L. S. (Lionel Sumner) Milford.

Haileybury College, past and present online

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LIBRARY



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA.



Class




<,




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HAILEYBURY COLLEGE



HAILEYBURY COLLEGE

PAST AND PRESENT



BY

L. S. MILFORD



Sursum Corda




T. FISHER UNWIN

LONDON LEIPSIC

ADELPHI TERRACE INSELSTRASSE 20

1909









(All rights reserved.)




PREFACE

I HOPE that some parts of this book may interest
members of other Schools, but it has been written
mainly for Haileyburians, and I am sure that they
will pardon deficiencies, and appreciate and under-
stand the reason for many of the details which to
others may appear trivial or unnecessary.

I hope also that to present and future Haileyburians
these records will prove not only instructive but
inspiring ; as the history of our own country ought
always to be if the historian does not fail. If there
is some amusement, too, I shall be glad, for School
life is a happy time.

O.H.s will, I know, be glad to revive their recol-
lections of by-gone days, to revisit familiar haunts, to
trace the development of the School that they love.
Many of them have already shown themselves worthy
citizens of no mean city. Members of a young School,
although they cannot shelter themselves under the
prestige of an ancient foundation, can at any rate feel
that the efforts of each individual are more necessary,
more effective. Haileybury is not afraid of being
judged by her Old Boys.

I found to my sorrow that I had constructed a
Haileybury Encyclopaedia rather than a manageable



219330



6 PREFACE

volume, and had to cut out ruthlessly (though with
regret), and I fear that in consequence there will be
in some places a noticeable want of proportion. If
any should still be inclined to accuse the author of
garrulity I would ask that the privilege which Cato
claimed for the old man may also be granted to an
" Old Boy " when he speaks of his old School.

I shall always be thankful that in collecting material
for my book last year I have been instrumental in
preserving so many reminiscences by Mr. Butler, in
his own inimitable words. It was characteristic of his
love for Haileybury that he wrote so freely and fully.
It is sad to think that this source is closed for ever.

I wish to express my gratitude also to Mr. Hensley
and Mr. Couchman, and others, masters and boys, for
helping me with their recollections of early days ; I
am none the less grateful though I have sometimes
been unable to use all they sent. Every one will
realise how deep a debt I owe to Mr. Penning for the
splendid series of photographs which his skill and
patience have provided. It is thanks to the invaluable
and ungrudging assistance of my wife that I have
been enabled to complete my task in days that were
already full.



L. S. MILFORD.



S



CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

I. A BRIEF INTRODUCTION . . . . 15

II. THE BEGINNINGS OF NEW HAILEYBURY, AND SOME

REMINISCENCES OF EARLY DAYS . . 18

III. THE MASTERS . . . . . . 31

IV. THE BOYS. . ... 71

V. OLD HAILEYBURIANS . . . . . 78

(a) O.H.s at the Universities ... 85

(b) Clerical O.H.s . . . .87

(c) O.H.s in the Navy and Army . . 90
(d) O.H.s in other Professions . . -94

(e) Haileybury Pioneers . . . 97

(/) Some Haileybury Poets . . .104
(g) O.H.s in other Branches of Literature . 116

VI. HAILEYBURY SERVANTS . . . , 118

VII. THE " HAILEYBURIAN " . . . .128

VIII. CRICKET . . . . . . 149

IX. FOOTBALL . . . .162

X. ATHLETICS . . . . . . 175

XL RACQUETS AND FIVES . . . .183



8 CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

XII. THE RIFLE CORPS . . . .188

XIII. THE GYMNASIUM AND SCHOOL OF ARMS . 196

XIV. SWIMMING AND THE BATH .... 201

XV. Music AND ART AT HAILEYBURY . . 205

XVI. THE SCHOOL SOCIETIES . . . .211

XVII. THE "PASTIMES" AND "ENTERTAINMENTS" . 230

XVIII. SPEECH DAYS AND OTHER NOTABLE DAYS . .238

XIX. "WHAT THE QUADRANGLE SAW" . . 257

XX. THE CHAPEL, OLD AND NEW . . .266

XXI. (a) The Library . ... 273

(b) The Bradby Hall . . .275

(c) The Big School, Old and New . . 278

XXII. THE HOUSES 281

XXIII. THE STUDIES ..... 287

XXIV. THE GRUB SHOP . . . . .294

XXV. " BRICKS AND MORTAR " . . .298

XXVI. (a) The Old Haileyburian Society . . .309

(b) The O.K. Cricket and Football Club . 310

(c) The Haileybury Wanderers' Football Club .310

(d) THE Triennial and other O.H. Dinners . 311

XXVII. (a) The Haileybury Mission Fund . . .314
(b) The Haileybury Guild . . . 315

XXVIII. "MISCELLANEA QUAEDAM" . . . .321

INDEX 333



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

FACING PAGE

THE TERRACE FRONT .... Frontispiece

THE TERRACE FROM THE MOORHEN POND . . 18

THE QUADRANGLE IN 1867 * . . . . 2 g

THE REV. A. G. BUTLER* . . . . 33

CANON BRADBY . . . . . -35

THE REV. J. ROBERTSON . . . . .41

CANON LYTTELTON . . . . . -44

THE REV. ST. J. B. WYNNE WILLSON f . . .47

THE NEW FORM ROOMS FROM THE LODGE . . .49

THE MASTERS, 1872* . . . . . 52

THE ROMAN ROAD . . . . . -73

SCHOOL OF ARMS GROUP". 85

THE "ROLL OF HONOUR" IN THE CLOISTERS . .92

THE OBELISK AND THE NEW FORM ROOMS . . 113

MR. JONES AND GEORGE DORSET* . . . . XI 8

9



10 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

FACING PAGE

THE DINING HALL. .... I2 6

CRICKET ON THE TERRACE FIELD . . . I49

THE XI. IN 1884* . . I57

FOOTBALL ON XX ACRE . . , l62

THE XX. IN 1871 * . . . . j68

THE SPORTS . . . . . . I76

THE START OF A HOUSE RUN . . I g o

THE CORPS IN OLD UNIFORM . . . ^9

THE CORPS ON INSPECTION DAY, 1908 . . 192

"EMPIRE DAY," 1905 .... i 94

GROUP OUTSIDE OLD SCHOOL OF ARMS* . . 197

GYMNASIUM . . . . . . I99

THE BATH ....... 203

AN "EXHIBITION" IN THE BRADBY HALL . . .226

THE ACTORS IN " SANTA CLAUS " . . 233
THE LAYING OF THE FOUNDATION STONE OF THE NEW FORM

ROOMS BY THE MARCHIONESS OF SALISBURY! . .241

SIR PERTAB SINGH'S VISIT . . . . . 243

THE LADYSMITH BAS-RELIEF ..... 246

THE UNVEILING OF THE OBELISK BY SIR JOHN FRENCH 250

SIR FREDERICK BORDEN ADDRESSING THE SCHOOL . .252



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



11



FACING PAGE
257



THE QUADRANGLE FROM THE WATER TOWER

THE CHAPEL ....... 266

THE INTERIOR OF THE CHAPEL AFTER THE FIRE I . 269
THE ORGAN . . . . . . .271

THE LIBRARY . . . . . .273

THE BRADBY HALL FROM THE TERRACE FIELD . -275

A DORMITORY . . . . . .281

A STUDY ....... 287

THE GRUB SHOP AND TEA ROOM FROM THE PAVILION FIELD 296
VIEW OF THE DOME FROM THE HEATH . . .301



Pictures marked with a * are reproduced from photographs by
Hills and Saunders, Oxford.

t From a photograph by Elliott and Fry.
J From a photograph by a local photographer.
From a photograph by H. E. Wace (O.H.).
All the rest are from photographs taken by the Rev. W. D.
Penning ("W. D. F.")



I HOPE that before beginning the book every one will
read these two poems. They were written for the
1900 edition of the " Haileybury Register." The
" Carmen " and " Vivat Haileyburia " will be found at
the end of the volume.

SURSUM CORDA.

Breathe them not lightly ! Words they were that started

Born of deep faith in ages long ago :
Martyrs have used them gazing broken-hearted

Helpless on scenes of unregarded woe.

Breathe them not sadly ! Youth, whose life is flowing
Bright with untroubled waters, calm and clear,

Great things are round thee more than thou art knowing;
Breathe them not sadly ! They are full of cheer.

Breathe them but truly ! There on yonder portal,
Near where the chestnuts bloom in spires of snow,

Still let them stand, uniting hopes immortal,
Far beyond Time, with thoughts of long ago !

Future and Past ! Before us and behind us,

Legend and hope, the known and the unknown,

Soul of our life, they breathe them to remind us
Bravely to live ! The Present is our own.

A. G. BUTLER.



TO HAILEYBURY.

O school beloved, like some old fairy-tale,

Rife with the haunting charm of vanished hours,

Who now a nymph appearest, flushed with flowers,

And serenaded of the nightingale,

Now as some Spartan mother, stern and pale,

Pointing to death for duty ! all our powers

Are dedicate to thee, thy name is ours,

We are thy children, who here bid thee hail.

Living or dead, one host from land and sea
Gathered, men famous, men who toiled obscure,
Or fought for country, priests and poets pure
Thy hand, thy star controlled them : O should we
Drift aimless of the end, deign still to be
At once our pilot and our cynosure.

JAMES RHOADES.



HAILEYBURY COLLEGE

CHAPTER I
A BRIEF INTRODUCTION

JHAVE sometimes found that there are people
who " don't quite know where Haileybury is,"
and so, without giving the accurate mileage of the
Prospectus, I may say, in the words of two Haileybury
poets, that the College stands " where Hertford Heath
slopes gently down," and " in Britain's isle, not far from
Ware." Any one who has ever visited the place will
agree that it is situated among some of the pleasantest
of " the pleasant fields of Hertfordshire." It is in the
ecclesiastical parish of Great Amwell, a village with a
beautiful old church, and many memories of Izaak
Walton and Charles Lamb.

"Hailet" appears in Domesday Book, but there
has been much discussion as to the derivation of the
name. On his first Speech Day Mr. Lyttelton said
that he had recently discovered " in a learned book that
the word means 'The Hill of the Heroes.' It is not
difficult for us to cast our imagination back into the
past and think of those distant days when some lonely



16 HAILEYBURY COLLEGE

chieftain, after a long life of toil and warfare, came
across the River Lea, perhaps on a rough raft of logs,
and chose this charming spot to be the place where
he should lay his bones to rest, and that he should
give it his name to hand down to posterity."

In "The Place-Names of Hertfordshire," by
Professor Skeat, we find another theory. "Neg-
lecting the suffix, Hailey answers to Anglo-Saxon
heglea. It answers to the Middle English, ' heye,'
* haye,' Mod. Eng. ' hay,' ' a fence.' Bury = A.S. dat.
case of bush, a borough or a fort, (' Jenningsbury,' on
the way to Hertford, is 'the fort of Jenning ' = son of
John). The sense of Haileybury (dat.) is 'at the
borough beside the fenced lea.' '

"Viator" suggested that the word meant the
" sloping ground " leading up from the Lea valley.
11 Heal(h)" = slope, A.S., whence " Hale " on the slope
above the Mersey, and " Hailey " on a slope of the
Chilterns. But, after all, what does the derivation
matter ?

..." We are here, and here we stay."

Vivat Hailey buria.

It has always struck me that the School, by its
position, is wonderfully "independent" or "self-
sufficient," as the old Greek philosopher put it, " in
the direction of happiness."

The impression that I should like to leave on any
stranger who may glance at these pages is that there
is a close bond between the Masters and their families,
and Old Boys, and boys and servants at Haileybury,
for I know that this is the case.



A BRIEF INTRODUCTION 17

I do not at all wish any one to think that I imagine
that Haileybury is peculiar in turning out good men
and good citizens. I hope that I may have succeeded
in proving that one of the younger Victorian schools
has justified her existence, and has shown herself not
unworthy of the honourable name and fame to which
she succeeded.

Diversity of practice with unity of aim is character-
istic of British institutions, and not least of the
Public Schools. I hope that some members of those
glorious old foundations which we cannot hope to
emulate may be interested in seeing how we are
trying to solve the same problems that they have been
tackling for centuries. If some should think that
some of the articles and poems are trivial, or that there
is too much of the humorous element, I would urge
in the first place that life is made up of small details,
and secondly, that school nowadays is so full of
pleasantness that it is difficult not " to be jolly," as
Mark Tapley used to say.



CHAPTER II

THE BEGINNINGS OF NEW HAILEYBURY, AND
SOME REMINISCENCES OF EARLY DAYS

. " A bird there was in days of old

(Each one the story knows),
Who birth did claim from a nest on flame,

And a dying mother's throes.
And we are like that bird of yore,

And we like her were born ;
We drew life-breath from a parent's death,
Left lone but not forlorn.' 1

F. W. BOURDILLON.

THE East India College, "Old Haileybury," as
we call it now, was closed in 1858, and before
passing on to some reminiscences of the early days of
the School it is necessary to show how there came to
be a School at all. Mr. Russell told the story admir-
ably in the second edition of the "Haileybury
Register " ; I can only give a brief outline here.

In 1 86 1, the British Land Company bought the
estate, and there was talk of turning the buildings
into an asylum or workhouse. Mr. Stephen Austin,
who was in charge of the Library before its removal,
was very anxious to save the place, and consulted the
Rev. Lowther Harrington, of Watton. Others were



IS



BEGINNINGS OF NEW HAILEYBURY 19

soon called in to discuss the question of starting a
School. Dean Bowers, of Manchester, who had
much to do with launching Marlborough and Rossall,
gave valuable advice, insisting among other things
that the School should not be proprietary.

After many meetings and much negotiation the
scheme was finally decided on at Mr. Hanbury's
house, March 21, 1862, and the first Prospectus was
issued on March 27th.

The generosity of the Rev. T. D. Hudson and
other leading Hertfordshire gentlemen, the financial
skill of Mr. Chesshyre, and the indefatigable zeal of
the Secretaries, Mr. Bourdillon and the Rev. L.
Deedes, surmounted all the difficulties which several
times " threatened to wreck the well-laid plans."

On April i;th the Rev. A. G. Butler was elected
Head Master, and the spirit and tact and humour which
he showed in meeting the countless problems which
he had to face made every one feel that the fortunes
of Haileybury were assured.

The original Prospectus was headed " Haileybury
College (late East India College), near Hertford," and
the first paragraph states that "the School being in-
tended for the Education of the Sons of the Clergy
and Laity of the Home and Eastern Counties, though
not confined to them, will be conducted on the same
principles as the Public Schools of Marlborough and
Rossall."

The Report for 1864 speaks of the "conversion of
Hailey House into a preparatory School capable of
holding 55 pupils." (We should now call this a
Junior School.)



20 HAILEYBURY COLLEGE

In some notes which Mr. Butler sent to Mr.
Couchman, he says :

" . . . On the Pavilion field and adjoining ground we used
to have our steeplechase, damming up a small stream and
getting a fair wide jump, very muddy. In the first race,
Chesshyre, the biggest fellow in the School, stuck, with the
mud splashed up over and into eyes, nose, and ears. He looked
doleful, when M., the School wag, said, ' Never mind, old fellow,
you'll have another try ' (in second round) ; this did not seem
to give much happiness to C.

" The bath was made, I think, in our second year, after we
had deepened and widened the big well. Water supply was
always rather a difficulty ; as was also a nest of hornets at the
shallow end of the bath, which was occasionally disturbed by
malicious persons when the bath was most crowded with naked
figures. The hornets went for the unlucky bathers, who were
much troubled by them. They plunged in, of course, and only
mouths reappeared, the only part safe to expose to the enraged
enemy. Here, too, we had our first swimming race, when M.,
the wag above mentioned, who was behind in the way up to the
shallow end and was gaining in the downward course, said to
thpse who cheered him on (' Go it, old 'un ! '), ' All right ! Down-
hill this way.' His friends believed that he really thought it was
down-hill.

u Our first epidemic was mumps. We were not aware of it,
and in happy ignorance invited the neighbourhood to an enter-
tainment before the Christmas holidays, in which Mr. Hensley
was truly great and invaluable. I then went abroad for a month.
On my return I found several letters detained by Mr. Lewis
Deedes, all in the same vein : l Dear Sir, I regret to tell you
that your entertainment before Christmas was the means of intro-
ducing mumps into my family. My daughters had mumps, my
wife had mumps, my servants had mumps, and our Christmas
holidays were wasted in the prolonged struggle with this
childish malady. Surely you should take means to prevent
such a wholesale spread of infection,' &c., &c. I was, of
course, ' very sorry ' ; but it took some time to get the thing
forgotten. . . .

u I have thus far spoken of slight and trivial reminiscences ;



BEGINNINGS OF NEW HAILEYBURY 21

but, on looking back, I feel how great a debt of gratitude we
owe, and I owe, to that remarkable group of boys who first
came to us, and who, by their industry and example, at once
established a tradition which was invaluable. I may, perhaps,
mention that in the absence of any earlier tradition we had the
advantage of being able to advance the studies of the higher
boys, when they were ready for it, without obliging them to go
through a complex system of successive Forms, and were also
able to allow them time for independent reading, under super-
vision, as was done by Kennedy at Shrewsbury, as well as at
Harrow and Winchester by my brother and Ridding. A good
library is a great incentive to private reading, especially where
there are few counteracting influences of an idle kind. We
started fresh, and had the advantages of such a state of things,
as well as the disadvantages. A better set of boys could not be
found than our first brilliant scholars and prizewinners."

Mr. Hensley sends me some notes of facts and plans
connected with the first few terms. I have ventured
to substitute " A. G. B." for " Butler " :

"Term i, 1862. A. G. B. hoped to build a new Chapel and use
the old one as a Great School ; in 1863 the Bishop of Rochester
decided that the Chapel could not be thus used. The first
Hymn Book used was Monk's. A. G. B. had suggested making
the Rugby Hymn Book the basis of the Haileybury one. In
the first Choir there were three basses and two tenors. In
October we began to have little ten-minute sermons on Sunday
evenings, taken in turn by the Assistant Masters in orders.
Only one boy in the School had been confirmed (this was hardly
surprising as the average age of the boys was 12 J years) ; there
were two of nine.

lt Many of the boys had never been to school before, and
evidently looked upon the College Quad, as a delightful place,
where they would do nothing but play, except when they were
eating.

"A week after the School met the XI. played the XXII.,
with A. G. B. and myself.

41 1 find recorded as the duties of an early Master, ' to initiate
the Steward into the mysteries of checking the issue of stores ;



22 HAILEYBURY COLLEGE

to look after the dormitory servants ; to give orders for new
clothes ; to read prayers for the servants in the morning, and to
make a row if the meat is tough.'

" The boys left on a Tuesday ; on Monday night they had a
Supper Roast Beef, Plum Pudding, Cake, Negus, and Singing.
[I suppose that this corresponded to the Rugby ' House Stodge.'
I do not know how soon Thursday became the regular day of
departure. Friday has always seemed to me an ideal day for
the beginning of term, for so little time need be wasted before a
regular week's work is started.]

" Term 2, Easter, 1863. 106 boys ; 42 in Choir. The Choir
were allowed supper on Saturday evenings.

a It was proposed to build a temporary iron Chapel in the very
centre of the Quad.

"Treveleyan was originally intended to be the Modern School
dormitory, and its master the M.S. master. The French Master
used to come for the whole of Wednesday, Drawing was on
Saturdays. [Monsieur Oppen came once a week, till the end of
the Summer Term, 1869. I suppose that the tradition of
Wednesday French on the Modern Side arose from these weekly
Wednesday visits. Mr. Burchett started his weekly visits in
1863. His first lesson was in the preparation hour of Friday
evening, and for some years after he left off work here,
evening preparation on Friday still began at 7.45.]

11 A. G. B. wished to have light blue ribbons for the XI. hats and
white flannels ; the rest to have grey flannels and House colours.
[I do not know who was responsible for the magenta. Only the
first three Elevens might wear a white flannel shirt in 1874.
This, in fact, was the only privilege of the Third XI. It is
etiquette now to wear white flannel trousers in a House match,
and in Cock-House match to appear in white shoes or boots.]

" The gas was first lit on March 6th, and on the Prince of
Wales's wedding-day the gasmen of their own accord put up
an illumination over the Great School door.

11 Term 3. A. G. B. took 26 boys into his house. As a sort of
nucleus for the Modern School, some boys did mathematics
instead of Greek.

u Term 4. A circular was sent round asking that a guinea
might be added to the boys' accounts for the new cricket
ground. S3 was wanted.



BEGINNINGS OF NEW HAILEYBURY 23

" Term 5, 1864. A. G. B. said he was refusing boys at the rate of
three a day. At that time he contemplated ultimately having
boarding-houses like Rugby and Harrow. There was only
room for ten new boys next term. The fees were raised."



From some reminiscences sent me by Mr. Couch-
man (" H. C"), I take the following paragraphs :

" It was on April, 1863, that I was greeted a custode benigno at
the Lodge ; and, dining that evening with the Head, met for the
first time, H. S. Reade, whom every one in Oxford knew by
sight as Captain of the Dark Blue Team. Many good games
did we enjoy together in the cricket field, fives courts, and
racquet court, and until our records were broken by the boys
we were the recognised exponents of the art of high jumping.
We were ordained together at Rochester in 1865.

u My first introduction to my form, the Remove, at 10 a.m. the
next day, I shall not forget. If they were not shy or nervous /
was ; as the Head, who had stepped down with me into the
Cockpit, as the room was not inaptly called, turned and left me,
I felt inclined to ask him to stay a little longer. I have no
recollection of that lesson, but years afterwards one of that choice
band introduced me to his wife with the remark that he was
'the first boy who made Mr. Couchman angry.' I am not
concerned to corroborate that statement, which I hope has no
reference to that particular lesson. The School was filling
rapidly, and for the first year I was promoted every term, taking
up with me the best ten or fifteen by natural selection, and as
the boy in question was one of my best, he had many oppor-
tunities of reducing the above accomplishment to a science.
But I have no recollection even of his preliminary efforts.



" Certain illustrations in ' Memorials of Old Haileybury,' by
Monier Monier- Williams, give a very good idea of how the
Quad looked before the Clock House and the present Big
School projected into it. In those days it must have been
easier than it is now to believe the statement that ' neither the



1



24 HAILEYBURY COLLEGE

quadrangle of Christ Church, Oxford, nor that of Trinity
College, Cambridge, could exhibit an amplitude of space so
liberal and extensive.'

"When Mr. Hensley married and went into the house which
he occupied for over thirty-five years until he left, I moved
across, taking the ' Edmonstone' boys with me, into the bachelor
quarters for which he had no further use. Between my sitting-
room and my House Class Room there ran one of the recog-
nised exits, leading from the Quadrangle to the Pavilion
field. It was narrow and tortuous, but just wide enough for a
cow. One day in the ' hour ' a boy ran up to me in the Quad,
with an expression of concern thinly veiled by amusement, and
said, ' Please, sir, there's a cow in your dormitory.' And so
there was ; having been conducted thither by my sympathetic
friend and his mates, who, on the principle of the person who sets
fire to his house and then rushes off to claim a reward by giving
early information, won his reward by the expression on my face,
and by the complete success of his manoeuvre. The dormitory
had first to be emptied of the large crowd of boys who were
cheering as at a House Match, and then the frightened animal
was, with the aid of ropes and other persuasive methods, got up
the steps, and eventually taken through the passage by which
she had entered, in a much exhausted and nervous condition,
to the road which bordered the Pavilion field."



Another item follows :

"January 30, 1864. Hare and Hounds, by Bengeo and


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Online LibraryL. S. (Lionel Sumner) MilfordHaileybury College, past and present → online text (page 1 of 21)