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l86l.] DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL WORLD. 293

his friend*8 assertion that he is a henpecked husband, proceeds to smoke his
pipe — not in the orchard as hitherto — but in the flower-garden, although
until now he has abstained from smoking there out of regard to his wife's
request. The mild oourse of dissipation which Max has thus gone through
before breakfast renders him an easy prey to the tempter^ at whose instiga-
tion he breaks off the intended marriage of his daughter Adeline (Miss F.
Hughes) with a worthy youog artist ; he quarrels with his wife, and makes
himself so generally obnoxious to the assembled guests that they are glad to
take their departure with the utmost haste. The treacherous friend, however,
meets with his match in the person of Rosa Morgenrath (Miss Charlotte
Saunders), with whom he falls madly in love, and of course vows a total and
immediate reform. The fooUsh husband, on coming to his senses, is
thoroughly ashamed of himself, and heartily sorry for the misery he has
caused to every one, the more so as his rollicking friend has merely been
indulging in his usual amount of practical joking at anybody's expense l>ut his
own. Max sues for and easily obtains his pardon, the youthfid Adeline and
her admirer having had the usual experience of ' the oourse of true love,'
&c., &c., are allowed to go on their way rejoicing, and if Judas Braitkopf only
keeps his promises of amendment it is to be hoped they all live and die
happy. Mr. Parselle, always painstaking and gentlemanly, took another stride
in his profession, and gave a most agreeable rendering to the fond but foolish
husband; Mr. Turner displayed much unctuous drollery as his dissipated
companion ; Mrs. Selby, in a part perhaps not thoroughly suited to her, dis-
played all the requirements of a clever actress ; and Miss Charlotte Saunders
— well, Miss Charlotte Saunders acted as she always does.

On the 9th January Mr. Howard Olover gave his annual concert at St.
James's Hall, aud a crowded audience fully testified to the judgment displayed
by this clever composer in the programme he had arranged for the entertain-
ment of his patrons. At the head of the list appeared the names of Mr. Sims
Beeves and Miss Arabella Goddard. The great tenor obtained a well-merited
encore in a new ballad by Balfe, * Fresh as a rose,' and sang ' Adelsdda ' with
his weUrknown exquisite taste, the accompaniment being played by Miss
Goddard, who also delighted the audience with her performance of * Home,
' sweet home,' and Benedict's fantasia on, * Where the bee sucks.' In addition
-to the above, a host of talent, comprising the names of Mademoiselle Parepa,
Miss Augusta Thompson, Madame Louisa Vinning, Mr. Lewis Thomas, Mr.
Wilbye Cooper, Herr Molique, MM. Sainton and Paque exerted themselves
to their utmost to render Mr. Glover's concert what it undoubtedly is — one of
the best in or out of the season. The London Glee and Madrigal Union sang
two very effective part songs, and Prince GaUtzin conducted two sacred choral
pteees, the productions of Russian composers. The concert might truly be
caUed a * monster ' one, as it lasted nearly four hours ; but notwithstanding its
length, so judiciously had Mr. Glover selected the various morceaux^ and so
aUy were Uiey executed by the various artistes to whom they Were intrusted,
that the audienoe took no note of time.

The Monday Popular Concerts have been resumed under most ^etvourable
circumstances^ and an array of talent brought together that we have hitherto
been accustomed to meet with only at entertainments which command a
much higher price of admission. Miss Arabella Goddard has presided at the
piano, and has performed admirably selected works with her customary skill ;
her unequalled mechanical &cility, bttr delicacy of touch and brilliancy of
execution eliciting the most rapturouf applause from the audience. M.
VOL. M. — NO. 12. y



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294 DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL WORLD. [Feb., 1861.

VieuxtempB, after an abaenoe of some years frem England, made his reappeir*
ance at these concerts on the 14th of last month, and was warmlj greeted and
applauded by the crowded assemblage. There are few, if any, violinists who
can compete with M. Vieuxtemps, in his full, rich, bold, but exquisitely mo-
dulated tone, whilst the manner in which he surmounts the most trying me-
chanical intricacies causes him to stand alone and imrivalled in his profession.
He was most ably seconded by MM. Baes, Schreurs, Webb, and Piatti, and
afforded the public an opportunity of hearing Schubert's quartet in D minor,
Haydn's quartet in E major, and Beethoven's glorious quintet in C major,
played in a style that may safely be termed perfection. Madame Laora
Baxter and Madame Louisa Yinning, the Misses Augusta Thompson and
Lasoelles sang between the instrumental pieces with the taste and moaical
ability which they invariably display. Altogether these concerts may be
look^ upon as 4 great success and a most convincing proof of the improved
taste of the masses in matters musical. Perhaps nothing better serves to
illustrate this fact than a little incident which occurred at the first concert
Previous to commencing the Haydn quartet, which stood last in the pro-
gramme, Mr. Benedict requested those among the audience who were desirous
of leaving to do so before the quartet commenced, as the noise and commotion
of their departure not only interfered with the enjoyment of those who wished
to hear the music, but was likewise a cause of considerable interruption to
the musicians. Only a very few among the crowded assembly proved them-
selves insensible to the beauties of the composition of the great master, by
fur the greater number retaining their places to the end ; and thus by this
admirable forethought on the part of Mr. Benedict the real lovers of mudc
were enabled to listen in comfort until the termination of the concert. On
dit^ that the gentleman above alluded to is busy on a new opera shortly to be
produced^ having flelected for his subject the 'Colleen Bawn.' Qlie com-
poser*l9 weHknown musical ability, in conjunction with the strong interest of
the story itself, will no doubt insure for Mr. Benedict's production a long
and successful run. A most extraordinary account is given in the French
papers of the success of t^e ' Pied de Mouton ' at the Porte St. Martin. The
firat hundred nights produced five hundred thousand francs (20,000{.X the
author's fees being no less than fifty thousand francs (2,0002.) ; and as there
is every chance of the piece yielding as much again, according to the system
pursued in France, the lucky author stands in a fair way of doubling his
2,0002. Our own authors will no doubt look upon this as an incentive
to fresh exertions, or, what is much more probable, they will set to work
and translate the original. Yerily, *they manage these things bettor io
•France.'

J. V. P.



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BAILY'S MONTHLY MAGAZINE



SPORTS AND PASTIMES.



GEORGE OSBALDESTON.

Prolific as England has been in eminent sportsmen, they have
been more generally distinguished by one great striking characteristic,
or, as our neighbours on the other side of the Channel would term it,
a specialite. For instance, the hero of Lord's would be a nobody at
Newmarket, the Master of The Quorn would be unnoticed by the
million at Epsom, and the crack shot of the Red House or Hornsey
Wood Tavern would find himself quite out of his element in the
turnip-fields of Norfollp. It is, therefore, in the capacity of one,
who unites all these attributes in. a degree, never before surpassed by
any man, of any. age or country, that we present The Squire to our
readers, and trust that the sketch we append of his extraordinary
career will be read with interest and profit by the rising generation
of the Sporting World, as well as by many of his former associates,
who are happily still spared to us.

Mr. George Osbaldeston was born on the 26th of December,
1787, in Wimpole Street, Cavendish Square, and was the son of
Mr. Osbaldeston of Hutton Bushell, near Scarborough. It being
the fashion at that time for ladies, whose means permitted it, to come
to the metropolis for their accouchement, Yorkshire lost the honour
of numbering among her sons one who would have done honour to
her. And while London may be proud of The Squire as a citizen,
yet it will scarcely be doubted, it is to the Yorkshire blood in his
veins he was able to accomplish those wondrous feats which have
rendered his name an undying one in the annals of English sports
and pastimes. Losing his father when he was only six years of age,
Mr. Osbaldeston went to reside with his mother at Bath, where he
received the first rudiments of his education, including riding-lessoris
fi'om Dash, who was the most celebrated teacher of the day, his
schools being fi-equented by the ilite of the visitors to the city of
Beau Nash. By him The Squire was regarded as his most pro-
mising pupil, and was constantly in the habit of being exhibited as
an illustration of the excellence of the system pursued in the
academy, and which would seem to do away with the supposition
generaJly entertained that ' the school * is not the best foundation for
the hunting field. After remaining some years at Bath, Mr. Osbak

VOL. II,-NO. 13. Digitized by Google



296 GEORGE osBALDESTON. [March,

deston was removed to Eton, where his tastes for all manly accom-

tlishments were more developed than his fondness for Gfreck and
/atin, and in the course of a short time he was recognized as the
best bowler, the best oarsman, and the best runner in the schooL
His larking disposition and readiness to join in anv species of mis-
chief, such as poaching, tying squibs to servants' oresses and firine
them off, running to Ascot races and back between the school
hours, and lighting Windsor boys, brought him into frequent col-
lisions with Sie authorities, and led to the infliction of corpora]
punishment to an extent which, if employed in the present dav, would
have brought about a strone protest from the editors of ' The Morning
* Advertiser* and *The Morning Star.* As he was intended for
Oxford, on leaving Eton he was transferred to the care of Dr. Carr,
the Vicar of Brighton, who was subsequently elevated to the Sec
of Chichester, and who had, as may be imagined, no small difficulty
in keeping him straight. For at that time Captain Bridges, better
known as * Mad Bridges,* from his foolish freak of ridine down the
Devil*s Punchbowl, was the great lion of the place ; and the imita*
tion of his equestrian feats had far more attraction for the youthful
Osbaldeston, than Greek plays, or the learned treatises of our emi-
nent Divines. However, he was coached sufficiently to matriculate
at Oxford, which he did on the 3rd of May, 1805, as a Gentleman
Commoner of Brazennose ; and if he did not bring to that ancient
seminary a mind richly stored with classic lore, he, at all events, had
little to learn in the hunting field, his career as a Master having
already commenced with a pack of harriers, which he purchased of
the late Lord Jersey. With these harriers, which were, in fact,
more strictly speaking, dwarf fox-hounds bred with that judgment
for which Lord Jersev was so remarkable, he had shown excellent
sport over his mother's property at Hutton Bushell, winning
thereby the hearts of her tenantry. At Oxford, as at Eton, the
career of our hero was highly characteristic of the fiist school of the
day: Diana being more his ruling goddess than Minerva, his
health was never endangered by too close an application to his
studies. Shortly after leaving Oxford, Mrs. Osbaldeston removed
to the Palace at Lincoln, and her son's passion for the chase became
still more developed by his purchasing Lord Monson's hounds, and
hunting the Burton country for five years, to the universal satis-
faction of the Lincolnshire sportsmen, who presented him on his
retirement with a splendid silver salver ornamented with foxes* heads
for handles. The hme of these hounds has hardly been surpassed by
that of any pack in England, and their descendants are regarded in
the present kennels as having * all the blood of the Howarcb in their

* veins.' Mr. Osbaldeston's opinion of them almost amounted to
idolatry, and Vaulter stood as hi^h in his estimation as Boatswain did
in that of Lord Byron. Speaking one day of men, manners, and
things in general, he exclaimed widi his natural enthusiasm, * People

* say nothing is perfect in this world 5 but I say my Vaulter is

* perfect, and never told a lie in his liffc. I'll believe the Monson



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l86l.] A BIOGRAPHY. 297

^ sort before any man alive.' This hound was associated with the
celebrated Vanquisher, Furrier, and Rocket, whose names are
regarded as household words by M. F. H's, and will live in the
annals of fox-hunting as Ions as Eclipse, Childers, and Sultan in the
history of the turf. After giving up the Burton country Mr. Osbal-
deston went into Nottinghamshire, and hunted what was termed Jack
Muster's country ; and as the latter refused him his kennels, he was
compelled to build others at Thurgarton. This country beine any-
thing but a good one he did not long remain in it, but quieted it for
The Atherstone, to which was united the Derbyshire country, he
drafting the best portion of Lord Vernon's hounds into his own
pack. His next step was, on the resignation of Tom Smith, to
take The Quorn, and Quomdon HaU. In this most aristocratic of
all Masterships, with Tom Sebright, who commenced with him in
Lincolnshire, as first whip, he displayed more sport and thorough
knowledge of hunting than any of his predecessors, and his reign m
Leicestershire has ever been regarded as * the golden age ' of the
chase. His retirement then would not have taken place but for his
having broken his leg when out with Lord Anson's hounds, through
Sir James Musgrave riding over him going down a bank, and
the wound causing the bone to protrude through his boot, the fall kept
him out of the saddle for no less a period than fourteen months, during
which The Quorn was hunted by Tom Sebright, and whipped into
by Dick Burton. His establishment consisted of twenty-five horses
and seventy couple of working hounds ; and although, in modern
times, this has been greatly exceeded, the return of sixty brace of
foxes in one season will show how quality can make up for quantity.
On resigning The Quorn to Lord Southampton, which he did m
1826, Mr. Osbaldeston did not assume office again until the fol-
lowing year, when he became Master of The Pytchley, and took
up his residence at Pitsford, bringing with him his own hounds.
The Pytchljsy countnr was in his estimation the very best in
England; and pleasea with it and his field he threw his whole
sold into his duties with such success that in his first season he
had forty good days' sport out of fifty, and twenty-three extra-
ordinary good runs in succession. At the same time, we should
add, he was Master of The Pytchley, he hunted the Thurlow
country, in Suffolk, for two seasons, going through the fetigue of
travelling all night, and meeting the hounds on alternate mornings.
Jack Stevens was then his first whip, and Jem Shirley his second
one, and both were great favourites. At last, after a career of
thirty-five years as Master of hounds, during which he had exhibited
the highest qualities of his art, at a period 'when there were
* giants in the land,' he laid down his horn, and disposed of his
hounds to Mr. Harvey Combe, who hunted the Old Berkeley
country with them 5 and such was their fame when thev were put
up at Hyde Park Corner, that six couple fetched no less a sum
than 1,360 guineas.
Thus havmg dismissed The Squire in one phase of his character.

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298 GEORGE OSBALDESTON. [March^

we will turn to him in another, viz., that of a steeple-chase rider, in
which he had no superior, and never was beaten. At that pericKl
cross-country jockeyship was but little practised, and Grand Na-
tionals and Professionals were unknown. No regular courses were
even laid out ; and if a dispute had to be settled relative to the
superiority of a horse, four miles of the most intricate country in
Leicestershire or Northamptonshire was selected, and orders given
to the riders merely to go from one point to the other. Conse-
quently there was a greater opportunity for the display of those
qualities which are the essentials of a steeple-chase jockey, viz.,
nerve, and knowledge of pace and of country, than are afforded
in the events of the present day, which are rarely more than an
exhibition of the game of * follow my leader.* Among the most
celebrated of the matches which he rode was the one betvireen
Clinker and Clasher for a thousand guineas, made while he and
Captain Ross were shooting a match at pigeons at the Red House.
Clinker had always a first-rate reputation as a fencer, and The
Squire was to have ridden Clinker against him the previous year
if he had kept sound ; but falling lame, the match went off*, according
to the articles. The Captain happening to mention that Clinker
was going up at Tattersall's that afternoon, the subject was re-
newed, and after a great deal of chaffing, the match was remade, wth
the condition of The Squire riding, a proceeding he rather objected
to, from being at the time High Sheriff" of Yorkshire ; but as the
stipulation was a sine qua nony he consented. The line chosen w^as
from Dalby Windmill to Lipton in Leicestershire, and Dick
Christian, then in his zenith, was put upon Clasher. The attend-
ance was commensurate with the interest the event created, and
thousands depended upon the result. With a view of frightening
The Squire, the Clashers told Dick to follow in his track, and to
ford the brook, for the purpose of saving his horse. These tacdcs,
however, had quite the contrary effect to what was anticipated, as
the following only made The Squire more determined, and the
wading gave him a good lead, which he got by Jumping over, and
discovering a gap in a very awkward corner of a field, he won easily.
On another occasion, when Master of The Pytchley, he beat
Captain Ross on Polecat with his own horse Pilot. He also won
two steeple-chases on Grimaldi, who ran second to Moonraker
for the St. Albans, which race was then looked on as the Grand
National is now. In the Harrow country he afterwards, on Grimaldi,
beat Moonraker, and over a frightfullv severe course at Dun-
church he defeated General Charettie on his grey horse Napoleon. On
the Flat he was hardly as good as he was in a steeple-chase, although
at Stockbridge, Goodwood, Gorhambury, and Heaton Park he rode
repeated winners. At Newmarket, while steering Sorella for The
Queen's Plate, he complained against Nat for riding against him
and using unparliamentary language; but Lord George Bentinck
having told him that if he rode with jockeys * he must put up with.
* their manners and customs,' he did not appear again in the saddle



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l86l.] A BIOGRAPHY. 299

^th the professionals. Lord George Bentinck, from this remark,
had clearly not forgotten ' The Rush affair ' at Heaton Park, which
led to a hostile meeting between him and The Squire; and as
various versions of the story are afloat, a correct one may not be
without interest. Heaton Park, which has long since been abolished
as a race meeting, was, at the period of which we treat, the Good-
wood of the north, and patronized by the elite of the racing world,
who were the guests of the noble owner of the domain. John Scott
always took a large string there, and the prizes were worth running
for. The riders were nearly all gentlemen jockeys, but divided into
two classes, one of which stayed at the House, and the other at
Manchester, which was within four miles of Lord Wilton's seat.
For a long time a feeling had prevailed among the less aristocratic
division that they had not a fair chance given them in the handicaps,
and that too much fevour was shown to a noble Lord, who, hardly
second to any wearer of a silk jacket, was supposed to mesmerise
the judge's eye, if we may be permitted to use the expression. To
strike a shivering blow at such an apparent monopoly had long been
resolved upon by the members of the Lower House, and Rush proved,
as we subsequently shall show, a fitting instrument in their hands.

Rush was a rare-bred horse, being got by Humphrey Clinker out
of Wire, own sister to Whalebone, and The Squire gave four
hundred guineas for him at Doncaster. Anxious to know what he
was like, he hired a mare of Old Job Marson to try him with \ and
agreeing upon the weights, so that there should be no mistake about
his havmg a good horse, he got upon him himself, and put a jockey on
the mare, and at six o'clock on the morning of The St. Leger they
were galloped on that course. On getting to the Red House, The
Squire found Rush pulling double over the mare ; but discovering a
lot of touts at the judge's post, he stopped him, and allowed the mare
to go in by herself. The report of this trial no doubt got Rush
favourably handicapped for Heaton Park ; and on the first day of the
races he ran in The Trial Stakes, but from some cause or another,
into which we will not inquire too closely, he was nowhere. The
next day he was started for The Cup, and a gentleman was put in
to get ^1 the House money, and another Commissioner was equally
diligent at Manchester. Opening at lo to i he finished at 2 to i,
and as The Squire was walking down to the post to canter up.
Lord George Bentinck cried out, * 200 to 100 a^nst Rush.* * I'll
* take 100 to 50,' replied his rider, and finding him go so well with
him, as he returned he said, ' My Lord, you can make it 200 to 100,*
which the latter booked. Waiting on Lord Wilton, who rode
William Scott's mare Ladyle Gros, and who was backed for pounds,
shillings, and pence, until they got to the distance, he came away and
won in a canter, as he had previously told Mr. Orton, the Judge,
he should do. Of course this sudden improvement in Rush's
form created considerable sensation, and very unparliamentary
language was made use of in respect to it, which was not diminished
in intensity, by his winning the last day another race, although he

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300 GEORGE OSBALDESTON. [Maich,

only pulled through by a head. Leaving immediately after the races
for the purpose of cub-hunting, The Squire had not time to ask
Lord George for the money he had won of him, and the matter stood
over until the following Craven Meeting at Newmarket. Seeing
Lord Georee standing with his back to Uie rails in the coffee-room
yard, The bquire, thinking he had had full time to digest his lo^
applied to him for the sum. Drawing himself up to his full height.
Lord George exclaimed, in his haughty passionate tone, ^that he was
^ surprised he should be asked for it, and that the affair was a robbenr,

* and the Jockey Club considered it so.* On this sudden onslat^^
being made on him. The Squire's fingers itched for his lordship's
nose; but prudently recollecting that at Newmarket the person of a

, Member of the Jockey Club, or even of their humblest menial, is re-
garded with as much sanctity as that of the Dalai Llama in Thibet, he
restrained his feelings, but added, in a firm tone, that he should pay
him. * Can you count ?' rejoined Lord George. * I could at Eton,*
was the curt reply of The Squire \ and after he had had the notes slowly
dealt out to him, he remarked to his lordship the matter would not
end there, and that he should hear from him again, an announcement
treated by the scion of the House of Portland with proud defiance.
The sequel was soon guessed, but Lord George gave out he would
not go out with our hero. * Tell him, then,' said he, * I will pull
^ his nose at Tattersall*s, and those who know me, are aware I

* always keep mv word.* This latter threat was more than the ficxy
Lord could stand, and he placed himself in the hands of the Hon.
Col. Anson, than whom a more fitting person, from his knowledze of
the world, bravery, and skill with arms, although he had not yet been
appointed Clerk of the Ordnance, could not have been selected to
conduct a delicate affair of this description. Wormwood Scnibbs, as
favourite a spot for settling aristocratic differences as Moulsey
Hurst used to be for deciding pugilistic ones, was ' the fixture * for
the next meeting of the pair. The hour was six : the morning a
loveljr one. The lark sang his matin carol, and a ploughman, * who



Online LibraryL PylodetBaily's Magazine of sports and pastimes, Volume 2 → online text (page 39 of 55)