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Hickman. Collected by Prof. N. S. Shaler."
This sub-soil is of a brownish dark-buff, or light yellowish-
brown color.

COMPOSITION, DRIED AT 212 F.



Organic and volatile matters


2. 2 so


Alumina, and iron and manganese oxides


6.OCK


Lime carbonate


.270


Magnesia ..


.414


Phosphoric acid . ... .


. 172


Sulphuric acid


not est .


Potash


. I">Q


Soda


.072


Sand and insoluble silicates .


QO . 4QO


Water expelled at 380 F


6SO






Total


IOO.442








2.2SO






Potash in the insoluble silicates, per cent


I .470






Soda in the insoluble silicates, per cent


I W6







It will be seen that in this sub-soil, which contains a very
large proportion of fine sand and insoluble silicates, and which



So



CHEMICAL REPORT. 8 1

only gave up 0.159 per cent, of its potash after long digestion,
with heat, in chlorohydric acid, there is yet a reserve supply
of that alkali of more than nine times that quantity, locked
up in the insoluble silicates. This potash, although not im-
mediately available for the use of plants, will doubtless be
gradually brought into an available condition, under the slow
but certain action of the atmospheric agencies and under that
of humus, &c.

No. 1438 MINERAL WATER. "Chalybeate water, sent by Mr.

B. R. Walker, from Nick Combs Spring, four miles southwest

of Hickman, Fulton county."

This chalybeate water contains free carbonic acid and 0.302
of saline matters in the one thousand of water. This consists
of iron, manganese, lime and magnesia carbonates, with some
lime and magnesia sulphates, &c. The quantity sent was too
small for a thorough analysis.

It is probably a valuable chalybeate water.

No. 1439 "INDURATED SiLicious CLAY. From the bluffs, one
hundred feet above low water mark, Hickman, Fulton county.
Tertiary formation. Collected by Prof. N. S. Shaler."
Of a light-grey color, with ferruginous infiltrations. Breaks
readily, with an irregular fracture. Adheres slightly to the
tongue. Is somewhat plastic when powdered and rubbed up
with water. When calcined, is of a light buff color.

No. 1440 " SILICIOUS CONCRETION or soft sandstone from the
Bluff at Hickman, fifty feet above low water. Tertiary. Col-
lected by Prof. N. S. S/ia/er."

A whitish, porous, and friable silicious rock or concretion;
adheres to the tongue. Only slightly plastic when powdered
and rubbed up with water. Burns of a light buff color.

No. 1441 " SILICIOUS CONCRETION or soft sandstone, from
Chickasaw Bluff, eight miles south of Hickman. Tertiary.
Bed ten feet thick. Collected by Prof. N. S. S/ia/er."

81



82



CHEMICAL REPORT.



A light-grey or dove-colored soft and porous silicious rock,
adhering to the tongue. Scarcely at all plastic when powdered
and rubbed up with water.

No. 1442 " SOFT SANDSTONE. Chickasaw Bluff, near the base,
eight miles south of Hickman"

A dull light-yellowish-grey porous soft sandstone ; adheres
strongly to the tongue. Composed of minute rounded quartz-
ose grains, with a whitish cement.

COMPOSITION OF THESE FULTON COUNTY SOFT SANDSTONES AND SILI-
CIOUS DEPOSITS, DRIED AT 212 F.





No. 1439.


No. 1440.


No. 1441.


No. 1442.


Silica


1A. 060


8 1 060


89 1 60




Alumina, and iron and manganese oxides . .
Lime carbonate


18.350
560


13.609
560


7.809
780


3.129

1X0




. "3OQ


. I 30


086


177


Phosphoric acid


.CXI


OS r


OC.T


OC.I




CQt


84.4


7O7


98l


Potash


2 JO


231


IIC




Soda


. 124


O2 I


O8O


I 24


Water expelled at red heat


5 800


-2 600
















Total


100 885


100 i 15


100 788


100 728













These silicious deposits do not contain enough mineral fer-
tilizing ingredients to make them valuable for application to
the soil, nor enough alumina to constitute good plastic clay.
Yet they may be made useful in tempering clay which contains
too much alumina, or for the formation of common glass and
for scouring purposes. Some of them are plastic enough to
enable them to be moulded, and the silicious material is fine
enough, in some, to permit them to be used as " Bath Brick"
for household scouring. Common brick could probably be
made out of No. 1439.

Some of these layers, in which the proportions of alkalies,
lime, magnesia, and iron oxide are small, may perhaps be man-
ufactured into a kind of fire-brick.

Part of the sulphur which appears in the above summary of
analyses as sulphuric acid, is doubtless in combination with
some of the iron in the sandstone, in the form of iron sulphide;



CHEMICAL REPORT. 83

the oxidation of which may account for a portion of the excess
in the total.

No. 1443 " CLAY from the foot of Grand Chain, Illinois.
Post Tertiary. Collected by Prof. N. S. Shaler"

Of a light-grey-dove color, with brownish incrustations.
Fracture large conchoidal-hackly ; quite porous ; adheres
strongly to the tongue ; grinds easily into a tough plastic mass
with water. Calcines of an orange-buff color ; but fuses before
the blow-pipe. Specific gravity, in its porous state = 1.764.
Contains minute glimmering scales of mica.

COMPOSITION, DRIED AT 212 F.

Silica 70.660

Alumina, and iron and manganese oxides 20.309

Lime carbonate .960

Magnesia .307

Sulphuric acid 1. 188= .475 per cent, of sulphur

Phosphoric acid .051

Potash .819

Soda .487

Water expelled at red heat, and loss 5- 2I 9



This clay, which was collected for comparison with the Ful-
ton county tertiary deposits, would prove of no especial value
as a fertilizer, except on very sandy soils to improve their con-
sistence. It would probably answer for common pottery or
bricks; but is too fusible for fire-brick. It compares pretty
well with No. 1439.

GRAYSON COUNTY.

No. 1444 CLAY IRON-STONE "From three miles south of Litch-
field. A six inch layer, on the land of Jno. H. Higden, in
the carboniferous limestone. On the old Brownsville road.
Collected by Prof. N. S. Shaler"
Fine granular, or compact. Dark grey.

83



84 CHEMICAL REPORT.

COMPOSITION DRIED AT 212 F.

Iron, carbonate 60.466) ,, , .

Iron, peroxide 6 ^ 6 j = 33 . 630 per cent, of iron.

Alumina ; . . . . 7-179

Lime carbonate 4.050

Magnesia, carbonate 6.378

Manganese, carbonate a trace.

Phosphoric acid .102 = 0.035 per cent, of phosphorus.

Sulphuric acid .054 = .022 per cent, of sulphur.

Silica and insoluble silicates 14.450 = II .900 per cent, of silica.

Water and loss . 785



Quite a good ore of its kind.

No. 1445 LIMONITE IRON ORE. "From north side of Grind-
stone branch of Rock Creek. Hill below Owen Whittries.
Gray son county. Collected by P. N. Moore."
A porous and cellular limonite, varying in color from dark

brown and steel black to reddish-brown and ochreous.

COMPOSITION, DRIED AT 212 F.

Iron, peroxide 27. 192 = 19.344 per cent, of iron.

Alumina 4- 2 99

Manganese, brown oxide a trace.

Lime carbonate '. . . . .410

Magnesia .317

Phosphoric acid .249=: o. 109 per cent, of phosphorus.

Sulphuric acid .103= .041 per cent, of sulphur.

Water expelled at red heat ' 5.600

Silica and insoluble silicates 6l .730 = 25.500 per cent, of silica.

Moisture and loss . .100



This ore is too poor in iron and too silicious to be of much value.

[See Appendix for other Grayson county iron ores.]

No. 1446 MARLY SHALE. "From S^mset Lick, a mile and a
half west of Litchfield. Geological position the carboniferous
formation. Collected by Prof. N. S. Shaler"
A friable marly shale of a greyish and brownish-olive color.

This marl, when analyzed by digestion in acids, &c., gave the

following results, dried at 212 F., viz:



Alumina, and iron and manganese oxides .

Lime

Magnesia

Phosphoric acid

Sulphuric acid

Potash

Soda

Water expelled at red heat

Silica and insoluble silicates .



Total



I9-I33
.269

353
.267
.027

2.910
.052

6.230
71.580

100.821



8 4



CHEMICAL REPORT. 85

The silica and insoluble silicates, when sintered with lime
carbonate and ammonium chloride, &c., &c., yielded 1.205 P er
cent of potash, and 0.55 per cent, of soda, in addition to that
given above as extracted by digestion in acids. So that the
total amount of potash in the marl appears to be 4.' 1 1 5 per
cent, and that of soda 0.602 per cent.

Some of the same marly shale, from this locality, subse-
quently collected by Mr. P. N. Moore, was analyzed by fusion
with the mixed alkaline carbonates ; sintering with lime car-
bonate and ammonium chloride, &c., &c., and gave the fol-
lowing results, viz :





14.130




13.480




.538




I.K8




.280




.204


Potash


4.62"?




.783




6.000




60 . 060






Total .


101 .258







The apparent excess in the total may be partly due to
oxidation of combined iron and sulphur in the marl, and prob-
ably, also, to an over-estimation of the water.

Its considerable proportion of potash might make it use-
ful as a fertilizer on impoverished land, were this alkali all in
an available condition. But the analyses show that a great
portion of it is in firm combination, in the silicates insolu-
ble in acids ; only to be released, and made available for plant
growth, by the slow process of weathering, under the influ-
ence of atmospheric agencies, Inunus, &c. Whether lime
could be profitably employed to decompose these silicates
and set free the alkalies, is yet to be tried.

The remarks given under the head of marly shales of Camp-
bell and Franklin counties, as to their use as "mineral paint,"
&c., apply to this marly shale also.

85



86 CHEMICAL REPORT.

No. 1447 " SOFT SANDSTONE; a micaceous, uncemented sand
rock, from Horse Branch, on the Elizabethtown and Paducah
Railroad. Border of Gray son and Ohio counties. Very fri-
able. Can be shoveled like sand. Collected by Prof. N. S.
Shaler. Geological position carboniferous. ' '
Of a light drab, or grey-buff color, consisting of small quartz
grains, mostly rounded, some spangles of mica, some few
grains of blackish and greenish ferruginous mineral, and a fine
powder, somewhat ferruginous, which can easily be washed
out from the quartz sand, &c., by water. Water disintegrates
the lumps.

This soft sand rock, dried at 212, gave the following results,
on analysis by acid digestion, &c. :



Sand and insoluble silicates


8? 7OO


Alumina, colored with iron oxide


7 O/1O






Magnesia


ZA C


Phosphoric acid


^43
37O


Sulphuric acid


OAQ


Potash


Q7C


Soda
















Total


IOO OOO







This would undoubtedly answer well for the manufacture of
common glass. Its considerable proportion of potash, nearly
one per cent, extracted by acids, has probably been mainly
derived from the mica which it contains, while the phosphoric
acid, also considerable for a sand, has doubtless been mostly
extracted from the dark greenish mineral. This sand would
prove a useful addition to heavy clay soil. No doubt analy-
sis by fusion would show that it contains a much larger pro-
portion of potash than digestion in acids demonstrates.

No. 1448 COAL. Labeled "Tar Lick Coal, Dismal Creek,
Gray son county. Average sample, by P. N. Moore."
Mostly in thin laminae, with some bituminous matter, fibrous
coal, and fine-granular pyrites between them. Generally of a
deep-black color, with occasional ferruginous stains.



CHEMICAL REPORT. 87

No. 1449 COAL. "Gravelly Lick, Miller s Fork of Bear Creek.
Average sample, by P. N. Moore"

Splitting into thin laminae, with a little fibrous coal and fine-
granular pyrites between.

No. 1450 COAL. "Near the School-house, on Brushy branch
of Galloway Creek, W. B. Me Crew's. Collected by P. N.
Moore"

Much weathered.

No. 1451 COAL (impure) "Copperas bank, branch of Hunting
Fork of Rock Creek, above the conglomerate. Collected by P.

N. Moore"

Mostly in thin laminae, some of which are shaly. Some fer-
ruginous incrustation.

No. 1452 COAL. "L. Higdons, Pearsons branch of Rock
Creek. Beloiv the conglomerate. About fifteen feet above the
limestone. Collected by P. N. Moore."

A jet-black coal ; generally breaking into thin laminae, some
of which are somewhat shaly. Not much fibrous coal or gran-
ular pyrites apparent. Some ferruginous incrustation.

No. 1453 COAL (impure) "From Gum Spring Fork of Cane
Camp Creek, Nolin Furnace property. Sample from above the
slate parting only. Collected by P. N. Moore."
A much weathered coal, in thin laminae, much tarnished

with ferruginous and aluminous incrustations.

No. 1454 COAL (impure] "From same locality as preceding.

Sample from below the slate parting only. Collected by P. N.

Moore"

In thin laminae, some shaly; weathered dull and stained
with ferruginous and clayey incrustation.

87



88 CHEMICAL REPORT.

COMPOSITION OF THESE GRAYSON COUNTY COALS, AIR-DRIED.





No. 1448.


No. 1449.


No. 1450.


No. 1451.


No. 1452.


No. 1453.


No. 1454.


Specific gravity


i-35


1-395


1.346


1-378


1.364


1.446


i .512


Hygroscopic moisture . .
Vol. combustible matters .
Coke


4.70
31.40
63.00


4.14
30-52
6s. 34


6.26

3 2 -44
61 .30


3-5
33-40
63. 10


3.60
35-8o
60 60


6.50
29. 10
64.40


4.40
25.86
69.74


















Total


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO OO


I OO . OO


IOO.OO


















Total volatile matters . .
Carbon in the coke . . .
Ashes


36. 10
52.20
1 1 .70


34.66
50.08
1 15.26


38.70
53-80

7. SO


36.90
47.50

I?. 60


39-40
49.40

1 1 .20


35.60

49.60
14.80


30.26
40.14

29.60


















Total


IOO OO


IOO.OO


IOO.OO


IOO OO


IOO OO


I OO . OO


IOO.OO


















Character of the coke . .


Spongy.


Dense
spongy.


Light
friable.


Light
spongy.


Light
spongy.


Friable.


Friable.


Color of the ash ....


Light
brownish

grey.


Brownish

grey.


Greyish-
salmon.


Lilac-
grey.


Light
chocolate


Light
brownish


Nearly
white.


Per centage of sulphur. .


1-945


3-565


1.476


2.041


3.158


0.818


0.777



No. 1455 "CoAL, remarkable for being found in the sub-car-
boniferous limestone ; about seventy-five to a hundred and twenty
feet below the Chester Group. Collected by C. J. Norwood."
A much weathered specimen ; splitting easily into thin

laminae, with very little fibrous coal or pyrites between. Some

little ferruginous stain.

88



CHEMICAL REPORT. 89

COMPOSITION SPECIFIC GRAVITY = 1.338.





4.24
30.82
64.94




Coke (light friable)


Total


IOO.OOO






35.06

55-52
9.42






Total


IOO.OO






2.892





Interesting only because of its unusual position.

GRAYSON SPRINGS MINERAL WATERS.

These waters were mostly collected and tested qualitatively,
at the springs, by Mr. Jno. H. Talbutt ; who spent several
days in this work and in the evaporation of a quantity of some
of the principal ones, for the purpose of determining the more
rare ingredients. The quantitative analyses were performed
at our chemical laboratory in Lexington.

No. 1456 "SuLPHUR WATER from the Centre Spring, a natural
spring, the most popular of the Gray son Springs."
Inclosed in a "gum" three feet deep and one and a half
feet in diameter. Flows in a perennial stream, of about half
an inch diameter. Gas bubbles up frequently, in moderate
intermittent bursts. The water is of nearly a constant tem-
perature of 61 F. ; clear, depositing in its channel a dark-grey
slimy sediment ; and on the gum an incrustation varying in
color from blackish and brownish to greenish and pinkish.

The spring is about two hundred yards southeast from the
hotel. Has a reputation as diuretic, aperient, &c., &c. Re-
action of the recent water is neutral with litmus paper, but
when it has been partly evaporated it is slightly alkaline.

No. 1457 SULPHUR WATER from the Moreman Spring.

A natural spring, inclosed in a sycamore "gum" (twenty-
two inches deep by eleven in diameter). Stream constant the

VOL. I.-CHEM. 7. 89



9O CHEMICAL REPORT.

year round, through a three-quarter inch hole. Bubbles of
gas rise intermittently. Sediment in the channel of overflow,
whitish ; that at the bottom of the gum greenish-black, and
slimy. Temperature of the water 66 to 67 F., nearly con-
stant.

Considered one of the best of the waters for cutaneous
diseases. Acts pretty constantly as aperient. Reaction of the
recent water, neutral.

No. 1458 SULPHUR WATER of the McAtee* Sulphur Spring.
A natural spring (said to have two sources, one warm the
other cold), located at the base of the hill, farthest of all from
the house, nearest to the creek; near the bath-house. In-
cluded in a wooden box, fourteen by twenty-two inches, and
twenty inches deep. The flow is about sufficient to fill a half
inch pipe. There is a slight intermittent evolution of gas.
Temperature, said to be invariable, at 60 F. The sediment
in the box is dark green, with much pinkish ; slimy. The in-
crustation on the box, greenish of various tints and shades.
This water is not quite so strong as that of the "Center
Spring."

No. 1459 SULPHUR WATER of the "Stump Spring."

A natural spring, included in a sycamore "gum," twelve
inches in diameter and twenty deep. The flow is about a
quarter to half inch in diameter. There is a slight evolution
of gas in bubbles. Temperature of the water 64 F., said to
be invariable. The sediment in the gum is blackish and slimy.
The incrustation very slight, and nearly black. The taste of
the water is sweetish-brackish. Reaction with litmus papers,
neutral.

No. 1460 SULPHUR WATER of the "Jar Spring."

A natural spring, nearest to the house (near the Stump and
Big Gum Springs), included in a gum twelve inches in diameter

*Calledby Dr. Owen "Macatine." Volume i, Kentucky Geological Reports, page 270.
90



CHEMICAL REPORT. 9!

and twenty-six deep. Flow of water from quarter to half an
inch in diameter. Slight evolution of gas in bubbles, smelling
strongly of sulphuretted hydrogen, as do all the others. Tem-
perature of the water 63 F., said to be constant. Taste sweet-
ish. Reaction, neutral. The sediment is dark-colored ; slimy.
The incrustation on the gum whitish, with greenish and purplish
tints.

No. 1461 SULPHUR WATER from the "Eye Spring."

A natural spring, included in a "gum" ten to eleven inches
in diameter and twenty deep. The flow of water is about a
quarter of an inch in diameter. Temperature of the water,
66 F., s'aid to be invariable. (The temperature of the atmos-
phere, at the time of observation, was 86 F.) Very little
evolution of gas bubbles. The sediment in the gum is dark,
and slimy. The incrustation on the gum dark green, yellow-
ish, and purplish, and dirty-whitish. Taste brackish. Reac-
tion, neutral.

No. 1462 SULPHUR WATER from the " White Sulphur Spring"
near the "Big Gum" and between it and the Moreman Spring \
to the left of the walk.

Flow about quarter to half an inch in diameter. A slight
intermittent evolution of gas bubbles. Temperature 62 F.,
said to be invariable. Incrustation whitish. Sediment green-
ish near the gum. Tastes and smells stronger of sulphuretted
hydrogen than any of the other springs. Reaction, neutral.
Water not at present used.

No. 1463 SULPHUR WATER from the "Hymenial Spring"

A feeble spring, situated about ten feet from the " Center
Spring." Temperature of the water 65 F., said to be invari-
able. Sediment greenish-black, with pinkish portions, and
slimy. Incrustation on the "gum" dark-green and dirty-white.
Reaction, neutral.



92 CHEMICAL REPORT.

No. 1464 SULPHUR WATER from the "Rock Spring."

The original spring of the group. Situated at the base of
the hill. Flows out from the rock in a constant stream, which
might fill an inch pipe. Temperature 58 F., said to be invari-
able. A whitish scum on the water in the channel of out-flow;
no gas bubbles evolved. Sediment bluish-blackish. Reaction,
neutral. Not very strong in sulphuretted hydrogen.

No. 1465 SULPHUR WATER from an Artesian Well, one
thousand feet deep, and six inches in diameter, completed in
1865.

Bored for "oil" on Hunting Fork, a tributary of Rock
Creek, near Mr. H. Haynes', six miles from Grayson Springs,
on the property of the Boston Kentucky Central Rock Oil
Company, H. W. Fuller, President. At first the water spouted
twenty feet above the surface of the ground, from the two-inch
tube. The tube is now out, and the hole has been widened
for six feet down and cased with an eight-inch square wooden
box. The water now flows out in a six-inch stream. Tem-
perature 61.5 F. Gas is evolved constantly in large bubbles.
The incrustation on the boxing, &c., is blackish, and is to be
seen in the channel of the stream for half a mile down. The
water is clear and colorless, and gives an alkaline reaction. A
salt water stream is said to enter the well about one hundred
and fifty feet below the surface.
92



CHEMICAL REPORT.



93



COMPOSITION OF THESE SULPHUR WATERS OF GRAYSON COUNTY IN 1000

PARTS.



Name of spring ....


Centre.


More-
man.


McAtee.


Stump.


Jar.


Eye.


White
Sulphur.


Hy me-
nial.


Rock.


Artesian




No. 1456


No. 1457


No. 145!


No. 1459


No. 1460


No. 1461


No. 1462


No. 1463


No. 146^


No. 1465


Specific gravity of water


I.O022


I.OOII


1.0015


i. 0016


not est.


not est.


not est.


not est.


not est.


not est.


Free carbonic acid gas .
Free sulphuretted hydro-


0.1950
.O2OO


0.1234
.0248


0.1500

.0203


o. 1650
.0410


O. 2O2O

.0265


not est.
0.0239


not est.
0.0270


not est.
not est.


not est.
not est.


not est.
0.0380




Lime carbonate ....
Magnesia carbonate . .
Iron, and manganese car-
bonates and phosphates
Silica


0.1736

a trace.

.0027
.0022

not est.


0.1952
.0512

.0048
.0094
not est.


0.1806
.0002

.0078
.0028
.0022


O.20O2

a trace.

.0066
.0008
.0268


0.1632

.0345

.0072
.0032
.0271


o. 1872
.0042

.0096
.0036
.0096


o. 1832
.0018

.0096
.0104
.0090


0.1525
not est.


o. 1660
.0118

.0072
.0022
.0304


0.1360
.0228

.0106
.0260
.0038


Organic matters and loss
Total sedi'nt on boiling


0.1785


0.2606


0.1914


o . 0342

0.6291
.6093
.0023
374


0.2352


0.2132


0.2140


not est .


0.2176


o. 1992


Lime sulphate
Magnesia sulphate . . .


i. 1649
5774


o.454i

.3768


0.4528
.4616
.0024
.0126


0.5078

.5781
.0045


0.6683

7542
.0017


0.6505
.6522


0.9001
.8835
.0085


0.5946
.4704
.001 1
.0288

traces .
.0059


1.3044
.8778
not est.
not est.

traces.
.0254








Iron, manganese and
alumina sulphates and


.0034
.0521


.0007
.0409

.0066


.0192
not est.


not est.
not est.


traces.
.0207


traces.
.0100


traces.
.0257


traces .
.0220


Sodium sulphide ....
Soda combined with or-


Potash " "


.0009


.0038


















.0200


.0053


.0760


.1059


.0192


.0226


.0084


.2960




0.1898


.0145




.0034
not est.


.0029
not est.


.0060

not est.


.0022
.0200


.0008
.2029


.0058
.0222


.0158
.1777


.0032
not est.


.0048
.1484


.0056
not est.


Organic matters and loss
Total saline matters .


2.0748


i. 1609


1.3252


1.574


1.6260


i . 7960


1.7470


1-9974


1.4800


2.7084


Lithium, iodine and bro-
mine


traces.


traces.


traces.


traces.


not est.


not est.


not est.


not est


not est.


not est.


Temperature of spring, F.


61


66, 67


60


64


6


66


ft 1


tf


5<? o


6i,65



The small quantities of lithium compound, indicated in the
above table, were detected by means of the spectroscope, after
proper treatment of the saline residuum obtained by the
evaporation of from ten to twenty litres of the water. The
bromine and iodine traces could only be observed by the ap-
propriate tests after a similar evaporation.

The organic matters recorded in the table are composed of
apcu-renic and crenic acids and the singular substance called
Baregine, from the fact that it was first observed in the sulphur
water of the celebrated Barege Springs of the Pyrenees.

This Baregine is found in solution in many of the sulphur
waters of the world ; more especially in the thermal waters.

93



94 CHEMICAL REPORT.

On evaporation of such waters they assume a yellowish tint
and leave a yellowish-brown residue, which, on calcination,
gives out ammoniacal fumes and the odor of burnt horn ; leav-
ing a very large proportion of ash, mainly silicious. This
organic matter, approaching to the nature of the albuminoid



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