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Sarah, daughter to Samuel Fox, Jr.
Ainia, daughter to Samuel Atwell.
Jerusha, daughter to Samuel Atwell.
Jabez, son to Ebenezer Williams.
Mary, daughter to James Otis.
Samuel Rogers, adult.
Prudence, daughter to Sanuiel Rogers.
Grace Rogers, wife of Daniel.
Esqr. Joseph, son to Adonijah Fitch.
Elizabeth, daughter to Elisha Mirick.



48 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

Sept. 21. Esther, daughter to Elisha Mirick.
1734.

June 1(5. Anna, daughter to Thomas Fargo.
'"'■ -iO. William, son to Joseph Bradfoi'd.

Joseph, son to Peter VVickwiie.

Sarah and Martha, dau's to Nathaniel Comstock.

Sarah, daughter to Gilhert Lilly.'

William, son to Patten.

Elizaheth, daughter to Adonijah Fiteli.
Anna, daughter to Samuel Johnson.
Rachel, daughter to Daniel Fitch,

Rachel, daughter to James Hillliouse.
Abigail Patton, adult.
Elizabeth, daughter to James Otis.
William, son to Alexander Patterson.
Martha, daughter to Alexander Patterson.

Daniel, son to Daniel Fitch.
Samuel, son to John Bradford.

— Mary, daughter to Gilbert Lilly.

Mary, daughter to Daniel Fitch.

John, son to John Bradford.

Margaret, daughter to Alexander Jt)hns()n.

James, son to Samuel Johnson.



Oct.


16.


Nov.


3.


Dec.


22,


1735


.


June


8.


Sept.


28.


Nov.


28.


a


28,


1736




Feb.


1.


Mch.


5,


April


9.


'^


17.


(b


17.


1737,




Dec.





1738.




June





1740




April





May





June





Auff.






Marriages by V^e\j. dames j4illi?ouse fron^ 1724 to 1740.
1724,

Sylvester Baldwin and Eli/.;d)etli Aveiy.
John Tliompson and Mary Otis.
Jolui Denison and Patience Grazell.
John Anderson and Margaret Dixon.



May


19,


Nov.


•').


a


5.


ii


9.



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 49

1724-5.

Jan. 12. Phiuily Ilallaek and Margaret Young.

Feb. 2-1. Jonathan Clinrch and Abigail Fairbanks.
1725.

Mch. 25. Edward Rogers and Sarah Gorton.

Oct. 27. James Morgan and Susanna Rogers.



Josiah Weeks and Levina Stebbens.
John Perkins and Lydia Malsworth.
Patrick McClellen and Dorothy Otis.
Thomas Dixon and Mary Morgan.
Elisha Mirick and Grace Rogers.
John Way and Mary Holmes.

James Fitch and Anna Denison.
Nathaniel Comstock and Margaret Fox.

Daniel Tuttle and Sarah Comstock.'^
Thomas Collit and Mary Rogers.
James Camp and Sarah Malsworth.

James Otis and Sarah Tudor.
Jolm Brown and Dorothy Noyes.
John Mason, Jr., and Mary Copp.

John Anderson and Susanna Morgan.

Samuel Fox, Jr., and Abigail Harris.

Abraham Simons and Rebecca Chapman,
Joseph Atwell and Martha Comstock.
Rev. Joseph Lovet and Anna Holmes.
Jabez Lathrop and Delight Otis.

Plialan and Abigail Whitney.

Samuel Johnson and Atwell.



1727


.


May


15.


a


27.


Nov.


25.


Dec.


25.


Nov.


14.


i(


21.


1727-8.


Feb.


12.


(I


12.


1728


.


April


4.


May


25.


"


30.


1728.




June





July


4.


Sept.


1.7.


1729


.


Apr.


15.


1730


.


Nov.


12.


1734




Mch.





a


27.


April





May


3.


Aug.


21.


Dec.


15.



50 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

1734-5.

Jan. 29. Carey Latham and Dorothy McClelland.

1735.

Apr. 3. William Frink and Abigail .

Aug. 4. Jonathan Harris and Rachel Otis.

1736.

Dec. 15. John Bradford and Esther Sherwood,
1738.
Dec. 21. Alexander Johnson and Susanna Fox.



Early Population of Plymouth Colony and Massa-
chusetts. — The first regular Census of the entire popula-
tion, either of the (^olony or Province of Massacihusetts was
made in 1765.

The population of tlie Plymouth Colony was mucli less
than that of Massachusetts. Estimated to have numbered
51 persons in November, 1621, 100 in 1622, and 180 in 1624,
it had increased in 1633 to nearly or quite 400, and in 1637 to
about 550 persons Sufficient grounds exist for the conclu-
sion that in 1654 the population (jf this colony was 2,941, and
that in 1665 the population liad increased to about 5,310.
Fiom otlier data, again, we learn that in 1673 the nund)er of
inhabitants was 9.410.

The popnlation of Massacliusetts — not including the Ply-
mouth Colony, which maintained a distinct government until
1691 — was, in 1629, only about 500, eight years later, in
1637, nearly 7,900, and in 1639, 8,600.

During fifteen years previous to 1643, 21,200 passen-
gers had come over from England to this colony ; but, about
the year 1640, emigration nearly ceased, concurrently with
the change of affairs in England, and many of the first settlers
returned thither. Accordingly, computations based on relia-
ble data show that the entire population of the colony was, in
1654, only about 16,026, and again in 1665, not exceeding
23,467.



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 51



Record of Marriages, by Rev. Gardner Thurston,
pastor of the Second Baptist Church, New-
port, R. I. 1759-1800.



%



EV. GAllDNER THURSTON was pastor of tlie Sec-
£ 011(1 Baptist Churcli, Newport, R, I., from 1759 until
May, 1800. During this time lie married 1105 couples,
keeping a faithful record of each marriage. We are
indebted to Mrs. Edward Seabuiy, of New Bedford, Mass.,
for tlie following copy of the original record. All the parties
mentioned, unless otherwise specified, were of Newport, R. I.
—[Ed.
1759.

June 7. Thomas Rogers and Reheckah Shearman.
'^ 17. John Shearmand and Ann Lj-on.
'' 21. Joseph Shefheld and Elizabeth Clagget,
" 28. Joseph Phillips and Hannah Sanford.
TluMnas Eyres and Amey Tillinghast.
John Hudson and Mary Wever.
Nathaniel Langley and Deborah Caswell.

John Jep and Ann Sabines.

Comfort AUin and Miriam Millward.

John Dunham and Elizabeth Phillips.

Amos Peterson and Catharine Warrin.

Joseph Peckham and Susannah Mumford.

William Tilley and Elizabeth Rogers.

Jonathan Maxoii and Lidia Clarke.

Enos Peckham, Middletown,R. I., and Ann Hovey

Newport.
John Wyatt and Martha Magrah.
William Gardner and Mary Bassett.



July


12.


11


12.


a


22.


Aug.


9.


bi


19.


Sept.


20.


(3ct.


7,


ii,


14.


a


28.


Nov.


15.


ii,


18.


((


22.


Dec.


5.



52 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

1759.

Thomas Tew and Ami Clarke.
Joseph Sims and Maryan Curtis.
Josiah Rogers and Elizabeth Rogers.

Paul Braiddison and Jean Sal)ins. •

Orbid Wing and Sarah Green.

Alexander Gillis and Ann Sabins.

Audley Clarke and Margaret Rowland.

Barnet Hill and Mercy Rogers.

Alexander Mullin and Mary Chapman.

Robert Leonard and Ann Stonal.

E})enezer West and Weight Carr.

Thomas Huse and Elizabeth Walker.

William Earl, Portsmouth, R. I., and Sarah Chase,
Freetown.

Gideon Lawton and Lucy Howland.

James Clarke and Mary Rogers.

William More and Peace Burden.

Giles Barker and Mary Tew, Middletown, R. L

Samuel Tripp, Portsmouth, R. L, and Sarah Tomp-
kins, Middletown, R. L

Samuel Wedon and Abigail Langworthy.

Thomas Chadwick and Dorothy Eldridge.

Daniel Austin and Ann Austin.

Benjamin Congdon and Catharine Taylor.

Jolni Gardner and Mary Gardner.

John Colverd and Mehitibel Thurston,

William S[)enier and Sarah Chase.

James Carpenter and Avis Tillingliast.

Othnial Tripp and Sarah Creapon.

Daniel Shrieve and Mary Green.

Joseph Tillingliast and Mary Cranston.

John Hicks and Ann Thompson,

Caleb Jeffries and Jerusha D^ae.

James Anderson and Ann Champlin.



Dec.


6.


u


15.


((


23.


1760




Jan.


17.


a


17.


((


28.


Feb.


7.


a


10.


a


14.


a


21.


a


22.


Mch.


2.


li


9.


a


10.


a


13.


((


16.


Apr.


13.


June


15.


July


3.


a


13.


Aug.


3.


Aug.


9.


ct


14.


a


14.


Sept.


IL


ii.


15.


n


29.


Oct.


1.


(I


9.


ki


9.


ii


17.


ii


20.



Oct.


23.


a


27.


Nov.


27.


a


30.


Dec.


3.


n


11.


n


18.


tk


28.


176]


L.


Feb.


3.


(4


15.


Mch.


11.


a


15.


a


18.


u


19.


a


26.


April


[ 4.


It


19.


Cl


19.


il


21.


ii


23.


May


7.


Cl


10.


t4


12.



"


15.


Ik


18.


i;


21.


ii


28.


June


7.


July


12.



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 53

George Gey and Hannah Smith,

Daniel Wilcox and Sarah Clarke.

William Grecnman and Susanna Gardner.

William Joy and Mary Pliillips.

Jonathan Cahoon and Ruth Phillips.

John Davenport, Tiverton, and Sarah Weeden,

Portsmouth.
John Bridges and Elizabeth Gardner.
John Battey and Ann Dayton.

Gideon Tomlin and Mary (ilrant.

David Nichols and Elizabeth Docotay.

Joseph Anthony and Elizabeth Sheffield.

Philip Bazell and Susanna Moses.

Amos Sheffield and Mary Herrington.

William Wilson and Catherine Thurston.

Jethro Spooner and Jerusha Barker.

Robert Cozzens and Jean Caswell.

James Talford and Margery Stanton.

Walter Clarke and Abigail Phillips.

Samuel Little Billings and Elizabeth Vinson.

Thomas Ninnegrett, the Indian Sachem of Charles-
town, R. I., and Mary Whitefield, New[)ort.

Thomas Goodman and Sarah Campbell of Newport.

William Morgan and Mar}' Richardson.

William Pollock, of South Kingstown, R. I., and
Sarah Pate, of Newport.
14. Alexander Huling, of North Kingstown, and
Sarah Freeborn, of Newport.

John Springer and Judith Holding, of New[iort.

James Clarke and Anne Moses, of Newport.

Sumner Smith and Mariba Havins.

Zebedee Grinnell, of Little Compton, and Sarah
Rider of Newport.

John Sheldon and Mary Sabins.

Charles Willit and Barshaba Rogers, of Newport.



July


12.


a


19.


Aug


. 9.


((


20.


a


29.


Sept.


, 5.


11


17.



54 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

Gideon Tanner and Mary Ling, of New[)ort.
John CaiT and Mary Arnold, of Newport.
Thomas Price and Mehitible Chase.
Phinies Gilbert and Sarah Clarke.
Jeremiah Pliillij)S and Pheby Phurcliase.
Thomas Hill and Mary Wilber.
Ichabod Congdon, of New London, and Maiy

Fowler, of Newport.
Oct. 15. Benedick Smith, of Jamestown, and Paticuice

Easton, of Newport.
Nathan Luther and Judah Tucker.
William Slocum, of Jamestown, and Mary Hill,

of Newport.
Thomas Brooks and Elizabeth Hull.
Daniel Critts and Elizabeth Huntington.
James Smith and Catharine Edmonds.
Charles Young and Patience Brayton.
John Griudall Gardner and Abigail King.
George Brown and Mercy Mortimore.
John Rogers and Mary Walshire.
William Ladd and Sarah Gardner.

John Caswell and Hannah West.

John Price and Mary Bentley.

Ivobert Taylor and Mary Lion.

Richard Story and Elizabeth Carr.

John Card and Sarah Hoar.

Samuel Young and Ann Smith.

Benjamin Barns and Asa Remington.

Edward Keeney and Patience Chadwick.

James McDonald and Lidia Mollinena.

Charles Dyre and Mary Hazard.

John Witson and Elizabeth Millard.

James Rogers and Hannah Smith.

John Walford and Ann Little.

William Grinnell and Lidia Tillinghast.

Jas. Martin and Elizabeth Brown, of Middletown.



(,i


25.


(i


29.


Nov.


5.


ki


15.


(k


15.


ki.


20.


a


29.


Dec.


13.


((


24.


a


27.


1762.


Jan.


1.


a


3.


a


10.


;i


28.


Feb.


11.


Mch.


9.


(•i


17.


Apri'


I 1.


41


13.


k(


22.


May


16.


((


26.


June


6.


a


17.


H


27.



July


11.


i;


21.


Aug.


1.


Sept.


5.


n,


27.


it


27.


(I


27.


Oct.


10.


t(


13.


n


21.


ti


24.


li


25.


ii


28.


a


28.


Nov.


14.


-


14.


a


20.


a


24.


Dee.


5.


(.1.


5.


((


23.



IMAGAZINK OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 55

Benj. Trowbridge and Eunice Thoniolin.

William Wilbour and Ann Wilhour.

Thomas Manning and Martha Pryor.

Thomas George and Freelove Bennett.

Peleg Sherman and Patience Sherman.

Joshua Godfry and Mary Coo})per.

John Meckins and Ann Powers.

William Rider and Mary Shearman.

Constantine llammett and xMar}- Young.

Peleg Barker and Mary Stevens.

Nathaniel Potter and Priscilla Lawton.

Green Rogers and Elener Green.

Charles Spooner and Mary Gardner, of Ports-
mouth, R. I.

Joshua Albro, Newport, and Caroline Dring, Ports-
mouth, R. I.

Caleb Coggeshall and Pheby Card, Middle-
town, R. I.

Nehemiah Rhodes, Cranston, R. I., and Abigail
Thomas, Newport.

Benjamin Vose and Sarah Clarke.

James Milward and Pheby Card, Newport.

John Sparks and Abigail Carter.

Jess' Lilibridge and Margaret Summers.

Paul White and Phebe Lewis.
(To be Continued.)



The first marble (piarry opened in Vermont was at Dorset,
in 1785, six years before the State was admitted into the
Union. People came hundreds of miles to get the crude
slabs for tire-place stones and other domestic uses. In 1808
a second (piarry was o})ened, and subsetpiently many others,
including those of Sutherland Falls, West Rutland and Cen-
tre Rutland. The channeling process, now familiar to mining
engineers, was introduced in 1841 ; the first derrick for hoist-
ing the blocks, in 1848; the first tunneling, in 1859. In
1818 the first attempt at sawing marble was made, but it was
many years before the experiment proved successful.



66 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.



Queries.



l4istorical.

1. Fort Independence, Boston Harbor. — Some time
ago I found the following notice among some papers and let-
ters belonging to my grandfather, a native of Boston, Mass.
I would like to know if the stone mentioned is still in exis-
tence.

Chicago^ III. T. PI.

"AFTER the destruction of (^astle William (now called
Fort Independence) by the British, the following lines were
found engraven on one of the stones among the ruins of that
beautiful fortress:

anno dpximo tertio

Regni GULIELMI, Tertif,

Mag: Brit: Fr: et Hir: REGIS Serenlssimi,

HocMUNIMENTUM

Ex ejus Nomine, WILHELMI Castellum:

nuncupatum fuit inceptuini;

Anno Secundo

Regni ANNiE, Mag: Brit: Fr: et IIib:

REGINJE Serenissim.e,

Perfectum Annoq: Domini MDCCIII.

a tribuno

wolfango wilhelmo romero,

Regiatum Majestatuini,

SePTENTRIONALI AlMERIC.E,

Architecto Militari Palmario Constructum.

Translation. — In the 13th year of the reign of William
the third, the most serene Prince of Great-Britain, France,
and Ireland, this fortification was begun, (being called CAS-



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 57

TLE WILLIAM, from his name) was finished in the second
year of the reign of the most serene Ann, Qneen of Great
Britain, &c., and in the year of our Lord, 1703. Built by
Cajit. William Wolfangus Romer, an able engineer to
their Majesties in North-America."

2. QuiNNATissET, CoNN. — Where can I find an account of
the town, or village, of Quinnatissit, Conn.? I think it is
mentioned in a description of Eliot's memorable visit to
Woodstock, Conn., in 1674. G. R.

3. An Invitation to Settle in New England. — Who
was the author of the following lines: —

"So farewell England old

If evil times ensue,
Let ^ood men come to us.

We 11 welcome them to New."

I find them quoted in an old book, printed in 1713.

C. H. L.

4. Ringing the Bells at thiiee O'clock. — In a pam-
phlet before me, giving a description of the St. Albans, Vt.,
raid, in 1864, I read: — "Several strangers boaided at the
hotels for a few days, and learned the habits of the people.
When tlie bells rang at 3 o'clock, on the 19th of October,
these men entered the banks in parties and robbed them of
their funds, while others of the band arrested every citizen in
the street," &c. I have twice written to parties in St. Albans,
asking for information on the subject, but received no reply.
Will not some one of the readers of the Magazine tell us Avh}'
the bells rang at 3 o'clock on that day. Is it one of the cus-
toms of the })lace? If so it will be interesting to know some-
thing of its origin. Qu/ERO.

Genealogical.

5. Eddy or Ady. — William Ady and Hannah Smith'were
married in Bristol, R. I., July 19, 1697. She was the daughter
of Richard and Joj-ce Smith, who came from Boston and set-
tled in Bristol in 1 680. When and where was the said William
Ady or Eddy born? When and where did he die, and where



58 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.

was lie buried? What is his ancestry? (Notes. William and
Hannah (Smith) Eddy had the following children born in
Bristol: Joseph, b. Aug. 26, 1699, William, Elizabeth and
John, b. June 17, 1707. Joseph m., Ruth Belcher of Brain-
tree, Mass., daughter of Grej^ory and Elizabeth (Ruggles)
Belcher, Oct. 10, 1728.)

Providence^ R. I. Edson Salisbury Jones.

6. Notice to Town Clerks. — If every Town Clerk in the
New England States who sees this notice, will examine his
town Records of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, and will send
me a copy therefrom of every entry of a PuUen birth, death
or marriage, he may find; I will remit his fee bill for making
cop3% on receipt of same.

Memphis, Tenn. Chas. L. Pullen.

7. Pullen.— A. In the ]-ecords of the City of Boston,
Mass., I find the following:

Abraham Pullen and Mary Ward were married September
17, 1703.

Joseph Pullen and Elizabeth Dennis were married Novem-
ber 29, 1716.

John Pullen and Mary Marjory were married July 10, 1713.

Richard Pullen and Elinor Andrews were married Decem-
ber 6, 1705.

I would like to obtain some trace of the descendants of any
one or all of them.

B. In 1744 there was living in Attleboro, Mass., a Mr.
Jas. Pullen. Wanted : the place and date of his marriage to
Miss L^dia Woodcock, which occurred prior to his settling in
Attleboro, Mass.

C. William Pullen, a son of John Pullen of Swansea,
Mass., and Marcy Randall of North Providence, R. I., the
daughter of Henry Randall of said town, were mariied in
North Providence, R. I., April 23, 1786. Wanted; the names
of their children, places and dates of birth, i)laces and dates
of marriage and places and dates of death.

Memphis, Term, Chas. L. Pullen,



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 59

8. PaimvER. — lufonnation would be gladly received re-
garding the family of Artemas Parker, who, at about
1810, moved to the State of Vermont. This is all that
is known of liini by the undersigned. He had a large family,
of wliom one son was named Rodol[)hus.

10 Htiwley St., Worcester. Theo. Parker.

9. Rev. John Crandall.— In the winter of 1888-9, A. P.
Crandall of Palmyra, N. Y., in connection with the writer
published a "'Genealogy of abranch of the Ci'andall Family,"
copies of which may be found in many of the Historical and
Genealogical Societies of New England. \\\ this publication
the chain of descent runs back unbroken to Rev. John Cran-
dall, a Baptist minister, who followed Roger Williams to
Rhode Island because of the general persecutions of the Mas-
sachusetts colonies, on account of creed. So far we have not
been able to trace his career beyond 1635-6. From Avhat port
he sailed, at what port he landed, and the date; the location
and character of his ancestry in the old Country (Wales), all
these items of interest to the present generation, have been a
matter of study and investigation with no tangible results.
The colonial records show that the Rev. John Crandall and
his children figured largely in church and state at New[)ort,
Providence and Westerly, R. I , and it seems strange that so
far we have been unable to lind any record beyond 1635.
The destroyed records of Salem might have solved some of
these points — as yet we have no clew. Any light Avhich can
be given of him previous to 16^5, will be most gratefully re-
ceived, and any trouble involved in the researcli, here or
abroad, will be propei'ly remunerated. Genealogists will
please take notice.

Chattanooga, Tcnn. W. I. Ckandall.

10. (^RANDALL. — b)hn Crandall Jr. of Newport, R.I., had
by his wife Elizabeth Gorton, live children, namely: John,
Peter, Samuel, Elizabeth and Mary. Can any one give dates
of birth of these and tell whom each nuwried.

E. G. Davis.



60 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY.



Book Notes.



[Publishers and authors wishing a notice in this department should send
copies of their publications to R. H. Tillev, Newport, R. I.]



Barrington on the Narragansett as a place of
Residence is the title of a finely illustrated book, compiled
and published by the Rural Improvement Association of the
town of Barrington, R. I. The purpose of this sketch of the
town is to direct attention to Barrington as a place of resi-
dence. Among the illustrations are "View near Congrega-
tional Church ;" "View at Rumstick ;" "View from Anna-
womscutt ;" "View at Nayatt ;" "View near Barrington
River;" "Episcopal Church ;" "View from Prince's Hill f
"View from Nayatt;" the new "Town Building:" "View in
Drownsville ;" "Town Beach ;" "Barrington Ridge ;" the
"R. R. Stations at Drownsville, Nayat, and Barrington Cen-
tre ;" "New Meadow," and others. Price, $1. Copies of
this beautifully printed and very handsomely illustrated
work may be had on application to O. S. Anthony, Secretary
of the Association, Drownsville, R. I.

The Wights: A Record of Thomas Wight, of Ded-

HAM and MeDFIELD, AND OF HIS DESCENDANTS. — This is a

carefully prepared genealogy by William Ward White, con-
taining 357 pages. Published in Milwaukee, Wis., 1890
It contains a recoid of ten generations of the Wights of
America, and a chapter on the Wights not connected with
the family of Tliomis. It also includes a valuable list of au-
thorities, and numerous fac-siniiles of the signatures of early
members of the family.



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND IlISTOEV. Gl

Some of the Descendants of John and ELiNoit Whit-
ney, WHO settled in Watertown, Mass., in 1635. — Mr.
William L. VVniituey, the compiler of this work, has made it
as complete and thorough as could be desired by any mem-
ber of the family, although it does not purport to be com-
plete. It contains 101 pages, published at Pottsville, Penn.,
1890. From it we learn that the name Whitney is of Saxon
origin, and that there is a Parish of Whitney in Oxfordsliire,
Eng. In early days of English history, the family seat was
in Herefordshire. The book contains a carefully prepared
index.

FiiA Ltppo Lippi. — Margaret Vere P^irrington has written
a romance founded on the life of Era Lippo Lippi, the Italian
painter, who lived from 1412 to 1469. A very pretty book,
containing fourteen photogravure illustrations, printed on
tliick paper, has been made of this art story. Lippi is intro-
duced as a Carmelite monk who has been selected to make
decorations in the convent chapel of Santa Marghartia at
Florence, in the days when the Hol}^ of Holies was turned
into a picture gallery, often painted by unworthy hands, and
when artists, in painting Madonnas, did not hesitate to repro-
duce the features of women well known to lead unseemly
lives. The romance is connected with a beautiful young
novice, who is of noble birth, but is about to take vows and
leave the world. Lippi confesses his love, and on the day
she should have taken vows they disappear together. The
book contains 225 pages. Printed by the Knickerbocker
Press, New York. G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1890.

History of the Old South Church, Boston, ALvss. —
The third edition of this valuable work has recently been is-
sued by Houghton, Mifflin & Co., Boston. Mr. Hamilton
Andrews Hill, the author, has been exceptionally fortunate,
not only in his theme but in laboring for and with a church
Avhose ample means and cultured taste have made possible,
and approved, so elaborate and well illustrated a record of
rich annals. The two large octavo volumes which contain
the History of the Old South Church, from the year 1669 to



62 MAGAZINE OF Is'EW ENGLAND HISTORY.

1884, print in full, for about a century and a lialf, the records
of the church. The portion extending fi-om 1821 to the
present day contains only the more noteworthy events of the
pastorate of the various ministers of the Old South. When
writing the earlier history of the church, Mr. Hill was fortu-
nate enough to have his attention called to an old manuscript
in the libraiy of Yale University, relating to the Old South
Cliureli, prepared by a committee of the church in 1693 or
1694, giving a relation of the circumstances which led to the
formation of this society. This document, the church records
ab-eady s})()ken of, with extracts from the diaries of John
Hull, Samuel Sewall, and Joseph Sewall, and investigation
ill the libraries of the New England Historic-Genealogical
Society, tlie Massachusetts Historical Society, the Boston
Athenaeum, the Boston Public Library, the University Li-
brary at Cambridge, the Congregational Library, Boston,
and tbe Seminary Library at Andover, together witli advice


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Online LibraryKuno MeyerMagazine of New England history (Volume 1) → online text (page 5 of 22)