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phur. It is probable that in other coals free sulphur may be
found, especially in those which have much fibrous coal between
their laminse.

The fibrous coal above described is remarkable for the large
proportion of carbon it contains. The carbonaceous mud, on
the contrary, contains but little combustible matter. It would
be a bituminous shale if indurated.



'52



CHEMICAL REPORT.



OHIO COUNTY.

No. 1631 COAL. "Rockport mines, one and three quarter mile*
east of Rockport. Average sample, from along the entry.
Collected by C. /. Norwood." ( Coal D.)
Rather friable. Pitch-black, with some incrustations oi

shining- pyrites in the seams, and some fibrous coal between

the laminae.

No. 1632 COAL. "Same locality, &c. Average sample, by C.
J. Norwood." General average of the mine. (Coal D.)
A pitch-black coal, with fibrous coal between the layers;

some infiltration of lime sulphate in the seams, and but little

pyrites.

No. 1633 COAL. "Same locality, &c. Averaged by C. /.
Norwood." (Coal D.)
Much like the preceding.

COMPOSITION OF THESE OHIO COUNTY COALS, AIR-DRIED.





No. 1631.


No. 1632.


No. 1633.


Specific gravity. .




i .421


1-332

' "

3.00
36.20
60.80


-334






Hygroscopic moisti
Volatile combustibl
Coke


re ......


3-5
35-oo
61.50


3.00
33.50
63-50


e matters




Total




IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO






Total volatile matte
Carbon in the coke
Ashes . . . . ,


rs


38.50
52-50

9.00


39-20

53-70
7.10


36.50

55-10
8.40






Total




IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO






Character of the co


ke


Light

spongy.


Light
spongy.


Light
spongy.








Light
brownish-
grey.


Light
lilac-grey.


Lilac-grey.






Per centage of sulpl


mr


3-139


2-837


3-332





These coals are all of very good quality.



152



[See Appendix for other Ohio county coals.]



CHEMICAL REPORT. 153

No. 1634 " VIRGIN SOIL from woodland, on Mr. Miller s land,
fifteen hundred and twenty feet north to east from Horse
Branch Station (Louisville and Paducah Railroad). Collected
by C. S. Schenk."

Slope 1:16. Depth of sample six inches. Substratum sand-
stone. Timber : white and black oak, some chestnut, hickory,
and poplar. Undergrowth : sassafras, dogwood, and small trees
of above named kinds. The new land is said to produce of
corn, forty to fifty bushels ; wheat, twenty to thirty ; oats, forty
to fifty ; and of tobacco, one thousand pounds to the acre.
Dried soil of a dark brownish-grey color. No gravel.

No. 1635 "SuB-soiL of the preceding, taken at depth of from
six to thirty -six inches. By C. S. Schenk"
Sub-soil of a light grey-buff color. No gravel.

No. 1636 " SOIL of an old field, forty years in cultivation.

Level table land, owned by Mr. Miller, sixteen hundred feet

north 20 east, from Horse Branch Station, &c. Collected by

C. S. Schenk."

Sample taken to the depth of seven and a half inches.
Substratum sandstone. Rotation of crops : tobacco two years,
corn three years (in some cases corn until it fails to produce
it), then wheat and clover, or oats and clover or grass. Yield
of corn, twenty to thirty bushels ; oats, twenty to thirty-five
bushels ; tobacco, six hundred pounds per acre. Never plowed
over six or seven inches deep. Good quality of table-land;
nearly as good as the valley land.

Dried soil of a greyish light-brown color. Contains a few
small fragments of ferruginous sandstone.

-No. 1637 " SUB-SOIL of the next preceding, taken to the depth
of from seven and a half to thirty-six inches. Collected by C.
S. Sckenk."

Dried sub-soil of a yellowish-grey color. Contains no
gravel.

VOL. I.-CHEM. II. 153



154 CHEMICAL REPORT.

COMPOSITION OF THESE OHIO COUNTY SOILS, DRIED AT 212 F.





No. 1634.


No. 1635.


No. 1636.


No. 1637.


Organic and volatile matters


4. 100


-j . CQO


"? <J?O


7 . 7CO


Alumina, and iron and manganese oxides . .
Lime carbonate


3-032
. I7O


7.047

-OQ^


4.066

.OQZ


6.475

.oqe


Magnesia


.IT.1


2 c8


. I O4.


.171


Phosphoric acid


.OQT


OQ7


124.


. I4.O


Sulphuric acid


Not estima


ted






Potash


I2C


211


Ill


260


Soda


a trace




OI2


210


Sand and insoluble silicates


02.4.^


88 841


OI OQO


80 . ? I ^


Water expelled at 380 F


.0.00


QIC


77C


.771:












Total


IOI .066


101 165


101 049


IOI .O2O












Hygroscopic moisture


i 171;


2 4OO


I ACO


2 S7H












Potash in the insoluble silicates ....


I 273


I 4.7O


QtQ


I IO7












Soda in the insoluble silicates


.814


.617


. cil


.2QO












Character of the soil


Virgin soil.


Sub-soil.


Old field


Sub-soil.








soil.





The old field soil seems to have been naturally richer than
the woodland soil, if no mistake has been made in the labels.
The considerable proportions of potash and soda in the sandy
portion (insoluble silicates) tend to give durability to the soils.
With proper culture and the due application of fertilizers, this
land may be made quite productive, if well drained

For the analyses of other soils of this serial collection, made
by Mr. C. S. Schenk along the line of the Elizabethtown and
Paducah Railroad, see Grayson and Hardin counties.
154



APPENDIX.



BOURBON COUNTY.

No. 1638 "LIMESTONE (magnesiari). From Cane Ridge; Jive
miles east of Paris. Used for the foundation of the Bourbon
county Court-house at Paris. Sent by Mr. fames Stevenson"
A somewhat porous, fossiliferous, ferruginous, magnesian

limestone, of a light grey-buff color, containing small specks

of hydrated oxide of iron. Specific gravity = 2.58 to 2.60

(in the lump).

COMPOSITION, DRIED AT 212 F.

Lime carbonate 79. 140 = 44.318 per cent, of lime.

Magnesia carbonate 11.826 = 5.371 per cent, of magnesia.

Alumina .380

Iron peroxide . . . . ; 5-5 10

Phosphoric acid -S 11

Sulphuric acid .240

Potash .231

Soda .252

Soluble silica .no

Insoluble silica 1. 1 60

Loss .640

100. OOO

The magnesian limestones are believed to withstand the
atmospheric agencies generally better than the pure lime-
stones. The iron in this rock is all in the state of peroxide,
which is also favorable to its durability.

Whether its small cavities or pores may retain enough water
to cause disintegration by freezing was not ascertained. It
would calcine into lime good for ordinary building purposes or
for use on the soil as a fertilizer.

COALS FROM THE STATE OF OHIO.

For the purpose of comparing our Kentucky coals with some
of the best of those of our neighboring States, some of these,
collected by Messrs. P. N. Moore and A. R. Crandall, were
submitted to analysis, as follow :

155



156 CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.

No. A. i "CoAL from Jackson county, Ohio. Star Furnace

coal. Averaged by A. R. Crandall."

A glossy, jet-black splint coal ; breaking into thin laminae,
with fibrous coal between.

No. A. 2 " COAL. Ho eking valley, Athens county, Ohio. Aver-
age sample from the whole thickness of the bed. Taken from
the pillar, three hundred yards. By A. R. Crandall"
A pitch-black, glossy coal, iridescent on some of the faces ;

having very little fibrous coal, and no pyrites apparent.

No. A. 3 " COAL. Hocking valley, &c., &c. Average sample
from the stock pile, from the whole thickness of the bed. By A.

R. Crandall."

Like the preceding, but brighter, and showing less fibrous
coal.

No. A. 4 COAL. Hocking valley, &c., &c. Average sample
from the upper twenty-eight inches. Taken from two rooms.

By A. R. Crandall."

Breaks into thinner laminae than the two preceding, with
more fibrous coal between. Some little shining pyrites in thin
crusts.

No. A. 5 " COAL. Hocking valley, &c., &c. Average sam-
ple from the middle part (twenty -six inches}, taken from two
rooms. By A. R. Crandall."

In thicker laminae than preceding, with much less fibrous
coal, and no appearance of pyrites between them. Hand-
somely iridescent on many of the seam faces.

No. A. 6 "CoAL. Hocking valley, &c., &c. Average sam-
ple, from the lower part (eighteen inches) of the bed. Taken
from two rooms. By A. R. Crandall."
Resembles the preceding, but shows some bright pyrites in

places.

No. A. 12 "CoAL. Sheridan coal mines, Lawrence county,

Ohio. Collected by P. N. Moore."
'56



CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.



157



A pure, pitch-black coal ; with very little fibrous coal and
some fine-granular pyrites, between the laminae.

COMPOSITION OF THESE SELECTED OHIO COALS, AIR-DRIED.





A. I.


A. 2.


A. 3-


A. 4.


A. 5 .


A. 6.


A. 12.


Specific gravity


I . ^61


I . ^22


not det'd.


I . 346


I . 7O7


i . ;i2


I . T.22



















Hygroscopic moisture . .
Vol'ile combustible matters
Coke .


4-^4
29.68
6c 78


3.60
33-42
62 98


4.20
36.68

CO 12


3.26
33-76
62 98


3 74
3 6 -32

Q Qd.


4.40

35-oS
60 52


3.46
36.64

CQ.QO


















Total


IOO OO


IOO.OO


IOO OO


IOO OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


















Total volatile matters . .
Carbon in the coke . . .
Ashes


34.22
57.06

8 72


37.02

55-82

7 16


40.88
54.16

A 06


37.02

54.42
8.56


40.06

55-74

4 2O


39-48

55-20

C . -22


40. 10
53-80
6. 10


















Total


IOO OO


IOO OO


IOO OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


I OO . OO


IOO.OO


















Character of the coke . .


Pulveru-
lent.


Dense.


Spongy.


Dense.


Dense
spongy.


Dense
spongy.


Light
spongy.


Color of the ash ....


Nearly
white.


Brownish
grey.


Light
lilac-grey


Light
lilac-grey


Light
lilac-grey


Light
lilac-grey


Light
lilac-grey


Per centage of sulphur. .


0.756


0.862


1 .692


2.247


1.299


1.659


1.947



These are remarkably good coals, and are acknowledged to
be amongst the best of the country.

The sample A. 2, taken from the pillar, seems to show the
effect of exposure to the atmosphere, which is generally be-
lieved to cause a diminution of the proportion of sulphur.

A correspondence may be observed between the proportion
of ash and the specific gravity, as follows :



A. 5 has specific gravity =

A. 6 has " "

A. 2 and A. 13 have ' ' ' '

A. 4 has ' ' ' '

A. I has ' ' ' '



.303, and ash per cent.

.312, " "

.322, "

.346, " "

.361,



4.20
5-32

6.10 and 7.16
8.50

8.72



COALS FROM THE STATE OF ILLINOIS.

No. A. 7 COAL. "Mine near Murphrysboro, Jackson county,
Illinois. Block coal. Big Muddy coal. Average sample, by
P. N. Moore r

157



158



CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.



A glossy, jet-black splint coal. It has some fibrous coal
between the laminae ; with occasional scales of bright pyrites,
and some slight lime sulphate incrustation in the seams.

No. A. 8 " COAL. Big Muddy coal. Mine near Murphrysboro,

Illinois. Average sample, by P. N. Moore"

Like the preceding. Some fine-granular pyrites with the
fibrous coal between the laminae, and occasional lime sulphate
incrustation in the seams.

COMPOSITION OF THESE ILLINOIS COALS, AIR-DRIED.





No. A. 7.


No. A. 8.


Specific gravity . .


I . 7IO


I ^IO








Hygroscopic moisture


2.62


1 A.A.


Volatile combustible matters


72. O4


T>\ 86


Coke


6c . 74.


6j. 7O








Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OO










^4.66


7C . 7O


Carbon in the coke


S8.<;8


Cn. CA




6.76


=;.i6








Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OO










Light






spongy.




Color of the ash


Lilac-prev


Lilac-grey^








Per centage of sulphur


2 A72


i i?6









These are also remarkably good coals, containing only a
moderate proportion of sulphur, which is partly in the form
of iron sulphide and partly in that of lime sulphate.

COALS FROM THE STATE OF INDIANA.

No. A. 9 " INDIANA BLOCK COAL. From near Brazil, Clay
county. Upper seam. Average sample, by P. N. Moore."
A pitch-black splint coal, breaking easily into thin laminae,

with fibrous coal (mineral charcoal) and some fine granular

158



CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.



159



pyrites between them. A few bright scales of iron pyrites
and some slight lime sulphate incrustation in the seams.

No. A. 10 " INDIANA BLOCK COAL. Mine near Brazil, Clay
county. Lower seam. Average sample, by P. N. Moore"
Like preceding, but little appearance of pyrites or lime sul-
phate.

No. A. ii "INDIANA BLOCK COAL. From mine near Brazil^
&c. Lower seam. Average sample, by P. N. Moore"
Resembles the others. Shows occasional bright scales of

pyrites and lime sulphate incrustation.

COMPOSITION OF THESE INDIANA COALS, AIR-DRIED.





No. A. 9.


No. A. 10.


No. A. 11.


No. A. ii

(repeated).


Specific gravity


i ii i


not est.


not est.














Hygroscopic moisture . .


2 7O


2.68


2 .40


2. C.2


Volatile combustible matters


?6 -28


?6. 72


^ 10


^c,.4.8


Coke


60 Q2


6 1 .00


62. Co


62.00












Total


TOO OO


IOO OO


IOO.OO


IOO Ot)












Total volatile matters ...


7O OS


79 oo


27 . co


38.00


Carbon in the coke


cc 64.


C7 C.8


c? . en


-2.06


Ashes


e 28


7 42


Q.OO


8.04.












Total


IOO OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO












Character of the coke


Spongy.


Dense


Dense.








spongy.






Color of the ash


Lilac-grey


Light


Lilac-grey t








lilac-grey.






Per centage of sulphur


i .664.


1 .802


2. 77'?















- These are remarkably good coals, as is well known by expe-
rience, especially in their use in the smelting of iron. Their
high reputation and successful application to this industry
make the comparison of their composition, with that of our

Kentucky coal, an object of interest; and as we could find in

159



16O CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.

the excellent reports of the Chief Geologist of Indiana, Prof.
E. T. Cox, no statement as to the amount of sulphur which
they contain, an ingredient of great and evil influence in iron
smelting, these block coals were examined especially for this
determination.

It will be seen on reference to the preceding table that this
ingredient exists in them in average proportion. Doubtless
to the existence of the sulphur in this fuel may we attribute
the fact, given by Prof. Cox, on page 70 of his First Annual
Report, 1869, that "the general character of the iron made in
Clay county is red-short, &c." This, however, may be meas-
urably corrected, and indeed does not prevent the iron from
being very good and profitable for many industrial purposes.

It is very probable that all the sulphur which exists in these
coals in the free, or uncombined, condition, will be volatilized
and burnt out at the upper part of the furnace, long before it
encounters the heat necessary to cause its combination with
the iron of the ore with which it is mixed. This would be the
case also with the second atom of sulphur of the bright pyrites
of the coal, the bi-sulphide of iron ; so that only that portion
of the sulphur which would remain in the resulting iron proto-
sulphide could vitiate the cast iron product. Hence we can
understand, how a coal which gives a considerable per centage
of sulphur in its ultimate analysis, may yet be quite available
for the smelting of tough iron.

CALIFORNIA ADOBE SOIL.

An opportunity having occurred for procuring a specimen
of this remarkably fertile soil, it was analyzed for comparison
with our Kentucky soils, with the following results.

No. A. 12 " ADOBE SOIL taken at three inches below the surface.

Valley of the Sacramento river. Solano county ', California."

Collected by Robert Peter, jr.

Dried soil of a light-umber color; adhering in clods, which
are easily crushed in the mortar. The powder (unground)
passed wholly through fine bolting-cloth, leaving only a few
vegetable fragments.



1 60



CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.

COMPOSITION OF THE AIR-DRIED SOIL.



161





No. A. 12.


No. 1329.




7.740


7.611;




11.117


12.085




.700


.oqo




1.596


."J2O




.OQ^


.48?


Sulphuric acid


.082


a trace.


Potash


.727


.726


Soda .


.081


a trace.




74.070


7 5 . "?QO


^^ater and loss .. ...


2 8O2


I 891








Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OOO








Potash in the insoluble silicates


o 814


2.771










O.QO"J


.Q2O









It will be seen above that this adobs soil resembles in com-
position the peculiar rich soil found locally in Campbell county,
Kentucky, No. 1329, which is also like the adobe in being a
sticky clay when wet, and hard and cloddy when dry. The
California soil exceeds our Kentucky soils in soda, the latter
has more phosphoric acid.

LYON COUNTY. (Continued.)
No. 1639 " Water taken from the interior of a geode of iron

ore pot iron ore. Suwaunee, Lyon county. Summit Cut ore

bank. Sent by A. L. Anderson, Esq."

The water had a strong astringent taste ; and had deposited
much ferruginous sediment in the bottle. It was analyzed by
my youngest son, Alfred M. Peter, in my laboratory.

COMPOSITION IN loo PARTS OF THE WATER, APART FROM THE SEDIMENT.





o. 2471;




4Q8l




. 1004




. I2OQ




.O6OQ


Potash sulphate






.06 SI








.OO28






Total


I . 1227







161



162



CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.



The analyses of some other samples of water, from the pot
ore of Trigg county, are given in volume 4, page 260-1, of
Kentucky Geological Reports.

EDMONSON COUNTY. (Continued.)

No. 1640 LIMONITE. " Old Nolin Furnace bank, near the fur-
nace ore. Bank about a quarter of a mile north of the furnace.
Davis 1 branch of Nolin river. Average sample, by P. N.
Moore"

Generally of a brownish-red color. A porous ore, with some
whitish portions.

COMPOSITION, DRIED AT 212 F.

Iron peroxide 27 .340= 19. 138 per cent, of iron.

Alumina 5-93

Manganese oxide not det'd.

Lime carbonate 1.090

Magnesia -447

Phosphoric acid 1 .068 = .497 per cent, of phosphorus.

Sulphuric acid not det'd.

Water expelled at red heat 12.380

Silica and insoluble silicates 51.230

Manganese oxide, alkalies, sulphuric acid, &c. . -5 1 5



This ore is too poor in iron to be valuable. It is probable
that its phosphorus is somewhat over-estimated.

No. 1643 PIG IRON. "From old Nolin Furnace. Cold blast"

Furnace long since out of blast.

A fine-grained grey iron, which yields easily to the file, and
extends considerably under the hammer. Seems to be tougher
than usual cast iron.

COMPOSITION. SPECIFIC GRAVITY = 7. 1 13.

Iron 94.287

Graphite 3.100") Q

Combined carbon .700 }= 3- &*> total carbon.

Silicon .493 including that in the slag.

Phosphorus 1.029

Sulphur .012

Undetermined ingredients and loss .379



This appears to be a remarkable instance of cast iron re-
maining tough although it contains a considerable proportion

of phosphorus, which is believed to render it "cold-short," or
162



CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX. 163

brittle at the ordinary temperature, in quantities even less than
one per cent. Possibly the quite small per centage of silicon,
which also renders iron brittle, may have something to do with
this apparent anomaly.

The phosphorus in the above analysis was first determined
as phosphate of bismuth, by the process of Chancel ; but not
satisfied with this determination, this phosphate, after solution
in chlorohydric acid, was decomposed by sulphydric acid, and
the separated phosphoric acid re-determined by means of the
magnesia mixture, in the usual way; and this without any ma-
terial alteration in the result obtained.

GRAYSON COUNTY. (Continued.)

No. 1641 "LiMONiTE. "Nolin Furnace ore bank, on the
Brownsville road. Average sample, by P. N. Moore"
In irregular layers, varying in color and density.

No. 1642 LIMONITE. " From Meredith Ray s farm, Taylors
Fork of Bear Creek, opposite the Chalybeate Spring. Aver-
age sample, by P. N.. Moore."
A pretty dense ore, generally of a dark-brown color, with

some lighter colored portions.

163



1 64



CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.



COMPOSITION OF THESE GRAYSON COUNTY LIMONITE ORES, DRIED AT

212 F.





No. 1641.


No. 1642.




57.830
6.719
Not determ
.290

.122

.921

not deter'd.
12.180
21.040
.898


44.528
1.368
ined.
5-590
.609
1.074
.151
8.940
37.380
.360
















Silica and insoluble silicates




Total


IOO.OOO


IOO.COO






40.481

.412


31.169






.468






not deter'd.


.060

not deter'd.




Silica, per centage


14.360





It is probable the phosphorus is somewhat over-estimated in
these ores.

No. 1644 CLAY IRON-STONE. "The glady ore, on the old
Brownsville and Litchfield road, west of Bear Creek, Grayson
county''

A dark-grey, fine-granular clay iron-stone, with much invest-
ing limonite ore.

COMPOSITION, DRIED AT 212 F.

Iron carbonate 1 6. "598 1 , .

Iron peroxide 42.761 }= 37-945 per cent, of iron.

Alumina 4-994

Lime carbonate 2.840

Magnesia carbonate . not det'd.

Phosphoric acid 1.017 = .444 per cent, of phosphorus.

Sulphuric acid a trace.

Silica and insoluble silicates 20.830

Water and loss 8. 054



164



CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX. 165

BOYD COUNTY. (Continued.)
No. 1645 COAL. No. 7. Used at Ashland Furnace.

A bright pure-looking coal, having but little fibrous coal
between its laminae; has some little bright pyrites and thin
scales of lime sulphate in the seams.

COMPOSITION, AIR- DRIED. SPECIFIC GRAVITY = 1.291.

Hygroscopic moisture 4 ' 8o X Total volatile matters . .= 39-00

Volatile combustible matters 34-2OJ

, f Carbon in the coke = 54. QO

Spongy coke 6l - oo ( Light brownish-grey ash = 6.10

IOO.OO IOO.OO

Per centage of sulphur = 1.312.

A very good and pure coal, which favorably compares with
the best so-called " Block coal" of Indiana, and is well adapted
to the purpose for which it is used.

CARTER COUNTY. (Continued.)

No. 1646 COAL. No. i. "From Graham bank. Little Fork
of Little Sandy river. Collected by P. N. Moore."
A pure-looking coal, which has some fibrous coal between

its laminae ; but shows very little pyrites.

No. 1647 COAL. No. i. "From Graham bank, &c. Sample
from all parts of the mine."

165



1 66 CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.

COMPOSITION OF THESE CARTER COUNTY COALS, AIR-DRIED.





No. 1646.


No. 1647.


Specific gravity


I 269


not deter'd.












360


Volatile combustible matters ,


o u


71 AO


Coke




6 1 oo








Total


JOO OO


100.00








Total volatile matters


10 80


7O.OO


Fixed carbon in the coke


C7 7O


jy.w

C7 OO


Ashes


2 QO


1 .40








Total


IOO OO


IOO.OO






















Brownish-


Brownish-




grey.


grey.


Per centage of sulphur


I 148


I . IO7









Remarkably good and pure coals.

GREENUP COUNTY. (Continued.)

No. 1648 COAL. No. i. "Raccoon Creek. Raccoon Furnace.
Collected by P. N. Moore"

A splint coal, with quite thin laminae and considerable
fibrous coal between. Some little iron stain, but little appear-
ance of pyrites.



No. 1649 COAL. " Hunnewell cannel coal. Hunnewell mines?

1 66



CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.



i6 7





No. 1648.


No. 1649.


Specific gravity


1.409


1.306

1.50
52.20
46.30




Hygroscopic moisture


4.10

28.90
67.00


Volatile combustible matters


Coke


Total


IOO.OO


100.00




Total volatile matters


33-00
49.60
17.40


53-70

40.60

5-70


Fixed carbon in the coke


Ashes .


Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OO






Pulverulent


Very friable

Light
yellowish-
grey.






Light-grey,
nearly white




Per centa^e of sulphur


0.655


0.782





This cannel coal is remarkably pure and good. Its propor-
tion of volatile combustible matters (52.20 per cent.) is remark-
ably great.

OHIO COUNTY. (Continued.)

No. 1650 COAL (D.) "From Taylor coal mines, near Beaver
Dam, Ohio county. Collected by C. J. Norwood. (Rather bet-
ter than a fair average"}
A bright-looking coal, with but little fibrous coal between

the laminae, but with some scales of bright pyrites.

No. 1651 COAL (D.) "Stevens coal mine, near Beaver Dam,
- &c. Collected by C. J. Norwood"

Has more fibrous coal than the preceding, but shows less

pyrites. Iridescent in parts.

167



168



CHEMICAL REPORT APPENDIX.

COMPOSITION, AIR-DRIED.





No. 1650.


No. 1651.


Specific gravity


I 31 ?


I 316










3 ?o


7 7O


Volatile combustible matters


35 84.


l6 76


Coke


60.86


CQ.Q4








Total


IOO OO


IOO.OO










3O. IA


40.06




CA 'if)


C2 60




6 50


7 14.








Total


100.00


IOO.OO










SDonsrv.



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