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LOUISE MUHLBACH




'Put out that light," said the King, "the moon will be our torch and will
glorify our bed of straw"

MukUmcli — ^^ Frederick tlie Great and His Family," I'oi. Two, /■. 346



THE WORKS OF

LOU ISE MÜH LBACH

IN EIGHTEEN VOLUMES



FREDERICK THE GREAT
AND HIS FAMILY



FRONTISPIECES IN COLOR FROM PAINTINGS BY

WALTER H. EVERETT




NEW YORK

P. F. COLLIER & SON

M C M I I



Copyright 1867, 1893
Bv D. APPLETON AND COMPANY



COI^TEInTTS.



BOOK I.

OHAPTER PAÖS

I. The King, 1

II. Prince Henry, . .4

III. Louise von Kleist, 8

IV. At the Masked Ball, 13

v. A Secret Captain, . . , , *. . . . 18

VI. The Legacy of Von Ti-enck, Colonel of the Pandours, . 21

VII. The King and Weingarten, 29

VIII. The Unwilling Bridegroom, 33

IX. The First Disappointment, 38

X. The Conquered, 46

XI. The Travelling Musicians, 52

XII. Travelling Adventures, 56

XIII. The Drag- Boat, 63

Xrv. In Amsterdam, 63

XV. The King without Shoes, 74



BOOK II.

I. The Unhappy News, . 83

n. Trenck on his Way to Prison, 93

III. Prince Heniy and His Wife, 103

IV. The Fete in the Woods, , Ill

V. Intrigues, . . 119

VI. The Private Audience, 135

VII. The Traitor 129

VIII. Declaration of War 136

IX. The King and his Brothers, 140

X. The Laurel- Branch, . , 145

XI The Ball at Count Bruhl's 147

XII. The Interrupted Feast. 155

XIII. The Archives at Dresden, 161

XIV. Saxony Humiliated, 168

MUHLBACH 1 ^'OL. 2



IV



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER
I.
II.

m.

IV.

V.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

IX.

X.

XI.

XII.

XIII.

XIV.

XV.

XVI.



BOOK III.



The Maiden of Brünen,

News of Battle,

The Certificate of Enlistment;

Farewell to the Village,

The Prisoner,

The Prison BaiTicade, .

The Battle of Collin,

The Inimical Brothers, .

The Letters,

In the Castle at Dresden,

The Te Deum, .

Camp Scene, ..

The Watch -Fire,

The Battle of Leuthen, .

Winter Quarters in Breslau

The Broken Heart,



PAQB

. 173

177
. 181

188
. 194

203
. 205

211
. 221

225
. 232

236
. 242

248
. 255

262



BOOK IV.

I. The King and his Old and New Enemies, . . . 268

II. The Three Officers 273

III. Ranuzi, 277

IV. Louise du Trouffle, 287

V. The Fortune -Teller 293

VI. A Court Day in Berlin, 302

VII. In the Window-Niche, 311

VIII. Tlie Nutshells behind the Fauteuil of the Queen. . . 314

IX. Tlie Duel and its Consequences, 319

X. The Five Couriers 324

XL After the Battle 331

XII. A Heroic Soul, 337

XIII. The Two Grenadiers 342

XIV. The Right Counsel 346

XV. A Hero in Misfortune, 356



BOOK V.

I. The Teresiani and the Prussiani, .
II. Frederick the Great as a Saint.
III. The Cloister Brothers of San Giovanni e Paolo,



361
366
371



CONTENTS.



Sons,



CHAPTER

IV. The Return from the Army,

v. The Brave Fathers and the Cowardly

VI. The Traitor's Betrayal,

VII. The Accusation, ....

VIII. Revenge,

IX. Trenck

X. " Trenck, are you there ? " .

XI. The King and the German Scholar,

XII. Geliert,

XIII. The Poet and the King,

XrV. The King and the Village Magistrate,

XV. The Proposal of Marriage,

XVI. The Ambassador and the Khan of Tartary,



FAQB

. 381

388-
. 395

400
. 408

413
. 417

423
. 433

439
. 445

448
. 457



BOOK VI.

I. The King's Return,

II. Prince Henry, ....

III. Mother and Daughter, .

IV. The King in Sans-Souci, .
V. The Engraved Cup,

VI. The Princess and the Diplomatist

VII. The Royal House-Spy, .

VIII. The Clouds Gather, .

IX. Brother and Sister,

X. The Stolen Child, .

XI. The Discovery,

XII. The Morning at Sans-Souci, .

XIII. A Husband's Revenge, . .

XIV. The Separation,



468
477
482
493
501
508
514
518
525
532
540
546
557
564



FREDERICK THE GREAT AND HIS FAMILY«



BOOK I.



CHAPTER I.

THE KING.

The king laid his flute aside, and with his hands folded behind
his back, walked thoughtfully up and down his room in Sans-Souci.
His countenance was now ti'anquil, his brow cloudless ; with the
aid of music he had harmonized his soul, and the anger and dis-
pleasure he had so shortly before felt were soothed by the melodious
notes of his flute.

The king was no longer angry, but melancholy, and the smile
that played on his lip was so resigned and painful that the brave
Marquis d'Argens would have wept had he seen it, and the stinging
jest of Voltaire have been silenced.

But neither the marquis nor Voltaire, nor any of his friends were
at present in Potsdam. D'Argens was in France, with his young
•wife, Barbe Cochois , Voltaire, after a succession of difficulties and
quarrels, had departed forever ; General Rothenberg had also departed
to a land from which no one returns — he was dead ! My lord mar-
shal had retm-ned to Scotland, Algarotti to Italy, and Bastiani still
held his ofiice in Breslau. Sans-Souci, that had been heretofore the
seat of joy and laughing wit — Sans-Souci was now still and lonely ;
youth, beauty, and gladness had forsaken it forever ; earnestness
and duty had taken their place, and reigned in majesty within those
walls that had so often echoed with the happy laugh and sparkling
jest of the king's friends and contemporaries.

Frederick thought of this, as with folded liands he walked up
and down, and recalled the past. Sunk in deep thought, he re-
mained standing before a picture that hung on the wall above his
secretary, which represented Barbarina in the fascinating costume
of a shepherdess, as he had seen her for the first time ten j'^ears ago ;
it had been painted by Pesne for the king. What recollections,
1



2 FREDERICK THE GREAT AND HIS FAMILY.

what dreams arose before the king's soul as he gazed at that bewitch-
ing and lovely face ; at those soft, melting eyes, whose glance had
once made him so happy ! But that was long ago ; it had passed like
a sunbeam on a rainy day, it had been long buried in clouds. These
remembrances warmed the king's heart as he now stood so solitary
and loveless before this picture; and he confessed to that sweet
image, once so fondly loved, what he had never admitted to himself,
that his heart was very lonely.

But these painful recollections, these sad thoughts, did not last.
The king roused himself from those dangerous dreams, and on leav-
ing the picture cast upon it almost a look of hatred.

"This is folly," he said ; "I will to work."

He approached the secretary, and seized the sealed letters and
packets that were lying there. "A letter and packet from the
queen," he said, wonderingly opening the letter first. Casting a
hasty glance through it, a mocking smile crossed his face. "She
sends me a French translation of a prayer-book, " he said, shrugging
his shoulders. " Poor queen ! her heart is not yet dead, though, by
Heaven ! it has suflfered enough. "

He threw the letter carelessly aside, without glancing at the
book ; its sad, pleading prayer was but an echo of the thoughts
trembling in her heart.

" Bagatelles ! nothing more, " he murmured, after reading the
other letters and laying them aside. He then rang hastily, and
bade the servant send Baron Pöllnitz to him as soon as he appeared
in the audience- chamber.

A few minutes later the door opened, and the old, wrinkled,
sweetly smiling face of the undaimted courtier appeared.

" Approach, " said the king, advancing a few steps to meet him.
"Do you bring me his submission? Does my brother Henry
acknowledge that it is vain to defy my power?"

Pöllnitz shrugged his shoulders. "Sire, " he said, sighing, "his
highness will not understand that a prince must have no heart. He
still continues in his disobedience, and declares that no man should
marry a woman without loving her ; that he would be contemptible
and cowardly to allow himself to be forced to do what should be the
free choice of his own heart."

Pöllnitz had spoken with downcast eyes and respectful counte-
nance ; he appeared not to notice that the king reddened and his
eyes burned with anger.

"Ah ! my brother dared to say that?" cried the king. "He has
the Utopian thought to believe that he can defy my wishes. Tell
him he is mistaken ; he must submit to me as I had to submit to my
father. "



THE KING. 3

" He gives that as an example why he will not yield. He be-
lieves a forced marriage can never be a happy one ; that your majesty
had not only made yourself unhappy by your marriage, but also
your queen, r.nd that there was not a lady in the land who would
exchange places with your wife. "

The king glanced piercingly at Pöllnitz. " Do you know it
would have been better had you forgotten a few of my wise brother's
words?"

" Your majesty commanded me to tell you faithfully every word
the prince said. "

" And you are too much a man of truth and obedience, too little
of a courtier, not to be frank and faithful. Is it not so? Ah!
vraiment, I know you, and I know very well that you are playing a
double game. But I warn you not to follow the promptings of your
wicked heart. I desire my brother to marry, do you hear? I will
it, and you, the grand chamberlain, Baron Pöllnitz, shall feel my
anger if he does not consent. "

"And if he does?" said Pöllnitz, in his laughing, shameless man-
ner ; " if I persuade the prince to submit to your wishes, what recom-
pense shall I receive?"

"On the day of their betrothal, I will raise your income five hun-
dred crowns, and pay your debts. "

"Ah, sire, in what a pitiable dilemma you are placing me!
Your majesty wishes Prince Henry to engage himself as soon as
possible, and I must now wish it to be as late as possible. "

"And why?"

" Because I must hasten to make as many debts as possible, that
your majesty may pay them. "

"You are and will remain an unmitigated fool ; old age will not
even cure you, " said the king, smiling. " But speak, do you think
my brother may be brought to reason?"

Pöllnitz shrugged his shoulders, gave a sly smile, but was silent.

"You do not answer me. Is my brother in love? and has he con-
fided in you?"

" Sire, I believe the prince is in love from ennui alone, but he
swears it is his first love. "

"That is an oath that is repeated to each lady-love; I am not
afraid of it," said the king, smiling "Who is the enchantress that
has heard his first loving vows? She is doubtless a fairy— a goddess
of beauty. "

" Yes, sire, she is young and beautiful, and declares it is also her
first love, so no one can doubt its purity ; no one understands love as
well as this fair lady ; no other than Madame von Kleist, who, as
your majesty remembers, was lately divorced from her husband. "



4: FEEDERICK THE GREAT AND HIS FAMILY.

" And is now free to love again, as it appears, " said the king,
"writh a mocking smile. "But the beautiful Louise von Schwerin
is a dangerous, daring woman, and we must check her clever plans
in the bud. If she desires to be loved by my brother, she possesses
knowledge, beauty, and experience to gain her point and to lead
him into all manner of follies. This affair must be brought quickly
to a close, and Prince Heniy acknowledged to be the prince royal."

" Prince Henry goes this evening to Berlin to attend a feast given
by the Prince of Prussia, " whispered PöUnitz.

"Ah ! it is true the prince's arrest ceases at six o'clock, but he
will not forget that he needs permission to leave Potsdam. "

" He will forget it, sire. "

The king walked up and down in silence, and his countenance
assumed an angry and threatening appearance. "This struggle
must be brought to a close, and that speedily. My brother must
submit to my authority. Go and watch his movements ; as soon
as he leaves, come to me. "

Long after Pöllnitz had left him, the king paced his chamber in
deep thought. " Poor Henry ! I dare not sympathize with you ; you
are a king's son — that means a slave to your position. Why has
Providence given hearts to kings as to other men? Why do we
thirst so for love? as the intoxicating drink is always denied us,
and we dare not drink it even when offered by the most bewitching
enchantress !"

Involuntarily his eye rested upon the beautiful picture of Barba-
rina. But he would have no pity with himself, as he dared not
show mercy to his brother. Seizing the silver beU, he rang it hastily.

"Take that picture from the wall, and carry it immediately to
the inspector, and tell him to hang it in the picture-gallery, " said
Frederick.

He looked on quietly as the servant took the picture down and
carried it from the room, then sighed and gazed long at the plane
where it had hung.

" Empty and cold ! Tlie last token of my youth is gone ! I am
now the king, and, with God's blessing, will be the father of my
people. "



CHAPTER II.

PRINCE HENRY.

Prince Henry sat quiet and motionless in his lonely room ; dark
thoughts seemed to trouble him; his brow was clouded, his lips
compressed. Had you not known him, you would have taken him



PRINCE HENRY. 5

for the king, so great was the resemblance of the two brothers ; but
it was only an outward resemblance. The prince had not the spir-
itual expression, his eyes had not the passionate fire, his face (beau-
tiful as it was) wanted the fascinating geniality, the sparkling
inspiration, that at all times lighted the king's countenance like a
sunbeam.

The prince possessed a greater mind, a clearer understanding,
but he wanted soul and poetic feeling, and allowed himself at times
to ridicule his brother's poetic efforts. The king, knowing this, was
inclined to regard the shortcomings of the prince as a determined
contempt and resistance to his command ; and as the prince became
more reckless and more indifferent, he became more severe and
harsh. Tims the struggle commenced that had existed for some
time between the two brothers.

For the last four days the prince had been in arrest for disobeying
orders, but the hour of his releaese was approaching, and he awaited
it with impatience.

The bell of the nearest church had just announced the hour of
six. The door opened immediately, and an officer, in the name of
the king, pronounced his arrest at an end.

The prince answered with a low bow, and remained seated,
pointing haughtily to the door ; but as the officer left him he arose
and paced hastily to and fro.

" He treats me like a school-boy, " he murmured ; " but I shall
show him that I have a will of my own ! I will not be intimidated
— I will not submit ; and if the king does not cease to annoy me, if
he continues to forget that I am not a slave, but son and brother of
a king, no motives shall restrain me, and I also will forget, as he
does, that I am a prince, and remember only that I am a free,
responsible man. He wishes me to marry, and therefore has me
followed, and surrounds me with spies. He wishes to force me to
marry. Well, I will marry, but I will choose my own wife !"

The prince had just made this resolve, when the door opened,
and the servant announced that Messrs. Kalkreuth and Kaphengst
awaited his commands.

He bade them enter, and advancing smilingly gave them his hand.

"Welcome! welcome!" he said; "the cage is open, and I may
enjoy a little air and sunshine ; let us not delay to make use of this
opportunity. Our horses shall be saddled. "

" They are already saddled, prince, " said Baron Kalkreuth. " I
have ordered them to the court, and as soon as it is dark we will
moimt them."

" What ! is it not best that we should mount before my door and
ride openly away?" said the prince, wonderingly.



6 FREDERICK THE GREAT AND HIS FAMILY.

" It is my opinion that is the best plan, " cried Bai-on Kaphengst,
laughing gayly. " Every one will believe your highness to be simply
taking a ride, while curiosity would be raised if we left the city on
foot."

"I think leaving in the dark, and on foot, looks as if I were
afraid, " said the prince, thoughtfully.

" Secrecy is good for priests and old women, but not for us, " cried
Kaphengst.

"Secrecy suits all who wish to do wrong," said Kalkreuth,
earnestly.

The prince glanced hastily at him. " You believe, then, we are
about to do wrong?"

" I dare not speak of your highness, but we two are certainly
doing wrong ; we are about to commit an act of insubordination.
But still, my prince, I am ready to do so, as your highness wishes
us to accompany you. "

The prince did not answer, but stepped to the window, and looked
out thoughtfully and silently. In a few moments he returned, look-
ing calm and resolute.

" Kalkreuth is right — we were going to do wrong, and we must
avoid it. I shall write to the king, and ask leave for you and myself
to go to Berlin. "

"That is, unfortunately, impossible," said a sweet voice behind
him, and as the prince turned he saw the smiling face of Pöllnitz.
" I beg pardon, your highness, for having entered unannounced, but
you allowed me to come at this hour and give you an accoimt of the
commissions you gave me. "

" Why do you say it is impossible to obtain leave of the king to-
day?" asked Henry, hastily.

" Because his majesty is already in the concert-saloon, and your
highness knows that he has strictly forbidden any one to disturb him
there. "

"We shall, then, have to give up our plan and remain here,"
said the prince.

Kaphengst glanced angrily and threateningly at his friend.

"And why should your highness do this?" asked Pöllnitz, aston-
ished. " All your preparations are made, all your commands fulfilled.
I have procured your costumes ; no one will recognize you, and if
they should, would not dare to betray you to the king. Only two
persons know that you are to visit the ball, the Prince of Prussia,
and a lovely lady, whose beautiful eyes were misty with tears when
I delivered her your message. ' Tell the prince, ' she murmured, in
a tender voice, 'I will await him there, even if I knew the king
would crush me with his anger. '"



PRINCE HENRY. '7

The prince blushed with joy. " And you say it is impossible for
me to see the king?"

" Impossible, my prince. "

" Well, we will have to renoxmce it, " said the prince, sighing.

"Renounce seeing the king, yes ! for he will not leave his rooms
in Sans-Souci to-day. "

" Then we would be entirely safe ; he would not notice our depar-
ture," said Kaphengst, quickly.

" Entirely safe, '" said PöUnitz.

" That is, if Baron PöUnitz does not himself inform the king, "
said Baron Kalkreuth, whose quick, clear glance rested upon the
smiling face of the courtier, and appeared to read his inmost
thoughts.

Baron PöUnitz cast a susijicious and angry glance at Kalkreuth.
"I did not know that borrowing money from you gave you the right
to speak rudely to me !"

" Silence ! gentlemen, " cried the prince, who, until now, had
stood quietly struggling with his own wishes. ."Take your cloaks
and let us walk. Did you not say that horses were awaiting us at
the door, Baron Kalkreuth?"

" I said so, your highness. "

" And you PöUnitz? Did you not say that three costumes awaited
us in Berlin?"

" Yes, your highness. "

" Well, then, " said the prince, smiling, " we must not allow the
horses and costumes to await us any longer. Come, gentlemen, we
will ride to Berlin. "

"Really it was hard to get him off," murmured PöUnitz, as he
regained the street, and saw the three young men fading in the dis-
tance. " The good prince had quite a dutiful emotion ; if the king
only knew it, he would forgive him all, and renounce the idea
of his marriage. But that would not suit me — my debts would
not be paid ! I must not tell the king of his brother's inward
struggle. "

"Well!" said the king, as PöUnitz entered, "has my brother
really gone to Berlin ?"

"Yes, your majesty, and accompanied by the two Messieurs — "

" Silence !" cried the king, hastily ; " I do not wish to know their
names, I should have to punish them also. He has then gone, and
without any hesitation, any reluctance?"

"Yes, sire, without hesitation. He thinks he has the right to
go where he pleases, and to amuse himself as he can. "

"Order the carriage, PöUnitz, " said the king. "Without doubt
my brother has taken the shortest road to Berlin?"



8 FREDERICK THE GREAT AND HIS FAMILY.

"Yes, sire."

" Then there is no danger of our meeting them and being recog-
nized ; and as we have relays on the road, we will reach Berlin be-
fore them. "



CHAPTER III.

LOUISE VON KLEIST.

Madame von Kleist was alone in her boudoir. She had just
completed her toilet, and was viewing herself with considerable
pleasure in a large Venetian glass. She had reason to be pleased.
The costume of an odalisque became her wonderfully ; suited her
luxuriant beauty, her large, dreamy blue eyes, her full red lips, her
slender, swaying form. At twenty-eight, Louise von Kleist was
still a sparkling beauty ; the many trials and sorrows she had passed
through had not scattered the roses from her cheek, nor banished
youth from her heart.

Louise von Kleist resembled greatly the little Louise von
Schwerin of earlier days — the little dreamer who found it romantic
to love a gardener, and was quite ready to flee with him to a para-
dise of love. The king's watchfulness saved her from this romantic
folly, and gave her another husband. This unhappy match was
now at an end. Louise was again free. She still felt in her heart
some of the wild love of romance and adventure of the little Louise ;
she was the same daring, dreamy, impressible Louise, only now she
was less innocent. The little coquette from instinct was changed
into a coquette from knowledge.

She stood before the glass and surveyed once more her appear-
ance ; then acknowledged with a pleased smile that she was beauti-
ful enough to fascinate all men, to arouse in all hearts a painful
longing.

"But I shall love no one but the prince," she said, "and when
my power over him is sufficient to induce him to marry me, I shall
reward him by my faith, and entire submission to his wishes. Oh !
I shall be a virtuous wife, a true and faithful mother ; and my
lovely little Camilla shall find in her mother a good and noble ex-
ample. I shall promise this to my angel with my farewell kiss ; and
then— to the ball !"

She entered the next chamber, and stood at her child's bed.
What a strange sight ! This woman, in a fantastic, luxuriant cos-
tume, bending over the cot of the little girl, with such tender, pious
looks, with folded hands, and soft, murmuring lips, uttering a
prayer or holy wish !



LOUISE VON KLEIST. 9

"How beautiful she is!" murmured Louise, not dreaming that
her own beauty at this moment beamed with touching splendor —
that mother love had changed the alluring coquette into an adorable
saint — "how beautiful she is!"

The gay, ringing laughter of her daughter interrupted her ; the
child opened her large black eyes, and looked amused.

" You naughty child, you were not asleep, " said Louise.

" No, mamma, I was not asleep ; I was playing comedy. "

"Ah! and who taught you to play comedy, you silly child?"
said Louise, tenderly.

The child looked earnestly before her for a few moments as chil-
dren are wont to do when a question surprises them.

"I believe, mamma," she said, slowly — "I believe I learned it
from you. "

"Fi'om me, Camilla? When have you seen me act?"

"Oh, very often, "she cried, laughing. "Just a few days ago,
mamma, don't you remember when we were laughing and talking
so merrily together. Prince Henry was announced, and you sent me
into the next room, but the door was open, and I saw very well that
you made a sad face, and I heard the prince ask you how you were,
and you answered, ' I am sick, your highness, and how could it be
otherwise, as I am always sad or weeping?' Now, mother, was not
that acting?"

Louise did not answer. Breathing heavily, she laid her hand
upon her heart, for she felt a strange sorrow and indescribable fear.

Camilla continued, " Oh ! and I saw how tenderly the prince
looked at you ; how he kissed you, and said you were as lovely as an
angel. Oh, mamma, I too shall be beautiful, and beloved by a



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