L. (Lorentz) Lermont.

The jumble; a collection of pieces in prose and rhyme for the Silver Lake stories .. online

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THE HENPECKED CANAEY.



SiLYER LAKE STORIES



AUBURN AND BUFFALO:

JOHN E. BEARDSLEY.

1857.




THE JUMBLE;

A COLLECTION OF PIECES

IN PROSE AND RHYME,

FOR THE |

O ssoam,

JUIustratfons.



BY COUSIN CICELY.

OF "THE OLD POST FOLIO," ITO.



. Loyem'r-z, L



AUBCRN AND ROCHESTER:

ALDEN AND BEARDSLEY.

1856.



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in tho year 1852, by

ALDEN BEARDSLEY & CO.,
In the Clerk's Office of the Northern District of New York.



STEREOTYPED BT

THOMAS B. SMITH,
216 William 8U,N.T.



F74



To MY DEAR LITTLE READERS,

You have all heard again and again the old
saying that '' you cannot have your cake and eat it too ;"
now I am going to prove that this old saying does not
always hold good, by offering to my little readers a
" Jumble" which they may devour as often as they please,
and yet (if they use it with care) they will always find it
ready to be devoured again. Too much cake is apt to
injure little children, and to make them fretful and cross,
but I hope that the " Jumble" I now offer them, will do
them good, and make them determine always to be kind
and obedient, truthful and honest, industrious and tem-
perate ; and I have only to add that with the blessing of
God upon them, I hope all of my little readers may
prove respectable and useful members of society.



LIBRARY



THE. SILVER LAKE STORIES,

COMPKISING THE FOLLOWING VOLUMES. ,

I. THE JUMBLE.

II THE OLD PORTFOLIO.
III. THE GREEN SATCHEL.
IV. THE CORNUCOPIA.

V, AUNT PATTY'S MIRROR.
VI. THE BUDGET.



Page

THE WAX DOLL, 11

THE HENS' CONVENTION, 22

THE BROKEN CHINA, . . . , . . .31

THE ECHO, 53

"IF I ONLY HAD A SAW!" . . . S . . 66

THE FIRST POCKET, 75

LITTLE ANNIE'S PEATEE, 78

THE WHITE TOP-KNOT, 84

"WHY IS NOT SANTA OLATTS, GOD?" .... 88
LITTLE PHEBE AND HER GRANDMOTHER, ... 94

THE HEN-PECKED CANARY, . . . -^ . .100

'IS MY THREE-CENT-PIEOE A TALENT?" . . . 104

THE LADY WITH A "DROP IN HER EYE," . . . 114

THE CROW AND THE TITMOUSE, .... 117

UTTLE BESSIE, ........ 123

THE COUSINS, 133



of



Pagt
THE HEX-PECKED CANARY, .... Frontispiece.

EMMA'S WAX DOLL, ....... 13

THE HENS' CONTENTION, ...... 23

THE BROKEN CHINA, ....... 36

THE ECHO, . . . ..... 54

"IF I ONLY HAD A SAW!" ...... 67

LITTLE ANNIE'S PEAYEH, .,..,. . . . V9

"WHY IS NOT SANTA CLATTS GOD?" .... 89

LITTLE PHEBE AND HER GRANDMOTHER, . . . 95

HOW TO SPEND THE MONEY, ..... 108

THE BOTTLE TITMOUSE, . ..'; . . . 118

THE SICK FATHER, ....... 124

MARTHA AND PRISCILLA IN THE GARDEN, . . . 134



soli.



SWISH you could have seen the wax
doll that was sent to Emma from
the city. She was a perfect beau-
ty ! Her cheeks and lips were as red
as roses, and her beautiful flaxen hair
curled in ringlets around her lovely
face, and down her white neck.

She had on an elegant blue dress,
and brown morocco slippers, and a
blue sash, and a string of beads around



12 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

her neck. But her eyes! oh! if you
could have seen her eyes !

"When she first came, Emma thought
she had no eyes, for she only saw a sort
of white film over the place where the
eyes should be ; but her mamma quiet-
ly put her hand up under the dress,
and pulled a wire, and the beautiful
bright blue eyes flew open so suddenly
that Emma was frightened at first ; but
in a moment she jumped, and laughed,
and clapped her hands, and was so de-
lighted that her beautiful doll's eyes
would open and shut.

Her mamma allowed her to take the
doll in her hands, and look at it for a




EMMA'S WAX DOLL.



14: THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

little while, and then she laid her away
in the drawer of a bureau, which was in
a spare room up stairs; and she said
to Emma,

"Wax dolls are very delicate, my
dear ; they are easily spoiled, and will
melt if they are in too warm a place.
Now I want you to see how long you
can keep your doll, to show to your
kind aunty, who sent her to you. When
you want to look at her, or to show her
to any of your little friends, I will take
her out for you, and you may sometimes
hold her a little while when you are
sitting by me; but you must never
take her out yourself."



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 15

Emma promised that she would do
as her mother said, and for many days
she kept her word. When any of her
little friends came to see the doll, she
would run and ask her mother to please
to take her out, and show her to them ;
and she was always delighted to see
how astonished they were, when the
doll's eyes opened and shut; for such
a doll had never been seen in their vil-
lage "before.

One day Emma brought home from
school a little girl, who had never yet
seen the doll, and who was very anx-
ious to see it ; but her disappointment



16 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

was very great, when she found thai
her mother had just gone out.

"I am afraid I cannot show her to
you, Kitty," said Emma, "for mamma
says I must not take her out myself."

"But cannot we just go up in the
room and look at her ?" asked Kitty.

" Well, I don't suppose there would
be any great harm in that," answered
Emma.

So they went up to the spare room,
and Emma opened the drawer a little
way, for Kitty to peep in.

"Pull the drawer open a little wider,
Emma, so that I can see her plainly."

So Emma drew it a little farther open.



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 17

" Oh, how lovely she is ! Make her
eyes open and shut, Emma."

So Emma pulled the wire, and Kitty
said she had never seen anything so
beautiful.

"Do just lift her out a minute, Em-
ma, and let me see her curls behind,"
said Kitty.

Emma thought that would do no
harm, so she lifted out the doll, and
they turned her round and round, and
examined her very carefully.

Pretty soon Kitty said, "Oh, Emma,
it is so cold up here ; let us take her
down in the dining-room."

"Oh, no!" said Emma; "mamma

2



18 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

would be very angry; for she said I
must never take her myself."

"But you have taken her, and you
have not hurt her at all ; and I think
we can take just as good care of her as
your mother does. Let us take her
down for a few minutes at any rate;
we can bring her back before your
mother comes home."

Emma at length allowed herself to
be persuaded by her little friend, and
they took the beautiful doll down
stairs. After they had played with
her a little while, Kitty was sent for to
go home ; and just as Emma was pre-
paring to take her dolly up stairs, she



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 19

heard some one coming into the room.
In haste and fright, she threw the doll
behind the stove, and covered her with
a newspaper.

It was only Biddy who came in, but
Emma did not dare to let Biddy see
that she had brought down her doll.
Biddy put several sticks of wood in the
stove, and it soon began to be very
hot.

Before Biddy left the room, Emma's
mother came home, and called Emma
to come up stairs with her, as she
wanted to show her something she had
bought for her. Ernma obeyed, but
she could take no pleasure in looking



20 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

at the beautiful new dress her mother
had bought her, for she was all the
time thinking of her beautiful wax
doll, melting down behind the stove.

As soon as she could leave her
mother's room, she hastened down
stairs ; the dining-room was very hot ;
the stove was red*; she tore the news-
paper from the doll. Oh ! oh ! what a
sight ! Eyes, cheeks, and lips, were all
melted into one mass, and the soft wax
had run down over the white neck, and
mixed with the flaxen ringlets, and the
lovely doll was ruined !

Oh, how Emma cried ! But I need
not tell you hoi badly she felt; any



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 21

little girl can tell how she would feel,
if she had done as Emma did, and had
been punished in the same manner. I
know she thinks that she would need
no other punishment than her own dis-
appointment and mortification, and I
believe Emma's mother thought she
had suffered enough, without farther
punishment



' 6oK)beK)fiof).



THE hens in a farmer's yard one day,

After holding a hen's-rights convention,
Came up to the Eooster in solemn array,
Having chosen as speaker old fat Mother Gray,
To make known their united intention.

Then old Mother Gray came and took the barn-
floor,

And thus she addressed the old Booster,
(Who had taken his post on the open barn door ;)
Having first cleared her throat with a hem and

a haw.
" I should like," she began, " to ask you, sir,




THE HEN S CONVENTION.



24: THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

" In the name of the hens black and white, brown

and gray,
If you know who the thief is that comes every

day,

And steals from our nest every egg that we lay
In the corners and lofts, in the grass and the hay,
And leaving but one takes the rest all away ?

"Now there's old Mother White, who for some

days has tried

A beautiful pile of fine large eggs to hide,
Which she thought she had stowed very safely

away ;

But for her it unluckily happened to-day,
That while she was cackling, (as what hen does

not?)

To tell that she'd added one more to the lot,
Some person came into the barn-yard and saw
Just where she had hid her eggs under the straw,



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 25

And the next thing she knows of her eggs she's

bereft,
And she finds that a chalk one is all that is left.

"Now this is a thing that no longer we'll bear,
And to-day we have met, sir, our mind to declare,
Which is this that we all to the woods will re-
pair,
And we'll see if they'll follow and find our eggs

there ;

For as you will admit, sir, the thing is quite clear,
That no broods will be raised if we stay longer

here,

So to-night from the barn -yard we'll all disappear,
And Fll lay that we'll show some nice chickens
this year."

Said the Rooster, " I grieve, ma'am, to hear your

intention,
And if you'll excuse me, I just wish to mention,



26 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

That I've noticed the outrage and grieve for the

same ;
Still I think that the hens themselves only can

blame ;

For not one of you e'er can an egg lay in quiet,
But you set up a cackling and clucking and riot,
And thus you get punished you see for your

pride :
"WTiat you tell out yourselves you can ne'er hope

to hide."

At this every hen towards the old rooster springs ;
Such a rustling of feathers and shaking of wings,
Such cackling and screaming, and clucking and

rage,

You ne'er saw in a barn-yard before, I'll engage.
They told the old Rooster that " whene'er a hen
Made a cackling or clucking, you might be sure

then,



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 27

That she'd done a good thing ; but could any one

say,
(Though they might hear him crow half a mile

any day)
That an egg he had ever been known once to

lay?"

The Rooster to make his voice heard tried in

vain,
Shut his eyes, clapped his wings, crowed again

and again,
But was forced to come down from his seat on

the door,
And (his crowing all hushed) take his place on

the floor.
Then out of the barn-yard they marched two and

two,
And he never presumed to cry " cock-doodle-

doo ;



28 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.-

But came meekly behind, with his feelings much

hurl,
And his tail, once his pride, dragging low in the

dirt.

To the woods the whole party in haste now re-
paired,

And while it was warm very nicely they fared ;
Still their feelings encountered some very rude



For their eggs very often were sucked by the

fox;

And one night he came slyly and carried away
Their friend and adviser old fat Mother Gray.

"When the leaves were all scattered by autumn's
rude breeze,

And no roost could they find but the bare leaf-
less trees,



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 29

Oh, then they remembered the nice dainty fare,
And warm nests of the barn-yard, and wished

themselves there ;

And soon they determined their steps to retrace,
And resume in the barn-yard their now vacant

place ;
And the kindness which fed them so well every

day,

They would be very willing with eggs to repay,
So they begged of the Booster to lead on the way.

"When they drew near the farm and the barn

came in view,

He flew on the post, and cried " cock-doodle-do !"
And there they remain still for all I can say,
And the same kind of food receive day after

day;

And still they observe that as fast as they lay,
Their eggs as before are all taken away ;



30 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

But this lesson I think they've been willing to

learn
That for kindness received they must make some

return.




HEN I was a little girl I lived in
a very large city ; but I always
passed my summer vacation of
six weeks at my aunt's beautiful place
in the country. Oh! with how much
delight I used to look forward to the
time when I should leave the hot, dusty
city, and go to the beautiful green fresh
fields, and play Reside the little stream
which ran near my aunt's house ; and



32 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

roam all day, without any thought of
books, or work, or anything but play !

Oh ! I used to have very merry hap-
py times there, till one summer when I
did something very wrong ; and that
one sin spoiled all my pleasure for
months and years, and made me dread,
rather than wish, to make my usual
summer visit to the country. How
much trouble one single sin will cause !

My aunt had no children of her own,
but as she was very fond of children,
she used to invite those of her friends
to visit her; and sometimes two or
three little girls besides myself, would
be spending their vacations with her



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 33

at the same time. There was one dear
little gentle girl named Alice, who was
staying there with me one summer;
she was a child of most lovely dispo-
sition, but very timid and fearful of
being found fault with.

One afternoon it was raining very
fast, and we were obliged to amuse
ourselves in the house. After trying
several other plays, we thought we
would play blind-man's-buff. I should
have mentioned that there was a girl
a little older than myself, who lived
with my aunt as a servant ; her name
was Sally. She was a very bright girl,
and very amusing ; but she was not so

3



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

good a girl as my aunt thought she
was, as you will see before I have done
with my story.

Sometimes when she had finished
her work, she was allowed to play with
us, and we were always very glad when
this was the case. On the afternoon
of which I have spoken, when it came
Sally's turn to be blindfolded, she tied
on the handkerchief herself, and then
said she could not see anything, not
even the light. But she flew around
the room after us so fast, and took
such good care not to hurt herself, that
it .was really wonderful to see her:
but we did not think much of that;



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 35

for we thought Sally could do any-
thing.

In a few minutes she had chased
Alice and me into a corner, and just as
she was going to lay her hand on me,
I sprang from her, and unfortunately
dashed against a little stand, on which
was placed a very valuable set of china,
which had been sent to my aunt from
China. What was my horror when I
heard a crash, and at the same moment
saw the beautiful china set all shivered
to atoms on the floor !

What was it that made me turn
round and accuse poor little Alice of
breaking the china? I had always



36 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.




THE BROKEN CHINA.



been called a truthful little girl; I
thought I was so ; but I was frightened
at having done such serious mischief;
I saw that Sally's eyes were blindfolded,
and I knew that little Alice would not
dare to persist in denying what I said,



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 37

and then I thought, too, that as Alice
was more of a stranger than I, my aunt
would not reprove her as she would
me.

All these things Satan put into my
head, and I did not ask God to help
me to drive them away. They passed
through my head in a moment, and
almost as soon as the china set was
broken, I had turned to little Alice,
and said,

"Oh! Alice, see what you have
done I"

I remember how her cheeks flushed,
and her beautiful blue eyes opened
with astonishment as she said



38 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

" I, Lizzy ? Why I was not near the
table!"

Oh! if I had only acknowledged the
truth even then ; but I did not ; I said,

"You broke it, Alice, and you know
you did 1"

Just then my aunt, who had heard
the crash, came to the parlor door.
She looked sad and displeased as she
said,

"Oh, children, who has done this
mischief?"

We were all silent.

"Lizzy," said my aunt, "did I not
hear you say that Alice broke the
china ?"



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 39

I said " Tes, ma'am ;" but oh, how I
wanted even then to confess the truth !
But I was too proud to say that I had
told a lie in throwing the blame on
Alice.

"Alice," said my aunt, "did you
break my beautiful things ?"

Alice faintly said, "No, ma'am;"
while her face was crimson, and the
tears stood in her eyes.

"It is always best, dear, to tell the
truth," said my aunt. "I am very, very
sorry to lose my beautiful china, but I
had rather lose a great many other
valuable things, than to find out that
one of my little friends would tell a



40 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

falsehood. I love good little girls, but
I do not wish to have any little girls
come to see me who will deceive me,
and say what is not true."

Poor dear little Alice did not dare to
say that I had told the lie, for she saw
that my aunt would not believe her
against me, but she looked into my
face, oh! so imploringly, as much as
to say, "Do, Lizzy, tell the truth, and
save me from this disgrace."

But I did not speak the truth, and
Alice, who was now unhappy with us,
wrote to her father to come and take
her home. I took care not to be alone
with her before she left, but oh! how



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. . 1

her little pale sad face reproached me,
and how. my conscience kept saying to
me, "Wicked, wicked girl!" I was
not happy after that ; I was very, very
wretched, but I was to suffer yet more
for my sin. One day, not long after
Alice left, the girl Sally came to me
and proposed that we should go up to
the orchard and get some fine red
apples, which grew on a particular
tree. I told her that my uncle had
said we must not take any of those
apples, for he wished to save them all
to put up in barrels for the winter.
She continued to urge me to go, and
when I still refused, she said:



42 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

"Ah, Miss Lizzy! I was not so blind
as you thought I was the day you over-
turned the stand in the parlor; I saw
it all ; I saw you break the china set ;
and then you threw the blame on lit-
tle Alice ; now if you do not go with
me to the orchard, I will tell your aunt
the whole story."

Oh, how frightened I was! And
must I steal now, I thought, in order
that the lie I have told may still be
concealed? How much better would
it have been for me if I had even then
confessed the truth, than to have put
myself in the power of this wicked
girl!



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 43

But I went with her, I am ashamed
to say, to the orchard, and we took
some of the nice red apples, and though
we were not found out, I had the sin
of stealing as well as lying on my con-
science, and I was very unhappy.

During the next winter, while my
aunt was staying with us in the city,
she took up a paper one day, and read
in it the death of poor little Alice.

"Oh, how sorry I am!" said my
mother. " She was a lovely child, she
was so good."

" I always thought so," said my aunt,
" till last summer, when she did some-
thing at my house, which convinced



44: THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

me that she was not altogether truth-
ful."

Oh, how I felt while my aunt was
telling my mother the story, but they
thought my tears were caused only by
sorrow for the death of Alice.

When the next summer came, I did
not want to go to the country, for I was
afraid of Sally. I knew she would
make me do wicked things, or bring
out the story of my former wickedness.
Oh, that falsehood ! it took but a few
moments to tell it, but it made me an
unhappy little girl for years. When-
ever I was at any place where I thought
I should enjoy myself, the remembrance



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 45

of my sin, and of dear little Alice,
would come in and destroy all my
pleasure.

But I did not like to ask to be left at
home, when the rest went to the coun-
try, for fear of the questions which
might be asked me, and so I went sum-
mer after summer, and wretched enough
I was.

At length, one afternoon, about three
years after the china was broken, my
aunt and several ladies who were stay-
ing with her having gone out to ride,
I happened to go suddenly into a
closet, where my aunt kept some of
her nice things, and there I found



46 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

Sally, with a box of raisins which she
had taken down from a high shelf; the
box was open, and Sally was in the act
of putting a handful of raisins into her
pocket, when I opened the door.

"Oh, Sally, Sally!" I exclaimed,
"what are you doing?"

Sally was frightened at first, and
offered me part of the raisins if I would
not tell of her. When I refused them,
she became very angry, and said that
if I told what she had been doing, she
would tell about the broken china, and
also how I helped her take the beauti-
ful red apples, and several other things
which she had made me do, which I



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 4:7

had much rather would not be made
known.

But I would not take the raisins, or
make her any promises. I was three
years older now than when I had first
put myself in the power of this wicked
girl, and I determined that I would
be ruled by her no longer. I would
tell the whole truth, on the first oppor-
tunity, from first to last, no matter
what they might think of me.

I dreaded it so much, however, that
I put it off from one hour to another,
hoping it might be easier. Several
times I almost made up my mind to
tell it all; but the words seemed to



48 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

stick in my throat, and I could not tell
how to begin.

So things went on till the next day
at dinner. A large company was seat-
ed around the table ; and when the
dessert was put on the table, my aunt
said, " Ladies, I should like to have
given you some raisins to eat with
your nuts to-day, but I find that some-
body has- been at my raisin box, and
carried them nearly all off, so that I
have not enough left to put on a
plate."

I glanced at Sally, but to my aston-
ishment she looked just as usual, and
went on quietly putting the things on



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 49

the table, without changing color at
all; but she took very good care not
to look towards me. As there was a
pause in the conversation, I looked up,
and happening to catch my aunt's eye,
I turned very red, so that it seemed as
if the blood would burst through my
cheeks. Everybody looked at me, and
I knew they all thought I had taken
the raisins.

"Oh aunty! oh ladies!" I cried, "/
did not take them, but I know who did,
and I have been almost as wicked. I
will come back and tell you all about
it!" And I ran up to my room, and,
bursting into tears, I threw myself on

4



50 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

my knees, and buried my face in the
bed, and sobbed as if my heart would
break.

Then I prayed to my Father in
heaven to forgive all my sins, and as
I prayed I grew more calm. In about
an hour I went down stairs, and found
the ladies all sitting round the fire in
the dining-room. I took my seat on a
little stool at my aunt's feet, and then,
beginning at the day when the china
was broken, I told them all that had
happened. I did not attempt to ex-
cuse myself, or to lay any more blame
on Sally than she deserved ; but I told
the whole truth, and they all believed



THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 51

me ; and my aunt said though she was
distressed to find how much I had done
which was wrong, yet she thought I
had suffered enough to make it a warn-
ing to me all my days.

But she told me that nothing would
keep me from sin but the grace of God,
and that I must always pray to Him
for strength.

" But where is Sally ?" asked my
aunt. Sally had disappeared the mo-
ment she had left the dining-room, and
we have never seen or heard of her
since. In her haste she left her trunk


1 3

Online LibraryL. (Lorentz) LermontThe jumble; a collection of pieces in prose and rhyme for the Silver Lake stories .. → online text (page 1 of 3)