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34 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

1710. He was installed pastor of the First Clmreh in Saleui,
Sept. 17, 1755. "Mr. Barnard having been taken oft' from
his labors by the i)alsy," says Mr. Felt, "and his son Tlionias
having supplied his place, — the ehui'cli had a fast, Oct. 31,
1770, preparatory to the choice of a minister. Mr. Thomas
Barnard, Jr., and Mr. Asa Dunbar, preached as candidates,
and upon tlie choice of the latter, the minoritjs friends of
the former, separated peaceably, and established the Noilh
Society, settling Thomas Barnard, Jr., as their minister.
The First Church, "for the continuing of peace and brotherly
love," made an equitable division with them of the ''tempo-
ralities of the church," though it could see no reasons for a
separation, Mv. Dunl)ar being "admirably qualified for a
Gospel preacher." Mr. Barnard died Aug. 5, 1776, aged 60
yef\rs.

12. Rev. Asa Dunbar (1772 to 1779) was l)orn in
Bridge water. May 26, 1745, and was ordained as colleague
with Rev. Thomas Barnard, Jidy 22, 1772. Mr. Dunbar's
services were interru})ted by the bad state of his health, and
in a few years he was induced to ask a dismission.

18. Rev. John Prince, LL. D., (1779 to 1886) was born
in Boston, July 22, 1751. He was ordained to the pastoral
care of the First Church in Salem, Nov. 10th, 1779. In
1817 a legacy of $58000 was received from the late Charles
Henry Orne, mercliant, a worthy member of tlie church,
Avhich, when accumulated to $5000, was to form a permanent
fund for the support of the settled minister of the First
Church. Miss Mehitable Higginson, the sixth in descent
from tlie first minister, and the last in Salem to bear that ven-
erated name, left at lier death a lasting memorial of her in-
terest in the society of the First Church by a generous be-
quest; also providing that a legacy of $500 given to the
Salem Athenaeum on certain conditions, should, "in case of
the non-fulfilment of said conditions, go to the use of tlie
ministerial fund of the First Congregational Society in
Salem." In Feb., 1824, at a meeting of the First Congrega



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 35

tioiKil Societ}', in S;ileui, called for llie purpose, it was voted
that it was expedient to settle a colleague. Rev. Henry
Coleman, having preached as a candidate, was earnestly de-
sired by a considerable portion of the society. A majority,
however, not being in favor of his settlement, his adherents
seceded from the First Church, in 1824, and built for him
the house in Barton square ; and he was installed as their
minister, Feb. 25, 1825, — Mr. Upham having been recently
ordained the colleague of Dr. Prince. This secession made
the fourth religious society in Salem formed from the First,
in a little more than one hundred years. Dr. Prince was
happy in his young colleague, who by his devoted attentions
cheered and brightened his latter days, and paid a just and
eloquent tribute to his memory in a discourse preached at his
funeral. Dr. Prince died on the 7tli of June, 1836, very
nearly 85 years of age.

14. Rev. Charles VVentworth Upham (1824 to 1844),
son of the Hon. Joshua Upham, formerly of Massachusetts,
and a graduate of Harvard College in the class of 1763, was
born at St. John, New Brunswick, May 4, 1802. He received
his education at Harvard College. He accepted an invitation
to settle as colleague pastor with the Rev. Dr. Prince, and
was ordained Dec. 8, 1824. Mr. Upham resigned his pasto-
ral office in December, 1844, from regard to his health, as did
his predecessor, Mr. Dunbar; — the only instances of resigna-
tion among the ministers of the First Church. In his excel-
lent farewell address, in writing, which was entered upon the
records of the Society, he warmly expresses "the gratification
with which he contemplated their unanimity, kindness and
generosity,"^ concluding "with the most fervent wishes and
prayers for the welfare of the Society, collectively and indi-
vidually, and with the liveliest sensibility in the remem-
brance of all their kindness, fidelity and sympathy. Mr.
Upham was soon called into public life, and became succes-
sively a representative of Salem in the General Court, a sen-
ator from the County of Essex, and a member of tlie Con-



36 MAGAZINE OF NFAV ENGLAND HISTORY.

gress of the United States. Me had also l)een Mayor of the
city of Salem.

15. Rev. Thomas Treadwell Stone (1840 to 1852)
was born at Waterford, Me., Feb. P, 1801. In June, 1840,
he Avas cliosen pastor of the First Concrregational Society in
Salem, and was installed on the 12th of July following. Mr.
Stone's ministry terminated in February, 1852. He had
greatly endeared himself to many persons in the society ; and
all, it is believed, entertained for him a high respect, and the
sincerest good wishes. One thousand dollars was contribu-
ted at once by members of the society, and cordially ])resented
to him upon the close of his ministerial connection with
them. Mr. Stone afterward settled in the ministry at Bolton,
Mass., and remained in connection with that church so long
as he continued free from the physical infirmities of old age.
Intellectually, we understand his mind remains clear and
sound, notwithstanding that he is now far advanced toward
the completion of his ninetieth year.

10. Rev. George Ware Briggs (1853 to 1867) was
born at Little Compton, R. I., April 8th, 1810, and was edu-
cated at Brown University. He graduated at the Theologi-
cal School in Cambridge, with the class of 1834, and was set-
tled in the ministry at Fall River, Sept. 24, 1834. He was
installed at Plymouth, Jan. 3, 1838, as colleague pastor with
the Rev. Dr. Kendall. On the 18th of December, 1852, he
was invited to settle as pastor of the First Church. His in-
stallation took place on the 6th of January, 1853. He re-
signed his office April 1, 1867, and removed to Cambridge,
where he was settled as minister of the Third Congregational
Society, to which he still continues to minister. Dr. Briggs
was always a particularly strong and interesting sermon
writer and good i)astor. He was settled in Salem during the
period of the war to ])reserve the Union. His voice and in-
fluence during that pei'iod, both as a minister and citizen,
were strongly in favor of the Union cause.



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 37

17. Rev. James Thacy Hewes (1868 to 1875) was in-
stalled Sept. 27, 1868. He resigned Augnst 31, 1875, and
went to Fitchburg. His liealth failed liini, and he died Nov.
21, 1882, in Cambridge, of consumption, at the age of 46,
Mr. Hewes was a good speaker, possessed many popular qual-
ities, and was a conscientious laljorer in the ministr3^

18. Rev. Fielder Israel (1877 to 1889) was installed
March 8, 1877, and died in office Jan. 4, 1889. Mr. Israel
was born in Baltimore, June 29, 1825. He was in that city
at the outbreak of the rebellion, and upheld the side of loy-
alty to the nation at a time when the secession feeling was
rampant there. He was reared in the Methodist faith and
became a preaclier in that body. He afterwards grew more
in S3'mpathy with the Unitarians, and was installed as minis-
ter of the First Church, March 7, 1877. Mr. Israel was a
man of broad and liberal views, and was personally of a
broad and genial nature. He was an able and interesting
preacher ; and there was no mistaking his kind heart, his
genuine interest in humanity, and his earnest desire to do his
j\Iaster's will.

[ The above recently appeared in the Salem, Mass., Ga-
zette, in connection with an account of the installation of
its new minister, Rev. Mr. Cressly. The article was compiled
by Hon. Caleb Foote, from a pamphlet wiitten by the late
Daniel A. White, Es<p, who was for many years a leading
member of the First Church. — Ed.]



The Times have Changed. — "From an old nuuiuseri[>t
recently brought to light," notes the New Bedford Standard,
"it appears that on the 25th of the fifth month, 1822, the
])opulation of Nantucket was 7266, composed of 1423 fami-
lies, with 911 dwelling houses. At this time there were 36
oil and candle factories and 7 rope-walks in successful opera-
tion. The maritime list enumerates 80 ships, 6 brigs, lli
schooners, and 59 sloops, all actively emploj'ed. Scarcely a
vestige of the Island's former industries and maritime im-
portance remain, and the po[)ulation is less than half >\hat it
was in 1822,"



38 >rAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.



A Document with a History.




HERE was lately found, among a packet of old bills,
receipts and other personal papers on their way to a
junk shop, a document that is historic, not because of
the name that is attached to it, but because it ma}^ be
said to have led up to the bloodiest tragedy of the Revolu-
tion. The results of a great struggle are not always wholly
the outgrowth of the actions of those who occupy public at-
tention by their places in, or under the government. This
was essentially so with regard to the Revolution. Its tri-
umph was due to many causes, and one that is now acknow-
ledged to have been largely instrumental in swaying public
opinion in Great Britain, was the depredations of the Ameri-
can privateers which preyed on the commerce of that coun-
try. The merchants of London, Bristol, and other British
ports, who found their cargoes failing to reach the people to
whom they were consigned, because the privateers of Con-
necticut, Massachusetts and other colonies diverted them to
the uses and advantages of the patriots, became so emphatic
in their demands for peace, that their voices penetrated to the
councils of the Ministers of King George, and forced Lord
North and his colleagues to listen.

Perhaps noplace was more active in this privateer business
than New London, Conn., whose people had long been noted
for their enterprise in ocean traffic, and whose captains were
brave, daring and ready in expedient. But wliile many ves-
sels were fitted out in New London, and sailed under cap-
tains who were identified with the place, the names of Hard-
ing, Hinman, Leeds, Starr, the Saltonstalls and others being
among the number, the money and enterprise that made their



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 39

deeds possible, was contributed by people scattered all through
the inland towns and villages of the east, as well as tliose lo-
cated on the seaboard. Among these, Adam Babcock, of
Westerly, seems to have been very prominent, because he
spurred others on to assist, and made extraordinary exertions
from his own resources in this direction. He appears to have
traveled between different localities, and to have sought in
all, help for his enterprises ; and during the years 1780 and
1781, to have been largely instrumental, while remaining in
Boston, in fitting out in New London the privateer brigantine
Minerva, which sailed on a cruise early in the June of the
last-named year, capturing, just south of the coast, the ship
Hannah, said to have been the most valuable prize taken dur-
ing the war, and whose seizure created such a turmoil among
the merchants of Great Britain, that the descent on New
London, which terminated in the burning of that place by
Arnold, and in the massacre of the troops in Fort Griswold,
September 6, 1781, was determined on.

Thus the letter of instruction whicli follows, becomes, as
previously stated, historic, for it is the instructions of the
owners of the Minerva, sent to the cojnmander of that ves-
sel before she sailed on the cruise that resulted in the capture
of the Hannah :

BosTox, May 27, 1781.
SiK : — The private armed Brij^t. Minerva, mounted with sixteen six-
pounders, which You are commissioned to command on a Cruise against
the enemies of the United States of America — being now completely
equipped and ready for Sea— you will embrace the tirst favorable Wind
to get out, taking every proper precaution to avoid the British fleet,
should they be off your port as here-to-fore.

Your cruising ground we leave the choice of to You, only would observe
that it is our Wish You should not cruise off either New York or Charles-
town — the danger appearing much greater than the prospect of advantage
in that quarter. If You are fortunate eno' to take any prizes, ^"ou
will order them into this port. Should they by distress of Weather ar-
rive at any out port You will direct the prize masters to give me informa-
tion by express of their situation and follow such directions as I may
think best for our Interests with regard to such prize.

With my best wishes for Your success, victory and safetv, I am, in be-
half of the Owners of Five-Eighths of the 1*. Brigt. Minerva,

Your most affectionate Friend and Brother,

Adam Babcock.



40 MAfiAZINE OF NHW EN(iLANI) HISTOKV.

r. S. On coinin<^ lionie off Your Cruise I would advise you to keep
well to the eastward so as to come in thro" the Vineyard Sound, where
you can get the needed information of the situation of the British fleet.
As soon as you get to New London you will lose no time in clearing the
vessel for a second trip.

Once more sincerely Yours,

A. B.

Dudley Saltonstall, Esq., Commdr. of tlie private arm"d Brigt. Miner-
va, laying at New London.

Tills is, then, the hotter tliat sent the Minerva to sea, and
wliile there she captured the Hannah. For this capture, and
because the phice had indeed become a thorn in the side of
Britisli commerce, it was determined to punish it, and thus
avenge the capture of the Hannah, and all previous Avrong-
doing of the kind. The expedition of Arnold, the burning of
New London and the bloody baptism of Fort Griswold followed.
These might have taken place had the Hannah sailed into
New York in safety, but that they so quickly succeeded the
uproar her capture caused in the mercantile circles of Great
Britain, is significant. That the capture and destruction of
New London was not intended as a force to recall Washing-
ton and his army from before Yorktown, is proved by the im-
mediate departure of Arnold — the same express that carried
the news of the enemy's capture and destruction of the town
bearing the word of his retreat, thus showing that there was
no necessity for Washington's return.

Another fact brought prominently before us by this docu-
ment, is the action of Dudley Saltonstall. Appointed the sec-
ond Captain on the first navy list,he took an active part in the
expedition under Commander Hopkins to New Providence.
When the navy was reorganized, he became number four in
the list of captains. In command of the Trumbull^ 28, he
fought a spirited action, and made valuable prizes, trans-
ferred to the Warren^ 32, he was in command of the naval
part of the expedition sent to destroy the British posts on the
Penobscot river, in Maine. The publicity given by the press
to the purpose of the expedition, gave the enemy informa-
tion wJiicli led to its failure, and the destruction of the fleet
under Commodore Saltonstall by a superior force, commanded



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENCJLAND HISTORY. 41

1)}' Sir George Collier. For this result. Commodore Saltoii-
stall was in no way to blame ; it was a cireumstauce of wai',
mifortuuate, but not to be avoided : yet the Continental Con-
gress, with its usual want of justice in sueh matters, dis-
missed Commodore Salstonstall. He did not, however, sulk
in his tent, but immediately entered the privateer service,
and proved as spirited and energetic in this duty as he had
been in the Regular Navy.

Thus the document is not only linked to the burning of
New London, and the trajjedy enacted in Fort Griswold, but
it is also linked to the name of a man who served his coun-
try in her hour of peril, and served her well. — Tliomas S. Col-
lier in the Collector.



Fortifications on the Piscataqua River.— Fortifica
tions on the Piscatacjua river, N. H., were begun by the
original proprietors, who sent over several cannon, which
their agents })laced on the north-east point of Newcastle, at
the north of the great-harbor called Fort Point. They laid
out ground about a ''bow shot" from the waterside to a high
rock, on which it was intended, in time, to build a principal
fort. In 1G66, it was decided by commissioners to build a
fort on the east side of Great Island, where the former one
was built, and which was to inclose the great rock and all the
easterly part of the island. The customs and imports on
goods imported into the harbor were to be applied to the
maintenance of the fort, and^the trainbands of Great Island
and Kittery Point were discharged from all other duty,
to attend to the service of it under Richard Cutts, who was
apjiointed captain. At a town meeting of Kittery, jNIe., held
in June, 1666, it was voted "that every dweller and liver in
this town, over sixteen years of age, shall work at the fort
one whole week."



On July, 31, 1830, a great hail storm visited Newton,
Mass. Many stones weighed from half a pound to a pound.
Much glass was broken, and a s[)ecial tax became necessary
on the pews of the First Baptist meeting house to repair the
extensive damage.



42 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.



Record of the Second Church in the North Parish

of New London, (now Montville) Conn.,

from 1722 to 1740.



CONTRIBUTED BY HENRY A. BAKER, ESQ.



Baptisms by ^^\J, dannes }-lillhousc.
1722.
May. — Charles, son to Charles Cani[)bell.

" (^"y, son to George Richard.

June. — James, son to Jonathan Noble.

" — Thomas Scarritt, adult.

" — Jonathan Minor, ^'■
July 29. Ebenezer Williams, adult.

" Hannah, daughter to Ebenezer Williams.

" Sai-ah, " " " "

Aug. 5. Stephen, son to Josiah Baker.

"• Sarah, daughter to "
Sept. 2. Jonathan Wickwire, adult.

" Alphens, son to Jonathan Wickwire.

" Katherine, daughter to Jonathan Wickwire.
Oct. 7. Agnes, daughter of James Dixon.
Oct. 28. Peter Wick wise, adult.

" Patience WickAvise, wife of Peter.

'' Ann Brown, wife of James.

" Ann, daughter to James Brown.

'' Lydia Malsworth, wife of Philip.

" Lydia, daughter to Philip Malsworth.

" Sarah, " " " "

" John, son *' " '*



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 43

Oct. 28. Philip, son to Philip Malsworth.

" Jonathan, " " " "

" Richaixl, " " " "

" Mary, dau. " " "

Nov. 11. Thomas, son to John Viber.

" 18. Katherin Horton, adult.

" • " Patience Ilowse, "
Dec. 16. Israel Dodge, "

" John Dodge, "

" Ann, daughter to John Dodge.

" Hannah, daughter to John Dodge.

" Thomas Dodge, adult.

" David, son to Thomas Dodge.

" William Dodge, adult.

" Samuel Dodge, "

" Elizabeth Dodge, wife of Thomas.
Dec. 30. Dorotliy, daughter to Robert Denison.
1722-3.

Jan. 1^0. Jonathan, son to Samuel Avery.
Feb. 10. Joshua Comstock, adult

" Mercy Horton, adult.

" Agnes, daugliter to Mathew Atchison.

Feb. 17. Mary Comstock, adult.

" Daniel Comstock,

" Benjamin " "

" Juela Morgan, "•

" Sarah Morgan, '•'•

" James, son to Samson Horton.

" Sarah, daughter to Samson Horton.

" Jonathan, son to Kinsley Comstock.
Mch. 10. John, son of John Dodge.
1723.
Mch. 24. George Minor, adult.

" Aaron Fargo, "

" Deborah, daughter to Robert Denison.

"• Sarah, daughter to James Scarrot.



u


14.


IC


14.


Apr.


21.


a




(I




ii


28,


Nov.


25.


1723


-4.


Mch.


15.


1824.


Apr.


3.



44 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

Mch. 24. Sarah, daughter to James Johnson.
Apr. 10. Jonathan, son of Jonathan Morgan.

" Abigail, daughter to Johnathan Morgan.

" Phebe, daughter to Jonathan Moi'gan.

*•• Katherine, daughter to James Hall.

Christian Fairbanks, wife of Samuel.
Ann Chappell, adult.
John, son to Stephen Maples.
Steplien, son to Stephen Maples.
Waitstill, daughter to Benjamin English.
John, son to John Steel.
Ezekiel, son to Ebenezer Williams.

Peter, son to Peter Wickwire.

Lebeaus, son to Samson Horton.

" Jeremiah, son to Peter Comstock.

May 24. Mary, daughter to Jonathan Christy.

" Thomas, S(m to James Dixon.

Aug. 30. Jerusha Horton, adult.

Sept. 21. Christopher Wickwire, adult.

" Ichabod, son to Christopher VVickwire.

" Salmon, " " " "

" Nathan, '' " "• "

" P^lizabeth, daii. '' " "

" Ann, " '' " "

1724.

Sept. 21. Mary, daughter to Christopher Wickwire.

Oct. 4. John, son to James Hall.

Nov. 22. James, son to Samuel Irving.

Dec. 20. Jose[)h, son to Jason Allen.

" Sarah, daughtt^r to John Viber.

1724-5.

Jan. 10. Thomas Fargo, adult.

Mch. 14. James, son to Charles Campbell.
1725.

Apr. 13. James, son to James Johnson.



JSIAGAZINE OV NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.



45



Apr. 17.

June 5.

" 20.



A no-.


8.




21.


Sept.


25.


Oct.


30.


Nov.


U.


172^


)~C).


Feb.


G.


1726.


Oct.


23.


((




Nov.


20.


Dec.


11.


a


18.


1727


.


Apr.

Ik


£0.


May


7.


ki


14.


a


28.


June


25.


July


1.


kk


10.


Oct.


8.


1727-


-8.


Mch.


3.


172^


].


June


9.



Mary, dauglitur to Matliew Atchison.
Sarah, daughter to Stephen Maples.
William, son to William Minor.
Jonathan, son to William Minor.
Mary, daugliter to William Minor.
Grace, daughter to William Minor.
John, son to William Whiting.
Elizabeth, daiiohter to John Dodue.
Thomas, son to Tliomas Dodge.
j\Iary, daughter to Samuel Avery.
Nathan, son to John Stoll.
Joseph, son of Kinsley Comstock.
Dorothy, daughter to El)enezer Williams.

Agnes, daughter to John Anderson.

James, son to Christopher Wickwire.
Elizabeth, daugliter to Robert Denison, Jr.
John, son to James Dixon.
Margaret, daughter to John Viber.
S(|iiare John, son to James Hillhouse.

Samuel Fox, adult.
Margaret Fox, wife of Samuel.
Mary, daughter to Adonijah P'itch.
John, son to Mathew Atchison.
Samuel, son to William Whiting.
Ephraim, son to Samuel Aver}-.
Joel, son to John Dodge.
James, son to John Anderson.
Ruth, daughter to Samuel Atwell.
William, son to Stephen Maples.

Edward, son to Joshua Rajmond.

George, son to Peter Wickwire.



46 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

Aug. 26. William, son to James Hillhnuse.

Aug-. 26. William, son to William Wliitino-.

Oct. 10. Otis, son to John Thompson.

Oct. 18, John, son to Josiah Baker.

Oct. 13. Dorothy, daughter to McClarion.

Oct. 17. Jedediali, son to John Nobles.

Oct. 17. Zehediah, son to John Nobles.

1728-9.

Jan. 20. Clarisa, daughter to Ebenezer Horton.

Mch. 16. Sarah, daughter to Adonijali Fitch.
1729.

Apr. 6. Martha, daughter to Peter Comstock.

June 8. Sarah, daughter to Joseph Comstock.

"- 8. Ann, daughter to Daniel Tuttle. V

June 29. Jeremiah, son to Gideon Comstock.

July 20. Mary, daughter to Nathaniel Comstock.

'• 27. Christopher, son to Joshua Raymond.

" 27. Lydia, daughter to Alexander Baker.

Aug. 3. Caleb, son to William Whiting.

Sept. 25. Daniel, son to John Dodge.

" 25. Mary, daughter to Abraham Avery.

Dec. 11. Mercy, daughter to Stephen Nobles.
1729-30.

Mch. 22. Zebediah, son to Christopher Wickwire.

" 22. Ann, daughter to John Viber.

" 22. Mary, daughter to Robert Denison.

1730;

May 16. James Abraham, son to James Hilllionse.

'• 24. Stephen, son to Ebenezer Horton.

July 12. James, son to James Otis.

"• 12. James, son to William Dixon.

Aug. 31. Stei)hen, son to Jason Allen.

Oct. 18. Thomas, son to Abraham Avery.

" 2(). Ann, dauofhter to John Mason.

Nov. 8. Achia, daughter to I'etei- Wickwire.

''■ 8. Benjamin, son to Samuel Atwell.



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.



47



1730-1.


Feb.


14.


ik


14.


1731


,


Apr.


25.


May


23.


Sept.


26.


ii


26.


173-2




Jan.


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June


29.


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29.


July


1.


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1.


Sept.


2.


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1733.




May


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June


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26.


Sept.


9.


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Elizabeth, (laughter to Joseph Bradford.
Lucretia, daughter to Samuel Ilayniond.

Elizabeth, daughter to Daniel Tutlle.>
William, son to William Whiting.
Johanna, daughter to Ebenezer Williams.
Mary, daughter to Peletiah Bliss.

Mary, daughter to John Mason.
Elizabeth, wife of Isaac Avery.
Margaret, daughter to Isaac Aver}'.
Jemima, daughter to John Dodge.
Ephraim, son to Ephraim Wells.
Margaret, daughter to Samuel Fox, Jr.
James Morgan, adult.
Susanna Morgan, wife to James.
James, son to James Morgan.
Benjamin, son to James Morgan.
Lucretia, daughter to James Morgan.
Elizabeth, daughter to James Morgan.
Stephen, son to Samuel Comstock. ,
Ebenezer, son to Ebenezer Horton.
Hannah, daughter to Abraham Avery.
Ebenezer Rogers, adult.


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