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& Co., Louisville."
A granular salt, colored light-buff with iron peroxide. Dried

for about a month, in the water-bath it lost 33.715 per cent, of

287



io8



CHEMICAL REPORT.



its weight by the evaporation of water; mainly water of crys-
tallization.

No. 1875 "Crab Orchard Salts ; furnished by Messrs. Arthur

Peter & Co., Louisville, from their stock; obtained by Dr.

Laney Egbert, druggist, of Crab Orchard. Said also to be

derived from various springs."

This also is in granular lumps, and presents various shades
of buff color, from the presence of iron peroxide.

COMPOSITION OF THESE SAMPLES OF CRAB ORCHARD SALTS, DRIED

AT 212 F.





No. 1874.


No. 1875.




54.842


60.627




I3.S66


8.260




2.7O7


2.814




2. I4Q


I .7QC




.0^8


.028




2.QC.A


1.874




.0^2


.018




.O8q


.O'?6




.078


.028




. 124


.118




23.421


24 . 402








Total


IOO.OOO


IOO.OOO









These salts have quite an extensive medicinal use in some
localities. The proportions of lithium salt shown in the above
analyses is not so great as is generally claimed for these salts.

MADISON COUNTY.
CLAYS.

No. 1876 (a) " Potter 's Clay (quality No. i). Upper Silurian.

Waco, nine miles east of Richmond. Collected by A. R, Cran-

dall."

A light-grey soft clay, with some ochreous stains and infil-
tration.

No. 1876 (b) "Potter's Clay (quality No. 2). Same locality,"



Of a bluish-grey color.



288



CHEMICAL REPORT.
COMPOSITION OF THESE CLAYS, DRIED AT 212 F.



109





No. 1876 a.


No. 1876^.




cq. 076


i;6.Q6o


Alumina, iron and manganese oxides, and phosphoric acid ....
Lime carbonate .. . . ... ........


27.640
.280


28 . 740
.200




.606


7^2


Potash


T, .Q"?r


2. ^O2




. ^47


.^IS




7.O2O


IO. I








Total .


IOO.OOO


IOO.OOO









Neither of these would answer for fire-clay, because of their
large proportions of alkalies, lime, magnesia, iron oxide, &c.
The iron was not separately determined, and hence the rea-
son why the one is better than the other for the use of the
potter was not clearly ascertained. Possibly the smaller pro-
portion of silica and larger amount of alumina, iron oxide,
&c., have something to do with it. These are good clays
for ordinary stone-ware, &c.

MADISON COUNTY COALS.

No. 1877 "Coal, from Cox s coal bank. Top of Big Hill.

Bed forty inches thick. A sub-conglomerate coal. Average

sample by A. R. Crandall."

A deep-black splint coal, splitting into very thin laminae,
with much fibrous coal and some little pyrites, some of which
is in a small shot form.

No. 1878 "Coal, from M. Moran s mine. Top of Big Hill,
on the road^ Bed said to be thirty-six to forty-four inches
thick. A sub-conglomerate coal. Sample (niore sulphurous
than usual} brought by Mr. Wm. A. Gunn, Civil Engineer,



- A pretty pure-looking splint coal, with very little/ 7 fibrous
coal, but considerable fine granular pyrites between/the lami-
nae.

/

269



TIO CHEMICAL REPORT.

COMPOSITION OF THESE MADISON COUNTY COALS.





No. 1877.


No. 1878.




1.281


i .282










2.66


I QO


Volatile combustible matters ...........


V, 68


4.C . 76


Coke


6^.66


t2 .T.A.








Total ....


IOO OO


IOO OO








Total volatile matters . .


-?6, 1A.


47 66




;6.i6


44.86


Ash


7 So


7.48








Total . .


IOO.OO


IOO.OO










Dense


Dense.




spongy.




Color of the ash ..


Nearly


Nearly




white.


white.




0.824.


2.888









These two samples, from the same bed evidently, present
remarkable differences; No. 1878 giving off much more vola-
tile combustible matters, and leaving less carbon in the coke
than the other, approaching more nearly to the character of a
cannel coal than that. The relative proportions of sulphur
are also very .different; all illustrating the great variations in
composition which may appear between a selected hand speci-
men and an average sample of the whole bed. The coke
obtained from No. 1877 is somewhat dense and fine cellular.

MAGOFFIN COUNTY.
COALS.

No. 1878 (a) " Salyerjsville Coal. Lower part ; fourteen inches
thick. Half cannel. Collected by A. R. Crandall."
A sample partly cannel and partly bright bituminous or

splint coal. No apparent fibrous coal or pyrites.
290



CHEMICAL REPORT. I I 1

No. 1879 "Satyersville Coal. Upper part; eighteen inches

thick. Collected by A. R. Crandall."

A pure-looking, pitch-black coal, with very little fibrous coal
and no apparent pyrites.

No. 1880 "Coal, from Amos Davis bank, on Licking river.

Bed forty -four inches thick, with a Jive-inch parting. Sample

by A. R. Crandalir

A firm, pitch-black splint coal, with some fibrous coal and
fine granular pyrites between its thin laminae.

No. 1 88 1 "Coal, from Stacy e coal bank, near the mouth of John-
son s Creek. Bed four feet thick, without parting. Average
sample from near the outcrop. By A. R. Crandall."
A somewhat mixed sample. Mostly bright, pitch-black coal,

with some little dull, and seemingly cannel coal.

No. 1882 "Colviris Cannel Coal. Bed three feet thick. Aver-
age sample from the main outcrop. By A. R. Crandall."
Rather a dull-looking cannel coal. Portions showing a
somewhat fibrous structure ; other portions splitting into thin
laminae. Has very little fibrous coal and no apparent pyrites.

Surfaces soiled somewhat with dirt.

291



112 CHEMICAL REPORT.

COMPOSITION OF THESE MAGOFFIN COUNTY COALS, AIR-DRIED.





No. 1878 a.


No. 1879.


No. 1880.


No. 1881.


No. 1882.




1 .27<


1 .202


I "JOO


i 270


I 21C












1 -^J5


Hygroscopic moisture
Volatile combustible matters. .
Coke


1. 80
45.60

$2.60


2.70
38.04
SO. 26


4-34
37-36
qS.^o


3-7
36.64
CQ 66


2.30

5 J -9Q

4.C.8O














Total


IOO.OO


IOO OO


IOO OO


IOO OO


IOO OO














Total volatile matters
Fixed carbon in the coke . . .
Ash


47.40
43-40
Q. 2O


40.74
51.62

7.64.


41.70
53.14

;.i6


40.34
54-68
4.0,8


54.20
37.56

8.24














Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO














Character of the coke


Dense

spongy.


Light
spongy.


Spongy.


Light
spongy.


Very
dense.


Color of the ash


Buff-grey


Very light


Light pur-


Light


Brownish-






bro'h-grey.


plish-grey.


buff-grey.


grey.


Per centage of sulphur ....


0.688


1.470


1-357


0.944


I-4I5



All of these coals are good, and most of them very good,
containing but a moderate or small proportion of ash, and less
than the usual quantity of sulphur. The cannel coals, al-
though leaving more ash than the others, would doubtless
produce fully as much heat, in equal weights of the coals,
because of their larger proportions of hydrocarbons : it be-
ing a well-established fact that hydrogen will give out three
times as much heat as carbon, when they are burned in equal
weights.

MARTIN COUNTY.
COALS.

No. 1883 "Coal No. i, from Warfield. Mouth of Collins*
Creek. Entry near the salt-works. Average sample from
upper four and a half feet bed. By A. R. Crandall"
A jet-black, pure-looking coal, breaking into thin laminae,

with some fibrous coal and fine granular pyrites between.
292



CHEMICAL REPORT. 113

No. 1884 "-Coal. Warfield. Opening in the face of the hill
on Tug Fork, three hundred feet above low water. Sample by
A. R. Crandall"

Aspect of the coal a little more dull than that of the pre-
ceding.

No. 1885 "Warfield Splint Coal. Three hundred and one feet
above the main Warfield coal. Bed three feet thick, with two
thin clay partings. Sample by A. R. Crandall."
Has fibrous coal between the laminae, but little appearance

of pyrites. Some little ferruginous stain on the seams.

No. 1886 "Eight Feet Coal. Head of Laurel Fork of Nat's
Creek. Sample from an old opening. By A. R. Crandall"
Rather a dull-looking coal. Has but little fibrous coal and
no apparent pyrites between the laminae. Some little ferrugi-
nous stain.

No. 1887 "Coal No. i. Warfield. Sample from two rooms.

By A. R. Crandall"

Generally a glossy, pitch-black splint coal. Has very little
fibrous coal, generally, between the laminae. Some thin scales
of brassy pyrites in some of the seams, and occasional layers
of fibrous coal with granular pyrites

293



114 CHEMICAL REPORT.

COMPOSITION OF THESE MARTIN COUNTY COALS, AIR-DRIED.





No. 1883.


No. 1884.


No. 1885.


No. 1886.


No. 1887.


Specific gravity


i .T>i


i.8


i. 3S8


I .^67


1 . 7O2














Hygroscopic moisture .....
Volatile combustible matters. .
Coke


2.16

33 - 60

64.24


2.50

33-70
61.80


2.24
33-6
64. 7o


3-50
3>-94

64. <;6


2.OO
35-12

62.88














Total


I OO . OO


I OO . OO


100 oo


IOO.OO


IOO.OO














Total volatile matters


^.76


^6.20


?e ?o


TC. 44


37.12


Fixed carbon in the coke . . .
Ash .


55-06

9.18


52.62
II. 18


52.70

12. OO


52.06
i 2. CO


54.82
8.06














Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OO 1


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


100.00














Character of the coke


Light
spongy.


Light
spongy.


Dense.


Dense.


Dense.


Color of the ash


Brownish-


Light


Very light


Very light


Lilac-grey.




grey.


lilac-grey.


lilac-grey.


lilac-grey.




Per centage of sulphur ....


2-563


0-754


0.604


0.873


0.983



These Martin county coals generally contain rather more
than the average amount of earthy matters, but less than the
usual quantity of sulphur. Their rather large proportion of
ash, however, does not materially detract from their value for
use in manufacturing processes, or for fuel.

M'LEAN COUNTY.

No. 1888 "BITUMINOUS SHALE (so-called cannel coal), from
near Wrightsburg. Collected by C. J. Norwood"
A somewhat tough, dull-looking bituminous shale. Some

ferruginous stain on the exposed surfaces.

No. 1889 "CoAL, from near Wrightsburg. Average sample
by C. J. Norwood."
A jet-black, splint coal, with very little friable fibrous coal

and granular pyrites between some of the thin laminae.
294



CHEMICAL REPORT.
COMPOSITION, AIR-DRIED.





No. 1888.


No. 1889.




not det'd.


1 .241










i .60


2. 7Q




36.4.0


36.OO


Coke


62.00


6O.7O








Total .


100 oo


IOO.OO










38.00


3Q."?O




JW.VW

?1 . 70


57.88


Ash


3O.64


2.82








Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OO










Friable.


Light






spongy.




Brownish


Buff-grey.




lilac-grey.




Per centage of sulphur


not est.


1 .024









The coal No. 1889 is remarkably pure and good. The
bituminous shale or impure cannel coal might, in many cases,
be profitably used as fuel, notwithstanding its large ash per
centage.

MORGAN COUNTY.
COALS.

No. 1890 "Pierat's Cannel Coal. Collected by A. R. Cran-



A tough, somewhat dull-looking coal, breaking with diffi-
culty into thin laminae. Has a satiny lustre on its cross frac-
ture. Contains no apparent pyrites or fibrous coal. The
sample is mixed with a little attached brittle, glossy, splint
coal.

No. 1891 "Cannel Coal, from Maynhier s bank. Elk Fork of
Licking river. Layer of cannel coal tivo feet two inches thick.
Collected by A. R. Crandall"

295



n6



CHEMICAL REPORT.



A dull-black, clean-looking coal. Fracture somewhat fi-
brous across the laminae. No fibrous coal or apparent pyrites.

No. 1892 "Six-foot Coal. Near West Liberty. Collected by

A. R. Crandalir

A soft splint coal, breaking into thin laminae, with fibrous
coal between, but no apparent pyrites.

COMPOSITION OF THESE MORGAN COUNTY COALS, AIR-DRIED.





No. 1890.


No. 1891.


No. 1892.


Specific gravity


I .270


i . 771


I . 7?1












2.O6


2 7O


4.26


Volatile combustible matters


40.64.


41 .60


-je 24




48. ^o


S6. 10


60. "jo










Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO










Total volatile matters


ci .70


4.3 QO


-2Q. CQ




4.7.20


44. 7O


<;o. 10


Ash . .


<;. 10


1 1 .40


10.4.0










Total


IOO OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO












Snonp'v.


Very dense


Dense






spongy.


spongy.




Light


Grey-buff.


Nearly




buff-grey.




white.


Per centage of sulphur


O OS?


I .271


I. Oil











Cannel coal No. 1890 is remarkably pure and good; the
others contain more than the average quantity of earthy mat-
ters, yet are profitable coals.

MEADE COUNTY.

No. 1893 "SALT WATER, fresh from the well. Glen Font Salt-
works. Collected by C. J. Norwood."
The water deposits a reddish sediment in the bottle, and

gives an alkaline reaction after a time.
296



CHEMICAL REPORT. I I 7

SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF THE WATER = 1.065.

COMPOSITION OF THE WATER IN IOOO. PARTS.

Iron and manganese oxides, alumina and phosphoric acid, 0.0551 Contained in the sed

Lime carbonate. 654 I iment deposited on

Magnesia carbonate 018 [ hoil - r

Silica 005 J

Sodium chloride 74-75

Potassium chloride .250

Calcium chloride 9- 05

Magnesium chloride 2.080

Barium chloride .036

Strontium chloride ... .026

Lithium chloride .284

Bromides and iodides not est.

Soluble silica not est.

87. 208

This brine, like that of the Goose Creek Salt-works, in
Clay county (which see), contains notable quantities of bari-
um and strontium chlorides ; and as the former salt is consid-
ered injurious to the animal economy, it is well to get rid of
it in the manufacture of the salt. This is easily to be done,
as described under the head of the Goose Creek Salt-works.

One thousand parts of the water evaporated to dryness left
a little more than one hundred parts of saline matters, dried
at 212 F. The difference between that amount and the sum
of the solid ingredients given in the analysis is doubtless
owing to moisture, the undetermined ingredients, and una-
voidable loss.

No. 1894 "TriE BITTERN WATER, from the Glen Font Salt-
works."

The water has a slightly brownish color.
Specific gravity =1.2 70.
This water, analyzed by my son, Alfred M. Peter, gave the

following results:

VOL. I ,-CHEM. 20. 2 97



Il8 CHEMICAL REPORT.

COMPOSITION IN 100. PARTS.





3 2O6




. EC?




12 O47




17 Id




.6*8




.096




. 147




.co8




02




.^82






Total ....


^O . 4OQ







The trace of copper is doubtless due to the copper pipes,
&c., in contact with the water. The proportion of lithium
chloride is considerable. Whether there is enough bromine
in it for profitable extraction depends on commercial and other
circumstances.

Remarks on other probable useful applications of the bittern
waters of salt-works will be found under the head of Goose
Creek Salt-works. Clay county ; also under the head of Gray-
son county marls.

With these samples there came a specimen of the "salt
water from the first settler," which also had a brownish tint,
and deposited a brownish sediment in the bottle.

Its specific g ravity was 1.205, and it contained nearly twenty-
six per cent, of dry saline matters.

Also "water from the Grainer" which had crystals of salt
at the bottom. Specific gravity = 1.210.

It gave a little more than twenty-four per cent, of dried
saline matters on evaporation, and was found to contain iodine
equal to 0.009 P er cent, of potassium iodide.

No. 1895 "SALT, manufactured from the Glen Font brine. Col-
lected by C. J. Norwood.

A moderately coarse-grained salt. Slightly damp with bit-
tern water. Of a very light pinkish tint in the mass, from the
presence of a little of the red sediment.
298



CHEMICAL REPORT. 119

COMPOSITION, DRIED AT 212 F.



Sodium chloride (common salt) with traces of potassium and lithium chlo-
rides ... . . .


O7 717


Calcium chloride ...


I 27 C




I 4.1 C




traces only.


Insoluble residue (remains of red sediment)


cm






Total


IOO OOO







This may be considered quite a pure salt as compared with
the usual products of our salt-wells. The traces of barium
salt are too small to be injurious ; nor is the residue of red
sediment injurious. The deliquescent salts, calcium, and mag-
nesium chlorides, keep the salt always moist; they are said
also to injure its antiseptic properties somewhat. These are
easily removed by the addition of a little carbonate of soda
soda ash will do which will precipitate lime and magnesia
carbonates, and leave an equivalent of sodium chloride in
solution. Thus purified, in the last operation before graining,
the resulting salt would be perfectly dry and white and pure.

In addition to the above-described samples, the following
were also received and examined from these salt-works, viz :

(a) "The Jiard red crust formed around the steam-pipe, where
the heat is not great." (A ratJier indefinite description.}
This crust, of a handsome orange-red color in the interior
and brown on the exterior, having a radiated fibrous structure,
dissolved in chlorohydric acid with effervescence; and was
found to consist mainly of lime, iron, and magnesia carbon-
ates, &c.

(6) "The sediment formed inside the copper pipes conveying

steam into the salt water."

A greenish-white, fibrous crust (colored thus slight by the
action of the water on the copper), mainly made up of hex-
agonal prisms of lime carbonate. An artificially formed ara-
gonite.

Testing showed no evidence of strontium in it, and only a
trace of magnesium. The crystals, under the microscope,



I2O CHEMICAL REPORT.

appear beautifully transparent and colorless. The crust has
the external form of the interior of the pipe, and is somewhat
impregnated with the soluble salts of the water.

(c) "The sediment from the bottom of the settler."

A yellowish-brown mud, containing saline matters. 'When
these were washed out the insoluble residue was found to con-
sist mainly of lime carbonate and a little magnesia carbonate,
colored with iron oxide.

These samples were all collected by C. J. Norwood.

MENIFEE COUNTY.
COALS.

No. 1896 (a) "Coal, from Price and Fitch 's bank. Top of the
mountain. Bed thirty-four inches thick. Sample from the
coal yard of Richardson and Bosworth, Lexington."
A bright splint coal, breaking with difficulty across the lam-
inae ; easily in their direction. Some reedy fibrous coal and
bright thin pyritous plates between them.

No. 1896 (b) "Coal, from Adams' bank, near Frenchburg.

Old Slate Branch. Average Sample collected by A. R. Cran-

dall" In the Sub -carboniferous limestone.

A very pure-looking coal ; glossy, pitch-black. Has very
little fibrous coal or pyrites.

No. 1896 (c) "Coal. Old State Road Branch. Sample from

the stock pile. By A. R. Crandall"

A very pure-looking, glossy, deep pitch-black coal. Very
little fibrous coal or pyrites apparent.

No. 1896 (d) "Coal, from Steele s bank. Mouth of Brushy
Fork of Beaver Creek. Collected by A. R. Crandall"
A pitch-black splint coal; not so glossy or black as i896(^).

Has some fine pyrites and fibrous coal between the laminae.
300



CHEMICAL REPORT. 121

COMPOSITION OF THESE MENIFEE COUNTY COALS, AIR-DRIED.





No. 1896 a.


No. 1896 b.


No. 1896 c.


No. 1896 d.


Specific gravity


I . T.OO


I . 700


1.318


I . Wl












Hygroscopic moisture


< .00


e .00


2 . 7O


3.80


Volatile combustible matters


>Q.o6


?2 4O


38 22


78.60


Coke . .


cc 04,


6' 60


CQ 08


C7 .60












Total


I OO . OO


IOO OO


IOO.OO


ICO.OO












Total volatile matters . .


44.06


"?7 .4.O


4O.02


A.I A.O


Fixed carbon in the coke . . . . .


C7.i8


e8.4O


54.82


52 oo


Ash


2.76


4. 2O


4.26


5 60












Total


IOO OO


IOO OO


IOO OO


IOO OO












Character of the coke


Snonp'v


Dense




Light










spongy.


Color of the ash


Brownish-


Light




Brownish-




lilac-grey.


grey.




lilac-grey.


Per centage of sulphur ... . .


I IQQ


o 614


I 615


2 CKK













These are all remarkably good coals, containing less than
the average of earthy matters, as well as of sulphur.

No. 1897 "LiMONiTE IRON ORE. Branch of Beaver Creek.
Menifee county. Average sample by P. N. Moore."

COMPOSITION, DRIED AT 212 F.

Iron peroxide 54-75 =38.750 per cent, of iron.

Alumina 14.517

Manganese oxide not est.

Lime carbonate a trace.

Magnesia .047

Phosphoric acid .697 = .304 phosphorus.

Sulphuric acid a trace.

Combined water 8.600

Silicious residue 20.830 Containing 19.300 silica.

Loss .559



IOO.OOO



This is quite a good iron ore, with an average proportion of
phosphoric acid, which will not injure it for all ordinary iron
production. Its considerable proportion of alumina may help



122 CHEMICAL REPORT.

to carry off much of this injurious ingredient in the furnace
slag or cinder.

MUHLENBURG COUNTY.
COALS.

No. 1898 "Coal B, from the Louisville and Stroud City mines.

Owensboro Junction. 'Gas coal ;' sixteen inches thick ; at the

top of the bed. Collected by C. f. Norwood."

A bright jet-black coal, with very little fibrous coal or py-
rites apparent.

No. 1899 "Coal B,from the same mine. Bed three to four feet
thick. Owensboro Junction. Sample by C. J. Norwood."
A pitch-black, glossy coal. Has some fibrous coal and fine
granular pyrites between some of the laminae, and thin, bright
pyritous and gypseous scales in some of the seams.

No. 1900 "Coal B,from the Memphis Coal Company's mine,
four miles south of Owensboro Junction, E., 0. & N. R. R.
From stock pile ; probably from the top of the bed. Has been
weathered for eighteen montJis, and is not a fair sample. Col-
lected by C.J. Norwood."
A pitch-black coal, with but little fibrous coal or pyrites

apparent.

No. 1 90 1 " Coal B. Bed four feet four inches to four feet eight
inches thick. Saint Louis mines. Owensboro Junction. Sam-
ple by C. J. Norwood."

A pitch-black coal. Has some fibrous coal, and a few shin-
ing pyritous scales.

No. 1902 "Coal B. Same mine as the next preceding. The
'gas coal;' sixteen incJies thick. Collected by C. J. Norwood."
A pure-looking pitch-black coal. Has very little fibrous

coal and no apparent pyrites.

No. 1903 "Coal B. Rothrock 's coal mine, a mile and a half
north of Owensboro Junction. Upper bench ; three feet nine

inches thick. Average sample by C. J. Norwood."
302



CHEMICAL REPORT.



123



Generally a pitch-black, glossy coal, with but little fibrous
coal, &c., but the sample contained portions of an inch thick
pyritous layer, weighing about nine per cent, of the whole,
which was separated from the coal analyzed and examined
separately (see 1903 a).

COMPOSITION OF THESE MUHLENBURG COUNTY COALS, AIR-DRIED.





No. 1898


No. 1899


No. 1900


No. 1901


No. 1902


No. 1903


Specific gravity. . .


1.280


1.309


I-3I3


1-235


i-37


1-332




Hygroscopic moisture


4.60
42.60
52.80

100.00


3.36
37-90

58.74

IOO.OO


5-4
35-90
58.70


5-4
34-20
60.40


4.60
37.60
57.80


3.80
36.20
60.00


Volatile combustible matters. . .


Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


100.00


IOO.OO




Total volatile matters


47.20

50.06

2.74


41.26

52-74

6.00


41.30
53.60
5.10


39.60
54.20

6. 20


42.20

52.64

5.16


40.00

51.80

8.20


Fixed carbon in the coke ....
Ash


Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


100.00


IOO.OO




Character of the coke


Spongy.


Light
spongy.


Light
spongy.


Light
spongy.


Light
spongy.


Light
spongy.




Color of the ash


Light
grey.


Ligh t
lilac-
grey.


Light
lilac-
grey.


Bright
lilac-
grey.


Dark
brown-
ish-grey.


Lilac-
grey.




Per centage of sulphur


1 .601


2.686


2.219


3-I36


2.372


3- '94





No. 1903 (a) The pyritous shale, separated from the gen-
eral sample as above stated, left on incineration 65.90 per
cent, of its weight of red-brown ash. It contained 27.64 per
cent, of its weight of sulphur. If it had been left in the sam-
ple it would have increased the ash per centage of the whole
to 13.394 per cent., and the sulphur per centage of the whole
to 5.410 per cent. It was probably only accidentally present
in the sample. This pyritous layer would certainly be rejected
in preparing the coal for the market.

MUHLENBURG COUNTY SOILS.

No. 1903 (a) " Virgin Soil, from the farm of A. Strozid, twenty-
seven miles from Owensboro. Collected by C. W. Beck ham."

33



124



CHEMICAL REPORT.



A clay soil, generally in lumps, breaking of a light bluish-
grey color, with ferruginous infiltrations. Contains a small
proportion of fine iron gravel. The bolting-cloth removed



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