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major emphasis on urban areas. The theoretical
perspectives of Weber, Simmel, Spengler, Park, Wirth,
Redfield, Duncan and others will be examined and
used to understand the following: the historical
development of cities, the ecology of cities, the
development of suburbs, urbanism as a way of life, city
planning, metropolitan dynamics, and contemporary
urban problems. Prerequisite: Sociology 306 or consent
of instructor for non-majors. Please note that a
student may not receive credit for both this course
and Sociology 208.

Mr. Hinrichs

312 Social Change Applications of theories of social
change to contemporary trends and changing norms,
values, and expectauons. Emphasis is on a crifical 1
examination of recent changes in the economy and
political structure of U.S. society and on the
assessment of the efforts by social movements to direct
social change. Prerequisite: Sociology 306 or consent of
instructor for non-majors. Please note that a student
may not receive credit for both this course and
Sociology 210.

Ms. Gill

313 PoUtical Sociology Analysis of the role of power
in social and political institutions. This course
examines the bases, distribution, and exercise of
power in organizations, communities, and nations as
well as organized attempts to change exisUng power
relationships using a variety of theoretical
perspectives, including Marxism, Weberian theory,
elitism and pluralism, resource mobilization, and new
social movements theory. Prerequisite: Sociology 306 or
consent of instructor for non-majors. Please note that
a student may not receive credit for both this course
and Sociology 213.

Ms. Heisler



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY/ SPANISH



157



400 Seminar Intensive culminating experience for
sociology-track majors. Under the direction of a
member of the department faculty, students will
work to integrate their major and their
understanding of the sociological perspective.
Prerequisite: Sociology 101 and Sociology 304 or 306
or consent of instructor for non-majors.

Staff

450s, 470s Individualized Study Independent study
in fields of special interest, including internships,
outside the scope of regular course offerings. The
consent of the department is required.

Staff

460 Research Course Individual investigation of a
research topic in sociology in the student's special
area of interest under the guidance of a faculty
member. The topic must be approved by the
department. The project culminates in written and
oral presentations of a formal paper to the
departmental faculty. This is required for
departmental honors and is open to juniors and
seniors only. Students must submit a proposal to the
department a minimum of two weeks before the end
of the semester preceding the proposed study.

Staff

Spanish

Professors Thompson and Burgess (Chairperson)
Associate Professors dinger, Vihuela, and Yager
Assistant Professors Gushing, Nanfito, and Rolon
Instructors Gonzalez, Roela, and Rosa
Adjunct Instructors Darhower, Elorriaga, Hubbard,

and Moore
Teaching Assistant Valdes

Overview

The ability to speak and understand a language
other than one's own, and to have insight into the
artistic and cultural heritage of other peoples of the
world, is considered an integral part of a liberal arts
education. The department, through a strong core of
basic courses, gives students facility in the use of
spoken and written Spanish and some knowledge of
its literature and cultural history. The oral-aural
method of modern language teaching is stressed in
the classroom. Laboratoiy facilities in the Library
Learning Genter and other audio-visual equipment
complement classroom instruction. Regular
laboratory work will be required of some students
and advised for others.

Advanced-level courses in literature and civilization



are designed to give students an understanding and
appreciation of the literature and cultures of the
Hispanic peoples. Students are encouraged to study
in a Spanish-speaking country, and opportunities are
offered through study abroad programs with
approved colleges and through cooperative
agreements with the Genter for Gross-Gultural Study,
Seville, Spain, and the Foreign Student Study Genter
at the University of Guadalajara in Guadalajara,
Mexico.

Gourses in the department provide sound
preparation for graduate study, teaching, or careers
in government, business, or social work. The
department works cooperatively with the education
department in the preparation of Spanish teachers.
Since the largest minority group in the United States
is Spanish speaking, the department feels that a
knowledge of Spanish and an understanding of the
Hispanic cultures is of increasing importance.

Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements for a major in Spanish include ten
courses above the 300 level. Gourse requirements are
Spanish 301 and 302 (except for students who
demonstrate an exceptional command of the
Spanish language and petition the department to be
exempted from this requirement), Spanish 304,
three other 300 level literature courses, Spanish 400,
and one civilization course. Other courses for the
major are elective. Spanish majors must spend one
semester studying abroad in a program approved by
the department. (Students with extensive previous
experience living or studying abroad may petition
the department to be exempted from this
requirement.)

Requirements for a minor in Spanish include six
courses above the 202 level, and must include
Spanish 301-302 (except for students who
demonstrate an exceptional command of the
Spanish language and petition the department to be
exempted from this requirement) , and no more than
one course from 205 and 245. Students may include
Spanish 202 for the minor if they have begun
language study at the elementary or intermediate-
level at Gettysburg GoUege.

Distribution Requirements

Prior to their first registration at the Gollege, all
students receive pre-registration materials which give
detailed instructions on language placement and
fulfillment of the distribution requirement in foreign
languages. The following courses may be counted



158



SPANISH



toward the distribution requirement in literature:
Spanish 205, 304, 308, 313, 314, 315, 319, 320, 324,
325, 326, 400. Spanish 310 and 311 fulfill the
distribution requirement in history/philosophy.

The distribution requirement in foreign languages
may be fulfilled by successful completion of Spanish
202, 205, 245, or a course at the 300 level or above.
Achievement equivalent to 202 may be demonstrated
by an advanced placement examination or a
departmental placement examination given during
orientation before the initial week of fall semester.

Intermediate Program Abroad

Students may complete the distribution requirement
in foreign languages (third and/ or fourth semesters)
by studying for a semester in Seville, Spain, or in
Cuernavaca, Mexico (in alternate years; fall 1995 in
Mexico, fall 1996 in Spain). The intermediate
program includes a two-credit course in Spanish
language at the appropriate level and a two-credit
course that integrates the study of Spanish or
Mexican literature and civilization. This course
satisfies the distribution requirement in literature. A
professor from the department leads students on an
initial orientation tour of Spain or Mexico and
teaches the literature/civilization class. Students live
with families. See listings for Spanish 251-252 and
253-254.

Study Abroad

Advanced students who have completed Spanish 301
may study at the Center for Cross-Cultural Study in
Seville, Spain, at the Instituto Universitario de Sevilla
in Seville, Spain, or at the Foreign Student Study
Center at the University of Guadalajara in
Guadalajara, Mexico, all three of which offer a wide
variety of courses in Spanish, including literature,
histoiy, sociology, political science, management,
and more. See Study Abroad, Center for Cross-Cultural
Study, Seville, Spain, page 45, Study Abroad, Instituto
Universitario de Sevilla, and Study Abroad, Foreign
Student Study Center, University of Guadalajara,
Guadalajara, Mexico, page 44.

Language and Service Practicum in the
Hispanic Community

Students have the opportunity for a cross-cultural
learning experience while serving the local Hispanic
community. Student projects may include tutoring,
translating, and helping families adjust to Anglo
culture. Prerequisite: SipdinKh. 301. Grading option:
S/U. Receives half coiuse credit. Can be repeated
once for credit.



101-102 Elementary Spanish Elements of
understanding, speaking, reading, and writing
Spanish. Use of language laboratory' is required.
Enrollment limited to those who have never
previously studied Spanish. Students cannot receive
credit for both 101 and 103; 102 and 104.

Staff

103-104 Fundamental Spanish Fundamentals of
understanding, speaking, reading, and writing
Spanish. Use of language laboratory is required.
Enrollment is limited to those who have previously
studied Spanish and who are enrolled according to
achievement on the Departmental Qualifying
Examination. Students cannot receive credit for both
101 and 103; 102 and 104.

Staff

201-202 Intermediate Spanish Practice in oral and
written expression, grammar review, readings, and
discussions of writing in Spanish as contact with
Hispanic culture. Pr^r^^uw;/^.- Spanish 102 or 104 or
consent of the department.

Staff

205 Readings in Spanish and Spanish American
Literature Conducted in Spanish with the dual
objective of comprehension of material and reading
of Spanish and Latin American literature of cultural
and literary merit. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or
consent of the department. This course counts
toward the minor but does not count toward the
major. Students whose native language is Spanish
mav not elect this course.

Staff

245 Spanish Conversation Conversation course
be\ond the intermediate level with emphasis on
everyday, applied usage of the language for
nonliterary purposes. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or
consent of the department. Enrollment limited to
twelve students. This course counts toward the minor
but does not count toward the major. To be offered
annually. Students whose native language is Spanish
may not elect this course.

Staff

251-252 Courses in Spanish Language for
Intermediate-Level Students in Seville, Spain or
Cuernavaca, Mexico Practice in oral and written
expression, grammar review, readings, and
discussions of Hispanic culture, with a particular
emphasis on present-day language usage and
contemporary Hispanic societv'. Offered annually in
the fall, alternating between Mexico (1995) and



SPANISH



159



Spain (1996). For intermediate students studying in
Cuemavaca, Mexico or in Seville, Spain. Prerequisite:
Spanish 104 or equivalent; concurrent enrollment in
Spanish 253-254. Fulfills language requirement. One
credit each.

Staff

253-254 Courses in Spanish Civilization and
Literature for Intermediate-Level Students in
Seville, Spain An integrated approach to the study
of Hispanic literature and civilization. The courses
provide an overview of the evolution of Hispanic
culture. The courses examine the origins of the most
representative values of Hispanic culture in art,
literature, and contemporary life. Students will visit
museums and historical sites, and will attend artistic
events. Offered annually in the fall, alternating
between Mexico (1995) and Spain (1996). For
intermediate students studying in Cuernavaca,
Mexico or in Seville, Spain. Prerequisite: Spanish 104
or equivalent; concurrent enrollment in Spanish
251-252. Fulfills literature requirement. One credit
each.

Staff

301, 302 Spanish Composition and Conversation

Exercises in directed and free composition; group
discussion and presentation of individual oral work;
review of grammar and syntax at an advanced level.
Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or consent of the
department.

Staff

303 Spanish Phonology Introduction to Spanish
phonetic and phonemic theory and analysis, applied
to improve pronunciation skills. Study of variation in
pronunciation in Spain and Latin America. Three
lecture hours and one laboratory. Prerequisite:
Spanish 302 or approval of the department. Offered
1995-96.

Staff

304 Introduction to Literary Analysis Introduction
to basic critical approaches to the reading of prose
fiction, poetry, and drama. Through the careful
study of works in each genre, students will acquire a
knowledge of analytical skills and critical
terminology in Spanish. Offered annually.
Prerequisite: Two Spanish courses beyond Spanish 202
or consent of the department.

Staff

308 Literature of the Golden Age Masterpieces of
different genres of the late-sixteenth through the
seventeenth centuries. Emphasis will be placed on



major writers of theater, short prose fiction, essay,
and poetry. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent of the
department. Offered 1996-97.

Staff

309 Current Events in the Hispanic World An

advanced composition and conversation course
based on current events in the Hispanic world.
Students will read articles from a variety of Hispanic
periodicals and will view Spanish language news
programs in preparation for class discussion. This
course can either substitute for Spanish 302 in the
requirements for the major and minor in Spanish, or
it can be taken in addition to Spanish 302. The aim
of the course is both to strengthen students'
conversation and composition skills and to keep
students abreast of current affairs in the Spanish-
speaking world. Prerequisite. Spanish 202 or consent
of the department. Offered annually.

Staff

310 Spanish Civilization Study of the history and
culture of Spain from the earliest times to the
present. Fulfills the distribution requirement in
history/philosophy. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or
consent of the department. Offered annually.

Staff

311 Latin American Civilization Study of the history
and culture of Latin America from pre-Columbian
times to the present. This course fulfills distribution
requirement in history/philosophy. Prerequisite:
Spanish 202 or consent of the department. Offered
annually.

Staff

313 Hispanic Theater A study of the drama of both
Spain and Spanish America through the ages. The
focus of the course will vaiy from semester to
semester, based on such aspects as literary period,
common theme, historical development, and
dramatic theory. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent
of the department. Offered 1995-96.

Staff

314 Cervantes A study of the masterpiece, Don
Quijote de la Mancha, as well as some Novelas ejemplares
and entremeses or one-act plays. Prerequisite: Spanish
304 or consent of the department. Offered 1995-96.

Staff

315 An Introduction to Hispanic Cinema A study
of Hispanic cinema from its inception in 1896
through the present, with major emphasis on films
made since the advent of revisionary cinema around
1960. The course will focus on the development and



160



SPANISH/WOMEN'S STUDIES



renovation of cinematography, will explore the
relationship between cinema and other forms of
artistic expression, and will examine the
development of Hispanic cinema in the context of
the historical circumstances of the Hispanic
countries which have been most active in making
films. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent of the
department. Offered 1995-96.

Staff

319 Nineteenth-Century Literature in Spain and
Latin America Studies in the essay, the novel, the
short story, the drama, and poetry according to the
essential literary movements (romanticism,
costumbrismo, realism, naturalism, modernism) of
the nineteenth century in Spain and Latin America.
Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent of the
department. Offered 1996-97.

Staff

320 Lyric Poetry A study of Spanish lyric poetry
through the ages. The course will concentrate on the
interrelationship of form, content, and idea, noting
major influences upon the poetry of each period.
Appreciation is considered a major goal of this
course and much poetry will be read orally and
discussed. Alternate years. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or
consent of the department. Offered 1996-97.

Staff

324 Latin American Contemporary Prose

Emphasizes the novel of the "boom" in Latin
America. Major writers such as Gabriel Garcia-
Marquez, Carlos Fuentes, Julio Cortazar, Elena
Poniatowska, Juan Rulfo, and Jorge Luis Borges will
be read. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent of the
department. Offered 1996-97.

Staff

325 Generation of '98 and Pre-CivU War
Literature Studies in the essay, poetry, prose fiction,
and drama of the major writers of the late-
nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries in Spain.
Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent of the
department. Offered 1995-96.

Staff

326 Post-Civil War Literature of Spain A study of
the major literary trends and works in Spain,
beginning with the resurgence of Spanish literature in
the 1940's and continuing to the present day.
Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent of the department.
Offered 1996-97.

Staff



351 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics

Introduction to linguistic theories, methods, and
problems as applied to Spanish. Some attention will
be given to typical areas of investigation, such as
Spanish dialectology, sociolinguistics, and
bilingualism. Prerequisite: Spanish 302 or approval of
the department. Offered 1996-97.

Staff

400 Senior Seminar Directed and specialized studies
in Spanish and Latin American literatures from the
medieval period to the present. This course is to be
taken by seniors during the final semester in order to
complete their undergraduate work in Hispanic
literatures. Prerequisite: Limited to seniors except with
permission of the department. Offered in the spring
of every year.

Staff

Portuguese

101-102 Elementary Portuguese Elements of
understanding, speaking, reading, and WTiting
Portuguese. Course includes oral and written work,
graded elementary reading, and use of audio-visual
cultural materials and correlative drill in the
language laboratory.

Staff

201-202 Intermediate Portuguese Practice in oral
and written expression, grammar review, readings,
and discussions of Portuguese writing as contact with
the culture of countries where Portuguese is spoken.
Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or its equivalent.

Staff

Women's Studies

Women's Studies Program Advisory Council
Professors Armster, Berg, Cain, Clay, Fiedler, Gill,
Ginge, Hardt, Hofman, O'Callaghan, Potuchek
(Coordinator), Powers, Small, and Richardson Viti,
Associate Provost Floge, Ms. Bamett, Ms. Becker,
Ms. Carey, Ms. Esterhai, Ms. King, Ms. Kon, Ms.
McGrath, Ms. Morgan, Ms. Moyer, Ms. Pettersen,
Ms. Rich, Ms. Schibilia, Ms. Schlosser, Ms. Siebert,
Ms. Sprague

Overview

The objecfive of women's studies is to encourage
students to analyze the roles, perspectives, and
contributions of women. Through the examination
of women's past history, present condition, and
future possibilities, students come to understand
gender as a cultural experience. In women's studies
courses, students learn a number of methods for



WOMEN'S STUDIES



161



examining, as well as strategies for modifying, the
conditions that affect all of our lives.

Women's studies emphasizes cross-cultural
perspectives and analysis. Through an array of
interdisciplinary courses and of courses that focus on
gender within particular disciplines, women's studies
seeks to integrate women and feminist scholarship
into all levels of the ctirriculum.

Women's studies is interdisciplinary and therefore
draws on courses in other disciplines. In order to
help students design their majors and minors, we
have developed the following categories: a core
course centers on women and women's studies
scholarship and has a WS designation only; a cross-
listed course centers on women and women's studies
scholarship and has a departmental designation; an
affiliated course has a significant amount of women's
studies content and is located in a department other
than Women's Studies. Prospective majors and
minors in women's studies are encouraged to discuss
their plans with a Women's Studies faculty member
as soon as possible in their academic careers.
Women's studies students are strongly advised to
take Women's Studies 120 in the first or second year
of study and Women's Studies 400 in the senior year.

Requirements and Recommendations

The Major in Women's Studies
Ten courses are required for the major in women's
studies. All majors in women's studies are required
to take the following courses:

WS 120: Introduction to Women's Studies

WS 300: Feminist Theories

WS 320: Practicum in Feminist Theoiy and
Collective Action

WS 400: Issues in Feminist Theoiy and Methods

In addition, students must take at least one core or
cross-listed course above the 100 level which focuses
on work by and about women of color or third world
women. Of the remaining five courses, at least one
must be a core or cross-listed course in the social
sciences and at least one must be a core or cross-
listed course in the arts or humanities. No more than
two affiliated courses may be counted toward the
requirements for the major.

Students choosing a major in women's studies must
combine it with a minor (or a second major) in an
arts, humanities, science, or social science discipline.



The Minor in Women's Studies
Six courses are required for the minor in women's
studies. Minors are required to take Women's
Studies 120 and Women's Studies 400. Two
additional covirses must be from the list of core or
cross-listed courses. The remaining two courses may
be drawn from any of the following: ( 1 ) core courses,
(2) cross-listed courses, (3) affiliated courses, and (4)
approved courses of individualized study in women's
studies.

Core Courses

120 Introduction to Women's Studies A study of
the perspectives, methodologies, and findings of the
new scholarship in various disciplines on women. We
will look at how women have influenced and been
affected by such issues as family, language, creativity,
and labor. The course is taught by an
interdisciplinary team of instructors.

Staff

217 Famous French Femmes Fatales Today women
are attempting to demystify the feminine condition,
for, as the late Simone de Beauvoir observed, the
"mythe de la femme" is a male invention. Literary
images of women have, understandably, been a major
focus of this investigation. Thus, this course will
examine some famous French women, from the
Princess of Cleves to Emma Bovary, and scrutinize
them from the perspective of feminist criticism. Fulfills
literature requirement.

Ms. Richardson Viti

219 Contemporary Women Writers: Cross-
Cultural Perspectives An examination of the novels
and short stories of authors from diverse socio-
cultural backgrounds, with emphasis on the Third
World. Particvilar attention will be given to the ways
in which these writers represent the female
experience. The class will examine works written
from 1965 to the present. Fulfills literature
requirement. Fulfills non-western requirement.

Ms. Powers

300 Feminist Theories An exploration of various
feminist theories about women вАФ about their
experiences, their representations, and their relative
positions in diverse societies. Contemporaiy and
earlier works will be discussed in order to evaluate
and synthesize the multiple approaches to feminist
theories. Prerequisite: YJomen's Studies 120.

Staff



162



WOMEN'S STUDIES / CROSS LISTED COURSES



320 Practiciun in Feminist Theory and Collective
Action An examination of the relationship between
feminist theory and community action. The course
combines weekly seminar meetings with student
internships in organizations that use collective action
to pursue change in societal conditions for women.
Readings from feminist theory of organizations,
collective action, and social policy are used as a basis
for discussion and analysis of students' internship
experiences. Prerequisites: Women's Studies 120 and
one other core or cross-listed women's studies course
(or permission of the instructor).

Staff

351 Women and Nazism An examination of the
effects of Nazism on women, primarily (but not
exclusively) in Germany beginning in the 1920s and
extending to post-war times. The course focuses on
women's perspectives as exhibited in historical and
literary documentation. Fulfills literature
requirement.

Ms. Armster

400 Issues in Feminist Theory and Methods The

capstone course in women's studies. This course
focuses on the variety of theories and methods in
women's studies scholarship by examining a



Online LibraryL SeamanGettysburg College Catalog (Volume 1992/93-1995/96) → online text (page 116 of 126)