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1791 Hon. John T. Gilman, of Exeter, was elected State
Treasurer by the Legislature. He soon after his election re-
signed. Who was elected to fill the vacancy?

N. H.

Gerpealogical.

15. Lane. — Can any one give the parentage of Capt. John
Lane, of York Co., Me? I have supposed that he was a son
of William Lane of Boston, 1650, whose son John was in



114 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

King Philip's war, in 1G74, under Capt. Pool, in the company
in which Samuel (son of William) Lane served. The tra-
ditions differing from this do not seem reliable. In 1692 he
married in Newbury, Mass., Joanna Davenson. Ten years
later, he was Capt. Lane, and served some 15 or 20 years as
an officer in So. Eastern, Maine.
Exeter, N. H. Jacob Chapman.

16. Saltsbuky — Eddy. — William Salisbury and Joice
Eddy were married in Warren, R, L, March 20, 1774, and had
the following children: Mary, Twins, Joseph, Phebe, William,
Barnard and Belcher. The said William and Joice Salisbur}-
removed to Brattleboro, Vt., about 1779. It is thought he
was born in Bristol, and lived in Warren. He is said to have
been a ship carpenter or builder. When and where was the
said William Salisbury born, and what is his ancestry? When
and where was Joice Eddy born, and what is her ancestry?
(Notes. Joseph and Ruth (Belcher) Eddy had the following
children born in Bristol from 1729 to 1745: Belcher, Abigail
Rebecca, Joseph, Elizabeth, Ruth, Sarah, and Joice born Oct.
3, 1745. Was this Joyce the Joice who niai'ried William Salis-
bury in Warren, March 20, 1774)?

Providefice, R. I. Edson Salisiutry Jones.

17. Choate. — Can any one give the names and dates of
birth of the children of Stephen and Rebecca (Bowman)
Choate, of Roxbury, Mass., who were married Feb. 4, 1730?

E. O. J.

18. Johnson. — When did John Johnson eettle at Ipswich,
Mass., and when did he arrive from England? Information
wanted in regard to the descendants of his grandsons John
and James Johnson of Andover, Mass. John had a son John,
and James had Andrew, Obadiah, Jose})h, James and Peter.
The last two were in the battle of Banker Hill. Information
also wanted of descendants of Isaac and Josiah Johnson who
were in Leominster, Mass., in 1752. Isaac had a son Isaac,
and Josiah had a son Josiah, b. Jan. 20, 1752.

North Greenfield, Wis., Rev. W. W. Johnson.



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOIIY. 115

19. Eaton. — T wish to ()l)tain the maidoii iianic of Jemima,
wife of Samuel Eaton, of Tolland, Conn., whose daughter
Bethiah, born 1733 was my great grandmother.

56 Myrtle St., Boston, Mass., E. G. Davis.

20. Jones. ( ). Cornelius & Abigail ( ) Jones

were the.parents of the following children, born in Dighton,
Mass., from 1719 to 1744— Priscilla, Henrj, Cornelius, Eli-
jah, born Apr. 11, 1725, Jaca, Charles, b. Dec. 14, 1780, Abi-
gail, Benjamin, Silvester, Priscilla and Catherney. When
and where was Cornelius, the father, born? When, where and
liy whom was he married to Abigail — ? When and where did
Cornelius die, and where is he buried? What is his ancestry?
What was the maiden name of Abigail (w. of Cornelius)?
When and where was she born? When and where did she
die, and where is she buried? What is her ancestry? (Notes —
A Cornelius Jones was b. in Bristol, Nov. 1, 1693, s. of Cor-
nelius and Mercy. A Cornelius Jones d. in Berkley about
1747, for his son Charles had Geo. Pitts of Dighton, appoint-
ed his guardian, Apr. 6, 1747, the said Charles then "being
above the age of 14." A Cornelius Jones m. (at an unknown
date) Mercy Cory, dau, of William and Mary (Earle) Cory,
of Portsmouth, R. I. (Gen, Die. of R. I. p. 56). When and
where did Cornelius Jones (husband of Mercy Cory) die.
and where is he buried? When and where was he born and
what is his ancestry?

Providence, R. L, Edson Salisbury Jones.

21. Ckandall. — Wanted parentage, births, deaths, and
descendants of the following: — Edward Crandall and wife
Anna, of Tolland, Conn., in 1788 — also Giles Crandall and
wife Elizabeth of same place 1761 — Isaac Crandall, early sett-
ler of Winchester, N. H. — Jane Crandall and Chipman Cobb,
m. in Portland, Me., 1783. — Philip Crandall and Martha
Cox, in same place 1784. — Philip Crandall and Mary Bab-
bage, m. in No. Yarmouth 1750. — John Crandall and Betty
Field, m. in Falmouth, Me., 1762.— John Crandall, b. in



116 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

Providence (?) about 175 '.^ and Nancy Lane, b. in Salem,
Mass. — Eber Crandall and Hannah or Abigail Sprague, re-
moved from Martha's Vineyard to Wilkesbarre, Pa., before
the massacre— 'Jared Crandall and Lydia Pendleton ni. in
Stonington, 1765. — A])raliam, Cary and William Craiuhill,
living in Stonington in 1790. — Adam Crandall and Eunice
Blodget, m. in Stonington, 1781. — Philip Crandall and
Margaret Fry, his wife, living in Newport, R. I., in 1795.
50 Myrtle St., Boston, Mass., E. G. Davis.

22. Messer. — 1, Where did he come from and who were
the parents of Richard Mercer (Messer)? He nianied March
18, 1669, Hannah Shatswell, born August 5, 1651, daughter
of Theopholas and Susanna (Bosworth) Shatswell. They had
a son Abiel, born Dec. 27, 1670, all of Haverhill Mass. 2,
Who were tlie parents of Daniel Messer of Bow, N. H., born
1760, died April 17, 1815, married Elizabeth Saunders of
Salem, N. H., June 18, 1780. They had Abigail, William,
Amos, Daniel, Betse3% Oliver, Sally and Peasley. I am pre-
paring a genealogy of the Messers, correspondence with those
possessing information, relating to the Messers in this coun-
try, and in Europe, is earnestly desired.

Onarga, Iroquois Co. III., Moses H. Messer.

23. Myers. — I would like to learn the parentage of the
brothers Ed. Myers, William Myers, Gilbert M. P. Myers
(born April 12, 1785, died 1827), and Beekman Myers. I
liave notes on Hobbell (1727), Patterson (1781), and Myers.
Will be pleased to correspond with those interested.

Adrian, Mich., Fred'k B. Stebbins.

24. Woou-KiNGSLEY. — 1. A John Wood settled at
Groton (then New London) Conn., in 1660. Has any one
traced his descendants? I would like to correspond with any
one interested. 2. One of my ancestors was Rufus Kingsley,
born 1768. His father was probably Jonathan, of Eastern
Conn. Father and son were both in battle of Bunker Hill.
Who can inform me about tliis family?

Westfield, N. Y., Frank B. Lamb.



MAGAZINE OF NEW P^NGLAND HISTORY. 117

25. Cock- Hushmore- Prior- Blrdsali^ Alli ng. — In-
formation desired upon the following points. — Family names
of Sarah, wife of James Cock, before 1655, Martha, wife of
Thomas Rushmore before 1700, Mary wife of Matthew Pricn-
before 1670, Dorothy, second wife of Jolni Cock, m. after

1690, wife of Nathan Birdsall before 1660, name of wife

and })arentage of Abraham Ailing, blacksmitli, who came to
Oysterbay, L. I. about 1677. Excliange of information as to
genealogy of early Queens Co., N. Y. families is offered by

Glen Cove, Queens Co. lY. Y., George W. Cocks.

26. Jones-Austin. — Elijah Jones (probably that son of
Cornelius and Abigail who was born in Dighton, Mass., Apr.
11, 1725) is said to have been a shi[)wright,also a sea captain
and to have been drowned at sea (probably after 1772.) In-
tentions of mari'iage were declared in Dighton between
Elijah Jones and Deborah Austin, both of Dighton, Jan. 24,
1746-7. When, where and by whom were Elijah and Debo-
rah married? When and froin what ship was Elijah drowned?
When and where was Deborah Austin born? When and
where did she die and where was she buried? What is her
ancestry? (Notes. Elijah and Deborah Jones had the fol-
lowing children — Elijah, Piiscilla, Aquila and Increase, born
in Dighton, from 1747 to 1752, and Seth, Benson, Miriam,
Income, b. June 28, 1757, and Mary, born at an unknown
place or places. Priscilla m. Elisha Johnson, of Taunton,
Increase m. Hannah Bowen, of Rchoboth, and Income m.
Mary Kingsle^^ dau. of Asa and Huklah (Bowen) Kingsley,
of Swansea.) Where was Income Jones born, and in what
Town or Church Records is his birth recorded (book and
page)?

Providence, R. /., Edson SALISBURY JoNES.

27. Wrr.LTAMS. — Parents of the following and date of
birth wanted; also names and dates of birth of (ihildren:
Elizabeth Haley who married Nathan Williams (b. at Ston-
ington, Ct., July 22, 1720);



118 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

Elizabeth Gallup who married Atwood Williams (b. at S.,

Apr. 16, 1723);
Rebecca Satterly who married Warham Williams (bp. at S.,

Apr. 9, 1727):
Daniel Brewster who married Phebe Williams, May 31,

1753 at S., (bp. at S., March 8, 1731;)
Joshua Culver who married Sarah Williams (b. at S., March

2, 1713);
Richard Williams who married Eunice Williams, (b. at S.,
Dec. 15,1732.)
Those named Williams, except Richard, were children of
Isaac and Sarah (Denison) Williams of Stonington.

Edward H. Williams, Jr.
117 Church st., Bethlehtm, Penn.

28. Weaver. Who can tell me anything about John
Weaver and Patience, his wife, who with sons Constont and
John, Jr., were in Glocester and Killingiy between 1746 and
1754? May have come from Swanzey. Was Elizabeth Weaver
who married Joshua King (Glocester records) April 2, 1750
their daughter? Constont, the son, marrried, first, Aug. 27,

1750 Elizabeth Allen of Killingiy, and second, Elethea .

What was second wife's maiden name? Any information
about this family welcomed.

Who can give me any information as to ancestors, rela-
lationship, or descendants of any of the following Weavers
whose marriages by the Swanzey town records are here set
down:

May 25, 1728, Thomas Francis and Hannah Weaver.

Sept. 18, 1787, Edward Weaver and Ale Chase.

July 12, 1738, William Wood Jr., of Rehobotli and Patience

Weaver of Swanzey.
Feb. 24, 1742, Peter Weaver and Phebe Baker.
Nov. 29, 1745, David Evins Jr., of Freetown and Anne

Weaver.
Jan. 29, 1750-1, Samuel Fowler and Mary Weaver both of

Swanzey.



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 119

March 31, 175-i, Peter Weaver of Swanzey and Lydia Uavis

of Freetown.
May 23, 1790; Peter Weaver and Sarah Luther, l)ot]i of

Swanzey.
Jan. 20, 1786-7, Thomas Lewis and Phebe Weaver both of
Rehoboth.

The last marriage is from the Rehoboth town records.

The following data from the land and probate records at
Taunton, about Peter Weaver, may identify him to some one
who can put me on the track of additional particulars. Feb.
1, 1743-4, Peter Weaver of Swanzey, boatman, bought 4 acres
of- land in Swanze}^ of Robert and Hepzabeth Gibbs for X135

Jan. 17, 1745, Peter Weaver of Swanzey, yeoman, bought
201 acres of land in Swanzey, "in ye Shawammett purchase"
of Benjamin Kinsley, yeoman, for X683. The bounds men-
tioned are Edward Slead's land and Taunton river. Right
was reserved for a bridle way, "for people to pass and repass
* * * * to go to the mill and for the use and
])enefit of ye mill."

July 25, 1802, Will of Peter Weaver of Swanzey. made. It
mentions wife Sarah, daughters Hannah Trott, Anna Chase,
Mary Cartwright, Phebe Terry and Alice Boyce; sons,
Thomas, Joseph, Benjamin and Jonathan (last two deceased);
and grandchildren, Peter Weaver, Benjamin Weaver Chase,
Lydia Weaver, Caudice Weaver and Elizabeth Dean.

OuEN W. Weaver.

Di'parfvirnt of Labor, Washingto7i, D. 0.

20. Chester. — Leonard Cliestcr, came from Blady, Eng-
land, and settled in Westfield, Conn. He married, prob. in

Eupiand, ]\Lirv . What was her maiden name? Their

childreji were:

I. John, b. August 3, 1635, m. Sarah Wells, Feb. 1658.

He died Feb. 23, 1698.
n. Dorcas, b. November 5, 1637, m. Rev. Samuel Whit-
ing, November 12, 1656. He died Feb. 16, 1713.



120 ISIAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

III. Stephen, b. May, 3, 1639, d. April 23, 1705.

IV. Maiy b. January 15, 1641.

V. Prudence, b. February 16, 1648, m. Capt. Thomas
Russell, December 30, 1669, He died October 21,
1678.
VI. Eunice, b. January 15, 1645, m. Richard Sprague,

February 1, 1672. He died May 27, 1676.
VII. Mercy, b. February 15, 1647, d. September 15, 1669.

p. T.

30. Reed. — Daniel Reed, son of James and Joanna
(^Castle) Reed of Amenia, N. Y., was born April 15, 1761.
Whom did he marry? Pliny.

{Replies.

2. — QuiNNATissiT, Conn. — G. R., in the January num-
ber of 1891, is mistaken in saying that Quinnatissit is, or
ever was, a village in the town of Woodstock, Conn. Wood-
stock was first incorporated by Massachusetts in 1690, and
remained under the jurisdiction of the Colony until 1749,
when it was annexed to Connecticut. Quinnatissit was the
Indian name of a large tract of land which was included in
the town of Killingly, Conn., when it was incorporated in
1708, and so continued until it was included in the town of
Thompson, Conn., which was incorporated in May 1785. If
G. R., will look at i)age 175 of the first volume of Miss Ellen
D. Larned's history of Windham County, he will find an in-
teresting sketch of Quinnatissit, Conn.

Stoimigton^ Conn., Richakd A. Wheeler.

3. — An Invitation to Settle in New England. — The
lines quoted can be found at the close of that witty book, by
"The Simple Cobbler of Agawam in America," another name
for Rev. Nathaniel Ward, of Ipswich. It was first published
in 1645. Five different editions were issued in 1647. In
1843, an edition, edited by D. Pulsifer, was published in
Boston. — Ed.



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. X2X



Historical Societies.




HE Collector for April, a monthly Imlletin for Auto-
graph Collectors, in an article on "Lost Autographs,"
has something to say about Historical Societies. As
the article is not credited to any particular contribu-
tor it is fair to presume that the editor is the author of the
article. In referring to the loss and destruction of valuable
documents and letters he says:

"The best place for a valuable letter is in the cabinet of
an intelligent collector. He will guard it carefully, and it
will be easily available for historical purposes. Historical
societies would seem to be the proper places of deposit for
them, but in most cases this is not so. A man who would
not steal from a private owner, will pilfer without conscience
from a society. What belongs to all belongs to none. Often
the governors of such societies are men selected for their
money or social importance,and they care nothing for old let-
ters. A very great many historical societies are inert and life-
less — existing rather in name than in anything they accom-
plish. Thousands of dollars' worth of the most valuable his-
torical material passes through my hands every 3^ear. I do
not think I have ever sold five dollars' worth to a historical
society. We never hear of them bidding at auctions. We
occasionally read dull repoi'ts of their stated meetings in the
very dull Magazine of Ayncrican History. If they secure
anything and actuall}^ take care of it, there is little hope of
getting at it for historical purposes. No society is more
roundly abused for its inaccessibility than the Boston Histori-



122 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGI.ANT) HISTORY.

cal Society. It is a dog-in-mauger business. I don't believe
that any one knows what is in the Pennsylvania Historical
Society. For this reason I should advise possessors of old
papers who do not care to keep them, to sell them at the best
price possible.* They will profit by it financially, and the
papers will })ass into the best hands possible."

We beg leave to differ with the editor of the Collector and
claim that "the best place for a valuable letter is in the
cabinet" of an Historical Society. The Society will certainly
"guard it carefully, and it will be easily available for histori-
cal purposes." During the past one hundred years, there
have been formed nearly two hundred historical societies, the
greater number of which have perpetuated their organiza-
tions. The object of these Societies has been to collect and
diffuse the materials of American history. The first society
organized was that now known as the Massachusetts Histori-
cal Society (which is the one referred to, in the Collector, as
the Boston Historical Society). This organization has been
in existence just one hundred years. The zeal of the mem-
bers in securing and preserving historical manuscripts, is
sufficiently illustrated by the fact that it has collected many
thousand volumes of manuscripts which relate to every period
since the founding of the Colonies. This Society has pub-
lished many volumes which have found their way to the
shelves of nearly every public libraiy in the United States.
The Society has therefore, not only actually taken care of
the documents and letters in their possession, but has per-
mitted the historical student in Maine and California to reap
the benefit of their collection. The Historical Societies of
New England work side by side with the Public Library.
Their doors are open to the public; every one is invited, in-
vestigators especiall3\ It is the duty of the Librarian to
assist the searcher for a single item, his duty to assist the
many who, day after day, and week after week, visit the
rooms in search of family history, and it is his duty to assist
and to make pleasant the visit of the stjanger who, from a



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 123

distant state drops in to look upon the portrait of some distin-
guished person of ancient times, or to simply inquire the age
or histor}^ of an old house.

It was, perhaps, a mistake of the editor of the Collector in
referring to the Pennsylvania Society, which has recently
been presented with a valuable collection of autographs. In
this case the "best place for a valuable letter," in the opinion
of Mr. Dreer, is in the cabinet of the Pennsylvania Histori-
cal Society.

The Collector has recently published many interesting
communications from a gentleman connected with one of our
New England Historical Societies. We were pleased to re-
print one of them. It told of the rescue of an old letter^
which is now safely guarded by the New London County
Historical Society where it can be consulted for historical
purposes. r. h. t.



The Old Town of Quincy, Mass., is rich in historical
incidents, and noted as the birthplace and residence of men
eminent in the early history of our country. Years befoi-e her
granite hills were laid open to supply materials for the foun-
dations and walls of our public edifices, she gave to the na-
tion some of the chief corner-stones in the history of our Re-
public. John Adams, the second President of the United
States, and John Hancock, the first signer of the Declara-
tion of Independence, were born and died in tliis town. It is
also the birthplace of John Quincy Adams, our sixth Presi-
dent, and of Edmund Quincy, Few towns in the State are
so rich in Revolutionary memories as this. Some of the
buildings, relics of those ancient days, are still standing, and
well worth examining, among which are the venerable houses
in which Hannah Adams and John Quincy Adams were born.



The Old Clock that was presented to the First Church
of Dedham, Mass., by Samuel Dexter, in 1783, is now exhib-
ited at the Dedham Historical Society.



J24 TMAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.



Record of Marriages, by Rev. Gardner Thurston,
Pastor of the Second Bartist Church, New-
port, R. L 1759-1800.

(Continued from pai;e 55.)

Gideon CorneU and Susanna Linican.

Weston Clarke and Maiy Allison.

Solomon Vanhine of New Shoreliani and Deliver-
ance Cornell of Middletown.

Aster Flagg and Florah Burroughs. Black couple.

William Hookey and Al)igail Burroughs.

George Hazard Peckham of Soutli Kingstown and
Sarah Taylor of Newport.

William Weeden and Amy Underwood.

Nicholas Hazard and Mary Dulucina.

Benjamin Allen and Sarah Hookey.

Charles Church and Elizabeth Tewels.

William Prior and Martha Dickinson.

Nathan Sheffield of South Kingstown, and Mar-
tha Rathburn of Newport.

Benjamin Coggeshall and Mary Anthony.

John Overland and Wate Spencer.

John Lassells and Sarah Church.

John Kilburn and Katharine Stanton.

John Bush and Elizabeth Smith.

Ebenezer Carr of Newport, and Phebe Robinson
of Jamestown.
Aug. 18. John Pnlfry and Elizabeth Harris.
Sept. 22. Job Howland of Jamestown, and Sarah Beebe of
Newport.



1763.
Jan.


2.


n


18.


((


20.


Feb.


9.


11


17.


ii


17.


a


17.


ii,


17.


Mch.


24.


April


[11.


11


11.


May


1.


Ik


3.


June


20.


'^


24.


July


10.


ii,


17.


ii


28.



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY 125

Sept. 22. William Parham of Pliilaclelphia, and Esther
Lilibridge of Newport.

" 29. Lemuel Wetlierell and Maiy Sawdey.

Oct. 9. Israel Brayton and Elizabeth Lawton.

" 11. Eleazer Reed and Mary Atwood.

" 13. Oliver Greenburg and Mary Slocum.

Nov. 8. James Prior and Lidia Inghram.

"■ 20. William Goddard and Freelove Pearce.

1764.

Jan. 8. Michael Blasin and Amey Greenman.

" 15. Peter Taylor, Portsmouth, and Frances Clarke,
Middletown.

" 22. Philip Smith, Middletown, and Sarah Smith,
Newport.

Feb. 4. Benjamin Barker and Mary Pettis.

" 5. Pardon Tillinghast Jr. and Abigail Rogers.

Mch. 18. Saxnuel Devenport and Frances Cranston.

" 25. John George Rix and Lois Reed.

April 24. John Kinyon and Ann Kinyon.

" 26. William Gubbins and Freelove Easton.

May 12. Richard Card and Martha Tripp.

" 23. John Smith and Sarah Hoxsey.

June 3. William Ross and Bathsheba Sisson.

" 13. Joseph Sanford and Mary Clarke.

" 21. John Shaw and Elizabeth Allen.

" 26. Abraham Hardin and Ann Vinson.

July 1. William Carpenter and Ann Gardner.

" 6. Gideon So wle and Abigail White.

" 30. Nathaniel Locke and Mary Burt.

Sept. 6. Thomas Scott and Elizabeth Baxter.

" 13. Henry Tillinghast and Rebeckah Vose.

" 23. Thomas Crapon and Elizabeth Walker.

" 23. Joseph Larkins and Amey Cor3\

Oct. 4. John Helmes and Sarah Wilcocks.

" 21. Job Cook, Tiverton, and Elizabeth Sisson, Ports-
mouth.



126 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

William Jackson and Elizabeth Philips.

Charles Wignoron and Mary Taylor.

William Chandler and Mary Sinking.

William Bnrronghs and Catharine Gardner.

William Lawton and Rebecca Gibbs.

James Taylor and Mary Wignoron.

Joseph Sheffield, Newport, and Mary Peckham,

Middletown.
Zephaniah Heeth and Elizabeth Langworthy.
Joram Place and Rebeckah Platts.
Clother Pearce and Mary Hill.

Thomas Weaver and Elizabeth Beard.

Woodman Billings and Patience Wilcox.

John Bliven of Ne^Aq3ort, and Abigail Lawton,

Middletown.
Benjamin Philips and Mary Sheldon.
Allen James and Elizabeth Pettes.
William Layhu and Ann Kelsey.
Oliver Reed and Mary Shearman.
Joseph Batty and Elizabeth Tayer.
Richard Leathearn and Mary Little.
William Fowler and Pheby Hopkins.
Vallentine Whiteman and Mary Ward.
John Nicklis and Mary Young.
William Walter Humphrey and Mary Hookey.
Joshua Hunt and Rebeckah Shearman.
Richard Cranston and Sarah Hookey.
James L3^on and Sarah Sweet.
Anthonj' Shaw and Remembrance Goddard.
James Fry and Dorathy Cartwaite.
James Goddard and Mary Nichols.
Thomas Chadwick and Deborah Burck.
George Sinkins and Mary Aldrige.
Charles Wrightson and Amey Weeden.
James Thompson and Elizabeth Geer.



Nov.


4.


ii


7.


ki


8.


"


11.


11,


20.


a


2L


Dec.


8.


C(


20.


ii


24.


ii


26.


1765.




Jan.


27.


Feb.


5.


"


7.


Mch.


24.


a


24.


a


31.


April


28.


May


6.


It


5.


ik


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June


8.


July


L


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4.


ii,


7.


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Oct.


9



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 127

Oct. 27. Andrew Miorrie, Georgia, and Ann Cliace, New-
port.
" 27. Joshua Stacy and Mary Gay.
Nov. 7. Edward Chapman and Ruth Bayley, both of Mid
dletown.
" lo. Michael Crosby and Frances Husband.
" 24. Jonathan Finley and Jane Dennis.
Dec. 5. Wm. Hall and Elizabeth Davis.
" 8. Thomas Townsend and Mary Dyre.
Rouse Potter and Waite Easton.
Jolni Atkinson and Hannah Chirke.

Samuel Tompkins, Newport, and Phebe Clark,
Middletown.

Perris Luther and Mary Steward.

Samuel Hatliaway and Temperance Trowbridge.

John Read and Rebecca Rogers.

John Shrive, Tiverton, and Ann Shrive, Newport.

Robinson Kelley and Pheby Howard.

Anthony Wilbor and Martha Green.

James Lawrania and Ann Pearson.

William Langle^- and Sarah Dunton.

Thomas Gardner, South Kingstown, and Katharine
Gar'dner, Newport.

Benjamin Tuell and Darkis Downer.

William Brown and Mary Coggeshall, Middle-
town.

Jolni Clarke and Maiy Bennet.

William Barron and Ann Humpreys.

Joseph Worrin and Sarah Tajdor.


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