white with snow.
But he was ready to go on so as to get

to the West.
He went back to the boats and told the

others about the mountains.
The men were happy and worked harder

to get near them.



The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 35

grew fell hot sul phur

worse

SACAJAWEA IS ILL.

Going up the Missouri, Sacajawea fell
ill. ; f ,

She could not eat.

She grew worse each day.

Captain Clark gave her some medi-
cine.

It did not make her well.

The soldiers had to camp until she could
go on.

They could not go on without her.

They wanted her with them to make
friends with her tribe.

One day the soldiers found a hot sulphur
spring. Ut ,\j, , ; .

They carried Sacajawea to this spring.

The water made her well.

In a week she could go on.



36 The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

bank killed hole to ward

HOW THE INDIANS HUNTED BUFFALO.




On the plains of the Missouri there were
many buffaloes.

Sacajawea told the soldiers how the In-
dians hunted them..

An Indian put on a buffalo skin.

The buffalo's head was over his head.

He walked out to where the buffaloes
were eating.

He stood between them and a high bank
of the river.

The other Indians went behind the buf-
faloes.



The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 37

The buffaloes ran toward the man in

the buffalo skin.
He ran fast toward the river.
Then the buffaloes ran fast toward the

river.
At the high bank the man ran down

and hid in a hole.
The buffaloes came so fast that they

could not stop at the bank.
They fell over the bank on to the rocks

near the river.
Many were killed.
Then the Indians came around the

bank.
They skinned the

buffaloes.

They dried the meat.
They dried the skins

to make blankets

and houses.




38 The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

June won der ful draw

pic ture spray write

cache

THE FALLS OF THE MISSOURI.

One June day Captain Lewis was walk-
ing ahead of the boats.
He heard a great noise up the River.
He pushed on fast.
After walking seven miles, he came to

the great Falls of the Missouri.
He was the first white man to see these

Falls.
He sat down on a rock and watched the

water dash and spray.
He tried to draw a picture of the Falls.
He tried to write about it in his book.
But he said it was so wonderful that he

could not draw it well nor picture it

in words.
When the men came up, they could not

take their boats near the Falls.



The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 39

The Falls are very, very high.

The highest fall is eighty-seven feet

high, and the water comes down with

a great rush.
So the soldiers had to go around the

Falls.

That was a long, long way.
It would be hard to carry all their things

around the Falls.
The captains said, "We will make a

cache here.
"We will put in the skins and plants

and maps.
"We can get them all again when we

are coming home/'
The soldiers made two caches.
In these they hid all the things they could

do without.
Without so much to carry, it would not

be so hard to go around the Falls.



40 The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

dried dug ring sod

hot torn branch es earth sides



THE CACHE NEAR THE FALLS OF THE MISSOURI,

To make a cache, the soldiers made a

ring on the ground.
They took up the sod inside the ring.
They dug straight down for a foot.
They put dried branches on the bottom

and at the sides of this hole.
They put dried skins over the branches.
Then they put their goods into the hole,

or cache.

They put dried skins over the goods.
Then they put the earth in.
Then they put the sod on.
The ring did not look as if it had been

dug up.
The Indians would not think to look

there for goods.



The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 4t

bite fresh rat tie snakes

cure morn ing sev en teen

beat

HOW SACAJAWEA CURED RATTLESNAKE BITES.




Near the Falls of the Missouri, the

party met many rattlesnakes.
The snakes liked to lie in the sun cin the

river banks.
Some times they went up trees and lay

on the branches.
One night Captain Lewis was sleeping

under a tree.
In the morning he looked up through

the tree.

He saw a big rattlesnake on a branch.
It was going to spring at him.



42 The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

He caught his gun and killed it.

It had seventeen rattles.

Sometimes the soldiers had to go bare-
footed.

The snakes bit their bare feet.

Sacajawea knew how to cure the bite.

She took a root she called the rattle-
snake root.

She beat it hard.

She opened the snake bite.

She tied the root on it.

She put fresh root on two times a day.

It cured the snake bite.

The root would kill a man if he should
eat it, but it will cure a snake bite.




The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 43

ax les even hail tongues

bears e nough knocked wheels

griz zly cot ton wood mast wil low



GOING AROUND THE FALLS.

The party had to go up a high hill to

get around the Falls.
It would take too long to carry the canoes

on their backs.
They could see only one big tree on the

plains.

It was a cottonwood.
The soldiers cut it down.
They cut wheels and tongues from it.
The cottonwood is not hard enough for

axles.
The soldiers cut up the mast of their

big boat for axles.
They began to go up the hill.
In a little time the axles broke.



44 The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

They put in willow axles.

Then the cottonwood tongues broke.

Then the men had to carry the goods
on their backs.

It was very hot.

The mosquitoes and blow-flies bit them
all the time.

The prickly pear hurt their feet.

It hurt them even through their mocca-
sins.

If they drank water, they were ill.

One day it hailed hard.

The hail knocked some of the men down.

At night the grizzly bears took their food.




The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 45



load
mouth



point ed
roared



large
fierce



safe
waist



GRIZZLY BEARS*

After many hard days, they got all the

goods to the top of the Falls.
The party saw many grizzly bears near

the Falls.
They were the first

white men to see the

grizzly bear.
They found it a very

large and very fierce

jr

bear.

One day Captain Lewis was out hunting.
He had killed a buffalo for dinner.
He turned around to load his gun again.
He saw a big bear coming after him.
It was only twenty feet away.
He did not have time to load his gun.
There was no tree near.




46 The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

There was no rock near.

The river bank was -not high.

Captain Lewis ran to the river.

The bear ran after him with open mouth,

It nearly caught him.

Captain Lewis ran into the river.

He turned around when the water was

up to his waist.

He pointed his gun at the bear.
It stopped still.
Then it roared and ran away.
Captain Lewis did not know why the

bear roared and ran, but he was glad

to be safe.




The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 47



body
brave


de feat ed
ly ing


shoul der
angry



GRIZZLY BEARS Continued.

One day six of the soldiers saw a big
bear lying on a little hill near the
river.

The six soldiers came near him.

They were all good shots.

Four shot at him.

Four balls went into his body.

He jumped up.

He ran at them with open mouth.

Then the two other men fired.

Their balls went into his body, too.

One ball broke his shoulder.

Still he ran at them.

The men ran to the river.

Two jumped into their canoe.

The others hid in the willows.

/. ^ -



48 The Bird- Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition


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Online LibraryKatherine ChandlerThe bird-woman of the Lewis and Clark expedition; a supplementary reader for first and second grades → online text (page 1 of 3)