Copyright
Kentucky Geological Survey.

[Reports of special subjects] A[-D, F] (Volume 1:1) online

. (page 4 of 34)
Online LibraryKentucky Geological Survey[Reports of special subjects] A[-D, F] (Volume 1:1) → online text (page 4 of 34)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


PARTS, DRIED AT 212 F.





No. 1325.


No. 1327.




Silica


80. ";6o


88.660




Alumina, &c., &c.
Lime


7-650)
.324 >-


Q.-MO




Magnesia ... .
Potash


.260 J
i .464


1.684


1.311 and 1.477, severally calculated into TOO


Soda


.743


. "?46


parts of the soil.










Total


IOO.OOI


ICO.OOO













An attempt was also made, with the use of the celebrated
Nobel's apparatus, to submit some of these soils to silt anal-
ysis ; i. e. to determine the relative proportions of the fine and
coarser earthy material contained in them ; but the results of
comparative operations on the same soil were so discordant
that no value whatever could be attached to them.

The writer regrets that he was not able, for want of time,
&c., to apply to the silt analyses of some of these soils the
improved apparatus devised by Prof. Eugene W. Hilgard, and
used by him in his researches on the soils and clays of Missis-
sippi, while he was the State Geologist, as described by him
in a paper read by him at the Portland meeting of the Ameri-
can Association for Advancement of Science, August, 1873, an( ^
published in American Journal of Science and Arts, October
and November, 1873.

The chemical analyses were conducted very much as is de-
scribed in volume III of Kentucky Geological Reports, except
that a larger quantity of the soil was digested in water con-
taining carbonic acid, charged under the atmospheric pressure
only, and found by analysis to contain about 0.9 of its volume
of this gas. Instead of filtering the solution, a proportional
quantity of it was drawn off from the residue by means of a
pipette of proper construction.

The residue obtained by evaporating this solution, frequently
deflagrated when ignited, showin'g the presence of nitrates.



CHEMICAL REPORT.



This was observed, in a marked degree, with the extracts from
Nos. 1324, 1325, 1326, 1327, and 1329.

The above table of the results of the analyses of these soils
is 'interesting, as demonstrating, what has frequently been
called in question by agricultural chemists in recent times, the
possibility of ascertaining the agricultural capabilities of soils
by chemical analysis ; having due reference, of course, to the
physical conditions.

For the purpose of more ready comparison of some of the
results of these analyses, we copy in the following table the
proportions of some of the most essential ingredients and
educts of these soils :





Extracted
by carbon-
ated water
from 1 ,000
parts.


Extracted by acids from 100 parts.


Organic and
volatile
matters.


Lime, car-
bonate.


Phosphoric
acid.


Potash.


No.
1324, virgin soil


2. 322
1.876

1.220
.891
I. 860

2.7OO


3-650
2-550
2-554
2-435
8.965

7-6i5


0.130
.090
.125
125
45

.990


0.145
.109

093

.122

093

.483


O. 1 2O

.062
.064
.062
483

.726


1325, old field, same locality. . .
1326, old field, same locality . .
1327, sub-soil, same locality . . .
1328, new field, same locality . .
1329, virgin soil (Youtsey's), high
priced; considered rich . .



Youtsey's land will be seen, by reference to Appendix No.
A. 12, to be strikingly like the California adobe soil in com-
position and consistence. It also resembles good blue grass
soil. The others show a deficiency of lime, potash, and organic
matters, or humus, except that of the "new field," which, like
No. 1325, is apparently deficient in phosphoric acid, and which
would be much more productive under better culture than it
has received, and with the application of phosphate or super-
phosphate of lime. The use of lime, wood ashes, and of
green crops, especially of clover, would be beneficial to these
soils of Col. Hodges?

VOL. I.-CHEM. 4. 4 1



42 CHEMICAL REPORT.

No. 1334 LIMESTONE. Labeled "Blue Limestone {Cincinnati
Group}, just below soils Nos. 1329 and 1330. Youtsey s land,
Alexandria Turnpike, eight miles from Newport, Campbell
county" Collected by Prof. N. S. Shaler.
A firm coarse-grained semi-crystalline, dark-grey limestone

full of fossils, corals and shells, with some, included nodules o'

light olive-grey granular material.

COMPOSITION DRIED AT 212 F.

Lime, carbonate 93.200 = 52.192 per cent, of lime.

Magnesia, carbonate 2.291

Alumina, and iron and manganese oxides .... 1 . 700

Sulphuric acid .535= .214 per cent, of sulphur.

Phosphoric acid .076= .033 per cent, of phosphorus.

Potash .173

Soda -384

Silex and insoluble silicates 2 . 360



100.719

A limestone not very rich in mineral fertilizers, which would
yield a good lime for building purposes.

No. 1335 "MARLY SHALE, from two miles south of Newport,
Licking Three Mile Creek. Geological position, ' Cincinnati
Group,' fifty feet above high watermark of the Ohio river"
Collected by Prof. N. S. Shaler.

A friable shale of a handsome light olive-grey color, con-
taining fragments of small encrinital stems and of orthis mul-
ticoste.

No. 1336 "MARLY SHALE, from Licking Three Mile Creek,
two miles back of Newport {Cincinnati Group}. About sixty
feet above high water mark of the Ohio river. The beds are
about thirty feet thick, with thin partings, and can be easily
stripped. Test their value as marl." Collected by Prof. N.
S. Shaler.
Of a light olive-grey color. The laminae are thinner than in

the preceding.

42



CHEMICAL REPORT.
COMPOSITION OF THESE MARLY SHALES, DRIED AT 212 F.



43





No. 1335.


No. 1336.


Silica


54. 160


S7.26O




12.269


16.782




I 5. 5 SO


II .500




7.800


4. t;6o




.i6<;


.778




.281


.008




.61:0


.233




1.298


4.471




.926


i .072


Wa^er expelled at red heat and loss


A 802


?. -j-j6








Total


IOO.OOO


IOO.OOO









These marly shales resemble in composition the marls and
clays reported above.

CARTER COUNTY.

No. 1337 CLAY. Labeled "Fire-clay; average sample from
the upper bed, four feet thick, on both sides of the hill. Ridge
between Grassy and Three Prong Creeks, Boone Furnace
property. Whole bed eight to ten feet thick. Collected by
Philip N. Moore"
The dried clay is quite compact, scarcely to be scratched

with the nail ; has a soapy feel ; not adhering to the tongue.

Breaks into sharp angular fragments. It is of a light-grey

color.

No. 1338 CLAY. ''From ridge between Grassy and Three
Prong Creeks, Boone Furnace property. Lower bed. Col-
lected by P. N. Moore"

Compact, breaking into sharp angular fragments ; hardly to
be scratched with the nail ; slightly adhering to the tongue ;
has a somewhat soapy feel. Presents, in parts, an approach
to an oolitic structure. Color dark-grey, passing into dove-
color.

No. 1339 CLAY. "From same locality as preceding. Rougher
part of the upper layer, &c., &c. Collected by P. N. Moore"
A light-grey compact rock, of a harsh gritty feel ; not to

be scratched with the nail. Under the glass showing many

43



44



CHEMICAL REPORT.



rounded grains of quartzose sand. Ferruginous incrustation
on the surface.

No. 1340 CLAY. "Fire-clay under coal. Old Orchard Dig-
gings, Boone Furnace property, Carter county. Collected by
P. N. Moore. 1 '
A compact shaly clay, with some of the lamellar surfaces

polished in various planes. Has a soapy feel, and no grit.

Of a dull dove-grey color.

No. 1341 CLAY. "Fire-clay from same bed as Nos. 1337, 1338,
and 1339. A dark- colored sample from the lower part of the
deposit." Collected by P. N. Moore.

Compact fine-granular ; hardly scratched with the nail ;
adhering very slightly to the tongue. Of a dark brownish-
slate color.

No. 1342 CLAY. "Fire-clay under the twelve inch coal Geo.
Osenton s land, near Grayson, Carter county. Sampled by f.
A. Monroe"
A grey or ash-grey clay in a pulverulent condition.

No. 1343 CLAY SHALE. Labeled "Argillaceous Shale, with
some Lingulcz near the top. Railroad cut, half mile south of
Station (Eastern Kentucky Railroad], Gray son, Carter county.
Collected by Prof. N. S. Shaler."
A soft friable shale of a light buff-grey color, mottled and

colored between the laminae with ferruginous and black.

COMPOSITION OF THESE CLAYS, &c., OF CARTER COUNTY, DRIED AT

212 F.





No. 1337.


No. 1338.


No. 1339.


No. 1340.


No. 1341.


No. 1342.


No. 1343.


Silica


48.560












66 060




37.471


38.531


32.466


27.203


43-775


24.604


23.726




. 112


MS


a trace.


a trace.


-H5


.538


*. 300


Phosphoric acid




.563












Sulphuric acid
Potash


not est.
.280


not est.


not est.


not est.
i 850


not est.


.157


not est.


Soda .,


.283






.584


.728






VVater expelled at red heat










8 522


8 300




















Total

































* Carbonates.
44



CHEMICAL REPORT.



45



The composition of these clays indicate that most of them
are highly "refractory" or fire-clays, and that all could be
used for the manufacture of stone-ware, terra cotta, &c.
Those which burn white might be used for "delf ware," or
" queen's-ware," so called.

The most refractory are, probably, Nos. 1337, 1338, and
1339; the next, Nos. 1342, 1341, and 1340. The least re-
fractory of all is the clay shale, No. 1343, which, however,
notwithstanding its more than two per cent, each of potash
and soda, would answer for the manufacture of stone-ware,
and, most probably, of ordinary fire-brick.

It is found that a large relative proportion of silica or sand
increases the refractory quality of the clay, and, according to
the experiments of E. Richters* (1868), this quality is least
affected by magnesia ; more so by lime ; still more by iron
oxide ; and most by potash. The influence of phosphates
has not been fully determined.

F^or comparison, the analyses of two of the best Kaolin
clays of France, of the best Stourbridge clay of England, and
of a crucible clay, are here appended :





w


(*j


w


(d)


Silica


48.68


SS.^o


6"? .40


47. SO


Alumina


T.6 .Q2


3,0. 30


21 .70


24. -27


Iron oxide




2.OO


3 .OO


I .24


Lime


not given.


not given


not given.


. SO


Magnesia


C2


.4.0


not est.


I OO


Phosphoric acid


not given.








Sulphuric acid '


not given.








Potash


not est.


I . IO )




not est.


Soda


S8


\

2. 7O 1


1 .90


not est.


Water expelled at red heat


13- I 3


8.20


not given.


1 .00













(a) Porcelain clay of Saint Yrieiex ; analyzed by Forchammer.
(6) Porcelain clay of China ; analyzed by Ebelmann and Salvetat.
(c) Stourbridge fire-clay; analyzed by Prof. F. A. Abels,
(rf) Crucible clay. Almerode, in Kurhessen.

It is evident our fire-clays do not suffer in comparison with
these, and that the industrial value of these large deposits in
our coal measures is very considerable.

[For other fire-clays see Greenup county, &c.]



*R. Wagner's Chemical Technology, American edition, page 294.

45



46 CHEMICAL REPORT.

COALS OF CARTER COUNTY.

No. 1344 "CoAL, probably sub-conglomerate, at Old Orchard
Diggings. (Eight inches of coal, four inches of slate, six inches
of coal.} Boone Furnace property."
A dull slaty coal, having much fibrous coal between the

laminae. Exterior stained with iron oxide.

No. 1345 "CoAL, No. 7, from old entry back of Star Furnace.

Upper layer twenty inches thick (Coalton coal). An average

sample, collected by A. R. Crandall"

Breaks easily into thin irregular laminae, with some fibrous
coal between. Incrusted somewhat with iron oxide.

No. 1346 "COAL, No. 7, from old entry back of Star Furnace.

Bottom layer, two feet two inches thick. Collected by A. R.

Crandall."

A pure-looking coal ; fracture glossy and pure black, some-
what like that of asphaltum. Very little fibrous coal, pyrites,
or ferruginous incrustation apparent.

No. 1347 "CoAL, No. 7, from entry back of Star Furnace.
Middle layer, two feet thick. Collected by A. R. Crandall."
Appears to be intermediate in quality to the two preceding.

No. 1348 "CoAL, No. 7 (Coaltori). Average sample from Wiley
Pritchard s bank, near Mount Savage Furnace, Carter county.
Collected by J. A. Monroe."

No. 1349 "CoAL, No. 7. Average sample of the six feet Coalton
coal, from all parts of the bed. Divide between Stinson and
Straight Creeks. (Two hundred and seventy-Jive feet level.)
Mount Savage property. Averaged by P. N. Moore."

No. 1350 "CoALTON COAL (No. 7 coal), from drift on Gum
branch of Straight Creek. Mount Savage Company drift,
lower part of the bed. Averaged by P. N. Moore"

4 6




CHEMICAL REPORT.

No. 1351 "CoALTON COAL (No. 7 coal), from drift on Gum
branch of Straight Creek. Upper part of bed, Mt. Savage
property. Averaged by P. N. Moore"

No. 1352 "Average sample of Coalton coal (No. 7), Watson
Bank, Willard, Carter county. Averaged by J. A. Monroe."

No. 1353 "CoAL (No. i) from Graham bank, Little Fork of
Little Sandy river, near Willard. Average sample by P. N.
Moore"

[See appendix, Nos. 1646 and 1647, for the analyses of two other samples of the coal from

this bank.]

No. 1354 "CoALTON COAL (No. 7), from main entry, west of
Dry Fork, Willard. Averaged by P. N. Moore."
A jet-black pure-looking coal, showing iridescent colors on

portions, and having very little fibrous coal or pyrites.

No. 1355 "COALTON COAL (No. 7) from Old Lost Creek drift,

near Willard. Averaged by P. N. Moore"

Of rather a rusty black color; shows but little fibrous coal
or ferruginous stain.

No. 1356 "CoAL (No. 2) from Kibby drift, Evermans Creek,
two miles from Gray son, Carter county. Average sample by
/. A. Monroe."

No. 1357 "CoAL (No. i) from Stone-coal branch of Tygert
Creek, Carter county. Averaged by P. N. Moore."

No. 1358 "CoAL (probably No. 2) from a quarter of a mile
north of N. Lewis house, Barrett 's Creek, Carter county.
Averaged by P. N. Moore."

. 1359 "CoAL (probably No. 3) from Carter farm, two miles
east of Grayson, on Dr. Jones land (not a very good average
sample). P. N. Moore."

47



4 8



CHEMICAL REPORT.



5>


00


Q O

o S oo


8


O TVO


8


b


.







d


M


COVO O

covo


8


Ov O\ "

m ^- M


8


c
o


IE


H




55












w*








t io


C?


S S, M


8


o O o
o\ * c^


8


1


i >.


CO




d


H


4- ro N


8


ti -' d


8


o

o.


-i


CO




^












in


j ._






CO


O\


v8 S>


8


o o o

M vo ro


8


V in


it


8




"




4- CO M


6


CO *-. O


d


52


bfi






d






o




o










|












a p.


>-.2






"Si


o\


O Q O




O 10 10





U !'


,


~




H?




M VO CO




O w r^
t^ O tx


8


C

U l-


it


5-




|


M


COVO




e m9t *


8


.


bo


M




CO


s


O vo


8


vo * o
vo o\ *


8


>,


fcfi


h,




J3


H?


CO IO O
COVO


8


CO IO


8


I c 1


a s

0|


ei




K






H




H





rQ






si


CO


g^S


8


VO O t-


8


b


S>.


M

vo




d


H


" COVO


8


oo' -4- ti


8


o
a,


^ w
>-) M



















CO








S


s


o o o

00 IO C-*


8


o o o


8


w

2 3


i & 1









m


CO * M


d


OO* OO CO




C O


o ^"


^




d




rovo


o














Z






"




"


M o.


ca.2






Si


VO


O O O




8VO f




o in


i >>


o




CO


W






00






i ^






d


H


**?


8


"ro Jo ^


8


I 2

aa


(5 J!


II




%


ro


8X8


8


goo


8


D W


a .- ^,


















C O




S




d


H


10 covo


8


coio"


8




Q *,


*




X






w






*


D,






o


0_


O O




O vo




U (/:


4


O^




CO

d
|






8


r^. tx *


8


II


=!&>

3 6fl
OH


VO




H


?


a*?


8


VO * O

00 O M


8


c o


ii^.


ft




d




10 roR


8


6 M 00


8




^S W)


'




g












H OH


^.2






5.


10


O O O




O N OO




U U!


(


VO






CO


C-. CT








3








H













3 O


_rt ^


ro




d


H


ro'O


8


ro 10


8


Jfc Q


hJ tUO


N




|






M




M


&








CO

d


!


NOO

TJ- w ro

vo t^vo
N VO


8

8


vo OO 10


8
8


||


I|


O




z










M


iii


-






1


00


O vo *

VO CO O


8


vo * O
O\vO ^


8


^





*




d





vo' 4- d\


8


d 4- *


8


II


36


O




?


tx

ro


O vo -0-


8


vo * O

00 O M


8


S$


rt >>


O


< 8 M U *






1^.00 -4-


o














d


H


vo


o


'*




>


hH OJO


M


d


CO


ro


O vp *


8


vo * O


Q
O


2


~ jj


4-1


ir co N o co o

CO CO HI CO HI


d


ro


**9>9i


8


ro * N


8


|1




U

4-t
O


" 10 IO O O M


g






M






0.


15 >


C


'Z







e


... .









jd .... .




.


.a . .






.




a






.rt . .


...








'~* ' ' '






K *


i ;


u




3


C! '"S * ' *







2 -


ii V ' *






Hi


o . o .






. * *


S-*






3


. a .




&


1 1 .


E 8 .


1


^3

1




.2 . 2 a .




1


o o .


=1


"!

V



V

-fl


o

H


1 ill : :




o

1


Ill 1


> a "3

O *"

WjO u o
S ^


1


o

o
Jo


C


o '.s , "3

S6g, ,0

ill 8 H




#


K>cj




u




^


C/3<JH-1



48



CHEMICAL REPORT.



49



No. 1360 "COKE, made from the No. 7 coal, in oven, by Mr.
Bates, Willard, Carter county. Collected by A. R. Crandall."
A bright-looking coke somewhat dense.



COMPOSITION, AIR-DRIED.



Hygroscopic moisture


2.4.6


Volatile combustible matters


I .84


Coke (dry)


QC .70






Total


IOO OO






Total volatile matters


4. 3O


Fixed carbon


87.^4


Ashes


8.^6






Total


IOO.OO






Color of the ash


Lilac-cTCT .








2.026







The proportion of sulphur has been but slightly reduced by
the coking of this coal. It is probably mostly in combination
with iron, as iron proto-sulphide, and may not seriously injure
this coke as fuel for the smelting and working of iron.

IRON CARBONATE ORES AND FERRUGINOUS LIMESTONE OF CARTER

COUNTY.

No. 1361 FERRUGINOUS LIMESTONE. Labeled " Limestone Ore,
from Old Orchard Diggings , Boone Furnace property. Aver-
aged by P. N. Moore"

A dull-looking, fine-grained or compact ferruginous lime-
stone, of a light-grey color, varied in parts by infiltrated
hydrated oxide of iron. Fracture somewhat hackley. Specific
gravity = 2.879.

No. 1362 CLAY IRON-STONE. Labeled "Limestone Ore from
drift at Old Orchard Diggings, head of Grassy Creek, Carter
county. Undecomposed ore. Average sample from various
farts of bed No. i . Boone Furnace property. Collected by
P. N. Moore r

49



5O CHEMICAL REPORT.

Irregular nodules and masses of clay iron-stone ; varying in
color from light-grey to blackish ; mixed with some hydrated
iron peroxide.

No. 1363 CLAY IRON-STONE. Labeled "Kidneys in shale below
the coal described, No. 1344, at Old Orchard Diggings,
Boone Furnace property, &c. Shale, with the kidneys, four
inches thick. Collected by P. N. Moore."
Irregularly shaped nodules of fine-granular clay iron-stone

superficially coated with hydrated brown iron oxide.

No. 1364 CLAY IRON-STONE. Labeled "Limestone Ore (No, i),
Horsley bank, Boone Furnace property, &c. The undecom-
posed carbonate. Collected by P. N. Moore' (for a cabinet
specimen}.

A fine-granular ore, varying from light-grey to purplish-
grey, and incrusted in parts with limonite.

No. 1365 CLAY IRON-STONE AND LIMONITE MIXED. Labeled
"Average sample of Limestone Ore (No. i), Horsley bank,
Boone Furnace property, &c. Collected by P. N. Moore"
A mixture of fragments of clay iron-stone and limonite ores.

No. 1366 CLAY IRON-STONE. Labeled "Blue Limestone Ore,
from west bank of Tygert Creek, about two miles from Iron
Hills, Carter county. Average sample by P. N. Moore"
Fragments of clay iron-stone nodules, invested externally

with limonite layers.

No. 1367 CLAY IRON-STONE. Labeled "Lower Block Ore, on
Dry Fork of Sinking Creek, Carter county. J. M. James*
land (six inches of undecomposed siderite). Average sample,
by P. N. Moore."
Compact clay iron-stone, with some little limonite.

No. 1368 CLAY IRON-STONE. Labeled "Foxden Ore. Means
and Russel land, Gumming s branch of Everman s Creek,
Carter county. Averaged by P. N. Moore."

5



CHEMICAL REPORT.



The undecomposed carbonate covered with layers of lim-
onite of various tints, some of which are ochreous.

No. 1369 CLAY IRON-STONE. Labeled "Grey Limestone Ore,
Mount Savage Furnace. Average sample, by J. A. Monroe"
Grey granular and oolitic carbonate, with more or less lim-

onite ore.

No. 1370 CLAY IRON-STONE. Labeled "Lower Block Ore. Mr.
Everman s Sammy s branch of Barrett 's Creek, Carter county.
Averaged by P. N. Moore"

Mostly dark-grey, fine-granular carbonate ore, with some
incrustation of limonite.

SUMMARY OF THE COMPOSITION OF THESE CARTER COUNTY CLAY-IRON-
STONE ORES, &c., DRIED AT 212 F.





No. 1361


No. 1362


No. 1363


No. 1364


No. 1365


No. 1366


No. 1367


No. 1368


No. 1369


No. 1370


Iron, carbonate ....


24.408


61.220
4.410
2.260
4.480
a trace.
.15
3'3
not est.
21.260
540
5-367


62.662
10.024
i. 600
.240
2.838
3-^51
.127
521
13.720


65.018
5-945
i. 060
2.720
9.038
2.332
255
1.280
10.260

2. 112


44.242
27.296
i. 560
6.580
1.046
.842
732
'4-587
n.ioo


27.511
26.240
9.021
2.320
2.838
.270

499
.116

25. 180


62.321
4.989
7.901

I 2. OOO
.222
. 121
.684
.206
10.740


46.893
9-255
5-703

12.460

.250
not est.
.978
a trace.
23 510


30,708
3 I -544
1.779
2.730
.144
.060
.421
.491
25-430


47.391

9-734
4.I97
5.220
7.893
.346

.121

15'
20. 230




.560
45.200
24.328
.391
M7
439
2.420

-339
1.768


Lime, carbonate . . .
Magnesia, carbonate .
Manganese, carbonate
Phos'ic acid (anhydr. )
Sulphuric acid (anhydr )
Silica and insol. silicates
KO = .i35; NaO = .2o 4
Water and loss


3-oi7




1-955


6.005


.8l6


951


6-523


4-7I7


Total


100. OO


too. ooo


100.00


IOO.OOO


IOO.OOO*


IOO.OOO


IOO.OOO


IOO.OOO


IOO.OOO


IOO.OOO




Per centage of iron. . .


10.960


32 578


37- 28 5


35-549


40.465


3!-59 8


33-348


29.116


36.627


29.685


Per ct. of phosphorus .


0.064


0.136


0.055


.in


.321


.208


.298


.427


.184


.052


Per centage of sulphur .


0.203




.208


533


1.855


.046


.082




.196


.060














23.80


8.980


20.860


10.560


19.760















* This sample had in it visible fragments of pyrites, and hence the above may not be an exact determination of
the average sulphur of this ore.

No. 1361 would be unobjectionable as flux for richer ores,
were it not for its considerable proportion of sulphur. It
would make good lime for agricultural uses ; which would
make a strong cement with sand for all building purposes,
where its color would not be objectionable.

The Horsley bank ores Nos. 1364 and 1365, although rich
enough in iron, also contain quite large proportions of sul-

5 1



52 CHEMICAL REPORT.

phur, exceeding in this respect all these ores; many of which
may be considered quite good of their kind, as may be seen
on examination of this table.

LIMONITE IRON ORES OF CARTER COUNTY.

No. 1371 LIMONITE. Labeled "Limestone Ore from Horsley
bank, Boone Furnace property. {A cabinet specimen.} Col-
lected by P. N. Moore."
In irregular curved laminse of various tints, from dark brown

to red and light yellow; with some soft ochreous ore.

No. 1372 LIMONITE. Labeled "Average sample of Lambert
Main Block Ore, Potato Knob Hill. From the stock pile,

Iron Hills Furnace, Carter county. Collected by J. A. Mon-

> >
roe.

Ore varying from dense dark chocolate-brown, irregular
laminse and grains, to brownish-yellow soft ochreous.

No. 1373 LIMONITE. Labeled "Potato Knob Iron Ore. Aver-
age sample. Iron Hills Furnace, &c."

In nodules varying from one to six inches in diameter.
Exterior of hard dark-brown limonite ; interior nodules soft
and porous, of yellowish and reddish-brown colors.

No. 1374 LIMONITE. Labeled "Main Block Ore, Stewart
bank. Divide between Barrett' s and Everman s Creeks, three
miles west of Gray son, Carter county. Average sample"
The irregular laminae and concretions varying in color from

dark chocolate-brown or purplish to greyish-yellow.

No. 1375 LIMONITE. " From Royster Hill Lambert bed. Iron-
Hills Furnace. TJie ochre from the lower part of the bed."



Online LibraryKentucky Geological Survey[Reports of special subjects] A[-D, F] (Volume 1:1) → online text (page 4 of 34)